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Collectible American Longarms
(post-1898)

Important information about ordering firearms from us!
If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items considered by the BATF directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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Collectible American Longarms
(post-1898)

**SOLD** SMOF6757 - 20448 - SCARCE U.S. MILITARY WW1 WINCHESTER MODEL 1894 .30-30 "SPRUCE GUN" SADDLE RING CARBINE - Serial number 843791, which is on the list of known Spruce Guns compiled by researcher Rick Hill. US and ordnance bomb handstamped on the receiver ring. One of the least known U.S. military arms of WW1 is the Winchester Model 1894 carbine in .30-30 caliber. Only 1,800 of these were purchased in 1917 directly from Winchester for use by the U.S. Army Signal Corps. While not intended for combat use, these were needed to arm the troops of the Signal Corps 412th Aero Squadron assigned to the spruce lumbering operations in the Pacific Northwest. At that time, the Army's aviation program was part of the Signal Corps, and spruce wood was a critical component of aircraft at that time. They probably saw more use providing game to feed the troops and loggers than use deterring saboteurs. These are invariably found in well used condition, and this one is a pretty nice one, so John expected to keep it for his collection, but comparison with the one he had shows that this is just about the same condition, not an upgrade, so it is up for adoption by another collector. There are faint traces of finish in some of the protected areas, but the metal is basically worn to a dull steel gray, with some staining and pinpoint roughness on the right side of the receiver and on the bottom. The stocks, as always are worn, but this one is much nicer than most we have seen. Bore is surprisingly nice, with sharp lands and only a small amount of dirt or roughness in the grooves, say fine plus to almost excellent. Front sight blade and the saddle ring (but not the stud) are probably replacements, otherwise it appears to be 100% correct and original.

Bruce Canfield's excellent U.S. Infantry Weapons if WWI has some info on these on pages 116-118, but his overall photo of the gun shows a later representative Model 1894, not one of the 1917 vintage U.S. guns, so that is why this rifle looks different from the one in his book. The Winchester Arms Collectors had a great article on the “Spruce Guns” by Rick Hill several years ago, and a digital copy will be provided with this rifle. This number is included in the article.

No collection of U.S. military arms of WW1 is complete without one of these, and they are a window into the vital role that lumber played in the U.S. involvement in WW1. When purchasing one of these, be careful as there are a number of out of range fakes out there, but we guarantee this is authentic. $1750.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6736 - SCARCE M1903A3 BY SMITH CORONA WITH “C” PREFIX (DUPLICATE OF NUMBER USED BY REMINGTON) Serial number C3711153 with SC 7-43 four groove barrel. All correct SC parts with possible exception of the bolt body. Wartime confusion about assigned serial number ranges resulted in both Remington and Smith Corona using some overlapping numbers. Smith Corona’s assigned numbers were 3608000 to 3707999 for their first contract. Remington had been assigned 3000000 to 3607999 in various contracts for M1903, 1903 Modified and M1903A3 and M1903A4 rifles. Subsequent Remington contracts assigned them the next batch of numbers, 3708000 through 4707999. As some Smith Corona receivers were lost by scrapping after numbering, Smith Corona continued to work towards the total number of rifles in the contract, and ran past their assigned range into the number block assigned to Remington. To prevent duplicate number problems, Smith Corona was directed to add a “C” on rifles in the range which overlapped into the Remington numbers. Clark Campbell cites number C3711586 and the only other C prefix numbers we have noted are C3708010 and C3712235, so it looks like maybe about 4,500 ended up with the “C” prefix.

Metal parts with about 98-99% original Parkerizing. A very scarce variant for the advanced M1903 collector. $1095.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6709 - U.S. RIFLE M 1917 EDDYSTONE SERIAL NUMBER 254687 CALIBER 30-06 WITH ALL MATCHING PARTS! When the U.S entered the First World War in April 1917 the number of rifles available to equip the expanded military was insufficient. The ordnance department realized that two private firearms manufacturers (Winchester, Remington, and the Eddystone subsidiary of Remington) had been making a service rifle for British Army, and had nearly completed this contract. There was intense pressure for rifles for the new draftees so the ordnance department approached these manufactures and asked them to convert their existing tooling and make the British designed rifle for our 30-06 cartridge. This was done and all three plants were in full production by the fall of 1917. The rifle was designated U.S. Rifle, Model 1917, but was commonly called the Enfield because of its British origins. The rifle was longer than the U.S. designed Model 1903, and the balance was not as good. But the action was stronger, and the rifle more accurate straight from the factory than the Model 1903. Over 70% of our troops who served in France carried this rifle, and it is claimed that Sergeant Alvin York won the Medal of Honor with a Model 1917 made by Eddystone. After the war most of the Model 1917's were arsenal reworked and put into storage. When World War II broke out we provided M1917's to many of our allies and also our own troops until the M1 Garand became available. After World War II many M1917's were sold to civilians by the Government, and became the basis for custom magnum actions.

The makers stamped there names on the receiver. Eddystone made the most with about 1.6 million rifles completed by the November 1918. Winchester and Remington made about 500,000 each.

This rifle was made by the Remington Arms Eddystone factory at Eddystone, Pennsylvania in 1918. It still has the original bluing unlike most of these that we see that were re-finished and Parkerized for use in WWII. The bluing may have been touched up but it would rate about 95% + with some wear on the high points and some light areas of pitting mostly on the receiver. All of the parts including the barrel, bolt and stock are marked with Eddystone’s E. The barrel is slightly dark and needs to be cleaned. Overall a excellent example of a Model 1917 that is still in original condition. $850.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6735 - BRITISH PATTERN 1914 MARK I W* .303 CALIBER RIFLE MADE BY WINCHESTER- UNALTERED- NICE! Serial number W173202. This is an extremely nice example of the Pattern 1914 rifle, and retains the original volley sights, and a crisp cartouche on the stock and brass marking disc in the stock which has never had any unit marks added. Comes with original WW1 British leather sling installed. No import marks or British commercial export proofs. Beautiful bright and sharp bore. Metal parts with about 95% original high quality blue finish, showing normal wear patterns, mostly the sharp edges and the upper band and buttplate. Bolt has original bright polished body and blued handle, and is not numbered. (Numbering seems to have been added during post war modification to Weedon Repair Standards to the bolts and rear sights, when the volley sights were removed, and was not done by the original makers.)

The stock has legible [broad arrow/ circle with IW*/ PATT 14 stampings by the marking disc, along with inspector cartouches. Stock has mellow old oiled finish with a few assorted minor dents and dings of an issued martial arm, but also one large round bruise on the right side of the forend and a ½” x 2” scarred area below the stacking swivel.

In 1913 the British considered a change to a Mauser style action rifle in .276 caliber, which was the Pattern 1913 rifle. However, the start of WW1 made such a drastic change unwise, so they modified the rifle to use .303 British ammunition and contracted with three American makers to produce large quantities. By 1917 British production of SMLE rifles was sufficient to meet needs, and the American contracts were cancelled just in time for the U.S. to keep the lines open producing a modified version in .30-06 caliber which we all know as the U.S. Rifle Caliber .30 Model of 1917.

Winchester only made 235,448 Pattern 1914 rifles, while Remington made 403,126 and Eddystone made 604,941 making Winchester the scarcest of the three. Although few of the Pattern 1914s actually saw service in France in WW1, they were used by non-deployed units in that war, and again heavily during WW2. The Winchesters were prized for their accuracy and many were deployed as sniper rifles during WW1, some with a fine screw adjustment rear sight and others with telescopic sights installed. After WW1, most of the Pattern 1914 rifles were altered to remove the volley sights, and eventually ended up in far flung points of the British Empire where they were abused and mistreated. About 90% of the Pattern 1914 rifles we have seen on the collector market in the last decade have been really doggy examples, so to find a really nice Winchester is a very rare opportunity.

Collecting the Pattern 1914/Model 1917 would be a neatly defined niche, with a goal of one of each model from each of the three makers, and could grow to include the extremely rare .276 caliber Pattern 1913 trials rifle, the No. 3 Mark I(F) which is a Winchester P14 with a fine adjustable rear sight for sniping use, a P14(T) with a scope for snipers, and if desired, the later Remington Model 1934 military rifle, and the Model 30 and 720 sporters which were all built using left over M1917 parts. (Don’t ask how I know this could become an addiction!) $1395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6733 - U.S. MODEL 1903 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE- WW2 REBUILD WITH MINT RARE M1923 SLING! Serial number 1316020 made in 1929 with correct original SA 5-29 barrel having an absolutely gorgeous sharp and bright bore. About 98% of the arsenal overhaul dark gray green parkerize finish remains on all part. Stock is an early WW2 replacement made without the finger grooves, but before they added the inletting for the M1903A3 handguard ring. Good S-S.A.A. in box cartouche from San Antonio Arsenal and a P in a box proof over a very faint trace of circle P behind the trigger guard. Stock finish is the mellow old arsenal linseed oil finish rubbed in. This is typical of the rifles which were updated circa 1941-42 when some of the wartime parts had entered the system, such as the stock discussed above and also the BF marked bolt body, while all other parts appear to be pre-war Springfield Armory parts. No import marks or foreign markings of any sort. No “Hatcher hole” in the left side of the receiver, so you could put this in a pre-war type “C” pistol grip stock and replace the bolt body with a N.S. marked body and it would be correct M1903A1 configuration.

The sling on this rifle is a near mint unissued example of the rare M1923 sling which was adopted but not produced in any large numbers until the gullible Brits ordered a bunch when they ordered their M1903 rifles from Remington. While theoretically the sling might be a good idea, in practice it is a bewildering pile of straps, buckles and clamps which defy logic and patience trying to install one, and impossible without a copy of the instructions to look at. Normally we would sell the sling separately (for $150-175) but this is a consigned rifle and we need to sell it as is or return to the owner in the same condition as received, so we can only sell the sling with the rifle.

An exceptionally outstanding condition handsome rifle, a great example of the rifles being rebuilt for wartime service at the start of the war, a near perfect bore, and with the added benefit of having an exceptionally rare sling installed. $1150.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6631 - (JM)- EXCELLENT U.S. RIFLE M 1917 REMINGTON SERIAL NUMBER 313591 CALIBER 30-06 WITH ALL MATCHING PARTS. When the U.S entered the First World War in April 1917 the number of rifles available to equip the expanded military was insufficient. The ordnance department realized that two private firearms manufacturers (Winchester, Remington, and the Eddystone subsidiary of Remington) had been making a service rifle for British Army, and had nearly completed this contract. There was intense pressure for rifles for the new draftees so the ordnance department approached these manufactures and asked them to convert their existing tooling and make the British designed rifle for our 30-06 cartridge. This was done and all three plants were in full production by the fall of 1917. The rifle was designated U.S. Rifle, Model 1917, but was commonly called the Enfield because of its British origins. The rifle was longer than the U.S. designed Model 1903, and the balance was never as good. But the action was stronger, and the rifle more accurate straight from the factory than the Model 1903. Over 70% of our troops who served in France carried this rifle, and it is claimed that Sergeant Alvin York won the Medal of Honor with a Model 1917 made by Eddystone. After the war most of the Model 1917's were arsenal reworked and put into storage. When World War II broke out we provided M1917's to many of our allies and also our own troops until the M1 Garand became available. After World War II many M1917's were sold to civilians by the Government, and became the basis for custom magnum actions.

The makers stamped there names on the receiver. Eddystone made the most with about 1.6 million rifles completed by the November 1918. Winchester and Remington made about 500,000 each.

This rifle was made in the July of 1918. The original blued finish is about 95% + intact with some dulling from age, but little evidence of war. ALL appropriate parts are Remington marked. The stock is correct Remington with the `R` marking on the end. Stock and has a few storage dings, but no major cracks or gouges. The bore is bright with sharp riflings. $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6728 - U.S. RIFLE CALIBER .30 M1 GARAND- JANUARY 1942- - mostly correct restoration Serial number 440850 made in January 1942 with correct SA 11-41 barrel (marked upside down). Excellent bore with muzzle gauge reading 1 and breech reading 1. This is a mostly correct restoration which looks great with about 95% of an old dark green parkerize finish, probably an arsenal refinish long ago. The stock has the correct SA/GHS small ordnance wheel cartouche and circle P with no subsequent rework marks. Wood has assorted minor to medium dings but looks pretty nice. This is probably a restoration and we noted that the following parts seem to be incorrect: Op rod is -9 with relief cut, should be -3 no cut; rear sight assembly is lock bar type and should be flush nut. Trigger guard unmarked which is probably correct or -3 would be correct; stock ferrule has no hole; follower is unmarked, should be 8. Seal over front sight screw is missing, but screw is correct rebated type.

This is a great chance to get a very early M1 Garand rifle which probably saw service during WW2, but was not among the early rifles sent to Britain as lend-lease material. No usage information is available for this rifle, so you can guess or dream. A good looking rifle and if the remaining restoration parts were added it would be a very nice addition to a collection, but is already much more desirable than most of the well used and abused rifles out there today. “The greatest battle implement ever devised,” according to Gen. George S. Patton. $1595.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6731 - U.S MODEL 1917 .30-06 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MADE BY EDDYSTONE- WITH NEW ZEALAND MARKINGS Serial number 951967 with WW2 replacement two groove barrel made by Johnson Automatics with bore that is either very dirty or has light roughness, but with strong rifling. The bolt is also a WW2 replacement part, made by Keystone. Other parts are a mix of makers as expected of the rifles hurriedly refurbished early in WW2 for shipment to our allies. This one was overhauled at Raritan Arsenal in Metuchen, NJ, according to the small RA stamp on the left side of the stock. The stock is very nice, unsanded, with an old oiled finish. The handguards are much drier and probably new parts installed during overhaul and never really given much care afterward, leaving them with raised grain and a dry look compared to the stock. The rear handguard looks like there may be a small crack by the rivet on the right side. About 95-97% of the overhaul parkerized refinish remains. Stacking swivel and screw missing or were removed by the Kiwis. Number 147 stamped on magazine floorplate but meaning unknown. No import marks, so this is probably one of the guns brought back by Sam Cummings circa 1960. The most interesting feature is the presence of New Zealand property markings on the right side of the butt, “N [broad arrow] Z over 11262.” This indicates that it was one of a small number of U.S. military rifles sent to New Zealand early in WW2. Many were the very earliest production Model 1903 rifles made by Remington, but some M1917s also ended up there. All were given the NZ markings and a newly assigned serial number on the stock. This would be a great addition to a collection of U.S. made arms provided under Lend Lease to our allies, which would include both the M1903 and M1917 rifles, and also M1 Garands, the Savage made No. 4 mark I Enfields, Savage made Thompsons, some of the .22 trainers, M1911 pistols, some Victory models, etc. The U.S. Army “green books” on WW2 had some info on these in the volume dealing with the Ordnance Department.

Overall an interesting albeit average condition example of the M1917 Enfield which served many countries in many wars. $500.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6621 - U.S. MODEL 1903 (MODIFIED) MADE BY REMINGTON Serial number 3317264 with correct original RA 12-42 barrel with excellent bore. About 96% original blue and parkerized finish remains. This appears to be all correct and original except it has a milled trigger guard assembly which does not have the usual “R” mark on the right rear web of the trigger guard and sloppy machined surfaces, so we think that has been switched. (You can trade out the milled guard for a stamped on and get enough money to boot to buy some ammo, if you like!).

This has the correct original straight grip stock, made at a time when they were using pins instead of bolts for the stock screws. They were getting close enough to M1903A3 production that the stock inletting includes $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6486 - NICE U.S. MODEL 1903A3 RIFLE REMINGTON SERIAL NUMBER 4038252 BARREL DATE 6-43 CALIBER 30-06 WITH 4 GROOVE BARREL. The U.S. Model 1903 was the standard service rifle of the U.S. military from 1903 till the late 1930's with well over one million produced. The action owes much to the German Mauser Gewehr 98, but also has some unique features including a magazine cutoff to hold 5 shoots in reserve till the enemy charged. After the disaster at Dunkirk in June 1940, the British approached Remington Arms Company about making a Model 1903 in caliber 303 to reequip their army. The U.S. government released the Model 1903 tooling from the Rock Island Arsenal to Remington, and two prototype Model 1903 rifles in 303 were made. (They can be seen at the Firearms Museum in Cody, Wyoming.) But with the U.S. heading for war, the Army commissioned Remington to restart manufacture of the Model 1903, with the first rifles turned out in October 1941. Between October 1941 and January 1943 Remington produced about 330,000 Model 1903 rifles. Remington made numerous changes to speed manufacture and by early 1942 the rifle was called the U.S. rifle 1903 Modified. These included changing the barrel bands, sling swivels, buttplate, and triggerguard from machined to stamped. When the rear sight was moved from the area in front of the receiver to the rear receiver bridge the rifle’s designation was changed from Model 1903 Modified to Model 1903A3. The production of the 1903A3 was phased in between December 1942 and January 1943, and about 700,000 were made when production ceased in early 1944.

This is an excellent rifle, the greenish-gray Parkerized finish would rate about 95% + with a little bit of wear on a few high points. The barrel is 4 groove and the bore slightly dirty but bright with crisp riflings. All of the parts are correct for those manufactured by Remington. The small parts have the correct blued finish. The stock has been sanded and there is a crack in front of the floorplate that is easily repairable. The cartouches and markings are still visible. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6572 - 22647 - M1903 SPRINGFIELD- HIGH NUMBER WITH STAR GAUGED BARREL Serial number 1504622 with SA 2-33 barrel. Star gauge mark on the crown of the muzzle, and the tiny star gauge record number K over 4426 stamped on the barrel near the rear sight base.

We believe this to be a rifle assembled during or after WW2 for U.S. military use, using parts on hand, possibly for competitive shooting. However, it may have been assembled by a shooter who purchased parts from the old DCM Program back in the late 1930s or 1940s, we just do not know. About 95% of the dark greenish-gray Parkerized finish remains with subtle variations in color on different parts typical of arsenal batch work, not Bubba’s work. The receiver is very late “high number” made from nickel steel, considered to be the best of the M1903 actions. It was probably made circa 1937-38 when M1903 parts still being made were mostly used as spares as the M1 Garand production had already begun. This has the “Hatcher hole” on the left side of the receiver, and the bolt stop remains in place. It has all milled parts, none of them “R” marked, and the buttplate is the fine checkered type.

The “scant stock” has the same longer pull and higher comb that shooters prefer on the full pistol grip “C” stocks, but these were made from blanks cut for the straight grip “S” stocks, with insufficient wood for the full pistol grip. The stock is NOT cut for the M1903A3 handguard ring, and has the “S” in the cutoff recess indicating manufacture at Springfield Armory. There is a P in a box on the front of the grip. Left side has cartouches from Augusta Arsenal (AA S in box) and San Antonio Arsenal (SAA in a box and another box with slightly larger E). There is also a rack number 680 stamped on the left side of the butt. This is NOT one of the “greasy Greek” surplus rifles, and there is no “B” on the floorplate. Stock has just the typical GI oil finish, with the assorted minor dings of an issued arm.

Four groove bore is about fine, with signs of slight wear and a bit of crud in the grooves which may or may not clean out. In addition to the star gauge markings applied to barrels meeting stringent quality control standards and generally reserved for match or sniper rifle use, this has “R DUNN” stamped on the side, ahead of the rear sight base, presumably an armorer or owner name, but this is hidden by the handguard. There is also a “P” on the bottom, immediately ahead of the rear sight base, indicating proof testing was completed after assembly. The rear sight base retaining pin had been removed, and is installed incorrectly (the ends are filed to a bevel after installation, and the pin was reinstalled upside down so the long part sticks out. One checkered scar on the hidden part of the sight base from a vice jaw as shown in the photos.

We sell all guns as collector items only, and the must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing, but we suspect that this would be an excellent choice for use in Vintage Military Bolt Action Rifle (VIMBAR) competition. $1095.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6513 - U.S. CARBINE M1 MANUFACTURED BY INLAND SERIAL NUMBER 3003919, BARREL DATE 10-43 U.S. 30 CALIBER CARBINE. With the adoption of the U.S. Model 1903 rifle the United States Army was one of the first in the world to abandon the concept of a short rifle usually called a carbine for use by cavalry, artillery, etc., and a long rifle for use by infantry. The developments of smokeless powder had made this possible. But doubts still persisted about the wisdom of this decision. Large numbers of personnel in support roles (cooks, clerks, truck drivers, etc.) had been given the U.S. Model 1911 pistol during World War I, and most had difficulty achieving any degree of competence with it. In 1940 with war already underway in Europe the U.S. decided to develop a semiautomatic carbine firing a round intermediate between a pistol and rifle to arm these support personnel. Winchester won the design competition, but could not meet the anticipated production schedule of several million carbines, so nine other manufactures were recruited. None had prior experience with firearms manufacturing, but most had experience with precision machining of metal. Two were typewriter/adding machine companies, Underwood and IBM, one a juke box manufacturing company, Rockola, and several were automotive parts manufacturers, Inland, Standard Products, and Saginaw. This system of manufacture was so successful that over 5 million carbines were produced well ahead of the original schedule. The carbine was loved by those who used it. It was light, could be shot accurately with little experience, and had a 15 round magazine.

This carbine was made by Inland, the largest maker of carbines (about 40% of the total), and automotive parts supplier to General Motors located in Dayton, Ohio. It was reworked sometime after the end of World War II by the Standard Products Company who put their rework stamp on the left side of the stock. During the rework the original barrel band was replaced with a Type III barrel band with bayonet lug. The two position non-windage adjustable rear sight was replaced with an elevation and windage adjustable rear sight, and the push button safety was replaced with flip safety. The trigger guard was made by Winchester as was the operating rod. The blued flat topped bolt is marked N14. The overall finish would rate about 95% and the barrel is bright with excellent riflings. The stock has some dings from use and storage, and has the IO for Inland on the sling cut. $950.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMOF6543 - 21675 - U.S. MODEL 1899 KRAG CARBINE MADE IN 1901 - 21675 - U.S. MODEL 1899 KRAG CARBINE MADE IN 1901 - Serial number 350896 made in 1901. The Model 1899 was the first Krag Carbine to be made without a “saddle ring” as doctrine and common sense finally called for carrying carbines in a scabbard on the saddle instead of bouncing around on the end of the traditional shoulder sling and snap hook. The earlier Krag carbines has stocks with the rear band up against the rear sight but the 1899 carbine stock was about 2 inches longer, with the band at the same location as on the rifles, making stock production a lot more efficient. The MODEL 1899 designation on the receiver identifies a genuine M1899 carbine. All other Krags were marked 1894 or 1895 (dates of manufacture) or MODEL 1896 or MODEL 1898 and were used indiscriminately on Model 1896 rifles or carbines, or M1898 rifles or carbines respectively.

This is an original Model 1899 Krag carbine, except the handguard which is the flat type, lacking the hump at the front to help keep the rear sight from catching when using the saddle scabbard and snapping the sight leaf off to the rear, and the replaced front sight blade. Metal parts with traces of original finish in a few protected areas, but essentially no finish, just bare metal, but no rust or pitting and not buffed down. Bore is shiny and decent, but well worn. Stock is excellent with sharp JSA 1901 cartouche and circle P, with mellow old patina and medium brown color, free from all but a very few insignificant minor scratches and bruises. It does have the small age crack starting at the left rear edge of the receiver inletting, but otherwise solid. Handguard is rifle type (without the hump) and has a crack at the back of the rear sight. (Collector Tip- whenever removing or installing a Krag handguard ALWAYS removed the rear sight, and remove the barreled action from the stock and SLIDE the handguard forward/back until it slips off. NEVER try to snap it into place- the 100+ year old wood is fragile and will crack easily.)

This has the correct M1901 carbine rear sight with "C" markings on the side of the base and side of the leaf. The front sight blade is a higher commercial replacement, probably installed when this was used as a deer rifle. Overall, a good representative example of the last of the U.S. military carbines made as a shorter version of the standard infantry rifle, a policy abandoned when the Model 1903 Springfield was adopted in a length suitable for either infantry or cavalry use. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6466 - 20947 - WW2 U.S. MILITARY WINCHESTER MODEL 12 TRENCH GUN (RESTORATION PROJECT) Serial number 965383, matching on receiver and barrel extension. Factory roll marked with U.S. and flaming bomb on the right side of the receiver. This is a REALLY nice original WW2 trench gun that met the fate of many guns after the war. Everyone wanted a shotgun to go hunting, but the short trench or riot barrels were not long enough. So, lots of the guns had the barrels (and handguard in the case of trench guns) removed and replaced by a longer sporter length barrel. Some used Winchester made barrels, but many used after market “brand x” barrels, like this one. Looks like about 28” full choke, with a thin blue finish on the barrel. The rest of the gun has about 95-96% original high quality Winchester blue finish. Stock was very lightly sanded and given a coat of varnish, but the GHD ordnance bomb cartouche is still in great shape, just filled in a bit with the varnish. The original buttplate and sling swivel remain in place.

This would be super easy to restore to trench configuration by simply cutting down the present barrel to the correct 20 inch length, and installing an original (if you are lucky enough to have one) or one of the good quality repro handguard, which will require filing three notches in the bottom of the barrel to clear the screws for the handguard. Ideally you would find an original barrel and handguard to use, and end up with a gun worth about double our asking price. Excellent mechanics, and John really hates to let this one go. $2250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5828 - U.S. MODEL 1903A3 MADE BY REMINGTON SERIAL NUMBER 3594983 CALIBER 30 06 BARREL DATE 3-43. The U.S. Model 1903 was the standard service rifle of the U.S. military from 1903 till the late 1930's with well over one million produced. The action owes much to the German Mauser Gewehr 98, but also has some unique features including a magazine cutoff to hold 5 shoots in reserve till the enemy charged. After the disaster at Dunkirk in June 1940, the British approached Remington Arms Company about making a Model 1903 in caliber 303 to reequip their army. The U.S. government released the Model 1903 tooling from the Rock Island Arsenal to Remington, and two prototype Model 1903 rifles in 303 were made. (They can be seen at the Firearms Museum in Cody, Wyoming.) But with the U.S. heading for war, the Army commissioned Remington to restart manufacture of the Model 1903, with the first rifles turned out in October 1941. Between October 1941 and January 1943 Remington produced about 330,000 Model 1903 rifles. Remington made numerous changes to speed manufacture and by early 1942 the rifle was called the U.S. rifle 1903 Modified. These included changing the barrel bands, sling swivels, buttplate, and triggerguard from machined to stamped. When the rear sight was moved from the area in front of the receiver to the rear receiver bridge the rifle’s designation was changed from Model 1903 Modified to Model 1903A3. The production of the 1903A3 was phased in between December 1942 and January 1943, and about 700,000 were made when production ceased in early 1944.

This rifle was made in the spring of 1943 to meet the increased demands for second line troopers in Europe and the Pacific. The greenish Parkerized finish is original as are all the parts. The bore is the more desirable four groove type and is bright with strong riflings. Overall condition is excellent, and the four groove barrel is a plus. $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6377 - 17426 - RARE U.S. “RIFLE, ACCURACY. 7.62MM [NATO] D75533795” MADE ON MODEL 1903A3 ACTION - Serial number 3562032 on the Remington Model 1903A3 action.

M1903 rifle actions have periodically been used to make special accuracy test guns, and for other special needs such as pressure test guns. Accuracy rifles use carefully made barrel to precise specifications and are used to test ammunition to ensure it meets the required accuracy standards. To eliminate all possible excuses or errors caused by sighting, the barrels usually have two large circular collars secured around the barrel, and these rest in a precision machined “V” groove test bench at a range with the necessary distance (often 600 yards). Dr. Horace Mann, famed ammunition experimenter invented the fixtures used, and these are often called Mann barrels or Mann rests. Round counts are carefully logged and sometimes several accuracy rifles will be used and the results averaged. Ammunition which fails to perform adequately is rejected. (See the excellent article at http://www.odcmp.org/1001/mann_inc.asp)

This rifle is made with a Remington M1903A3 action, apparently taken from a lightly used rifle. The barrel was supplied by Walker, presumably related to Mike Walker who was connected with famed barrel maker Clyde Hart, and Remington where he perfected their button rifling process. (Mentioned in the interesting article on barrel making at http://www.firearmsid.com/feature%20articles/rifledbarrelmanuf/barrelmanufacture.htm ) The 22 inch long barrel is electric pencil etched near the muzzle D7553795/ F68-7005- #294/ WALKER with the #294 probably being a serial number. The stock assembly is cut off to be little more than a convenient grip for handling the device or while firing. There is a RA-P cartouche on the left side of the wood. There is a crack on the right side, probably from being tossed around by Army guys when they stacked them on pallets for shipment to CMP.

Bore is excellent, and most of these accuracy barrels were apparently assembled in the 1970s, and were unused when turned over to the CMP program. This is a really neat oddball device to add to any M1903 Springfield collection, or even to a M14 or Vietnam era collection. While a handful turned up in very advanced collections in the past, these were almost unknown except for brief mention in Brophy’s book until the Army transferred all remaining inventory of them (a few hundred) to the CMP program about 10 years ago. It seems that most were in 7.62 x 51mm NATO, some in .30-06, some in .30 carbine and a dozen or so in .22 Hornet. CMP has been sold out of these since 2012, and we were lucky to pick this one up out of a collection that was being sold off. $750.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6378 - 17434 - RARE U.S. “RIFLE, ACCURACY. CALIBER .30 CARBINE D45850” MADE ON MODEL 1903A3 ACTION - Serial number 3491634 on the Remington Model 1903A3 action.

M1903 rifle actions have periodically been used to make special accuracy test guns, and for other special needs such as pressure test guns. Accuracy rifles use carefully made barrel to precise specifications and are used to test ammunition to ensure it meets the required accuracy standards. To eliminate all possible excuses or errors caused by sighting, the barrels usually have two large circular collars secured around the barrel, and these rest in a precision machined “V” groove test bench at a range with the necessary distance (often 600 yards). Dr. Horace Mann, famed ammunition experimenter invented the fixtures used, and these are often called Mann barrels or Mann rests. Round counts are carefully logged and sometimes several accuracy rifles will be used and the results averaged. Ammunition which fails to perform adequately is rejected. (See the excellent article at http://www.odcmp.org/1001/mann_inc.asp)

This rifle is made with a Remington M1903A3 action, apparently taken from an unissued rifle. The barrel was supplied by Walker, presumably related to Mike Walker who was connected with famed barrel maker Clyde Hart, and Remington where he perfected their button rifling process. (Mentioned in the interesting article on barrel making at http://www.firearmsid.com/feature%20articles/rifledbarrelmanuf/barrelmanufacture.htm ) The 18 inch long barrel is electric pencil etched near the muzzle 30 CAL CAR/ WALKER/ C345 probably a serial number. The extractor claw was specially lengthened to grip the smaller .30 carbine case. The stock assembly is cut off to be little more than a convenient grip for handling the device or while firing. The wood is cutoff directly ahead of the front guard screw, and the crack seen there is not an issue.

The stainless steel barrel was electric pencil marked RIFLE, ACCURACY, CALIBER .30 CARBINE D45850 after assembly into a complete rifle to identify its present configuration. Bore is excellent, and most of these accuracy barrels were apparently assembled in the 1970s, and were unused when turned over to the CMP program. This is a really neat oddball device to add to any M1903 Springfield collection, or to a M1 carbine collection. While a handful turned up in very advanced collections in the past, these were almost unknown except for brief mention in Brophy’s book until the Army transferred all remaining inventory of them (a few hundred) to the CMP program about 10 years ago. It seems that most were in 7.62 x 51mm NATO, some in .30-06, some in .30 carbine and a dozen or so in .22 Hornet. CMP has been sold out of these since 2012, and we were lucky to pick this one up out of a collection that was being sold off. $795.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3420 - - 8803 – U.S. RIFLE CALIBER .30 M1 (GARAND) BY HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON- NICE! - Serial number 5489839 with correct HRA 7-54 barrel having excellent sharp and bright bore and the breech gages 3.0 and the muzzle 1.5. This is an old CMP rifle from the 1980s or early 90s, but we think it has had some restoration involving switching parts to make it “correct.” It appears to be all correct with HRA receiver, barrel, bolt, op rod, trigger housing, hammer and sights. The stock is birch without the “horseshoe” sometimes found on HRA rifles and the sharp DOD acceptance stamp cartouche measures ½” across, while we would normally expect to see one measuring 3/8” wide. Nice matching birch handguards, and all wood is just about perfect. The right receiver leg is electric penciled LEAD 5-69 indicating overhaul at Letterkenny Army Depot. The chamber area is dark, so we assume that the rifle was refinished at Letterkenny. Overall about 97-98% dark gray parkerize finish remains, with a bit more wear on sharp edges of the op rod and trigger housing than on the corners of the receiver and swivels which is why we think this has been restored to some extent. Previous owner installed one of the extremely scarce M5 winter trigger guard and safety kits, which bring about $100 if you can find one at all. NOTE- in our opinion the M5 winter trigger is UNSAFE on a rifle except when essential in Arctic combat conditions requiring wearing of heavy gloves, and the risk of accidental discharge from grasping the stock is an acceptable tradeoff. This is an extremely handsome example of a mostly correct example of the 1950s Harrington & Richardson made M1 Garand. $1795.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6012 - RARE SAVAGE MODEL 720 MILITARY MARKED RIOT GUN SERIAL NUMBER 66745 CALIBER 12 GAUGE The operation system for this shotgun, using the long recoil system where the barrel and bolt recoil together formed the basis for two other very popular shotguns, the Browning A5, the first semi-automatic shotgun, and the Remington Model 11. The design sprang from the creative mind of John Browning.

When World War II broke out the U.S. military began purchasing these shotguns with a 20 inch barrel length. They were called riot guns and were primarily used to guard critical facilities.

This shotgun is one that Savage had already configured for sale as high end commercial gun as evidenced by the machine engraving on the receiver. It is configured in riot gun length with a 20 inch barrel with the front sight bead on a separate base. Savage was the only company that did this. This is a re-blue and it has been heavily buffed. Overall condition would rate about 85-90% with fading of the bluing and some dings in the stock. It has the correct U.S. property marks. These are very rare, this is the only U.S. military marked Savage riot gun we've seen in over 10 years. $1095.00 (View Picture)


Restoration Projects

SMOF6415 - REMINGTON M1917 RECEIVER SERIAL NUMBER 412026 The U.S. Model 1917 rifle probably formed the basis for more customized and wildcat rifles than any rifle in U.S. history. This was because of the design of the rifle. A brief history of the rifle is in order. The US M1917 was certainly the rifle no one wanted until the custom gun makers got hold of it after 1945.

It was a British design, and thrust up on the army because of the manufacturing inadequacies of the Springfield Armory when we suddenly entered the First World War in April 1917. At the end of the war the Army found itself with 2.4 million rifles it never wanted.

During World War II we gave them to allies including Britain and China, and also to our own troops, but still had over a million left. After the end of World War II the government authorized sales to civilians. An excellent condition Model 1917 could be yours for $10 (about $133 today).

Gunsmiths suddenly had a supply of sturdy, inexpensive rifles with a Mauser action to play with. It had a bolt face that could be opened up for a belted magnum cartridge, and a long bolt and magazine well able to accommodate a magnum case.

We recently acquired several U.S. Model 1917 actions. The rear sight assembly and protective ears have been neatly removed and the rear of the receiver has been professionally contoured. Holes have been drilled and tapped into the receiver for scope mounts and the receiver comes with Weaver mounts. If you`ve ever wanted to build your own custom rifle, this is the place to begin. $195.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6493 - EDDYSTONE M1917 RECEIVER SERIAL NUMBER 840595 The U.S. Model 1917 rifle probably formed the basis for more customized and wildcat rifles than any rifle in U.S. history. This was because of the design of the rifle. A brief history of the rifle is in order. The US M1917 was certainly the rifle no one wanted until the custom gun makers got hold of it after 1945.

It was a British design, and thrust up on the army because of the manufacturing inadequacies of the Springfield Armory when we suddenly entered the First World War in April 1917. At the end of the war the Army found itself with 2.4 million rifles it never wanted.

During World War II we gave them to allies including Britain and China, and also to our own troops, but still had over a million left. After the end of World War II the government authorized sales to civilians. An excellent condition Model 1917 could be yours for $10 (about $133 today).

Gunsmiths suddenly had a supply of sturdy, inexpensive rifles with a Mauser action to play with. It had a bolt face that could be opened up for a belted magnum cartridge, and a long bolt and magazine well able to accommodate a magnum case.

We recently acquired several U.S. Model 1917 actions. The rear sight assembly and protective ears have been neatly removed and the rear of the receiver has been professionally contoured. If you`ve ever wanted to build your own custom rifle, this is the place to begin. $125.00 (View Picture)

SMF6462 - 11679 - U.S. MODEL 1898 .30-40 KRAG RIFLE (EASY RESTORATION PROJECT) - Serial number 324297, made around 1901. This is a standard Model 1898infantry rifle with 30 inch barrel. Lots of good finish, maybe 80-90% except for the receiver and sideplate which have been a bit too aggressively cleaned, and the buttplate which shows normal wear and finish loss. Bubba needed a Bambi blaster and chopped the forend off ahead of the lower band, but did no further molestation. We have added a correct upper band assembly and screw, so all you need to do is splice on one of the replacement forends made by Dunlap Woodcarving, do some refinishing on the stock to get it all matching color and you will have a good representative example of the standard rifle of the Spanish American War era. This has the M1898 rear sight arsenal modified to M1902 style. Good, but not great, bore. Krags have always been prized for their exceptionally smooth actions, and commercial .30-40 ammo is easy to find. The Krag rifles mark a significant milestone in U.S. Army small arms as the first small bore, smokeless powder bolt action magazine rifle adopted. Although they performed well in the Spanish American War, especially compared to the old black powder trapdoor rifles used by many volunteers, the Spanish Mauser bolt action rifles had several advantages, leading to our adoption of the Model 1903 Springfield to replace the Krags. Some Krags actually were issued to Engineer troops in France during WW1, but there is no known history on this rifle. Price reflects the restoration work needed, but it is well worth the effort to salvage this. $525.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6466 - 20947 - WW2 U.S. MILITARY WINCHESTER MODEL 12 TRENCH GUN (RESTORATION PROJECT) Serial number 965383, matching on receiver and barrel extension. Factory roll marked with U.S. and flaming bomb on the right side of the receiver. This is a REALLY nice original WW2 trench gun that met the fate of many guns after the war. Everyone wanted a shotgun to go hunting, but the short trench or riot barrels were not long enough. So, lots of the guns had the barrels (and handguard in the case of trench guns) removed and replaced by a longer sporter length barrel. Some used Winchester made barrels, but many used after market “brand x” barrels, like this one. Looks like about 28” full choke, with a thin blue finish on the barrel. The rest of the gun has about 95-96% original high quality Winchester blue finish. Stock was very lightly sanded and given a coat of varnish, but the GHD ordnance bomb cartouche is still in great shape, just filled in a bit with the varnish. The original buttplate and sling swivel remain in place.

This would be super easy to restore to trench configuration by simply cutting down the present barrel to the correct 20 inch length, and installing an original (if you are lucky enough to have one) or one of the good quality repro handguard, which will require filing three notches in the bottom of the barrel to clear the screws for the handguard. Ideally you would find an original barrel and handguard to use, and end up with a gun worth about double our asking price. Excellent mechanics, and John really hates to let this one go. $2250.00 (View Picture)


Classic & Collectible Commercial Longarms
(post-1898)

**HOLD** SMOF6615 - HANDSOME PRE-WAR REMINGTON MODEL 81 IN 35 REMINGTON MANUFACTURED IN 1939 SERIAL NUMBER 8022 On October 16, 1900, John Browning was granted U.S. Patent 659,786 for a semi-automatic rifle design, which he sold to Remington. Browning's design was the first successful high-powered semi-automatic rifle to be manufactured in the United States and quite possibly anywhere else in the world.

The rifle introduced many features that were copied by other gun designers. John Garand and Michel Kalashnikov copied the U shaped sear mechanism. Kalashinikov took the safety for his AK 47 from this rifle. The spring loaded ejector of the M1 Garand also came from this design.

Inside the U.S., Remington manufactured and marketed Browning's design as the Model 8 and outside the U.S., this rifle was manufactured by Fabrique Nationale of Liege, Belgium, and marketed as the FN Browning 1900. The rifle offered the hunter a choice of four calibers, 25, 30, 32 and 35 and was powerful enough for deer, elk and even bear. There is a picture taken about 1910 of John Browning getting ready to clean a large elk he had just shot with his personal Model 8.

Because of the automatic loading feature, the rifle was popular with U.S. law enforcement. In 1934, legendary Texas Ranger Frank Hamer purchased a Model 8 in .35 Remington at Petmeckey’s Sporting Good Store in Austin and then had it fitted out with a 20-round magazine manufactured by the Peace Officer’s Equipment Company of St. Joseph, Missouri. He took the rifle along with him when trailing bank robbers Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker and found it more than up to the task of punching through the couple’s Ford V-8, as well as the couple themselves. Today, many Model 8s and some 81s will be found with police markings.

Remington discontinued the Model 8 in 1936 and introduced the Model 81 Woodsmaster with improvements by C.C. Loomis. The Model 81 was offered in .300 Savage and the .25 Remington cambering was dropped after a limited number of 81s were chambered in this round. The Federal Bureau of Investigation acquired some Model 81 rifles chambered for .30 Remington and .35 Remington in response to the 1933 Kansas City Massacre. Production of the Model 81 ceased in 1950.

This rifle was manufactured in 1939 and it is one of the nicest Model 81s that we have ever seen. The original bluing would rate 95%+. The bore is bright and shiny with strong lands and grooves. The stock has not been messed with and it still has the original Remington buttplate. The finish on the wood is wearing thin in some areas but it does not detract much from the overall handsome appearance of the rifle. $895.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6637 - EARLY FIRST YEAR (INTERNATIONAL) PRODUCTION RUGER 10- 22 INTERNATIONAL SERIAL NUMBER 58401 MANUFACTURED IN 1966 The 10-22 is sleek, perfectly balanced, rugged, accurate lightweight, reliable, rifle that is built to perform under demanding use. It has become a standard among small-game hunters, plinkers and competitive target shooters, where speed and accuracy are paramount.

Ruger introduced the International in 1966, the model was similar to standard 10-22 rifles, except it came equipped with a walnut full stock Mannlicher style stock.

This is one of the first 10-22 international rifles made, it was manufactured in 1966. The rifle comes with the full length Mannlicher style walnut stock and blued metal finish. It is in excellent condition with a few small dings and scratches from normal usage. $295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6688 - PRE-64 WINCHESTER MODEL 70 FEATHERWEIGHT IN 308 SERIAL NUMBER 580768 MANUFACTURED IN 1963. The Featherweight was a lightened version of standard Model 70 that came with an aluminum trigger guard and floorplate. The Featherweight was only manufactured from 1952 to 1963. Many experts claim that the Pre-64 Winchester Model 70 is the best bolt action sporting rifle ever manufactured. The metal on this rifle is in excellent condition, with 95%+ Original finish remaining and a bright shiny bore. The wood is excellent also with only a couple of insignificant dents or dings. A period micrometer peep sight has been added but no alteration were made to the rifle and it would be easy to remove with no evidence remaining that it was ever there. This rifle would make a great shooter (Assuming your gunsmith approves it as safe to fire, we sell all guns as collector items only.) Or because of the excellent condition it is in, it would be a great addition to a collection. $1195.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6720 - PRE-1964 WINCHESTER MODEL 70 (MADE IN 1946 – TRANSITION MODEL WITH THE PRE-WAR FEATURES) SERIAL NUMBER 58411 CALIBER 270 The Winchester Model 70 rifle is often referred to as the “Rifleman’s Rifle”. It was introduced in 1937 and is still in production. The Model 70 immediately established a reputation for accuracy and durability. It is made in calibers from 22 Hornet to 458 Winchester. It continues to be one of the most popular hunting rifles in the World and some experts claim that it is the best bolt action rifle ever made.

This rifle was made in 1946 and the barrel is stamped with that year. It is chambered for the ever popular 270 cartridge, a necked down 30-06 cartridge. It has the early features including the safety on the left side of the bolt, and strip charger guide on the receiver bridge, and the cloverleaf shaped rear tang.

The bore is bright with strong riflings. The bluing would rate about 95% with the expected high edge wear. The open sights are correct. The rifle been modified from original factory condition by the addition of a recoil pad. $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6575 - 19957 - RARE MOSSBERG 590 LINE LAUNCHER KIT KIT (Line throwing gun) Mossberg offered these circa 1994 to maybe 2002, but they have been discontinued for many years now. These were about the only commercial line throwing guns made post WW2, competing with the well established Naval Company of Doylestown, PA, who have been selling traditional single shot .45 caliber guns built on single shot shotgun actions for at least 80 years. The Mossberg guns were Coast Guard approved, but the approval would only remain in effect as long as cartridges less than five years old were available, but none have been made for several year now.

The Mossberg Line Launcher was offered both as a complete kit (catalog number 50298) including most parts (less barrel) of a Model 590 shotgun, but with orange stock and forend, in the satin nickel finish. It was also offered as a conversion kit (catalog number 90298) where the purchaser would furnish their own shotgun, and by removing the barrel and installing the line throwing barrel would be ready to go. The kit was a cheaper option and avoided any hassles with being a “firearm” and the purchaser had already jumped through those hoops when purchasing their shotgun. This is one of the kits with a Model 590 shotgun available as part of the sale (with FFL hassles) or without the gun with no FFL hassles- your choice.

The kit included the special 20inch satin nickel finished barrel with mounting loops that slip over the magazine tube and hold the canister for the line. Also three of the metal shafts for use as projectiles, having a 12 gauge piston at the rear for a close fit in the barrel. There are two plastic buoyant heads and two described as a “distance heads” which are more of a weighted slug. Special 2 ¾” 12 gauge blank “launching cartridges” were used and there are two five round boxes of these, although one cartridge is missing. The literature states that the maximum rand with the buoyant head projectile is 250 feet. Condition of the kit is basically new unfired, but the Model 590 shotgun is used excellent.

The photos show the conversion kit installed on a Model 590 shotgun which is included. At the option of the buyer, we will keep the Model 590 shotgun and sell the complete kit which remains for the price of $895.00, and this can be shipped direct to the buyer with no FFL needed. Serial number of the shotgun is L870832, and a standard shotgun barrel that came with it will be included, although shipped separately. The kit with the shotgun included will have to be shipped to a FFL dealer since the line launchers are not C&R listed. Price for this configuration is $995.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6573 - NAVY ARMS- PEDERSOLI- ROLLING BLOCK HARPOON GUN- RARE- POSSIBLY UNIQUE Serial number 48, caliber .38 Special (blank) . Harpoon guns are used mainly in fishing for sharks and the like, as shown in the 1975 film “Jaws.” They are essentially the same as “spearfishing” but with a longer range using a firearm to drive the harpoon or spear into the fish at a longer distance or against a larger fish.

Serial number 48 is stamped on the front of the frame, and also on the barrel and forend and that is what we are using as the serial number. Although there is a visible number 23 stamped on the trigger guard, the number on the frame or barrel is usually used as the serial number of a firearm. Like all the Navy Arms/Pedersoli rolling blocks, the maker names are on the frame. But, most have the model and serial number stamped are on the exposed parts of the barrel near the breech. This strongly suggests this was not a cataloged model, but rather a prototype.

This is a very close copy of the Greener Light Harpoon gun, except for using the rolling block action instead of the Martini actions used by Greener. Navy Arms had been selling the Greener Light Harpoon Guns, and were familiar with them, and also sold Greener harpoons and the frame used for holding the line. This example was purchased about five years ago directly from the President of Navy Arms, Val Forgett, III, who said it was the only one they had left. He did not know exact numbers made, but had the feeling it was a very small number. My guess is that it was less than a handful, and perhaps even a single prototype example made for evaluation prior to entering production contracts. The only reference I can find on these was a September 2008 Gunbroker forum posting on the Greeners: “I spoke recently by E-Mail with Val of Navy Arms Inc. about the Greener Light Harpoon Gun, he advised me they were considering making them again. If you or anyone you know have ever had any interest in owning one of these classic you should contact Navy Arms…” That suggests that Navy Arms was out of Greeners by 2008, and that a replacement was being considered. This is possibly the design they had, but apparently there was insufficient demand to go into regular production.

The action and butt stock with brass trigger guard and buttplate are the same Pedersoli made parts as used on a large number of Navy Arms rolling block rifles, usually in .45-70 caliber. The barrel contours near the muzzle and design of the forend are identical to the Greener type guns with a Martini action, with the same style harpoon and line release frame arrangement.

The 20.5” long barrel on this one was turned down from an old 8mm barrel with a rough condition bore, and is chambered for .38 Special cartridges, but the smaller bore diameter makes it impossible (or probably a fatal accident) if anyone tried to fire a ball cartridge instead of a special purpose blank load. Reportedly these used “special tool” blanks originally made by Remington for use in their “Ramset Super Power Jobmaster nail driver.” (See more on cartridges for both the Greener and Navy Arms harpoon guns at http://iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=13210

This comes with the original 14” long tubular stainless steel Harpoon weighing 16 ounces having a hollow shaft which slides down over the barrel of the gun. It has two pivoting barbs to help in retrieving the target. A brass collar at the rear provides the attaching point for the approximately 1/8” diameter braided nylon line. The “line holding frame” is about 15” wide and has the original line still wrapped (with a couple pieces of nearly invisible fishing line securing it for display). The horns for wrapping the line are about 6” long. The end of the line holding frame slips into a hole at the front of the stock. There is a metal lined cross slot on the forend that lines up with a notch in the spreader bar, presumably for some sort of pin to latch the spreader bar in place, but it is missing.

Overall excellent plus, with about 98-99% original factory polished blue finish on metal parts. Brass parts with some mellow age tarnish. The varnished walnut stocks have a few tiny handling and storage blemishes, but no signs of use. Line frame and the harpoon are new, unused. Remember, this is for harpoon gun use only, and it is unsafe to attempt to fire a conventional .38 caliber cartridge in it.

People collect all sorts of firearms for different reasons. (John likes line throwing guns and got this before deciding that harpoon guns were outside his defined specialty.) This would be a great addition to a harpoon gun collection, or for someone who finds the field of “Navy Arms” brand guns to be their chosen specialty. This will have to go to a dealer FFl as it is not on the C&R list, or eligible under the “50 year rule” $995.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6563 - HANDSOME PRE-64 WINCHESTER MODEL 94 IN 30-30 SERIAL NUMBER 2573142. The Model 1894 lever action rifle is one of John M. Brownings enduring legacy to hunters (and law enforcement) throughout the United States. It is the only gun design that we are aware of that is still in production 108 years after the first one was made. Winchester needed a lever action rifle capable of handling smokeless powder to compete with Marlins Model 1893. Browning turned out the design in two weeks, and nearly six million rifles later its still in production. The rifle was chambered in several calibers from 25-35 to 32 special. It could be ordered in rifle or carbine configuration with other fancy features such as takedown, pistol grip buttstock, shotgun buttplate, and fancy walnut.

This is a very nice Pre-64 Winchester Model 94 carbine. It is chambered in the most popular caliber (30-30). The wood is in very good condition with one or two small dents and dings. Excellent bright shiny bore. 95%+ original blue remaining. This is the classic Winchester 94 carbine in the classic caliber, from a bygone era when pride was taken in fit finish and craftsmanship. $750.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6471 - CUSTOM SPORTING RIFLE MADE ON A REMINGTON M1917 ACTION A classic 1950s-early 60s vintage custom sporter, tastefully designed and nicely executed. Serial number 52133 with 21 inch barrel in 30-06 caliber. Bore is bright and sharp, about excellent. Rear sight assembly and protective ears have been neatly removed, and the front and rear rings each have two holes drilled and tapped for an old style Weaver scope mount. The Bausch & Laumb 4x Scope has a few dents and dings. Scopes and mounts like this were very popular in those days. Bluing would rate about 95%. The stock is nicely laid out on straight grain walnut, with tasteful cheek rest and comes with sling swivel studs installed. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6534 - 19965 - RARE MBA GYROJET MARK I MODEL B 13MM ROCKET CARBINE- “SPORTER” MODEL WITH NICKEL FINISH - Serial number B0212. This is one of about 300 “sporter” carbines made circa 1965-1968.

Gyrojets are a wonderful invention from the 1960s, and played a role in the 1967 James Bond movie “You Only Live Twice” and were written up in Life Magazine. But, the reality of their inaccuracy and relatively high prices for the guns and very high costs of the rocket ammunition doomed them, The vast majority of Gyrojets were pistols, but MBA hoped to create a market for longarms as well. Initially they tried a version imitating the overall lines of the M16 rifle, and in hopes of generating civilian sales, made some resembling popular sporting rifles,. However, they were not successful and production of the longarms was extremely limited, and even pistol production numbers were small. The “Sporter carbines” were made using standard pistol frames with longer barrels, and walnut rifle stocks with rollover cheek rest and a Bushnell “Phantom” telescope. The large “bell” on the muzzle has no purpose and is only for appearance. The rubber Pachmayr recoil pad is also for appearance as there is no recoil from the rocket rounds.

The Sporter Carbine just one number lower -B0211- was presented to President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. When originally sold, the Gyrojet Sporter Carbines cost $300.00. At that time, a Ruger 10-22 was $54; a Winchester Model 94 was $84; and a Winchester Model 70 was $140. Gyrojet rockets cost $1.35 each when a box of 50 .22 Long Rifle ammo was 80 cents, or a 20 round box of.30-06 soft point ammo, or a 50 round box of .38 special was under $5.00.

Visually this is a great looking example except for the stock having a scratch on the right side above the trigger, and a small chip (1/4” x ½”) on the right side by the tip of the forend as shown in the photos. The left side of the muzzle bell has a 1” area of corrosion where the nickel finish has peeled off. The hammer will not stay cocked although there is a nice "click" when it engages the sear, which must be worn or broken. Remember, the internal parts are of the same cast aluminum as everything else except the steel screws and springs. Also, the slide release lever on the right side will not stay engaged because its spring is missing, although externally it looks fine, but it just does not stay up when the slide is forward. These flaws are reflected in the price which is far below the usual price for one of these rare guns.

How a Gyrojet works- Gyrojet rockets are propelled by thrust from the burning propellant in the rocket passing out the nozzles, not by the force of an explosion contained in a barrel to expel a projectile. Gyrojet barrels have holes in them to vent the rocket blast. Rockets are fed from a magazine to a firing position aligned with the barrel. The hammer is located in FRONT of the rocket and when released the hammer drives the rocket backwards against a fixed firing pin which ignites the primer in the base of the rocket.

The hammer holds the rocket in position for a millisecond as thrust builds up, and then the rocket moves forward, cocking the hammer for the next shot. The rocket burns for about 1/10th of a second to achieve a velocity of about 1,500 feet per second at about 60 feet from the muzzle. Since there is no cartridge explosion in the barrel, there is no recoil in a Gyrojet, and the noise is a “whooshhh” sound, not a “BANG!” Note that although Gyrojets have a 13mm bore diameter, BATFE has removed them from NFA status and classified them as “Curio & Relic” firearms.

The definitive reference on all things related to MBA and the Gyrojets is Mel Carpenter’s superb book “An Introduction to MBA Gyrojets and Other Ordnance” which can be ordered from his website which is loaded with info on the Gyrojets at http://gyrojet.net

Price for this rare piece of firearms technology history is only $1595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6411 - SUPERB CUSTOM SPORTER RIFLE BUILT ON A PRE WAR WINCHESTER MODEL 70 ACTION. SERIAL NUMBER 12850 (RECEIVER MADE IN 1937) This rifle displays exceptionally fine workmanship, with elegant lines and tasteful embellishments superbly executed. The receiver is a pre-WWII Winchester Model 70 bolt action fitted with an octagonal profile barrel drawn from a Shilen blank. The octagon barrel is 25" in length, about 0.930" flat to flat at the receiver and about 0.645" flat to flat at the muzzle. The bore is button rifled and chambered for .375 H&H Magnum, a classic and effective large game cartridge. Bore is new and test firing at 100 yards produced groups that were less than one inch in diameter. The barrel and receiver have 100% of a well done hot tank oxide blue finish. The rifle is fitted with a special recoil lug designed to deal with the strong recoil from the 375 cartridge.

This rifle is superbly stocked in a beautifully figured piece of premium grade European Bastogne walnut from a blank provided by Mr. Shang of Idaho. The checkering is among the best we have seen, superbly executed in a 22 lines per inch pattern. The butt has an attractive and functional European style oval cheek rest which features a shadow line around the lower edge. A Winchester recoil pad, most welcome to control the jolt of the .375 caliber, has been fitted. The result is a beautiful yet completely functional hunting rifle. It is suitable for the largest game on the North American continent and also meets the legal requirements for hunters contemplating an African safari!

It has been said that life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun, and this rifle will cure that problem in a hurry! Even the most hoplophobic spouse could grudgingly admit that this is a work of art, in the tradition of artistic arms made for wealthy patrons with good taste ever since the invention of firearms. Almost too nice to shoot, but why not enjoy it if you want to? If you’ve dreamed of an African safari this rifle is just what you need. $3500.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5995 - 23023 - WINCHESTER MODEL 1897 12 GAUGE PUMP SHOTGUN- Serial number 876463 made in 1932 with 30 inch 12 gauge barrel, full choke, mirror bright bore. This is the takedown model, and the lockup is nice and tight, and mechanics are fine. This is a field used gun that has been well cared for. Screw heads are crisp and unbuggered. Barrel has about 80-85% original blue, but the magazine tube has about 40-50% due to handling wear, and the almost none on the receiver. Buttstock is one of the few we have seen that is NOT cracked at the rear of the receiver, and while the varnish finish is flaked and scraped, overall the wood is pretty nice except for one long shallow bruise on the right side as shown in the photos. Missing the buttplate, but does not seem to have been cut down, just a case of the hard rubber buttplate getting broken and lost. Repro buttplates are readily available, and somewhere I have several old originals, but no idea where they are, or I would install one.

This is one of John M. Browning’s classic designs, with more than a million Model 97s made before production ended in 1957. It was the first really successful pump action shotgun made, and improved over the less successful Model 1893 Winchester which had been designed for blackpowder loads and. The only other pumps prior to these were one designed by C.M. Spencer (the Civil War carbine inventor!) and Andrew Burgess, the latter using an awkward but functional arrangement where the entire pistol grip would slide back along the axis of the stock to work the action. The Burgess was only built 1893-1897 and finally bought out by Winchester. Spencer was a good inventor, but lousy businessman and his guns were made starting about 1879, but in 1890 he sold out to Francis Bannerman, the big surplus dealer, who continued to make them under the Bannerman name until about 1910.

This classic old shotgun is one of the key historic arms for collectors of American sporting arms, and many are still enjoyed by shooters today. (We sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith before firing.) With a little refinishing on the stock and a new buttplate this will be a much nicer looking gun. C&R FFL okay for this one. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $575.00 (View Picture)


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