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Ammunition for Collectors
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We have a nice assortment of ammuniton for collectors, best in the area of U.S. military cartridges.
Scroll down the page to look at all of it, or use the links to get to the section that interests you most.

Great Reference Books!

18818 CIVIL WAR SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION-ROUNDBALL TO RIMFIRE- THREE VOLUME SET! VOLUME 1, 1880-1939 REVISED - The definitive work for all types of Civil War small arms ammunition. Based on years of research and collecting specimens, Dean Thomas accurately identifies the ammo, where it was made, the contract details, how it was packed, and often, where it was shipped. This is the full THREE VOLUME SET, not a single volume. There may be additional volumes in the future, but it will take a while to read these. Details of each volume follow. All are 8.5” x 11” hardbound, total of over 1350 pages!. Round Ball to Rimfire -- Part One Federal Ordnance Dept., Arsenals, Smoothbores & Rifle Muskets. (344 pages) Part One covers Federal rifle musket and smoothbore ammunition. Detailed information on the Ordnance Department, Northern arsenals, patents, designers, & manufacturers of Federal musket ammunition. Round Ball to Rimfire -- Part Two Federal Breechloading Carbines and Rifles (528 pages) This book fully covers Federal carbine and rifle ammunition. Detailed information on patents, designers, & manufacturers of Federal breechloaders and their ammunition. Round Ball to Rimfire -- Part Three Federal Pistols, Revolvers & Misc. Essays (488 pages) This is Part Three of the projected four-part series on Civil War small arms ammunition. This volume thoroughly covers Federal pistol ammunition. Detailed information on patents, designers, & manufacturers. Miscellaneous essays wrap-up the Northern side of the story. Regular price is $139.90 but we are selling the set of three volumes with FREE SHIPPING INCLUDED for only $125.00 (View Picture)

18812 HISTORY OF MODERN US MILITARY SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION VOLUME 1, 1880-1939 by Hackley, Woodin & Scranton- REVISED edition - An absolutely essential book for anyone interested in U.S. military small arms ammunition prior to WW2. Virtually every regular and experimental round from .22 rimfire through .50 BMG and Trench Gun ammo is included with unbelievable detail and superbly done accurate detailed drawings and images of boxes. The definitive work! Compiled from decades of research at the National Archives, military, public, and private museums and libraries, as well as individual collections, this contains all available information on military small arms ammunition from 1880-1939. Addendum to Volume 1 with 28 pages of additional information, research, and corrections to volume 1. (priced at $7.95 if bought separately) comes FREE with purchase of this volume. FREE SHIPPING INCLUDED $49.00 (View Picture)

10007 .30-06 BY CHRIS PUNNETT - Superb reference book for anyone interested in any type of cartridges. 384 pages, hardbound loaded with illustrations of cartridges, and boxes from makers all over the world. Great information including much historical data on the companies that made the cartridges, as well as details on the unbelievable number of variations that exist in this popular collecting specialty. Extensive coverage of U.S. military variations alone is worth the very modest price of this great book. This is my favorite cartridge book out of the dozens I own. Title page autographed by the author. OUT OF PRINT- these are the last few copies the author had.! $95.00 (View Picture)



New Additions

NOTE: We were fortunate to acquire several dozen boxes (full, partial or empty) from some of the most advanced collections of .30-06 ammunition ever assembled. Some are the actual ones pictured in Chris Punnett's superb book ".30-06" (available above) and others came from another long time specialist in that field. Some are extremely scarce, perhaps unique, other are rare, and some are minor variations of fairly common types. In any case, this is a great opportunity to add some interesting boxes to your collection.
We will list these among the new items for now, and then may start a separate section below in the future.

We will be happy to shrink wrap boxes of ammo in plastic for display. Just ask when ordering, and we will do it for you. Depending on our schedule, it may delay shipment by a few days.

**NEW ADDITION** 22882 COLLECTOR’S GROUP OF LOT OF FOUR DIFFERENT BOXES OF .30 CALIBER RIFLE BLANKS - Three boxes are .30-06 caliber M1909 blanks, all made by Frankford arsenal, two are sealed and one has been opened. The first label probably circa 1910-1918 specifies “For Model of 1903 Rifle.” The second with a 1920 loading date specifies “For Service Rifles, Models 1903 and 1917, Automatic Rifle with muzzle attachment and machine gun with muzzle attachment.” The third box is probably 1930s vintage “For Rifles and Automatic Gun.” The fourth box is .a sealed 30-40 Krag caliber, designated “Cartridge, Blank, Caliber .30 (1898) M3” having M1909 style rolled crimps, but these should not be confused with the .30 M3 Grenade Launching cartridges for .30-06 rifles. The entire collection of four different boxes for $55.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22881 40 ROUND BOX OF PEDERSEN DEVICE AMMUNITION - “40- CAL..30 AUTO. PISTOL BALL CARTRIDGES Model of 1918” Full box of original ammo for the super secret "Pedersen Device" which was deceptively called a "pistol" to camouflage it's real nature. The cartridges are very similar to a lengthened .32 ACP, or the French 7.65mm Long used in some of the MAS/MAB pistols. Getting harder to find these. Headstamp is RA H 19. Intended for use in secret WW1 device to make M1903 Springfield a semi-auto weapon for cleaning out trenches. Most of us will never own a device, but here is a chance to at least own some of the ammo for this historic episode of U.S. military arms development. Nice clean box, although somewhat age toned to brownish white, shrink wrapped in plastic for display with your WW1 collection. The 40 round box was used because the Pedersen Device magazines held 40 rounds. The boxes were packed in a “brick holding 15 boxes (600 rounds), three bricks to a bandoleer, but you never see the bricks or bandoleers for sale. $95.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22880 ORIGINAL 1870 DATED SEALED BOX .56-50 SPENCER BLANK CARTRIDGES - “10 Rim-Primed Blank Cartridges Spencer Carbine, Cal: .50—Frankford Arsenal 1870” printed on light blue label used to designate blank ammunition. Excellent plu condition with the label still sealed shut and the opening string in place. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display after the photos were taken. A great item for display with your M1865 Spencer or Indian War collection. Blank ammunition was used for training and especially for getting horses used to the sound of gunfire. $65.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22873 20 CARTRIDGES, PISTOL BALL, CALIBER .45 M1911 AMMUNITION LOT - FA 1321, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box. Headstamp probably FA 41. This is what was issued during the early days of WW2, not the more familiar 50 round boxes which did not appear until later in the war. Excellent bright clean box. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display after the photos were done, and looks even nicer now. $29.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22871 BOX 20 ROUNDS .30 INCENDIARY M1, DEN 42 DEN 14143 - Very nice box except tips are poking through a little. Will shrink wrap in plastic if desired at no added cost. .30-06 Incendiary ammo is hard to find in decent boxes. $95.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22554 RARE WW2 EXPERIMENTAL .50 BMG (12.7 x 99mm) BALL CARTRIDGE WITH ALUMINUM CASE - There was a box with nine of these in the estate of career Army Ordnance officer and ammunition collector and author Berkeley Lewis. All I can tell you is what is on the box, a typewritten label “Caliber .50 ALUMINUM CASE BALL 233 gr. IMR 4814 Lot 2639” The cases have no headstamp, a peculiar type flat faced primer, and a heavy varnish type coating which gives them a light silver-brassy-brown color. All of the cartridges have split necks, some a single split that is not too bad, which I am calling grade 1, others with a bad single split or multiple splits and corrosion which I am calling grade 2. Hackley, Woodin & Scranton Volume 2 discusses the 1945-46 experiments with aluminum cased .50 BMG ammunition. Apparently split necks were a problem right from the start, and never fully overcome. Problems with primers backing out were solved with a new primer design, which seems to be the type in these cartridges. Remington apparently did all (or nearly all) of the work on this project, and the cases were tentatively designated T3 and ball rounds with aluminum case were to be T94. Interpreting HWS, it looks like these rounds would be among those made without headstamps in 1944 although some were marked RA 44. These cartridges would have been part of the Phase 1 order for 5,000 rounds, or Phase 2 with 20,000 rounds for test firings. There was a Phase 3 with 100,000 rounds ordered in 1945, but those were headstamped RA 45 (and more neck splitting problems were encountered). Although condition is not perfect, these are very rare in any condition.

Price for ONE round GRADE I is $29.00 (View Picture)
Price for a GRADE 2 example is $20.00. (View Picture)
The empty box will be available for $40.00 and will only be sold with the purchase of a cartridge.

**NEW ADDITION** 22440 50 ROUNDS 9mm [LUGER] BALL NATO M882 (Gulf War vintage) - Full box of 50 rounds circa 1990 made by Olin (WCC). Great for display as part of a Gulf War or Iraq/Afghanistan collection. $40.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21710 20 CARTRIDGES, 7.62mm NATO, DUMMY M63, FRANKFORD ARSENAL LOT 4 - Very early box of the dummy 7.62 NATO cartridge with fluted cases and primer pocket without flash hole. What is surprising is that on the one box we opened, the headstamps were mixed, including FA + 55. FA + 56, and FA + 60, and since we did not check all the cartridges, there may be others as well. The box label is dated 1960, so it is likely that Frankford Arsenal took advantage of the order for dummy cartridges to use up all the odd lots of unfinished cases which had accumulated. This box has bee opened (deliberately or through rough handling and taped shut again, so we are not 100% these are the exact original contents, but believe so. Box as shown $30.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21695 .450 NITRO EXPRESS 3 ¼” SOFT POINT DANGEROUS GAME CARTRIDGE BY KYNOCH - Headstamp KYNOCH .450 this is the classic round introduced in 1898 by John Rigby for use in the finest English double rifle for the really BIG and DANGEROUS African game- elephants, tigers, rhinoceros, etc. These fire a 480 grain soft point bullet at about 2150 fps with a muzzle energy of 4,926 foot pounds. These rounds came from estate of an experienced African hunter. Impress your friends or fix your elephant problem with one of these babies! Price for one round $12.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21634 SEALED SPAM CAN OF 600 ROUNDS U.S. MILITARY .30 CARBINE AMMUNITION ON 10 ROUND STRIPPER CLIPS IN BANDOLEERS - Full sealed can with five bandoleers of 120 rounds each. We had another opened can, so we know that it is nice, bright clean ammo in excellent condition bandoleers with clear stencil markings “CAL.. 30 CARBINE/ BALL M1/ 10 RD CLIPS RA5242” Headstamps are RA 52 indicating manufacture by Remington in 1952. Great for M1 carbine display, or you can have your can and shoot it too if you carefully open the can on the bottom, instead of using the key and opening around the sides as was the intent for field use. That way you can use the ammo, but still have a “sealed looking” can for display. Front of the can has been pushed in a little but still displays okay. Cannot sell to serfs stuck in states run by idiots. The can of 600 rounds for $400.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21122 RARE REMINGTON-UMC 3 GAUGE 4 ¼” PAPER SHOTSHELL - New, primed, empty case as sold by the factory. These are about 1 ¼” diameter. The orange-brown paper is in good condition, and the open mouth of the case shows some wrinkles from poor storage and there is some light staining on the brass base and head. Very seldom seen, and among the very largest factory made shotshells, with only the 2 Gauge and 1 ½” size cartridges being larger. Current value reported in the latest International Ammunition Association Journal is $100, but our price is only $69.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21074 .50 CALIBER BROWNING MACHINE GUN “MA DEUCE” DUMMY CARTRIDGE (FA 4) - New old stock with FA 4 headstamp indicating manufacture at Frankford Arsenal in 1944. These are totally inert with holes in the case and an empty primer pocket with no flash hole for visual identification. These use steel cases with a corrosion resistant finish (some sort of zinc based Cromac type material which shows some storage scraped and an occasional rust speck or two. The .50 BMG was adopted in 1921 by the U.S. military and since then has been used continuously as the heavy machine gun in aircraft, on naval vessels, in armored vehicles and on tripods for ground use. Also known as the 12.7 x 99mm cartridges in the many other countries where John M. Browning’s invention is also used. Price for one unissued cartridge $6.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20876 120 ROUNDS KOREAN WAR VINTAGE .30 CARBINE AMMUNITION ON 10 ROUND STRIPPER CLIPS IN BANDOLEER - Nice, bright clean ammo in excellent condition bandoleers with clear stencil markings “CAL.. 30 CARBINE/ BALL M1/ 10 RD CLIPS RA5242” Headstamps are RA 52 on most, but we found some LC 52, so it looks like someone used a couple of clips and then replaced the ammo. All U.S. GI ammo, just the Lake City 52 ammo is not original to this bandoleer, but no one will ever know unless they checked the headstamps. (We almost missed it ourselves!) $85.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20789 .54 CALIBER BURNSIDE CARBINE ORIGNIAL CARTRIDGE- Excellent - Nice clean example with bullet crimped in the mouth of the tapered brass case with belted center and open flash hole at rear. The Burnside was the third most purchased carbine of the Civil War, and invented by the man who later became a mediocre General during the war, afterwards a Governor of Rhode Island. The Burnside carbine was pretty rugged and reliable, but strictly a single shot and used an external percussion cap for ignition, but still far superior to the paper cartridge or muzzle loading arms of the era. However, the guns were complicated and the guns expensive so purchases were terminated before the end of the war, although troops continued to use them until the end. This is an ORIGINAL Civil War Burnside cartridge, with condition as shown in the photos. Most likely this is one of the surplus rounds sold after the war and is in excellent condition. Great for display with a minty carbine. $39.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20788 .54 CALIBER BURNSIDE CARBINE ORIGNIAL CARTRIDGE- VERY GOOD - Tarnished and oxidized but otherwise very nice example with bullet crimped in the mouth of the tapered brass case with belted center and open flash hole at rear. The Burnside was the third most purchased carbine of the Civil War, and invented by the man who later became a mediocre General during the war, afterwards a Governor of Rhode Island. The Burnside carbine was pretty rugged and reliable, but strictly a single shot and used an external percussion cap for ignition, but still far superior to the paper cartridge or muzzle loading arms of the era. However, the guns were complicated and the guns expensive so purchases were terminated before the end of the war, although troops continued to use them until the end. This is an ORIGINAL Civil War Burnside cartridge, with condition as shown in the photos. Most likely this is one of the surplus rounds sold after the war and is in very good condition. Great for display with a Burnside Carbine. $35.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20787 .54 CALIBER BURNSIDE CARBINE ORIGNIAL CARTRIDGE- relic conditon - This example is a relic condition round, probably dug from a battlefield or campsite, but exact location is no longer known. Bullet remains crimped in the mouth of the tapered brass case but the brass is badly corroded and very weak with parts missing. The Burnside was the third most purchased carbine of the Civil War, and invented by the man who later became a mediocre General during the war, afterwards a Governor of Rhode Island. The Burnside carbine was pretty rugged and reliable, but strictly a single shot and used an external percussion cap for ignition, but still far superior to the paper cartridge or muzzle loading arms of the era. However, the guns were complicated and the guns expensive so purchases were terminated before the end of the war, although troops continued to use them until the end. This is an ORIGINAL Civil War Burnside cartridge, with condition as shown in the photos. Great for display with other relics, or with a poor condition carbine. $20.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 19841 FULL BOX 11MM AMMO FOR M1871/84 MAUSER RIFLES - Pretty good box with white label "20 scharfe Patronen 71/84, Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken Karlsruhe (Baden)" Probably circa 1880-1910. Sealed in plastic for display. $75.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 19393 WW2 BOX 20 CARTRIDGES TRACER CALIBER .30 M1- NICE! - Nice clean, EMPTY box for 20 rounds made at St. Louis. Headstamp was SL42. Box was opened and contents shot up by Bubba, but this is a great condition box and will be shrink wrapped in plastic for display with a block of wood inside for weight. After wrapping it will look almost like a full sealed box with the opened lable just barely visible. Perfect for display with any .30-06 caliber U.S. military rifle or machine gun, especially in places run by idiots which restrict possession of tracer ammo. Can go by mail so shipping will be cheaper too. Empty display box shrink wrapped in plastic $12.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 18849 20 Cartridges NATO 7.62mm, Dummy M63- (box is messed up but ammo perfect) - Full sealed box Lot LC12004, with headstamp + LC 60. Brass cased cartridges with fluted sides and undrilled flash hole, made for training and armorer function testing use. Cartridges are perfect, but the boxes have old tape sealing the box shut. Not much for display, and priced lower than a nice display box. $25.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 18805 SPANISH AMERICAN WAR DATED BOX .30-40 KRAG AMMUNITION- - FRANKFORD ARSENAL 1898- Although the ink stamped marking is faded and barely legible, the velocity test marking on the bottom of the box is April 20, 1898. Box has been opened, and the cartridges have the tinned cases and headstamp F 4 98. This one of a handful of 1898 or earlier US military .30-40 ammunition I have encountered in over 25 years of collecting. $85.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 18649 -20 CARTRIDGES, 7.62mm NATO, DUMMY M63, FRANKFORD ARSENAL LOT 4 - Very early box of the dummy 7.62 NATO cartridge with fluted cases and primer pocket without flash hole. What is surprising is that on the one box we opened, the headstamps were mixed, including FA + 55. FA + 56, and FA + 60, and since we did not check all the cartridges, there may be others as well. The box label is dated 1960, so it is likely that Frankford Arsenal took advantage of the order for dummy cartridges to use up all the odd lots of unfinished cases which had accumulated. This box has bee opened (deliberately or through rough handling and taped shut again, so we are not 100% these are the exact original contents, but believe so. Box as shown $35.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 18587 SPANISH AMERICAN WAR BOX OF .30-40 KRAG AMMUNITION (FRANKFORD ARESNAL 1898) - This is a partially full, incomplete box, but one of a very few I have ever found with 1898 or earlier dates. The headstamps on the eighteen cartridges look like F over 3 98 on all of them, but the marks are tiny, poorly struck and already sealed in shrink wrap for display. The box top on another box which was complete is dated April 1898, but there is no date visible on the portion of the box that remains here. What you see is what you get. $35.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 18586 SCARCE M7 GRENADE LAUNCHING AUXILIARY CARTRIDGES FA 44 - These are scarce just a loose individual cartridges, but even though I have collected grenade launcher related items for many years, this was the first time I found any of these packed in a sealed five round packet. These were made from partially formed .45 caliber cartridge cases, and loaded with a powder charge and a red sealing wad. There are no markings at all on the individual cartridges and some people have no idea what they are if they see one loose. In use, one of these could be inserted into the muzzle of the grenade launcher before placing the rifle grenade on it. When the main grenade launching cartridge was fired, the hot gases would ignite the powder in the auxiliary cartridge and give it extra “oompf” for longer ranges. (Listed on the range table sheets packed with the grenade launcher sights). This packet has been torn, but not opened, and is still full. One sealed packet shown in the photo, probably circa 1944. $75.00 (View Picture)

21528 U.S. MILITARY DUMMY CARTRIDGE SET .45 ACP to 20mm - One of each: .30-06 Dummy Model 1906 (fluted case); .30-06 Dummy M2 (holes in case); .30 Carbine Dummy M13 (no primer); 7.62mm Dummy M63 (fluted case); 5.56mm Dummy XM199 (fluted case); .50 Browning Machine Gun, Dummy M2 (holes in case), .45 ACP M21 (no primer); 20 x 110mmRB Oerlikon Dummy (holes in Case); and 20 x110mm Hispan-Suiza Dummy M18A3 (solid metal). $20.00 (View Picture)

18585 SCARCE M7 GRENADE LAUNCHING AUXILIARY CARTRIDGES- These are scarce just a loose individual cartridges, but even though I have collected grenade launcher related items for many years, this was the first time I found any of these packed in a sealed five round packet. These were made from partially formed .45 caliber cartridge cases, and loaded with a powder charge and a red sealing wad. There are no markings at all on the individual cartridges and some people have no idea what they are if they see one loose. In use, one of these could be inserted into the muzzle of the grenade launcher before placing the rifle grenade on it. When the main grenade launching cartridge was fired, the hot gases would ignite the powder in the auxiliary cartridge and give it extra “oompf” for longer ranges. (Listed on the range table sheets packed with the grenade launcher sights). One sealed packet as shown in the photo, probably circa 1944. $95.00 (View Picture)

13550 PACKET OF 6 .30 CARBINE GRENADE LAUNCHING M6 - In addition to the standard 50 round cardboard boxes, sometimes these cartridges were packed in small cardboard packets of six rounds, and issued in a miniature “Spam can” with a pack of 10 rounds of the .30-06 caliber M3 grenade launching blanks, and sometimes with some of the M7 auxiliary cartridges. This is one of the six round packets packed in a lightweight folded box inside a waterproof kraft paper wrapper. These were used with the M8 grenade launcher. Several different selections were packedin the mini spam cans over a relatively short time, and the five round pack of carbine cartridges was by far the most common, making the six round pack like this fairly scarce. Fairly scarce stuff in this packing configuration. Headstamp unknown, but will include a loose round of this type of cartridge to show contents. $49.00 (View Picture)

13543 U.S. WW2 SEALED 5 ROUND PACKET OF CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE CAL..30 M6, FOR M1 CARBINE - The Caliber .30 Grenade Launching Cartridge M6 was used with the M8 grenade launcher. During WW2 it was usually packed in a small 5 round mini-boxes either heavily coated in wax, or sealed in a kraft-foil overwrapping. Several boxes would be included in a crate of rifle grenades, along with some .30-06 Grenade Launching Cartridges M3 for use in the M1903 or later M1 Garand rifles. This is a mint, unopened example of the 5 round kraft foil packet for the M1 carbine. Hard to find any more. Total of three available and lot numbers or markings may vary somewhat, but you will get one of the three packets shown. Price per packet of five rounds $40.00 (View Picture)

12242 SCARCE- 20 Caliber .45 Revolver Blank Cartridges, model of 1909 for Colt's Double Action - Revolver, Model of 1909. Smokeless powder, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box with clear May 1914 date stamp. The half moon section where you are supposed to press through the label to open the box has been broken but otherwise remains sealed. Label is a light blue gray color, the color used to indicate blank ammunition, but the box has be given a coat of clear varnish so the color is very muted. Blanks were used for training, especially getting horses accustomed to gunfire. A rare box for display with your M1909 revolver “and one of everything to go with it.” Hard to find in any condition, and I am not sure I have one in my collection either! Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $85.00 (View Picture)

12241 10 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 GRENADE LAUNCHING M3- FULL BOX - Full box that is still sealed, although the wax on the ends has been peeled off, and the label on the top of the box is missing a bit at one or both ends. All of this style pack we have seen had a headstamp FA 4 on the cartridges which would indicate loading at Frankford Arsenal in 1944. These special 10 round boxes were wax coated for better protection from exposure and only used a short time before switching to the mini spam can style packing. Great for display with any of the numerous grenade launchers used on M1903, M1917 or M1 Garand rifles. Have two boxes in basically the same condition, so one you get may not be the exact one in the photos. Grenade launching blanks have gotten very hard to find in the last few years. $55.00 (View Picture)

12239 RARE- 10 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 GRENADE LAUNCHING M3 - This is a very rare packet with two rows of five cartridges, and used in the mini spam cans. This packet has a wax style waterproofing instead of the kraft/foil paper usually seen. Content markings unknown, but probably FA 4headstamp. Nearly impossible to find loose. $75.00 (View Picture)

10882 DILLON 300 GRAIN LEAD BULLETS FOR .45-70 (BAG OF 250) - High quality factory product, lubed and sized, ready for loading. We just do not have time to reload ammo so might as well let someone else get some use out of them. Bag of 250 bullets $29.00 (View Picture)

2759 20 CALIBER .38 REVOLVER BLANK CARTRIDGES- SMOKELESS POWDER - Made by Frankford Arsenal and loaded June 12, 1905. An nice full box with the paper seal broken on one side to the top can be opened to view the contents, as shown in the photos. Label was originally pale blue, but faded and toned to almost same brown color as the box. Great to go with some of the Colt M1889-1903 Army or Navy revolvers. The Ball boxes are seen regularly, but this is only the second or third box of blanks we have had in over 20 years. $40.00 (View Picture)

20774 THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION- VOLUME 1 by George Hoyem - 230 pages 9” x 11” hardbound first edition. Signed by the author, and inscribed as copy number 50 of 500 to a prominent early cartridge collector. George A. Hoyem’s superb series on ammunition development systematically and thoroughly lays out the progression and varieties of ammunition, not just metallic cartridges, but also the early paper cartridges. While there are more detailed and specialized studies devoted to a single caliber (“.58s are the Greatest”), or narrow time period (Dean Thomas’ four volumes on Civil War ammunition “Roundball to Rimfire”) Hoyem’s work is the starting point to finding answers on just about any really unusual cartridge, and also these have a surprising amount of information on the related guns, so sometimes you can find the ammunition for a gun by working in that direction. This volume is of special interest and importance to collectors of military long arms, as it covers: “Martial Long Arms: Flintlock Through Rimfire. Two centuries of military small arms and their ammunition from Flintlock Musket, ca. 1700, through the Percussion Smoothbore and rifle, Tube Prime and Pinfire Arms, the Percussion Breech-Loader, and finally the Rimfire. Over 380 photographs of the firearms and cartridges. Dimensions tables in inch and metric. Used very good to fine condition. An important reference which is out of print. $65.00 (View Picture)

19087 TWO .45-55-405 TRAPDOOR CARBINE CARTRIDGE BOX LABELS - These are original boxes which have been broken down and consist of the label and the front and top of the box. These could be trimmed up and would be a nice addition to a Trapdoor carbine display, or you could scan them in and start making replica boxes by cutting blocks of wood to the correct size and then covering them with a newly printed label glued on. One dated 1886 other 1889. BOTH for only $25.00 (View Picture)

10583 U.S. MILITARY .30 CALIBER GALLERY PRACTICE MOLD DATED 1899 - for casting five .30 caliber round balls. Heavy brass construction with blued steel sprue cutter plate. Bottom of mold marked "Frankford Arsenal, 1899, Cal.. 30, C.L’H.R." Some blue remains on the sprue cutter, and much original varnish on the wooden handles. The mating surfaces of the mold look okay around the cavities, but have lots of dings near the edge, but the reason is a mystery to me. I think it would still work just fine and it displays nicely. These were issued with the Krags for loading ammunition for gallery practice at the unit level, before they decided to go with .22 caliber rifles instead. Only the second on of these we have had, and you seldom see early dates like 1899. $175.00 (View Picture)

21518 SCARCE WW2 U.S. NAVY 37MM SIGNAL CARTRIDGES, TWO-STAR, (WITH TRACER), MARK IV - Used for identification by aircraft or signaling, and usually fired from the AN-M8 Pyrotechnic (flare) pistol. This signal is similar in appearance and functioning to the Signals, Aircraft, AN-M53 to AN-M58 series. The color of the stars is indicated on the cartridge case by two wide bands near the paper end of the case ; a narrow band indicates the color of the tracer. The names of the colors of the stars and the tracer are printed on the paper closing wad. Information for identifying the signal cartridge is printed on the cartridge case. After the primer is hit by the firing pin, igniting the propelling charge, the inner container is propelled from the barrel of the projector, and the tracer is ignited by the propelling charge. The tracer becomes visible after traveling about 20 feet, and burns for about four seconds, then ignites the bursting charge and the two stars within the inner container. In effect, upon leaving the barrel of the projector, the tracer appears as a single star and rises to a height of about 250 feet when fired from the ground ; at this point, the star separates into two stars, which fall separately. The tracer and stars can be seen about five miles at night, and about two or three miles in daylight. These were made in six different variations: (1) Red-red with red tracer; (2) Green-green with red tracer; (3) Red-red with green tracer; (4) Red-yellow with yellow tracer; (5) Red-green with red tracer; and (6) Red-green with green tracer. All of these are pretty scarce, and I was totally unfamiliar with them until we recently found an old stash of them. This is the green tracer with red and green stars, made in April 1944 by International Flare and Signal Division of Kilgore. (Sorry, no other color variations available.) Perfect condition, fresh from a sealed box, live, ready to signal your distress. We have a sealed box of ten rounds for $250.00, or buy a loose single round for $35.00 (View Picture)

18585 SCARCE M7 GRENADE LAUNCHING AUXILIARY CARTRIDGES FA 11 - These are scarce just a loose individual cartridges, but even though I have collected grenade launcher related items for many years, this was the first time I found any of these packed in a sealed five round packet. These were made from partially formed .45 caliber cartridge cases, and loaded with a powder charge and a red sealing wad. There are no markings at all on the individual cartridges and some people have no idea what they are if they see one loose. In use, one of these could be inserted into the muzzle of the grenade launcher before placing the rifle grenade on it. When the main grenade launching cartridge was fired, the hot gases would ignite the powder in the auxiliary cartridge and give it extra “oompf” for longer ranges. (Listed on the range table sheets packed with the grenade launcher sights). One sealed packet as shown in the photo, probably circa 1944. $95.00 (View Picture)

17470 20 CARTRIDGES, PISTOL BALL, CALIBER .45 M1911 AMMUNITION LOT - FA 677, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box. Headstamp probably FA 37 or FA 38. This is what was issued during the early days of WW2, not the more familiar 50 round boxes which did not appear until later in the war. Nice clean box which was shrink wrapped in plastic after the photos were taken to better protection and use in a display. $25.00 (View Picture)

13551 20 CARTRIDGES, SHOT, CALIBER. 45 M15 - for use in huting small game effective range 25 feet. Full box of natural brown color with black printing, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. These were issued for use as a survival load, not for combat, and carried in the survival vests worn by air crews. Headstamp is probably RA4. $22.00 (View Picture)

13550 PACKET OF 6 .30 CARBINE GRENADE LAUNCHING M6 - In addition to the standard 50 round cardboard boxes, sometimes these cartridges were packed in small cardboard packets of six rounds, and issued in a miniature “Spam can” with a pack of 10 rounds of the .30-06 caliber M3 grenade launching blanks, and sometimes with some of the M7 auxiliary cartridges. This is one of the six round packets packed in a lightweight folded box inside a waterproof kraft paper wrapper. These were used with the M8 grenade launcher. Several different selections were packedin the mini spam cans over a relatively short time, and the five round pack of carbine cartridges was by far the most common, making the six round pack like this fairly scarce. Fairly scarce stuff in this packing configuration. Headstamp unknown, but will include a loose round of this type of cartridge to show contents. $49.00 (View Picture)

13549 40 ROUND BOX OF PEDERSEN DEVICE AMMUNITION - “40- CAL..30 AUTO. PISTOL BALL CARTRIDGES Model of 1918” Full box of original ammo for the super secret "Pedersen Device" which was deceptively called a "pistol" to camouflage it's real nature. The cartridges are very similar to a lengthened .32 ACP, or the French 7.65mm Long used in some of the MAS/MAB pistols. Getting harder to find these. Headstamp is probably RA H 19. Intended for use in secret WW1 device to make M1903 Springfield a semi-auto weapon for cleaning out trenches. Most of us will never own a device, but here is a chance to at least own some of the ammo for this historic episode of U.S. military arms development. Nice clean bos, shrink wrapped in plastic for display with your WW1 collection. The 40 round box was used because the Pedersen Device magazines held 40 rounds. The boxes were packed in a “brick holding 15 boxes (600 rounds), three bricks to a bandoleer, but you never see the bricks or bandoleers for sale. $110.00 (View Picture)

13543 U.S. WW2 SEALED 5 ROUND PACKET OF CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE CAL..30 M6, FOR M1 CARBINE - The Caliber .30 Grenade Launching Cartridge M6 was used with the M8 grenade launcher. During WW2 it was usually packed in a small 5 round mini-boxes either heavily coated in wax, or sealed in a kraft-foil overwrapping. Several boxes would be included in a crate of rifle grenades, along with some .30-06 Grenade Launching Cartridges M3 for use in the M1903 or later M1 Garand rifles. This is a mint, unopened example of the 5 round kraft foil packet for the M1 carbine. Hard to find any more. Total of three available and lot numbers or markings may vary somewhat, but you will get one of the three packets shown. Price per packet of five rounds $40.00 (View Picture)

12242 SCARCE- 20 Caliber .45 Revolver Blank Cartridges, model of 1909 for Colt's Double Action - Revolver, Model of 1909. Smokeless powder, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box with clear May 1914 date stamp. The half moon section where you are supposed to press through the label to open the box has been broken but otherwise remains sealed. Label is a light blue gray color, the color used to indicate blank ammunition, but the box has be given a coat of clear varnish so the color is very muted. Blanks were used for training, especially getting horses accustomed to gunfire. A rare box for display with your M1909 revolver “and one of everything to go with it.” Hard to find in any condition, and I am not sure I have one in my collection either! Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $85.00 (View Picture)

12241 10 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 GRENADE LAUNCHING M3- FULL BOX - Full box that is still sealed, although the wax on the ends has been peeled off, and the label on the top of the box is missing a bit at one or both ends. All of this style pack we have seen had a headstamp FA 4 on the cartridges which would indicate loading at Frankford Arsenal in 1944. These special 10 round boxes were wax coated for better protection from exposure and only used a short time before switching to the mini spam can style packing. Great for display with any of the numerous grenade launchers used on M1903, M1917 or M1 Garand rifles. Have two boxes in basically the same condition, so one you get may not be the exact one in the photos. Grenade launching blanks have gotten very hard to find in the last few years. $55.00 (View Picture)

12239 2x5 RARE- 10 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 GRENADE LAUNCHING M3 - This is a very rare packet with two rows of five cartridges, and used in the mini spam cans. This packet has a wax style waterproofing instead of the kraft/foil paper usually seen. Content markings unknown, but probably FA 4headstamp. Nearly impossible to find loose. $75.00 (View Picture)

10882 DILLON 300 GRAIN LEAD BULLETS FOR .45-70 (BAG OF 250) - High quality factory product, lubed and sized, ready for loading. We just do not have time to reload ammo so might as well let someone else get some use out of them. Bag of 250 bullets $29.00 (View Picture)

2759 20 CALIBER .38 REVOLVER BLANK CARTRIDGES- SMOKELESS POWDER - Made by Frankford Arsenal and loaded June 12, 1905. An nice full box with the paper seal broken on one side to the top can be opened to view the contents, as shown in the photos. Label was originally pale blue, but faded and toned to almost same brown color as the box. Great to go with some of the Colt M1889-1903 Army or Navy revolvers. The Ball boxes are seen regularly, but this is only the second or third box of blanks we have had in over 20 years. $40.00 (View Picture)

20774 THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION- VOLUME 1 by George Hoyem - 230 pages 9” x 11” hardbound first edition. Signed by the author, and inscribed as copy number 50 of 500 to a prominent early cartridge collector. George A. Hoyem’s superb series on ammunition development systematically and thoroughly lays out the progression and varieties of ammunition, not just metallic cartridges, but also the early paper cartridges. While there are more detailed and specialized studies devoted to a single caliber (“.58s are the Greatest”), or narrow time period (Dean Thomas’ four volumes on Civil War ammunition “Roundball to Rimfire”) Hoyem’s work is the starting point to finding answers on just about any really unusual cartridge, and also these have a surprising amount of information on the related guns, so sometimes you can find the ammunition for a gun by working in that direction. This volume is of special interest and importance to collectors of military long arms, as it covers: “Martial Long Arms: Flintlock Through Rimfire. Two centuries of military small arms and their ammunition from Flintlock Musket, ca. 1700, through the Percussion Smoothbore and rifle, Tube Prime and Pinfire Arms, the Percussion Breech-Loader, and finally the Rimfire. Over 380 photographs of the firearms and cartridges. Dimensions tables in inch and metric. Used very good to fine condition. An important reference which is out of print. $65.00 (View Picture)

19087 TWO .45-55-405 TRAPDOOR CARBINE CARTRIDGE BOX LABELS - These are original boxes which have been broken down and consist of the label and the front and top of the box. These could be trimmed up and would be a nice addition to a Trapdoor carbine display, or you could scan them in and start making replica boxes by cutting blocks of wood to the correct size and then covering them with a newly printed label glued on. One dated 1886 other 1889. BOTH for only $25.00 (View Picture)

10583 U.S. MILITARY .30 CALIBER GALLERY PRACTICE MOLD DATED 1899 - for casting five .30 caliber round balls. Heavy brass construction with blued steel sprue cutter plate. Bottom of mold marked "Frankford Arsenal, 1899, Cal.. 30, C.L’H.R." Some blue remains on the sprue cutter, and much original varnish on the wooden handles. The mating surfaces of the mold look okay around the cavities, but have lots of dings near the edge, but the reason is a mystery to me. I think it would still work just fine and it displays nicely. These were issued with the Krags for loading ammunition for gallery practice at the unit level, before they decided to go with .22 caliber rifles instead. Only the second on of these we have had, and you seldom see early dates like 1899. $175.00 (View Picture)

18632 WINCHESTER AMMUNITION HANDBOOK- 1st EDITION 1950 - Overall about excellent condition except for a bit of wear on the top edge of the cover. Dated September 1950. $20.00 (View Picture)

17287 “10 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gage Paper, No. 6 Chilled Shot” Scarce Western Cartridge Company WW2 military contract “Hawk Load” - A scarce find for the military shotgun collector! Nice clean full original box. Most collectors are familiar with the 12 GA shells with 00 Buck issued for guard duty or combat, or the No. 7 ½, 8 or 9 shot issued for training of aerial gunners. A few other sizes were procured in much smaller quantities. Hackley Woodin & Scranton list the No. 6 as “Hawk load.” We found a box of this for our collection years ago, then found this box. One small puncture on the face of the box, but still displays great. Shrink wrapped in plastic. $55.00 (View Picture)

16002 Cartridge, Spotting, Rifle, 9mm SMAW Mark 217 Mod 0 (Original box with 18 rounds remaining) - This round is part of the Shoulder Mounted Assault Weapon (SMAW) an 83mm rocket family. The cartridge provides a tracer round that matches the trajectory of the rocket and is used to sight-in the rocket. The cartridge is a 9mm rifle cartridge with a High/Low system to have the cartridge arc more like the rocket path. The outer case is a 7.62 x 51mm NATO type case necked up to 9mm and instead of a primer and powder charge it has a smaller cartridge case (similar to the .22 hornet) with powder charge to provide a “high-low” effect which better imitates the rocket trajectory. For some more info and views of a sectioned cartridge see http://cartridgecollectors.org/cmo/cmo05oct.htm The SMAW rocket has a long and distinguished career with the USMC and was originally known as the Israeli B-300 and used by the British. One of the system's many nicknames is, "the bunker buster," and it does quite well against armor and other fortifications. The Army chose to use the single use SMAW-D for disposable, where the standard SMAW required a two-man team: a gunner with a round in the launcher and a second man to carry three extra rockets. This box has 18 original rounds remaining. $30.00 (View Picture)

20774 THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION- VOLUME 1 by George Hoyem - 230 pages 9” x 11” hardbound first edition. Signed by the author, and inscribed as copy number 50 of 500 to a prominent early cartridge collector. George A. Hoyem’s superb series on ammunition development systematically and thoroughly lays out the progression and varieties of ammunition, not just metallic cartridges, but also the early paper cartridges. While there are more detailed and specialized studies devoted to a single caliber (“.58s are the Greatest”), or narrow time period (Dean Thomas’ four volumes on Civil War ammunition “Roundball to Rimfire”) Hoyem’s work is the starting point to finding answers on just about any really unusual cartridge, and also these have a surprising amount of information on the related guns, so sometimes you can find the ammunition for a gun by working in that direction. This volume is of special interest and importance to collectors of military long arms, as it covers: “Martial Long Arms: Flintlock Through Rimfire. Two centuries of military small arms and their ammunition fom Flintlock Musket, ca. 1700, through the Percussion Smoothbore and rifle, Tube Prime and Pinfire Arms, the Percussion Breech-Loader, and finally the Rimfire. Over 380 photographs of the firearms and cartridges. Dimensions tables in inch and metric. Used very good to fine condition. An important reference which is out of print. $65.00 (View Picture)

14840 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 TRACER M25 (SL 53 - Adopted near the end of WW2, these were the standard tracer used in .30-06 caliber rifles and machine guns until the end of their service. This is a nice clean fresh box, taken from a sealed “spam can..” Made at the Saint Louis Ordnance Plant in 1953, these have non-corrosive primers. Nice clean rounds in sealed boxes, with the tips NOT sticking through. Will seal in plastic shrink wrap for display at no extra charge if requested. Hard to find. $45.00 (View Picture)

23319 TWO BOXES .30 CARBINE AMMUNITION - This was made in the Dominican Republic in 1960 with headstamp 30 M1 60. They make fine cigars in the Dominican Republic, but they make really crappy ammunition. THIS AMMUNITION IS UNSAFE TO SHOOT!!! Sold as collector items only, for the obsessive Carbine collector who has to have “one of everything.” This looks like regular .30 carbine ball M1, and the box is printed on the top “50 CARTUCHOS 30 M1” but reliable reports indicate that the actual loading varies from little or no powder to dangerous overloads which have destroyed guns. SO NOT ATTEMPT TO SHOOT THIS STUFF. Two boxes, nice looking, but one is missing one round, so total of 99 rounds. Label has been placed on bottom of box warning that it is dangerous and not to shoot, slightly degrading the collector value, but possibly saving your life! Two boxes, total 99 rounds for display only $25.00 (View Picture)

22678 Lot of 41 rounds military 7.62 NATO (.308) blanks in M13 links for M60 machine gun - What you see is what you get, live unfired rounds, fine to excellent condition, already linked. Great for a Vietnam era collection or display. Headstamp is LC 76. All 41 rounds with links for $25.00 (View Picture)

21271 LOT OF SIX ROUNDS .577-450 AMMUNITION (RELOADS) - What you see is what you get. Kynoch cases with paper patched lead bullets. Load data unknown, so use at your own risk and we disclaim all liability if you decide to shoot them. Fine for display with a rifle in this caliber. All six rounds for $29.00 (View Picture)

20655 10 SHELLS, SHOTGUN, PAPER, 12 GAGE NO. 6 CHILLED SHOT, - LOT WCC [ink stamped] 6150. Black printing on natural kraft color box. A scarce find for the military shotgun collector! Most collectors are familiar with the 12 GA shells with 00 Buck issued for guard duty or combat, or the No. 7 ½, 8 or 9 shot issued for training of aerial gunners. A few other sizes were procured in much smaller quantities. Hackley Woodin & Scranton list the No. 6 as “Hawk load” and there is also a nearly unknown No. 4 load (listed elsewhere in our catalog). Hawks were a serious threat to the Army’s still active use of trained pigeons to carry messages during WW2. We found a box of this for our collection years ago, and recently found another. Never opened, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $65.00 (View Picture)

15379 RARE BANDOLEER CALIBER .30 BALL M1 (NATIONAL MATCH) AMMUNITION IN 5 ROUND STRIPPER CLIPS- FRANKFORD ARSENAL 1932 - Very nice clean bandoleer that is missing one clip of 5 rounds, but will still be great for display with a 1930s National Match rifle. No lot card, or I would definitely keep it for myself. Headstamp FA 32 NM. $135.00 (View Picture)

14223 10 LINK, BELT, METALLIC, CAL .50 M9 for .50 caliber Browning Machine Gun - Full mint box of 10 links for the Browning .50 caliber machine guns. These were used with the .50 BMGs mounted in aircraft, vehicles and on tripod mounts by the infantry. New old stock, fresh from a sealed crate. SPECIAL- 10 boxes total 100 links for $40.00, or a single box of 10 links for only $5.00 (View Picture)

18733 .50-70 FRANKFORD ARSENAL- EARLY INSIDE PRIMED CARTRIDGE - Made circa 1865-1877. What you see is what you get. This is a desirable early cartridge, using the “internal primer” which is inserted into the inside of the case with a dab of priming compound in the center of a bar across the base of the case with a crimp on each side to keep it in position. These worked just like modern centerfire primers- the firing pin strikes the metal at the back of the primer (which happens to be part of the case instead of s separate primer inserted into the rear of the case) and the pressure against the primer compound which is blocked by the bar (instead of an anvil) ignites the powder charge. These inside primers were used from the earliest days of the .50-70 and .45-70 cartridges up until about 1882. I only found five of these, and all have some corrosion on the copper case, but still have a “good side” for display. Price for ONE original Frankford Arsenal .50-70-450 loaded cartridge- $25.00 (View Picture)

18053 .45-70-405 INSIDE PRIMED CARTRIDGE R 4 80 F - What you see is what you get. This is a desirable early cartridge, using the “internal primer” which is inserted into the inside of the case with a dab of priming compound in the center of a bar across the base of the case with a crimp on each side to keep it in position. These worked just like modern centerfire primers- the firing pin strikes the metal at the back of the primer (which happens to be part of the case instead of s separate primer inserted into the rear of the case) and the pressure against the primer compound which is blocked by the bar (instead of an anvil) ignites the powder charge. These inside primers were used from the earliest days of the .50-70 and .45-70 cartridges up until about 1882. Initially, both the .45-70-405 (caliber-powder weight-bullet weight) rifle cartridge and .45-55-405 carbine cartridge were only identified by the markings on the cardboard box they were shipped in. However, in March of 1877 they added four part headstamps so that they could be distinguished form each other. This included a R or C for rifle or carbine, the month and year of manufacture, and the maker (F for Frankford Arsenal). In 1886 a longer 500 grain bullet was adopted for rifle use, making the rifle cartridge visibly longer than the carbine cartridge, so that the R or C identifier was dropped, leaving a three part headstamp with the maker, month and year. This cartridge was made by Frankford arsenal in April 1880 for use in rifles with the 70 grain powder charge and the 405 grain bullet common to both rifle and carbine at the time. Nice clean example. Have several of these and headstamps are a bit light on some but will ship the best ones first. Price for one round R 4 80 F cartridge $15.00 (View Picture)

22872 UNUSUAL MILITARY REPACKED BOX OF 20 ROUNDS .45 ACP - Oddball arsenal repack with typical 20 round box sealed with brown paper tape with stenciled markings: 20/ CTGS PISTOL BALL/ 45 LOT WCC with hand written 6041. This is the first of this type of pack I have seen in all my years. Perfect for the collector who has one of everything except this… $30.00 (View Picture)

22869 BANDOLEER OF 48 ROUNDS .30 BALL M2 LC 72 - The most recent dated bandoleer of U.S. Military .30-06 ammunition I recall ever seeing. This is Lake City 1972 in 8 round Garand clips, in pristine condition. $48.00 (View Picture)

12310 SCARCE- 20 Caliber .45 Revolver Blank Cartridges, model of 1909 for Colt's Double Action - Revolver, Model of 1909. Smokeless powder, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box with clear May 1914 date stamp. The half moon section where you are supposed to press through the label to open the box has been broken but otherwise remains sealed. Label is a light blue gray color, the colr used to indicate blank ammunition. Blanks were used for training, especially getting horses accustomed to gunfire. A nice clean box for display with your M1909 revolver “and one of everything to go with it.” Hard to find in any condition, and I am not sure I have one in my collection either! Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $95.00 (View Picture)

12270 20 CALIBER .38 REVOLVER BALL CARTRIDGES FOR COLT'S DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER - Made by Frankford Arsenal and loading date looks like April 1903. An nice full early box. Great to go with some of the Colt M1889-1903 Army or Navy revolvers. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $55.00 (View Picture)

11947 20 CALIBER .38 REVOLVER BALL CARTRIDGES FOR COLT'S DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER - Made by Frankford Arsenal and loaded June 17, 1911. An extra nice full sealed box. Great to go with some of the Colt M1889-1903 Army or Navy revolvers. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $55.00 (View Picture)

5748 20 WINCHESTER .303 BALL CARTRIDGES, RED LABEL, SYNCHRONIZED GUNS, RAF- 1941 DATED - Scarce “Battle of Britain” lend lease ammunition made in July 1941 during England’s darkest hours when heroic British pilots in their fighters armed largely with .303 caliber machine guns were able to keep the Luftwaffe at bay. This is an opened box, but full with the original contents. Headstamp W.R.A. 1941 .303. We have had several of the .30-06 caliber boxes made for RAF use, but this is the first of the .303 caliber boxes we have ever had. $65.00 (View Picture)

22404 .22 Box Collection “Brick cartons”- lot of 10 different vintage empty cartons - See photo for details of the boxes included. These are EMPTY cartons which held ten 50 round boxes. Most in excellent condition, but you can see more in the photos. Probalby circa 1960s-1980s. These will be shipped folded flat so FREE SHIPPING on these. Only one set available. $25.00 (View Picture)

22062 U.S. Military Rifle Dummy Cartridge Set - One of each: .30-06 Dummy Model 1906 (fluted case); .30-06 Dummy M2 (holes in case); .30 Carbine Dummy M13 (no primer); 7.62mm Dummy M63 (fluted case); 5.56mm Dummy XM199 (fluted case); .50 Browning Machine Gun, Dummy M2 (holes in case) $12.00 (View Picture)

21068 20 Cartridges NATO 7.62mm, Dummy M63- (box is messed up but ammo perfect) - Full sealed box Lot LC12009, with headstamp + LC 60. Brass cased cartridges with fluted sides and undrilled flash hole, made for training and armorer function testing use. Cartridges are perfect, but the box is either opened, or has old tape on the box so it is not much for display, and priced lower than a nice display box. $25.00 (View Picture)

15876 20 Cartridges, Dummy, Caliber .30 M1906 for use in rifles - Ammunition lot FA S-130 Frankford Arsenal. These are probably the steel case dummies headtamped FA 4, but without opening the box cannot be sure. Hard to find these any more in the boxes. Full sealed box, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $45.00 (View Picture)

15438 WW2 U.S. MILITARY .38 SPECIAL TRACER AMMUNITION - Nice clean full box with a bit of dirt along one edge. This was issued to pilots for signal purposes. These have red painted tips on the full metal jacket bullets for identification, loaded on cases headstamped REM-UMC .38 SPL. I have only seen about 6 boxes of this stuff over the years and four of them were incredibly ratty, and only partially full. Perfect for display with your Victory Model revolver. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $149.00 (View Picture)

14725 20 Cartridges, Ball, Caliber .30 M2 by WINCHESTER during WW2 - Lot W.R.A. 23019. Full sealed box, probably WRA 45 headstamp, but since it is not open, we are not 100% sure. WW2 Winchester ammo is pretty hard to find, so we were glad to get this for you, even though the label has numerous discolored spots. Great for display with a Winchester made M1 Garand (even though the Army made no effort to match ammo makers with the maker of any particular weapons). Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $49.00 (View Picture)

14047 SCARCE BOX OF EARLY 7.62 x 51mm NATO- LOT LC 12019 - Full box with the seal mostly intact, but partially torn on one end. The M59 was the original 7.62MM NATO Ball cartridge only used for the first year or so of the M14 rifle service life. It had a mild steel-core bullet. It was replaced in 1959 with the M80 Ball cartridge, not because it was more expensive but because there was no need for two steel cored bullets. The M61 AP was good enough for any armored targets and could be used against personnel as well, if necessary. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $55.00 (View Picture)

13630 “20 WESTERN .308 WINCHESTER MATCH - 197 Gr. O.P.E. Boattail hand loaded cartridges, “ with Winchester-Western info on the front. Back of box (not shown in the photos, reads: “Loaded with smokeless powder, O.P.E. boattail bullets,and special non-corrosive primers for finest match accuracy. Adapted to Winchester Model 70, and other arms chambered for this cartridge.” Headstamp is WCC 60. These are military contract match loads for the elite military teams. Nice full box which has been shrink wrapped for display. $35.00 (View Picture)

13553 20 Cartridges, Ball, Caliber .30 M1 by Frankford Arsenal, in 5 round stripper clips - Lot F.A. 1782. Full sealed box, probably FA 34 or FA 35 headstamp, but since it is not open, we are not 100% sure. Although not mentioned on the label, this is packed in 5 round stripper clips, which could be used with the M1903 or M1917 rifle or for the M1918 BAR, and the M1 Garand had not yet been adopted. Nice bright colors and a top condition box, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $45.00 (View Picture)

13469 RARE- 1957 LAKE CITY .30-06 T291 MATCH AMMUNITION- CLIP OF 8 ROUNDS - The first post- WW2 match ammunition was loaded in 1957, with most work done at Frankford Arsenal, which has a FA headstamp. However, a small quantity was also loaded at Lake City Ammunition Plant with a MATCH LC 57 headstamp. Most of that was then shipped packed in 8 round clips for the M1 Garand, “bulk packed” in .30 caliber ammo cans, not packed in cartons. Lake City did not make any more match ammo until 1961, so this is a real oddity. This is one original clip of MATCH LC 57 ammunition in its original clip and cardboard sleeve. This one of a handful from the estate of a career Army ordnance officer involved with small arms ammunition. Great for the .30-06 cartridge collector or someone who likes to collect 1950s-60 match rifles and accessories. $20.00 (View Picture)

19054 .22 LR Box Collection- Lot of 10 different vintage full boxes .22 Long Rifle ammunition - See the photo for details of the boxes included. All have the original contents with bright and clean boxes, not scuffed or price marked or anything. A great start for someone who wants to get into .22 Box collecting, or have a colorful assortment to display with one or more guns in .22 Long Rifle caliber. Dates are mostly circa 1960s-1980s, I think. The lot of 10 boxes for $55.00 (View Picture)

20043 RARE EARLY BOX 9mm LARGO AMMUNITION FOR BERGMAN BAYARD PISTOL - 9mm Largo (also known as 9 x 23mm) was used in a number of different European pistols over the years, but this box is a nice early two piece box specifically noting that it is for the Bayard ArmeePistole. Made by Rheinishche Metallwaaren und Maschinenfabrik, in Sommerda. One corner on the upper part of the box has broken, otherwise solid, with label as shown. Contains 37 rounds of ammunition which are believed to be correct and original to the box. Rare item for display with that Bayard pistol you might have! $95.00 (View Picture)

18964 50 DUMMY CARTRIDGES, CARBINE CAL. .30 M13 BY WINCHESTER (Empty Box)- Nice clean box, carefully opened to remove contents, then sealed in plastic for display. Great for a carbine display. Getting very hard to find, especially this eye catching version with red and black label and WINCHESTER logo. $25.00 (View Picture)

22622 50 CARTRIDGES DUMMY, CALIBER .45 M1921 - Lot F.A. S-13. Headstamp FA 56 on steel case with no primer, no flash hole, no holes in side of case. Bullets are nickel color. Nice clean full box, suitable for display with any pistol or SMG that fires the .45 ACP cartridge. Or slip a round in you shooting ammo for use as a “range dummy” to require immediate action for a simulated malfunction. Totally INERT, not live ammunition. Will shrink wrap in plastic for display if requested. $35.00 (View Picture)

21822 Dummy Cartridge, 7.62mm, M172, linked for M60 or M240 Machine Guns - Lot of 50 cartridges in M13 links, suitable for use in either the M60 or M240 machine guns. These are purpose made dummy cartridges with blind primer pockets. Headstamp LC 89 and blackened overall. Mint unissued, not the usual scraped and scratched and dented used examples. DODIC code A159. This is a belt of 50 cartridges, what you see is what you get. $75.00 (View Picture)

21736 BOX OF 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .45 BALL M1911- WCC 1941 - Exceptionally nice, full sealed box of pre-WW2 ammo for the M1911 pistol. Headstamp is WCC 41, based on other open boxes from the same lot we saw. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display with that minty WW2 M1911 pistol. $25.00 (View Picture)

20435 WW2 BRITISH (CANADIAN) 9MM LUGER AMMUNITION- BOX OF 64 ROUNDS - WW2 production for use in the 9mm Hi Power pistols and various submachine guns. This has headstamp DI 43 9mm indicating manufacture by Defence Industries Ltd., Canadian Industries Ltd, Park Avenue Plant, Montreal, Canada, in 1943. Nice bright, clean ammunition, but CORROSIVE PRIMED as was nearly all WW2 miliary ammunition. Sold as collector item only, but if you shoot any of it (at your own risk), be sure to immediately clean the gun, and clean it again the next day to mitigate the harmful effects of the corrosive primers. This is packed in 64 round boxes (enough to fill two STEN magazines). The cartons have been rubber stamped with the information shown sometime after being imported by the surplus dealer Golden State Arms, probably in the 1970s. One box of 64 rounds for $35.00 (View Picture)

18546 20 Cal. 30 Guard Cartridges Model of 1906 (1918 dated empty box) - Nice clean box that was carefully opened and the contents removed. Box has been wrapped in plastic for display. Loading date November 13, 1918 stamped on top of the box. Empty box only. $18.00 (View Picture)

17934 50 WINCHESTER DUMMY CARTRIDGES CARBINE CAL..30 M1 - Full sealed box.Black and red printed label. Will shrink wrap in plastic for display at no extra charge if requested. $125.00 (View Picture)

17168 .577-450 MARTINI-HENRY AMMUNITION- 20 ROUNDS - These are reloads done by an individual who had a very nice Martini-Henry and was meticulous about his record keeping which suggests that he was equally precise when loading. However, since we did not load these ourselves, we are selling as components only and if you decide to fire them you do so at your own risk. His notes indicate the load is: Jamison cases, 85 grains of Pyrodex RS powder with 20 grains of cotton filler, .06 fiber wad and OxYoke wad dipped in 50% beeswax/50% Thompson Center natural lube and a 480 grain .460 diameter hollow base bullet. Lot of 20 rounds for $125.00 (View Picture)

14437 .577-450 MARTINI-HENRY AMMUNITION- 10 ROUNDS KYNOCH FACTORY LOADED - Probably circa late 1940s or early 1950s, a lot of this surfaced on the surplus market a few years ago. It looks good, but reportedly was stored in a way that it is not totally reliable, and some people report a lot of “click-boom” hangfires while others report few problems. Sold as components only, use at your own risk. Or, wrap the box up for display with your .577-450 caliber rifle. This is a smokeless powder load with 480 grain paper patched lead bullet, specifically for use in Martini Henry rifles. Full original box of 10 rounds Kynoch factor loaded ammo for $95.00 (View Picture)

9183 .577-450 MARTINI-HENRY NEW UNPRIMED BRASS CASES- LOT OF 20 - Made by Jamison as .577-450 cases, not some sort of improvised modification of cases of some other caliber. Jamison went out of business and as far as I know, there is no current supplier of brass or loaded ammunition, so get this while you can. One, and only one, lot of 20 new unfired unprimed cases. $95.00 (View Picture)

23330 .50 CALIBER BROWNING MACHINE GUN “MA DEUCE” DUMMY CARTRIDGE - Mint unissued with LC 87 headstamp indicating manufacture at Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in 1987. These are totally inert with holes in the case and an empty primer pocket with no flash hole for visual identification. The .50 BMG was adopted in 1921 by the U.S. military and since then has been used continuously as the heavy machine gun in aircraft, on naval vessels, in armored vehicles and on tripods for ground use. Also known as the 12.7 x 99mm cartridges in the many other countries where John M. Browning’s invention is also used. Price for one unissued cartridge $5.00 (View Picture)

23259 FULL SEALED BOX 20 ROUNDS .30-40 KRAG BLANKS - 20 Cartridges Blank Caliber .30 (1898) M3 Ammunition lot RA [ink stamped 60 37]. Full box, sealed, with light blue strip on the label. These are 1930s or WW2 era production, probably intended for use in military funerals by veterans groups. Nice clean sealed box $20.00 (View Picture)

23184 WW2 U.S. NAVY "20 Caliber .45 Blank Cartridges for Line Throwing - Gun/ Contract No. W-849-ORD-2901, Western Cartridge Co. Lot 6287" in black on front of white box. Box also has ink stamped date 3-29-44. Headstamp "WCC 45-70 MK1 1944" Nice clean full box, great for display with one of the several types of .45-70 line throwing guns used by the U.S. Navy. $49.00 (View Picture)

23306 ORIGINAL WW2 BANDOLEER 48 ROUNDS .30-06 ARMOR PIERCING M2 IN 8 ROUND CLIPS FOR M1 GARAND RIFLES! - Nice clean full bandoleer with original contents. Ammo was made by Frankford Arsenal in 1943 (FA 43 headstamp) and is packed in 8 round clips. This is one of the earliest lots with the info stenciled on the bandoleer instead of a lot card, a change made sometime circa 1943. Exceptionally nice clear markings and ammo in nice clean bandoleers, taken from a recently acquired full crate of WW2 ammo. The standard ammo issued for combat was Armor Piercing, while Ball was mainly used for training, and we find probably 10 bandoleers with Ball for every one we find that has AP. (Some silly state laws prohibit shipment to some states. If you live in one of them, we cannot sell to you until you move away top a free state!) $110.00 (View Picture)

23257 LOT OF 105 ROUNDS MILITARY .30-40 KRAG BLANKS- CHEAP! - These are regulation M3 blanks made by Remington under military contract in 1930's, mainly for ceremonial use, including veterans groups. These have a cannelure with a cardboard wad secured bu a roll crimp, basically the Model 1909 style blank but made using Krag cases. $50.00 (View Picture)

23155 20 CARTRIDGES, PISTOL BALL, CALIBER .45 M1911 AMMUNITION LOT - FA 395, Frankford Arsenal. Full sealed box. Headstamp probably FA 29. This is what was issued during the early days of WW2, not the more familiar 50 round boxes which did not appear until later in the war. Excellent bright clean box, FA 29 very lightly penciled on bottom for ID. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display after the photos were done, and looks even nicer now. $25.00 (View Picture)

23153 BOX OF 10 ROUNDS 9MM MAUSER RIFLE AMMUNITION (9 X 57MM) BY KYNOCH - Made by Kynoch, probably in the early 1960s as this has an ink stamped "child safety" warning added. Ammo in good condition in original packing and has 245 grain soft point bullets. Sold as collector ammunition only, but we don't know of anything that would make it unsafe to use. Nice for display with a hunting rifle in the somewhat scarce German 9 x 57mm caliber. $25.00 (View Picture)

23151 LOT OF SEVEN ROUNDS OF 8MM NAMBU WW2 JAP MILITARY AMMUNITION - Lot of seven loose rounds of 8 x22mm rimless ammunition for the Nambu semi auto pistols. Genuine original WW2 Japanese military issue with typical cases having no headstamps. Some corrosion on the cases as shown in the photos. The lot for $25.00 (View Picture)

23012 WW2 .50 BROWNING MACHINE GUN DUMMY CARTRIDGES- LOT OF 5 - Original WW2 manufacture military dummy cartridge for the .50 caliber Browning Machine Gun which was used in most combat aircraft, tanks, and as an infantry weapon, and even on many ships and small craft. Made at Frankford Arsenal specifically as dummy ammunition with the primer pocket never drilled, and holes drilled in the side of the case for identification. These used steel cases with a zinc based anti-corrosion coating. Used excellent, but some may have some stain or corrosion spots. Lot of five loose rounds. $10.00 (View Picture)

22938 BULLET MOLD-LEE SINGLE CAVITY .457 ROUND BALL - Not exactly sure what takes the .457 diameter round ball, but I am told that this is what the Ruger .44 caliber “New Army” uses, and they can also be used in the .45-70 trapdoors. In any case, this is a gently used Lee single cavity mold. $18.00 (View Picture)

22879 .30 CARBINE TRACER M27 AMMUNITION- STRIPPER CLIIP OF 10 ROUNDS - Headstamped LC 52, this is genuine U.S. military tracer ammunition for the M1 Carbine. Full stripper clip of 10 rounds as shown in the photos. Cannot be shipped to states that restrict possession of tracer ammunition, or place run by idiots who require special licenses for buyers or sellers. $20.00 (View Picture)

22868 "20 Cartridges AK 47 Rifle Ammo, 7.62x39mm - Lot 1-43" printed in black on face of brown cardboard box. Rounds are "sterile" (no headstamp) and reportedly loaded at Lake City circa 1970 for (a) CIA use in clandestine operations, or (b) foreign military assistance to Cambodia or another country near Vietnam but as no one specified what headstamp to use it was made without any. Full sealed box. $30.00 (View Picture)

17283 20 CARTRIDGES 5.56MM DUMMY XM199 - Lot LC-12003 with headstamp LC 69. Nice clean full sealed box. Nice for a Vietnam era display. Will shrink wrap in plastic at no extra charge if requested. $12.00 (View Picture)

22811 10 CTGS, 12 GAGE/ SHOTGUN PLASTIC CASE/ NO. 00 BUCKSHOT XM162 - Lot WCC 51-4, Olin Corp. printed on the brown kraft/foil overwrap. Kraft overwrap is sated 1977, so these are slightly post-Vietnam era. Nice clean, full sealed box of the ammunition used in trench and riot guns during Vietnam and until the present. $49.00 (View Picture)

22714 .50 BMG DUMMY CARTRIDGE FA 41 - Early date cartridge which was arsenal reloaded as a dummy. $6.00 (View Picture)

22649 WW1 U.S. ARMY .30-40 KRAG AMMUNITION BY REMINGTON- BOX OF 20 ROUNDS - Headstamp is RA 18 on these 220 grain FMJ Ball Cartridges for Rifle Model of 1898. Box is open and about 2/3 of the label remains. Interestingly, Remington must have had some surplus boxes from another order that they reused when packing these, as the lower part of the box has printed on the back “20 STK 8m/m PATRONER 1908/ REMINGTON-UMC 1917. Box is a bit tired, and like much Krag ammo, the necks are split, but a scarce item for the Krag enthusiast who needs one of everything. $29.00 (View Picture)

22396 VIETNAM ERA BANDOLEER OF 140 ROUNDS 5.56mm BALL M193 AMMUNITION (1968 dated) - Full original bandoleer with stripper clips and inserts. All original and correct. Headstamp is TW 68 indicating manufacture at Twin Cities Ordnance Plant in 1968. Bandoleer is really clean and sharp. Great Vietnam display item. $125.00 (View Picture)

22346 Scarce M7 Grenade Launching Auxiliary Cartridges FRANKFORD ARSENAL - These are scarce just a loose individual cartridges, but even though I have collected grenade launcher related items for many years, this was the first time I found any of these packed in a sealed five round packet. These were made from partially formed .45 caliber cartridge cases, and loaded with a powder charge and a red sealing wad. There are no markings at all on the individual cartridges and some people have no idea what they are if they see one loose. In use, one of these could be inserted into the muzzle of the grenade launcher before placing the rifle grenade on it. When the main grenade launching cartridge was fired, the hot gases would ignite the powder in the auxiliary cartridge and give it extra “oompf” for longer ranges. (Listed on the range table sheets packed with the grenade launcher sights). One sealed packet as shown in the photo, probably circa 1943-44. $95.00 (View Picture)

22347 SCARCE M7 GRENADE LAUNCHING AUXILIARY CARTRIDGES FA - These are scarce just a loose individual cartridges, but even though I have collected grenade launcher related items for many years, this was the first time I found any of these packed in a sealed five round packet. These were made from partially formed .45 caliber cartridge cases, and loaded with a powder charge and a red sealing wad. There are no markings at all on the individual cartridges and some people have no idea what they are if they see one loose. In use, one of these could be inserted into the muzzle of the grenade launcher before placing the rifle grenade on it. When the main grenade launching cartridge was fired, the hot gases would ignite the powder in the auxiliary cartridge and give it extra “oompf” for longer ranges. (Listed on the range table sheets packed with the grenade launcher sights). One sealed packet as shown in the photo, probably circa 1944. $95.00 (View Picture)

22158 Bandoleer 140 round 5.56mm (.223) Ball in stripper clips - At first I thought this was a nice original bandoleer of Vietnam era M16 ammunition, 5.56mm Ball M193. However, close inspection showed that the primer crimps have been removed and the cases reloaded. Probably commercially done on a production basis, not Bubba’s basement work. However, they are sold as reloads with unknown load data, and use them at your own risk if you decide to shoot them. Lot of 140 rounds in clips and bandoleer for $35.00 (View Picture)

21741 120 ROUND BANDOLEER .30 CARBINE, BALL, M1 IN STRIPPER CLIPS- WCC 52 - Nice clean full original bandoleer of U.S. G.I .30 carbine Ball M1 ammunition. Made by Western Cartridge Company in 1952. Bandoleer has excellent markings Lot number WCC 6729. Ammo is nice and clean and bright, in original stripper clips. $85.00 (View Picture)

21731 CIVIL WAR BURNSIDE CARBINE CARTRIDGE (REPLICA) - Exact replica loaded with 40 grains black powder and 380 grain lead bullet with a reusable turned brass case, so it is a live cartridge and must be treated as such. Nice for display without the risk of damaging a scarce and pricey original cartridge. $12.00 (View Picture)

21701 W- BOX OF 5 ROUNDS .450 NITRO EXPRESS 3 ¼” DANGEROUS GAME CARTRIDGES - Headstamp KYNOCH .450 this is the classic round introduced in 1898 by John Rigby for use in the finest English double rifle for the really BIG and DANGEROUS African game- elephants, tigers, rhinoceros, etc. These fire a 480 grain soft point bullet at about 2150 fps with a muzzle energy of 4,926 foot pounds. These rounds came from estate of an experienced African hunter. Impress your friends or fix your elephant problem with one of these babies! Price for box of five, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $60.00 (View Picture)

21667 .470 NITRO EXPRESS CARTRIDGE FOR ELEPHANTS AND OTHER DANGEROUS GAME - Headstamp KYNOCH .470 this is the classic round introduced about 1907 and used in the finest English double rifles for the really BIG and DANGEROUS African game- elephants, tigers, rhinos, etc. Have several and headstamp KYNOCH .470 or KYNOCH .470 NITRO will be supplied at our option, although we will try to provide a specific one if you prefer.  This is a LARGE cartridge, shown in the photo with a .30-06 for comparison.  This is the classic round introduced about 1907 and used in the finest English double rifles for the really BIG and DANGEROUS African game- elephants, tigers, rhinoceros, etc.  These fire a 500 grain full jacketed bullet at about 2150 fps with a muzzle energy of 5140 foot pounds. These rounds came from estate of an experienced African hunter, and show some minor tarnish or scratches from being handled and carried.  Impress your friends or fix your elephant problem with these babies!  One live round as shown in the photo- $15.00 (View Picture)

21598 U.S. WW2 SEALED 5 ROUND BOX OF CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE CAL..30 M6, FOR M1 CARBINE - The Caliber .30 Grenade Launching Cartridge M6 was used with the M8 grenade launcher. During WW2 it was usually packed in these small 5 round mini-boxes heavily coated in wax. Several boxes would be included in a crate of rifle grenades, along with some .30-06 Grenade Launching Cartridges M3 for use in the M1903 or later M1 Garand rifles. This is a mint, unopened example of the 5 round box for the M1 carbine, heavily coated in wax. Hard to find any more. $45.00 (View Picture)

21508 10- SCARCE WW2 U.S. NAVY 37MM SIGNAL CARTRIDGES, TWO-STAR, (WITH TRACER), MARK IV (SEALED BOX OF 10) - Used for identification by aircraft or signaling, and usually fired from the AN-M8 Pyrotechnic (flare) pistol. This signal is similar in appearance and functioning to the Signals, Aircraft, AN-M53 to AN-M58 series. The color of the stars is indicated on the cartridge case by two wide bands near the paper end of the case ; a narrow band indicates the color of the tracer. The names of the colors of the stars and the tracer are printed on the paper closing wad. Information for identifying the signal cartridge is printed on the cartridge case. After the primer is hit by the firing pin, igniting the propelling charge, the inner container is propelled from the barrel of the projector, and the tracer is ignited by the propelling charge. The tracer becomes visible after traveling about 20 feet, and burns for about four seconds, then ignites the bursting charge and the two stars within the inner container. In effect, upon leaving the barrel of the projector, the tracer appears as a single star and rises to a height of about 250 feet when fired from the ground ; at this point, the star separates into two stars, which fall separately. The tracer and stars can be seen about five miles at night, and about two or three miles in daylight. These were made in six different variations: (1) Red-red with red tracer; (2) Green-green with red tracer; (3) Red-red with green tracer; (4) Red-yellow with yellow tracer; (5) Red-green with red tracer; and (6) Red-green with green tracer. All of these are pretty scarce, and I was totally unfamiliar with them until we recently found an old stash of them. This is the green tracer with red and green stars, made in April 1944 by International Flare and Signal Division of Kilgore. (Sorry, no other color variations available.) Perfect condition, fresh from a sealed box, live, ready to signal your distress. We have a sealed box of ten rounds for $250.00 (View Picture)

20919 20 ROUND BOX OF .38-55 CARTRIDGES CIRCA 1890-1911 by UMC - Full box of 20 round of pretty nice condition .38-55-255 soft point jacketed bullet ammo. Box only mentions UMC, not Remington-UMC, so this was made before 1911, and probably no earlier than about 1890. Box has gotten damp and the cardboard strip on the bottom has come off, and the label is in the condition shown. Still okay for display, but not a great box. We will shrink wrap in plastic for display, with ammo inside, or will wrap the box only and ship the ammo loose so you can display both the box and the ammo- your choice. Unless requested otherwise, we will just ship the box unwrapped as shown. $35.00 (View Picture)

20916 - BANDOLEER WITH 60 ROUNDS .30-40 KRAG CARTRIDGES, FRANKFORD ARSENAL 1907 - One pocket is open and about 5 round missing. There is a hole in the bottom of that pocket, and a rim has poked through the cotton cloth on another, and this is overall a bit tired from poor storage and handling, at least compared to the minty ones we have had. But, that is reflected by the much lower price, and it still is a good enough display item, and being open you can actually see how the ammo was packed in these early bandoleers. $75.00 (View Picture)

20786 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 MATCH M72- LC 62 MATCH- FULL SEALED BOX - Until 1962, Frankford Arsenal had been the source of all post-WW2 .30-06 Match ammunition. However, in 1962 that task was transferred to Lake City Ordnance Plant which continues to the present. This is a pristine full sealed box of “20 cartridges Caliber .30 Match , M72, LOT 12151” in the handsome box with the white label and large eagle and red and blue markings. Headstamp should be LC 62 MATCH. The M72 Match ammo was prized by competitive shooters, and snipers in Vietnam like Carlos Hathcock preferred Match ammo whenever it could be obtained. Will shrink warp in plastic for display if requested. $30.00 (View Picture)

20852 SET OF THREE WW2 VINTAGE 10 GAUGE "VERY SIGNALS" FOR FLARE GUN - These were used in Navy (and other) flare guns chambered for the 10 gauge shells, starting around 1877 when LT. Edward Very invented his flare. The guns were originally made by the Washington Navy Yard, and by WW1 were being made by Remington with brass frames, blued steel barrels and walnut grips. By WW2 the design was much simplified and the Mark V signal pistol made by Sedgley became the most commonly used gun. The flares (officially called “signals”) were made in red, white and green versions, by about six or eight different manufacturers, using essentially the commercial 10 gauge shotshell with varying heights of brass bases and various headstamps. These usually were secured on the end with a roll crimp. The closing wad was colored to indicate the color of the flare, and usually (but not always) the cardboard body was the same color. These also had a “tactile” identification feature so they could be selected in the dark by touch. Green closing wads were smooth; red had several ridges, and the white had a bump or tit in the center of the wad. This is a set of one of each- red, white and green. Photo shows a sample set, but headstamps and other details may vary depending on what we find to make these sets up. The lot of three for $25.00 (View Picture)

20543 20 CARTRIDGES, BALL FRANGIBLE, CALIBER .30 M22 (Super nice!) - Lot TW 18001 with 45 TW headstamp- full sealed box. Frangible ammo used a bullet made of compressed bakelite and lead dust which would break up on impact with sheet metal of aircraft or vehicles, and could be used for practice against moving targets. I believe these are listed as an authorized item for use with rifles such as the M1903 and M1, but in practice they were mainly used in machine guns. Bullets have green and white tips. This is the nicest box we have had in years. Nice sharp label, clean box with no damage from bullet tips, and sharp edges. Will shrink wrap in plastic at no extra charge, but it may slow down delivery for a day or two until we have time to wrap it. $49.00 (View Picture)

20540 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 TRACER M1- WW2 ISSUE- NICE! - Nice clean, full sealed box of 20 rounds made at St. Louis. Headstamp SL42. Box has been sealed in plastic for display. Almost i mpossible to find these anymore. $95.00 (View Picture)

20458 20 CARTRIDGES, BALL, CALIBER .30 M2 BY WINCHESTER - Full sealed box. Headstamp is WRA 45, made I 1945. Winchester made ammo seems to be far less common than that from other WW2 contracts. Nice for display to show a box from each of the makers, or for display with a Winchester made Garand or Carbine. $35.00 (View Picture)

20278 U.S. military flare- "Signal, Distress, 1 inch, Single Star, Red, M73" dated 1945 - Among the many different flare guns used by the U.S. military in WW2, most were 37mm, some were 12 Gage, and some were 1 inch. We have had a number of 37mm and 12 GA flares over the years, but this is the first time we have had any of the 1 inch flares. These are red stars, and have a 1945 date. Sold as collector item only, not warranted as safe to fire. One flare for $10.00 (View Picture)

19702 FULL BOX 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 INCENDIARY M1 - Lot DEN 14449 headstamped DEN 42. Box is in good shape. The top has been opened, but if shrink wrapped this will display about the same as a sealed box. Some minor dirt and staining on the box, but overall pretty nice. Bullet tips are NOT poking through the bottom as is so often the case. It has been sealed in plastic for display. Hard stuff to find any more. $95.00 (View Picture)

20097 BUTTWEILER PRICES REALIZED 1985 AUCTIONS FOR COLLECTOR CARTRIDGES - Prices ’85- The results of collectors ammunition auctions for 1985, Robert T. Buttweiler auctions. Small booklet, with valuable info for cartridge collectors. Excellent condition. $5.00 (View Picture)

19989 20 CARTRIDGES ARMOR PIERCING, M2 LOT SL 7385 (SL 43 HEADSTAMP) (GRADE 3) - Grade 3 box- full box but the seal has been broken. Nice bright colors but label and/orpther parts of the box will be dirty. Tips of bullets may be poking through the bottom but not badly enough to be in danger of falling out, but more so than the grade 2 boxes. Great to fill clips to refill a bandoleer or cartridge belt. Okay for display is you want to show and open box, or will display almost the same as a sealed box if we shrink wrap in plastic at no extra charge. (Please request this at time of purchase). $29.00 (View Picture)

19959 20 CARTRIDGES ARMOR PIERCING, M2 LOT SL 7385 (SL 43 HEADSTAMP) - Grade I box- full and still sealed, nice bright colors and face of label is clean although there may be some dirt smudges on teh backs or side or top of the box. Tips of bullets not poking through the bottom. Great for display. Will shrink wrap in plastic at no extra charge if requested. $45.00 (View Picture)

19940 U.S. 37MM FLARE GUN FLARE AN-M44A2 (SINGLE STAR- YELLOW) - Officially the “Signal, illumination, aircraft, single star (yellow) M44A2: these are the flares used in the 37mm Flare guns such as the AN-M8 type and several others. The flares were made in several styles- single star, multiple starts, and colors (white, yellow, red or green) for different signal purposes. This is a LIVE pyrotechnic round, not explosive, but is hazardous if fired over dry brush. 10-1965 dates, so it is Vietnam era, but other than the date, it is identical to the same item issued during WW2. One round, live. $49.00 (View Picture)

19920 U.S. 37MM FLARE GUN FLARE AN-M44A2 (SINGLE STAR- YELLOW) - Officially the “Signal, illumination, aircraft, single star (yellow) M44A2: these are the flares used in the 37mm Flare guns such as the AN-M8 type and several others. The flares were made in several styles- single star, multiple starts, and colors (white, yellow, red or green) for different signal purposes. This is a LIVE pyrotechnic round, not explosive, but is hazardous if fired over dry brush. 10-1965 dates, so it is Vietnam era, but other than the date, it is identical to the same item issued during WW2. One round, live. $49.00 (View Picture)

19901 50 CARTRIDGES, CALIBER .30 CARBINE DUMMY M1 (EMPTY BOX) - Nice clean box by Winchester with red and black printing on the label. Excellent condition- shrink wrapped in plastic for display. Empty box only. $25.00 (View Picture)

19842 6mm Lee Navy- Remington UMC (empty box) - Circa 1898-1915 two piece box with dirty and scuffed label text including “For Remington Lee Military and Sporting and Lee Straight Pull Rifles.” This was for ammunition with soft pointed bullets but is very similar to what boxes for military ball ammunition from Remington would have looked like. Not a perfect box, but it is complete and legible. Wood dowels placed inside for proper spacing of the upper section of the box, and it has been shrink wrapped in plastic after being photographed, so it will look good for display. Hard to find ANY 6mm Lee Navy ammo or boxes. Empty bos as shown in the photos for $45.00 (View Picture)

19720 ROUND BALL TO RIMFIRE: PART 4 - A HISTORY OF CIVIL WAR SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION - PART TWO - SIGNED By the Author – 8.5” x 11” hardbound, 328 pages - This is the first (of an esitmated three) volumes to cover Confederate ammunition. The text sets the stage for the organization of the Confederate Ordnance Bureau and the emergence of Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance, who was one of the few federal ordnance officers to resign his post and join with the "rebellion." But, Gorgas could not run the Bureau alone, and the addition of John W. Mallet to his staff as Superintendent of Laboratories in the spring of 1862, was destined to bring order out of the chaos amid frenzied demands for small arms ammunition. Includes examples of over 650 specimens of Confederate bullets and cartridges, in addition to bullet moulds and numerous other illustrations. Dean Thomas does wonderful research and writing and these volumes are the definitive coverage of the subject. $50.00 (View Picture)

19487 SWISS VETTERLI RIFLE CARTRIDGE .41 SWISS CALIBER (10.4 X 38MMR) RIMFIRE - This is an original Swiss military cartridge made circa 1892, according to the paper packet dates on other cartridges found at the same time. These were used in all their Vetterli rifles, as well as in some of the earlier single shot rifles converted from muzzle loaders. Overall excellent condition with the paper patch around the bullet intact. We have had dozens of more modern commercial ammunition over the years, but this is the first group of original military loads. Ammunition sold as collector items only, not considered to be safe to fire. Price per single cartridge- $7.00 (View Picture)

19384 WW1 5 ROUND BRASS STRIPPER CLIPS FOR M1903, M1917 AND BAR (LOT OF 12) - .30-06 ammunition for the M1903, and M1917 rifles and the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) was issued in five round stripper clips, packed 12 to a bandoleer (total of 60 rounds). During WW1 the clips ere made from brass, but during WW2 they used steel for the clips (with either steel or brass spring). These were intended as one time use items to be thrown away after stripping their five rounds into the rifle. These are used VG-fine condition, but most will have one of the tiny metal tabs at the end of the spring broken off (and a few may have them broken at both ends). It is easy to make the clips function well again by slightly pinching the ends of the clip with a pair of pliers to provide enough tension to keep the rounds from slipping out accidentally. This is a lot of 12 WW1 brass five round stripper clips, enough to refill one bandoleer. $24.00 (View Picture)

19264 WW2 5 ROUND STEEL STRIPPER CLIPS FOR M1903, M1917 AND BAR (LOT OF 12) - .30-06 ammunition for the M1903, 1903A3, and M1917 rifles and the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) was issued in five round stripper clips, packed 12 to a bandoleer (total of 60 rounds). During WW1 the clips ere made from brass, but during WW2 they used steel for the clips (with either steel or brass spring). These were intended as one time use items to be thrown away after stripping their five rounds into the rifle. These are used VG-fine condition, but most will have one of the tiny metal tabs at the end of the spring broken off (and a dw may have them broken at both ends). It is easy to make the clips function well again by slightly pinching the ends of the clip with a pair of pliers to provide enough tension to kep the rounds from slipping out accidentally. This is a lot of 12 WW2 steel five round stripper clips, enough to refill one bandoleer. $18.00 (View Picture)

19226 WW2 U.S. NAVY VERY SIGNAL (FLARE) BOX - Empty box for "10 Signal Lights, Mark II, Very, White Star" with June 5, 1944 date. This is empty but can be filled with a block of wood and taped or glued shut for display. Most of the Very signals we find are loose, and seldom see any of the boxes. We do see some of the small cans (similar tot hose used for Planters Peanuts) but even those are scarce. $15.00 (View Picture)

19106 WW2 U.S. NAVY 20MM OERLIKON (20 X 110MM RB[REBATED]) DUMMY DRILL CARTRIDGE - This cartridge was used in the thousands of 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft guns mounted aboard nearly every type of Navy ship in WW2. The fired cases are unique as the gun begins to recoil while the case is still being extracted, blowing the neck diameter out to nearly the diameter of the body. They are also nearly unique in their having a rim diameter much smaller (or "rebated") than the base of the case. Two fired, empty, INERT cases The U.S. Navy adopted the 20mm Oerlikon guns shortly before WW2 to replace the .50 caliber machine guns previously used for close in anti-aircraft use. By the end of the war about 125,000 of the guns had been made in the U.S. mainly for use aboard ships. Beginning in 1943 the 40mm Bofors began to replace the 20mm Oerlikons with even greater range and stopping power and all were removed from the fleet by the mid-1950s.. Between December 1941 and September 1944, 32% of all Japanese aircraft downed by the USN were credited to the Oerlikons, with the high point being 48.3% for the second half of 1942. The Oerlikon rounds are easily spotted by their distinctive “rebated” rim which is smaller than the case diameter. These dummy cartridges were made for training use, and feature a regular case with three holes drilled in it, and a regular (bur empty) projectile which is silver soldered to the neck to withstand harsh use. The manufacturing process leave tiny splashes of flux on some of the cases which has caused some mild corrosion, and some of the brown paint on the projectiles may have chipped or flaked off. Most of these are still in the original cardboard shipping sleeves, never issued. Special quantity price for volume purchasers is 10 rounds for $40.00, but single rounds are $5.00 (View Picture)

19091 -WW2 JAP 7.7MM BALL AMMO IN 30 ROUND BRASS FEED STRIP - Ball ammunition, typical no headstamp, with reddish-pink sealing band at case mouth to identify it as Ball ammunition. This is 7.7x58mm SR (semi-rimmed) ammunition used in the Type 92 machine guns in the brass strips instead of belts or links, basically the old Hotchkiss system. Packed in cloth covered cardboard box with Japanese markings. Nice bright clean ammo. The box has been opened, and most of the label over the opening has been lost, as shown in the photo. Have a couple of these, so the actual label markings on the edge of the box may vary somewhat but condition is the same as one in the photo. Price per one feed strip and original cloth covered cardboard box. $40.00 (View Picture)

19089 WW2 JAP 7.7MM BALL AMMO IN 30 ROUND BRASS FEED STRIP - Ball ammunition, typical no headstamp, with reddish-pink sealing band at case mouth to identify it as Ball ammunition. This is 7.7x58mm SR (semi-rimmed) ammunition used in the Type 92 machine guns in the brass strips instead of belts or links, basically the old Hotchkiss system. Packed in cloth covered cardboard box with Japanese markings. Nice bright clean ammo. Although the box has been opened, the label pieces are mostly present as shown in the photo. Have a couple of these, so the actual label markings may vary somewhat but condition is the same as one in the photo. Price per one feed strip and original cloth covered cardboard box. $45.00 (View Picture

17101 RARE .58 CALIBER GATLING GUN SHORT RIMFIRE CARTRIDGE- FIRST U.S. MACHINE GUN CARTRIDGE - The first machine guns were Richard J. Gatling’s hand cranked guns, the Model 1862. These set the basic pattern for general mechanics of the Gatling gun, but the ammunition was troublesome with separate cylindrical steel chambers bored out at the front to be loaded with standard .58 caliber rifle musket paper cartridges, and the rear of the chamber had a nipple for a percussion cap. Essentially, the chamber became a primitive form of a metallic cartridge. However, reloading the chambers in the field was tedious and slow, greatly reducing the effectiveness of the Gatling gun for any sort of sustained fire. The next step in the evolution was to modify the chambers by boring them all the way through and modify the strikers to hit the edge instead of the center where the nipples had been. This allowed use of a rimfire cartridge loaded into the chambers for much quicker reloading and sustained fire. Since the barrels were .58 caliber, the same 60 grain powder charge and bullet previously used were adopted for the rimfire cartridge for these guns. This was the origin of the .58 caliber Gatling gun cartridges. The .58 caliber Gatling cartridges were basically experimental, as the Civil War ended about the time they were proven to be successful, and the Army switched to .50-70 caliber center fire cartridges for their rifles. For the sake of uniformity the settle on that caliber for Gatling guns as well. By this time Gatling had modified his design to eliminate the separate chambers so that the guns fed the .50-70 cartridges directly into the barrels and extracted the cases at the end of the cycle. Thus the .58 rimfire Gatling cartridge had a very brief career, making them extremely scarce. This .58 Short Gatling is sometimes called the “.58 Mountain Gun Gatling” but origin of that name is unclear. Subsequently Gatling guns were made in .50-70, .45-70, .30-40, and .30-06 caliber and even 1 inch caliber for U.S. military use. Reportedly they were made in 29 different calibers for 25 different countries over their 56 year history. By WW1 the hand cranked Gatling was obsolete, but in 1947 an experiment hooking an electric motor to an old Gatling gun produced rates of fire around 4,000-6,000 rounds per minutes. The “new” Gatling guns included the 20mm Vulcan used in fighter jets to the 7.62mm “Mini-guns” in helicopters and even an experimental 37mm anti-aircraft gun. While the .58 Gatling has an important role in U.S. military arms history, it would be an interesting challenge to get an example of every different caliber cartridge ever used in Gatling guns. This round is from the estate of Colonel B.R. Lewis, a former Commanding Officer of Frankford Arsenal, and later author of the highly respected “Small Arms and Ammunition in the United States Service.” Price for one original .58 Gatling short rimfire cartridge in excellent condition- $135.00 (View Picture)

18080 EARLY MARK I RED "VERY SIGNAL" FOR 10 GAUGE FLARE GUN - These were used in Navy (and other) flare guns chambered for the 10 gauge shells, starting around 1877 when LT. Edward Very invented his flare. The guns were originally made by the Washington Navy Yard, and by WW1 were being made by Remington with brass frames, blued steel barrels and walnut grips. By WW2 the design was much simplified and the Mark V signal pistol made by Sedgley became the most commonly used gun. The flares (officially called “signals”) were made in red, white and green versions, by about six or eight different manufacturers, using essentially the commercial 10 gauge shotshell with varying heights of brass bases and various headstamps. These usually were secured on the end with a roll crimp. The closing wad was colored to indicate the color of the flare, and usually (but not always) the cardboard body was the same color. These also had a “tactile” identification feature so they could be selected in the dark by touch. Green closing wads were smooth; red had several ridges, and the white had a bump or tit in the center of the wad. The later WW2 vintage “Mark II” Very signals are still pretty easy to find. However the WW1 and earlier Mark I version is seldom seen. The Mark I did not use a roll crimp, but instead left the walls of the paper case straight, and seated the closing wad about ½ inch in, with a thick wax sealing coat holding the wad in place, and most of the cartridge has a wax coating for waterproofing. This is a single RED signal, nice for display with a WW1 or earlier Very pistol. $10.00 (View Picture)

17827 "50 Eley Smokeless Cartridges, .32 and .30 inch and 7.65mm - adapted to the Webley & Scott, Colt, & Browning Automatic Pistols.” Two piece box with upper half in pretty good shape except for scuffing and edge wear. However, all the label pieces are missing from the lower half. It will still display okay. It has about 20 mixed rounds of .32 ACP ammo in the box, few if any from Eley, but they come with the box, or we can dump those and just ship the box and save a little on shipping. Uncommon box, especially nice to go with a Webley & Scott auto pistol. $20.00 (View Picture)

17686 8MM LEBEL RIFLE - ONCE FIRED BRASS- RELOADABLE - 38 rounds once fired REM-UMC 8mm Lebel cartridge cases. These are boxer primed, reloadable cases. Hard to find reloadable brass for the Lebel rifles. The lot for $25.00 (View Picture)

16774 WW2 JAP 7.7MM BALL AMMO IN 30 ROUND BRASS FEED STRIP - Ball ammunition, typical no headstamp, with reddish-pink sealing band at case mouth to identify it as Ball ammunition. This is 7.7x58mm SR (semi-rimmed) ammunition used in the Type 92 machine guns in the brass strips instead of belts or links, basically the old Hotchkiss system. Packed in cloth covered cardboard box with Japanese markings. Nice bright clean ammo and box from a nearly full wooden crate we found. Price per one feed strip and original cloth covered cardboard box. $49.00 (View Picture)

16653 REMINGTON .30 SPRINGFIELD (1906) BLANK (FULL BOX) - Two piece box, circa 1933-1940 with dog bone logo and red/blue printing. REM-UMC 30-06 headstamp on the cartridges with paper bullets. Nice clean box with all 20 original rounds. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display and looks better now than in the photo. $35.00 (View Picture)

16652 REMINGTON .30 SPRINGFIELD (1906) BLANK (EMPTY BOX) - Two piece box, circa 1933-1940 with dog bone logo plus the DuPont logo, and red/blue printing. Nice clean box but empty. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display and looks better now than in the photo. $18.00 (View Picture)

16647 REMINGTON-UMC .30 SPINGFIELD & WINCHESTER BLACK POWDER BLANK CARTRIDGES (Empty box) - Two piece box with rounded corners, circa 1920s. Unusual in that it is for “Black Powder Blank Cartridge” All labels are intact and pretty clean. Some slight soiling on the rest of the box. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display and looks better now than in the photo. $18.00 (View Picture)

16463 5 ROUNDS KYNOCH .450- 3 ¼” CASE FULL BOX OF AMMO - These are loaded with 480 grain soft nose metal jacketed bullets. Fancy red and yellow box with added label on the back: “IMPORTANT- These cartridges are loaded with a modified propellant and in some double rifles may shoot to a different point of impact.” Front has added label “non-mercuric, non-corrosive primers” and ink stamped “WARNING: Keep out of reach of children.” The ammo probably dates to the 1950s or 60s when they added the requirement for the child safety warning on ammo sold in the U.S. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. Great addition to a display with rifles in an African hunting collection. $59.00 (View Picture)

16096 FULL BOX 20 ROUNDS WINCHESTER MADE .25-25 STEVENS SOFT POINT - Two piece box with orange label. Label is somewhat scuffed and dirty, but a very scarce caliber. Contents generally excellent with some oxidation on the heads, domed primers. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $195.00 (View Picture)

16029 WW2 JAPANESE MILITARY 7.92 X 57MM MACHINE GUN AMMUNITION IN STRIPPER CLIPS - Five rounds in brass stripper clip. No headstamp. Reddish-brown lacquer seal at the case mouth. Stripper clip is not flat on the back like most Japanese clips, but with a squared groove down the back. The Japanese used the Type 98 machine Gun (a license built copy of the German MG15) as a flexible gun in some of their aircraft, fed from 75 round saddle drum magazines. One stripper clip with five rounds. A scarce type of Jap ammo. $30.00 (View Picture)

15979 WINCHESTER 7.62 RUSSIAN BOX WITH 14 ROUNDS - Hard to find caliber. Box is pretty ratty and has been restored and taped up for display. Both end flaps missing. Includes 14 rounds of WRA Co. 7.62 x 54mmR ammunition, but probably not original to this box. Great for display with one of the M1895 Russian contract rifles. (And that was what the previous owner did with it!). Probably dates to the late 1920s or 1930s as it has the Staynless primers mentioned on the blue-red-yellow box. $25.00 (View Picture)

15873 12 CARTRIDGES, REVOLVER, .455 INCH MK VIZ FOR WEBLEY REVOLVERS - This is WW2 vintage ammo issued for the .455 Webley revolvers stillin service. Each gray cardboard box has 12 rounds of full metal jacket ball ammunition. Headstamp is K43 VIZ indicating it is Mark VI configuration loaded with nitro-cellulose (smokeless) powder as indicated by the "Z". This was loaded by Kynoch in 1943, and the lot number and date are ink stamped on the label. (Photo shows one sample, we have several different months, but all are 1943 dated.) The "Cartridge SA Ball revolver .455 inch Mark VIz" using design DD/L/9513 was approved in April 1941. The charge was between 5.5 and 7.5 grains of NC powder, depending on batch. It was declared obsolete in March 1946." Although the mark VI was a WW2 era load, it is very similar to the Mark II load used during WW1 except that they had lead bullets with no jacket. Box is in good conditoini and markings pretty legible, but the paper label seal has been broken across the seam due to rough handling over the last 60 years. Will shring wrap in plastic for display if requested. One box of 12 rounds for $19.00 (View Picture)

15125 WW2 JAPANESE AMMO SET - 3 rounds 7.7x58mm Ball (red band at mouth) in a section of the brass feed strip for Type 92. 97, 99 or Type 1 machine guns; 1 round 7.7x58mmSR (Semi-Rimmed) Armor Piercing (black band at mouth) used only in Type 92 machine guns (rim diameter has been slightly reduced); 1 round 7.7x58mm Ball (red band at mouth) for use in Type 99 rifles; 1 round 6.5x50mm for use in Type 38 and Type I rifles; 1 round 8x21mm pistol round for use in Type 14 pistols. All live, original WW2 Japanese military issue, with typical unmarked headstamp. $20.00 (View Picture)

14608 50 WINCHESTER No. 38 RIFLE CARTRIDGES (.38 CALIBER LONG RIMFIRE) - A nice clean, full SEALED box. The lousy Saran Wrap job was replaced with crystal clear heat shrink wrap for better protection and appearance after the photo was taken, but the black printing is still a little lighter than we would like. No label date codes, so this probably is prior to 1900, but sometime after 1871 as the label mentions Stetson’s patent of that date. Best guess is 1880s to 1890s vintage. This is a black powder load (green label) and would be a great companion in a display of any rifle in .38 Long Rimfire caliber. $175.00 (View Picture)

6081 .30-06 BLANKS- ATTENTION VETERANS GROUPS - G.I. M1909 Blanks- headstamps vary (as they were usually made using fired cases) but dates indicate these should be non-corrosive. These are getting scarce. I have a very limited supply, and will donate 100-200 rounds to any veterans group needing these for funeral salutes, and will even pay shipping. I know the reenactors would love to have these, but rather than making a few bucks supplying them, I am honored to do a small bit to provide a final salute to our veterans. (NOTE: If you have .30-06 blanks you would like to donate, please email us and I will forward requests when my supply is exhausted.)



U.S. Military Cartridges 1865-1965 (Boxes & Bandoleers.some single rounds and miscellaneous ammunition related items)

U.S Military Rifle & Carbine Ammunition

19204 SCARCE EARLY BOX 1957 .30-06 MATCH T291- LOT 4 - This is a full sealed box of this scarce early match ammunition, 1957 being the year they reintroduced .30-06 match ammunition at Frankford Arsenal. It is unusual in that the white label with red and blue printing has an additional small label glued on the front covering the sections where technical details appear, and faintly visible under the overlabel. This appears to be a change to the format as they transitioned from basically experimental loadings to a regular production type, although it still has the T291 designation. This box has some condition problems from improper storage where insects got into the wooden box it was stored in, and feasted on the glue and label material. I had four boxes of this ammo, all in basically the same condition, so the insect damaged area locations may vary from that in the photo, but overall they are all the same condition. Price per one box- $35.00 (View Picture)

18808 20 Cartridges Ball, Caliber .30 M1- Frankford Arsenal repacked at Twin Cities (lot of 2 boxes) - One box is lot FA 49300 and is a nice clean full sealed box, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. The other box is an empty box, but lot number is 49301, consecutive with the first box, so we are selling them together. Apparently Twin Cities replaced a bunch of old Frankford Arsenal Ball M1 ammunition circa 1964, most likely for war reserve stocks, or possible sale by DCM, or perhaps for foreign aid shipments. Most of it was FA 39 headstamped, but we are not sure if that is the case with the sealed box or not. The boxes used were recycled, as they have tracer or AP labels under the new repacked label. One full and one empty box for $30.00 (View Picture)

18803 U.S. ARMY AMU CONTRACT WESTERN MATCH AMMO- 200 GR .30-06 - Circa 1963-1966 this was handloaded for match use by the Advanced Marksmanship Unit.. Nice clean full box shrink wrapped in plastic for display. This is the exact box shown in Chris Punnett’s superb “.30-06” on page 335. $45.00 (View Picture)

18802 RARE FULL BOX FRANKFORD ARSENAL 1938 PALMA MATCH .30-06 CARTRIDGES - Frankford Arsenal continuously tinkered with their loads striving for optimum accuracy, especially with the elite Palma match ammo. After minor changes from 1932 through 1936, the 1938 loading used high pressure test cases headstamped FA 38P and uncrimped tinned primers. A thin lead collar was used to secure the primer in place. The 172 grain M1 style bullet was used, a few were tinned, but most were just the plain gilding metal jacket types. This is an original full sealed box, shrink wrapped in plastic for display. The contents are starting to leak the greenish exudite which is staining the label and box, but when was the last time you saw one of these in any condition? $95.00 (View Picture)

18773 20 Cartridges, REFERENCE, Caliber .30 DWG NO. C8595416 (Empty box) - with Lake City Army Ammunition Plant lot number. Circa 1966- this is the exact box shown in Chris Punnett’s “.30-06” book on page 268. Reference cartridges were made to extremely close tolerances and used as the standard against which other ammunition is compared during test or inspection. Neatly opened to remove contents and shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $20.00 (View Picture)

18707 SCARCE BOX- 1954 PALMA MATCH- 20 CARTRIDGES BALL CAL..30 - Very scarce full sealed box of Palma Match Ammo for 1954. Box is full, sealed and in excellent condition with markings as shown in the photo. Sealed in plastic for display. This ammo was made specifically for use in the Palma matches. The "National Matches" at Camp Perry were resumed in 1954 after being suspended since WW2, and Frankford Arsenal had not yet begun to make special "National Match: ammunition, so they used regular M2 Ball ammunition made by Twin Cities (Lot 41279) for the 1954 National Matches. $85.00 (View Picture)

17101 RARE .58 CALIBER GATLING GUN SHORT RIMFIRE CARTRIDGE- FIRST U.S. MACHINE GUN CARTRIDGE - The first machine guns were Richard J. Gatling’s hand cranked guns, the Model 1862. These set the basic pattern for general mechanics of the Gatling gun, but the ammunition was troublesome with separate cylindrical steel chambers bored out at the front to be loaded with standard .58 caliber rifle musket paper cartridges, and the rear of the chamber had a nipple for a percussion cap. Essentially, the chamber became a primitive form of a metallic cartridge. However, reloading the chambers in the field was tedious and slow, greatly reducing the effectiveness of the Gatling gun for any sort of sustained fire. The next step in the evolution was to modify the chambers by boring them all the way through and modify the strikers to hit the edge instead of the center where the nipples had been. This allowed use of a rimfire cartridge loaded into the chambers for much quicker reloading and sustained fire. Since the barrels were .58 caliber, the same 60 grain powder charge and bullet previously used were adopted for the rimfire cartridge for these guns. This was the origin of the .58 caliber Gatling gun cartridges. The .58 caliber Gatling cartridges were basically experimental, as the Civil War ended about the time they were proven to be successful, and the Army switched to .50-70 caliber center fire cartridges for their rifles. For the sake of uniformity the settle on that caliber for Gatling guns as well. By this time Gatling had modified his design to eliminate the separate chambers so that the guns fed the .50-70 cartridges directly into the barrels and extracted the cases at the end of the cycle. Thus the .58 rimfire Gatling cartridge had a very brief career, making them extremely scarce. This .58 Short Gatling is sometimes called the “.58 Mountain Gun Gatling” but origin of that name is unclear. Subsequently Gatling guns were made in .50-70, .45-70, .30-40, and .30-06 caliber and even 1 inch caliber for U.S. military use. Reportedly they were made in 29 different calibers for 25 different countries over their 56 year history. By WW1 the hand cranked Gatling was obsolete, but in 1947 an experiment hooking an electric motor to an old Gatling gun produced rates of fire around 4,000-6,000 rounds per minutes. The “new” Gatling guns included the 20mm Vulcan used in fighter jets to the 7.62mm “Mini-guns” in helicopters and even an experimental 37mm anti-aircraft gun. While the .58 Gatling has an important role in U.S. military arms history, it would be an interesting challenge to get an example of every different caliber cartridge ever used in Gatling guns. This round is from the estate of Colonel B.R. Lewis, a former Commanding Officer of Frankford Arsenal, and later author of the highly respected “Small Arms and Ammunition in the United States Service.” Price for one original .58 Gatling short rimfire cartridge in excellent condition- $135.00 (View Picture)

18148 M1 GARAND CLIP OF 8 CARTRIDGES, INCENDIARY, CALIBER .30 M1 (BLUE TIPS) - Made at Denver Ordnance Plant in 1942 with headstamp DEN 42. Authorized for use in rifles, but really not very widely used and left mainly for machine gun use. However, rifle collectors like to show the different types of ammo used in them should have a clip for display. Full clip of nice clean ammo. $30.00 (View Picture)

18129 M1903/1903A3 CLIP OF 5 CARTRIDGES, INCENDIARY, CALIBER .30 M1 (BLUE TIPS) - Made at Denver Ordnance Plant in 1942 with headstamp DEN 42. Authorized for use in rifles, but really not very widely used and left mainly for machine gun use. However, rifle collectors like to show the different types of ammo used in them should have a clip for display. Full clip of nice clean ammo. Clip may be brass or steel depending on what is on hand. $20.00 (View Picture)

17566 U.S. GI Bandoleer and 120 Rounds .30 Carbine Ball M1 - Nice clean full bandoleer of U.S. G.I .30 carbine Ball M1 ammunition. Made at Lake City in 1953. Bandoleer has good markings (but a little faint) Lot number LC 13660, and headstamp LC 53. One of the pockets is missing the cardboard insert. That is just a rectangle folded into three sections, very easy to make from lightweight cardboard, it you really want to replace it. $95.00 (View Picture)

17451 50 DUMMY CARTRIDGES, CARBINE CAL. .30 M13 BY WINCHESTER - Nice clean full sealed box, sealed in plastic for display. Headstamp probably WRA 43 as bottom of box has 1942 manufacture date. Great for a carbine display. I will include a loose dummy carbine cartridge if desired, but not certain it is an exact match for the contents since the box is still sealed. Most used steel cases, some with holes in the side, some without and some had the primer hole drilled, and others did not. $135.00 (View Picture)

17402 50 CARTRIDGES, BALL, CALIBER .38 SPECIAL M41 (RA 62) - White box with black lettering, loaded by Remington lot number 5308 with headstamp RA 62. This is Vietnam era issue for use with the S&W Victory Model revolvers carried by USN and USMC pilots, and also for security forces. Nice clean full box fresh from an original can. $25.00 (View Picture)

17269 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 MATCH M72, 1962 - Nice clean full sealed box. Great for display with a National Match rifle of the period. Has been shrink wrapped in plastic for display. $30.00 (View Picture)

16659 REMINGTON .30-06 PALMA MATCH 180 GRAIN CIRCA 1950 - Full original box in about excellent condition. Wrapped in plastic for display. Nice to go with a classic target rifle in .30-06 such as a Winchester Model 70 or even the M1 Garand. $40.00 (View Picture)

15726 60 round Bandoleer of .30 Ball M1- by Western - Exceptionally clean with original lot card. An unusual variation not found in Chris Punnett’s superb and comprehensive book “.30-06”. He notes that Western had an education al contract to make .30 Ball M1 in the late 1920s and identifies them as having headstamp WESTERN 28. However, A similar 1927 Winchestere contract used commercial headstamps, so I think this is probably the same situation where Western used their (then) standard “WESTERN 30-G-1906” headstamp with the domed nickeled primers and red primer seal. Very little M1 Ball ammunition survived as most was used up prior to or during WW2, and this is the only non-FA example we have ever encountered. Note that bandoleer is stenciled LOT-D-427 while the lot card indicates lot number WCC 1801. Nice clean stuff. $135.00 (View Picture)

16679 20 CARTRIDGES, CALIBER .30 MATCH M72 (1966 WHITE BOX) - LOT LC 12232. Red and blue printing on while label with handsome eagle design on one side with 1966 MATCH Lake City Ordnance Plant. Full sealed box wrapped in plastic for display. This is the stuff that was used by snipers in Vietnam, when they could get it, such as Carlos Hathcock and others before adoption of the 7.62mm rifles for the sniping role. Getting hard to find the older Match ammo. $25.00 (View Picture)

16645 FULL SEALED BOX 20 ROUNDS .30-06 BALL M2 (TAN BOX) - Lot TW- 41269 in brown box with black printing. This is probably circa 1954-55, based on the style of the box, and probably headstamped TW 54 or TW 5. Shrink wrapped in plastic for display $20.00 (View Picture)

16275 Full sealed box 20 Rounds .30-06 Ball M2 (tan box) - Lot TW- 41263 in brown box with black printing. This is probably circa 1954-55 based on the style of the box. Will shrink wrap in plastic for no extra charge. $20.00 (View Picture)

16072 20 CARTRIDGE, CASES CALIBER .30 M1, PRIMED (NOT CRIMPED) FRANKFORD ARSENAL - Full sealed box. Circa 1920s-30s. $20.00 (View Picture)

15926 50 CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE [LAUNCHING] CAL..30 M6 - Full Sealed box of Lake City 1943 vintage ammo as used with the M8 grenade launcher. Fairly scarce stuff. Headstamp LC 43 with the rose petal crimp. These were also authorized for use as regular "blanks" with the carbine. Will include a loose round to show contents. $65.00 (View Picture)

7876 20 CARTRIDGES, CALIBER .30 MATCH M72 (1967 WHITE BOX) - LOT LC 12245. Red and blue printing on while label with handsome eagle design on one side with 1967 MATCH Lake City Ordnance Plant. Full sealed box wrapped in plastic for display. This is the stuff that was used by snipers in Vietnam, when they could get it, such as Carlos Hathcock and others before adoption of the 7.62mm rifles for the sniping role. Getting hard to find the older Match ammo. $25.00 (View Picture)

14800 20 CARTRIDGES CALIBER .30 TRACER M2 (RARE) - Frankford Arsenal Lot number 32, headstamped FA 42. On top of being a very rare type, this is probably the best condition box of WW2 era .30-06 tracer we have had with bright clean labels and the box in superb condition with no bullet tips poking through. Note that this is not the usual Tracer, M1 with the red tip which continued in production into 1945, nor the Tracer, M25 with the orange tip which was adopted (initially as the T10) in 1944-45. The Tracer, M2 was a special “short trace” design made in limited numbers from about March 1942 to November 1943, and can be found with white tips and with or without an extra cannelure on the bullet for identification, and in this variation with the red tip and the extra cannelure on the bullet as seen in the photo. Although I had collected .30-06 boxes for many years, I did not have a box of Tracer M2 for my own collection until I found this small stash of a few boxes. (Full details in Hackley, Woodin & Scranton Volume 2, pages 105-107.) $110.00 (View Picture)

8662 50 CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE CAL..30 M6 - Full Sealed box of Lake City 1944 vintage ammo as used with the M8 grenade launcher. Fairly scarce stuff. Will include a loose round to show contents. $65.00 (View Picture)

7185 M1 GARAND 7.62MM (MK2 MOD 0 OR MK 2 MOD 1) BANDOLEER KIT - M1 GARAND 7.62MM (MK2 MOD 0 OR MK 2 MOD 1) BANDOLEER KIT Very scarce item issued only for the Navy's Mark 2 rifles which were M1 Garands converted to fire 7.62mm ammunition. This is what was left over after some idiot used up the ammo. Bandoleer with stenciled markings NATO 7.62MM/ BALL M80/ 8 RD CLIP/ LOT LC 12179. Also, six of the correct clips (used once!) and six cardboard inserts. (Photo shows typical example but with different lot number). $29.00 (View Picture)

14340 M1 GARAND 7.62MM (MK2 MOD 0 OR MK 2 MOD 1) BANDOLEER KIT - Very scarce item issued only for the Navy's Mark 2 rifles which were M1 Garands converted to fire 7.62mm ammunition. This is what was left over after some idiot used up the ammo. Bandoleer with stenciled markings NATO 7.62MM/ BALL M80/ 8 RD CLIP/ LOT LC 12638. Also, six of the correct clips (used once!) and six cardboard inserts. (Photo shows typical example but with different lot number). $29.00 (View Picture)

13852 Full bandoleer of 7.62 ammo in 8 round clips for converted M1 Garands - Very scarce stuff. This is an original full 48 round bandoleer (with maker name and 1965 date on the back) and stenciled “7.62MM, NATO/ BALL M80/ 8 RD CLIPS/ LOT LC 12694” on the front. Ammo is LC 66. The Navy was the only service to issue the M1 conversions to 7.62mm, and needed ammo packed in 8 round clips/bandoleers for issue to landing parties or security teams. I have only seen a few dozen bandoleers of this stuff in the last 20 years, along with a few of the empty bandoleers. Essential for display with one of the Rifle, 7.62mm Mark 2 Mod 0 or Mark 2 Mod 1, if you are lucky enough to have on in your collection. Nice clean stuff. I have several of these, but one is missing the cardobard inserts- deduct $10.00 from price for that one. Photo also shows example of a .30-06 clip and the 7.62mm clip for comparison. $110.00 (View Picture)

13503 20 CARTRIDGES, INCENDIARY, CALIBER .30 M1 (BLUE TIPS) - Full sealed box of WW2 issue incendiary ammo made at Eau Claire Ordnance Plant in 1942. Authorized for use in rifles, but its main use was in aircraft machine guns, but by late 1942 most .30 caliber aircraft guns had been replaced by .50 BMGs. We found several boxes of this (after being out of stock for several years!) and they have nice bright colors on the labels. However, they were handled roughly and the tips of the bullets poked through the bottom of the box as shown in the photo, so price is less than other boxes we have had in the past. We will seal these will be sealed in heat shrink plastic wrap for display. $95.00 (View Picture)

13466 VIETNAM ERA BANDOLEER OF 7.62 NATO AMMO FOR M14 RIFLES - Full bandoleer of 60 rounds on five round stripper clips in green cotton bandollers with lot number etc stenciled on them, and includes the stripper clip guide. Headstamp LC 69 [NATO symbol]. Seldom seen Vietnam era item. $75.00 (View Picture)

11669 60 CARTRIDGES, BALL, CALIBER .30 M1 (FA 38) IN BANDOLEER (damaged) - (Loaded in brass five round stripper clips, bright clean cartridges with FA 38 headstamp) Excellent bandoleer except for 3/4"diameter hole chewed in one pocket by someone's pet rodent. The .30 Ball M1 with a 173 grain bullet replaced the Ball M1906 which used a 150 grain bullet. This was motivated by the search for a heavier bullet that would be more effective in extreme long range machine gun fire. The M1 ball was made from 1925 to 1941 although it was officially replaced by the Ball M2 with a 150 grain bullet (essentially the old M1906 round) in 1939. Thus the Ball M1 was the round used with the early M1 Garands, and with all arms during the first year or so of WW2. This is a nice clean bandoleer except for the hole. No lot card with this one. $85.00 (View Picture)

10291 1956 INTERNATIONAL MATCH- FULL BOX - 20 Cartridges, 7.62mm, Ball, T275, 172 gr. B.T. Bullet, International Match, Primer FA26, VEL 2440, Powder IMR 4895, Lot FA-2, Sublot K, Frankford Arsenal on one side in blue on white label. Other side has label with large red white and blue shield with yellow border and lettering INTERNATIONAL MATCH with 19 and 56 on either side. FRANKFORD ARSENAL at bottom. Cartridges have green primer seal, headstamp is [NATO symbol] FA 56. Each box has 4.5" x 4.5" paper showing target results on test target at 300 yards.(about 2.75" diameter- not bad!). Box has been opened, but is now sealed in plastic and displays as if unopened. Printed side of box is fairly dirty from contact with waterproofing liner in storage can, but colorful side displays nicely. Box is full, but has been neatly opened. $40.00 (View Picture)

13451 WW2 BANDOLEER 60 ROUNDS .30-06 BALL M2 IN 5 ROUND CLIPS/BANDOLEERS - Nice clean ammo in nice clean bandoleers. Someone has removed the lot cards and the cardboard pocket inserts used to keep the bullet tips from posking through the thin cotton cloth of the bandoleer. I am not sure if these are all one lot or maybe two or more as we spot checked a few clips and found both DEN 43 and LC 43 and there may be others, but you will never know unless you remove the ammo from the stripper clips. These display very nicely as is although most have the ammo insterted with one clip up and one pointed down. Normally all were loaded with the tips down. Since these are missing the cardboard inserts and lot cards, price is greatly reduced over what a full bandoleer of WW2 ammo would normally bring. $65.00 (View Picture)

12442 1986 REPACK OF SL 53 .30 CALIBER BALL M2 AMMUNITION - Full sealed box. Ammo is M2 Ball headstamped SL53 and you can see faint pattern of web belt or links. Ammo was arsenal repacked in old WW2 vintage .30-06 Tracer M1 boxes, identified by bits of the green and yellow label under the new label. The new label has a form number or printing date of July 1986. This is the latest date on U.S. GI .30-06 ammunition packing I have seen. Probably repacked for use in foreign military sales to allies who still had .30-06 rifles or machine guns. $35.00 (View Picture)

11855 20 CALIBER .30 RIFLE & CARBINE SHELLS MODEL 1898 (PRIMED) - Small size box, used especially for packing cases to be sued for reloading ammunition, presumably at the unit level. The cases are salvaged cases with mixed headstamps, most having a line across them (to designation previously fired cases). We have had a couple of the empty boxes before, but these are the first we have found with the primed cases still there. Ink stamped date on top of box looks like 1908. $25.00 (View Picture)

10676 .30-40 KRAG BLANKS, FRANKFORD ARSENAL, - Paper Bullet. Full sealed box of 20 rounds, packing date 1905, "Made from fired cases" with blue paper label. Nice for display with your Krag rifles. Will include loose single round with the box to show contents- tinned case and white paper bullet. $29.00 (View Picture)

10581 20 CARTRIDGES, BALL CALIBER .30 M2 ALTERNATIVE (SL 43) - Nice clean box, sealed in plastic for display. This is early WW2 type packing with the label with black printing and the traditional red stripe. SL (St. Louis Ordnance Plant) was one of the larger ammo makers during WW2 and continued in operation well into the 1950s. $20.00 (View Picture)

10286 WINCHESTER .45-55-405 AMMUNITION FOR TRAPDOR CARBINE - Made under military contract circa 1898. Full sealed box. Sometimes ammo from that period has ballistics info or loading data rubber stamped on the label, but these do not, and I do not have an open one to see what the headstamp is. Theya re "reloading" and probably tinned cases, so made after 1885. Exceptionally nice clean box, great for dislay with your trapdoor carbine. $175.00 (View Picture)

9520 1956 INTERNATIONAL MATCH- FULL BOX - 20 Cartridges, 7.62mm, Ball, T275, 172 gr. B.T. Bullet, International Match, Primer FA26, VEL 2440, Powder IMR 4895, Lot FA-2, Sublot K, Frankford Arsenal on one side in blue on white label. Other side has label with large red white and blue shield with yellow border and lettering INTERNATIONAL MATCH with 19 and 56 on either side. FRANKFORD ARSENAL at bottom. Cartridges have green primer seal, headstamp is [NATO symbol] FA 56. Each box has 4.5" x 4.5" paper showing target results on test target at 300 yards.(about 2.75" diameter- not bad!). Box has been opened, but is now sealed in plastic and displays as if unopened. Portions of bax are dirty, and will vary fromthat shown inthe photos, but typical box shown here. $49.00 (View Picture)

9349 LOT- 3 BOXES (60 RDS) .30-06 BLANKS M1909 - Loaded in 1920, so corrosive primed and not guaranteed to fire. Packed on stripper clips, so you get a dozen WW1 brass stripper clips at no extra charge. Two boxes have the sealing labels opened, and other one is a bit rough. The lot for $35.00 (View Picture)

8662 50 CARTRIDGES, CARBINE GRENADE CAL..30 M6 - Full Sealed box of Lake City 1944 vintage ammo as used with the M8 grenade launcher. Fairly scarce stuff. Will include a loose round to show contents. $59.00 (View Picture)

7395 UNOPENED 60 ROUND KRAG BANDOLEER, FA 1907 - Khaki cotton stenciled on the front "60 Ball Cartridges, Model of 1898, Frankford Arsenal, Rifle Velocity at 55 feet, 1966 feet, Jun 22 1907" (Dates vary April or June 1907) Bandoleer is in excellent condition, with just a bit of storage soiling. Ammo unknown condition but not being sold as shooting ammo anyway. Ammo in one that I opened is bright and shiny but many have split necks. Headstamps F A [month 3,4,5,6] 07.) These have the tops of the pockets sewn shut with a cloth pull tab. I have never seen any US military bandoleers dated earlier than 1907, and believe that they may have been first introduced in 1903 when stripper clip loaded ammunition was first issued for the M1903 Rod Bayonet rifles in .30-03 caliber. Stephen Dorsey calls the familiar half flap type used in WW1 and later with .30-06 ammo for the M1903, 1917 and M1 rifles a "pattern 1909" bandoleer. I have only see a few bandoleers of the Frankford Arsenal loaded Krag ammmo, as most found on the market is 1917 vintage Remington production. Scarce item. $165.00 (View Picture)

7172 5 CARTRIDGES, GRENADE RIFLE, NATO 7.62MM M64 - Headstamp LC 77. These are packed 5 to a cardboard box, with a kraft-foil overwrap with nomenclature printed on the outside. Sealed pack of five rounds, plus one loose round to show contents. (have several) $10.00 (View Picture)

7161 .50 BMG LINKED BLANKS - 5 rounds of .50 BMG blanks in links. These are used for training purposes. Similar to .30-06 blank, just a LOT bigger. Nice clean late date non-corrosive with LC 82 headstamp. Links are the M9 links for the M2 .50 BMG $10.00 (View Picture) (SPECIAL- 35 linked rounds for $55.00)

7037 [.45-70] 20 CARBINE BALL CARTRIDGES, RELOADING, - Frankford Arsenal manufactured with March 11, 1905 date stamped on the top. Exceptionally nice clean full sealed box. Sealed in plastic for display. $225.00 (View Picture)

7003 KRAG PARKHURST CLIP - A special five round "stripper clip" invented for use with Krag rifles or carbines adapted with a special block on the rear of the magazine to accept the clip. Very small number rifles and carbines and clips were made for trials in1902. However, work was already underway towards the Model 1903 Springfield, so the Parkhurst idea was dropped. This clip has some heavy rust along the edges and about 1/4" tip at one end is broken off. $75.00 (View Picture)

5940 20 CARTRIDGE CASES, CALIBER .30 M1 NOT PRIMED - FA 35 or FA 36 headstamps. Full sealed box. Black printing on natural tan box. $25.00 (View Picture)

5890 20 CALIBER .30 BLANK CARTRIDGES, MODEL OF 1909 - for Service Rifles, Models 1903 and 1917, Automatic Rifle with Muzzle Attachment and Machine Gun with Muzzle Attachment" etc. Frankford Arsenal lot 254 with loading date of May 1920. Headstamps are a wide range in the box examined (1907-1917 FA). Loaded in four brass stripper clips. Wrapped in plastic for display. Full, sealed box, although seal may be partially cut. $18.00 (View Picture)

4051 20 Cartridges Ball Caliber .30 M2 Lot RA 33484 printed in black on plain buff colored label. Full sealed box. Headstamps on an open box were mix of RA 4 and RA44, with heavy annular crimp usually associated with machine gun use. Not sure why they were still doing this, but that is what they are. If you ask I will include a loose round to show contents. $18.00

4037 ..30-06 Paper Bullet Blanks- Remington commercial box with red printed label .30 Springfield (1906) smokeless for .30 Springfield Model 1903 and Winchester Model 1895 rifles. Picture on side of box has small red printed "Paper Bullet" label pasted on. Label on end of box reads "smokeless powder [Remington UMC round logo) .30 Springfield and Winchester Blank" and black printed "paper bullet". Full box of 20 rounds, with headstamp "REM UMC 1906" badly tarnished and some corrosion. Box looks pretty good, but has barely noticeable rip on back of the upped section of the box and overall dingy and soiled. Still displays okay, and is the earliest box of paper bullet blanks I have seen. $35.00

3538 .30-40 Krag Paper Bullet Blanks Full box of 20 by Remington. Green, white, and red box with REM-UMC in a circle and DUPONT in oval. Box is pretty much scuffed, but pretty scarce. Believe these were loaded in the WW2 era for use by VFW honor guards in funeral services and the like. Cartridges have commercial headstamps and paper bullets have reddish wax coating so they alomst appear to be wood rather than paper. Only second full box of these I have ever found. $39.00
 

U.S Military Shotgun  Ammunition

20268 “10 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gage Paper, No. 4 Chilled Shot” Scarce Winchester WW2 military contract - A scarce find for the military shotgun collector! Nice clean full original box fresh from a sealed spam can. Most collectors are familiar with the 12 GA shells with 00 Buck issued for guard duty or combat, or the No. 7 ½, 8 or 9 shot issued for training of aerial gunners. A few other sizes were procured in much smaller quantities. Hackley Woodin & Scranton list the No. 6 as “Hawk load” but they do not mention the N. 4, nor is it listed in the “Shotguns, All Types” TM. We found a box of this for our collection years ago, then found a spam can full and are sharing the wealth with other collectors. Only a few boxes left. $40.00 (View Picture)

19635 U.S. PROPERTY REMINGTON “ARROW” 00 BUCK FOR TRENCH GUNS- FULL BOX - Full with original ammunition. This is one of the less common military buckshot loads used with trench or riot guns during WW2. The most common is the cream and green colored Remington “Kleanbore” box, followed by the Peters Victor, Western, and Federal boxes. The least common, at least in my decades of collecting U.S. martial shotguns, is this cream and red Remington “Arrow” box. Apparently these were only procured very early in WW2, and perhaps for a few years prior to WW2. This box is far above average for this scarce type, with bright colors, almost no scuffing and only a slight bit of deformation at the corner from the pressure from the rims of the shells. But there is some damp staining of the bottom flap along with an old price of $2.25, and a puncture hole in one of the side panels about the size of a pencil. Still a very nice box. $135.00 (View Picture)

19665 "U.S. PROPERTY" 00 Buck for Trench Guns- Nitro Express Kleanbore by Remington- - Green and cream color box. This is in above average conditin with good color and minimal staining or scuffing. Minor stretching of the corner seam from the shell rims, but nothing bad. It has an old yellowing plastic wrap which makes it look less nice than it is. Still full of the original contents. These are the paper case shells that were standard combat issue for most of WW2, brass cases not being adopted until late in the war. $125.00 (View Picture)

19635 U.S. PROPERTY REMINGTON “ARROW” 00 BUCK FOR TRENCH GUNS- FULL BOX - Full with original ammunition. This is one of the less common military buckshot loads used with trench or riot guns during WW2. The most common is the cream and green colored Remington “Kleanbore” box, followed by the Peters Victor, Western, and Federal boxes. The least common, at least in my decades of collecting U.S. martial shotguns, is this cream and red Remington “Arrow” box. Apparently these were only procured very early in WW2, and perhaps for a few years prior to WW2. This box is far above average for this scarce type, with bright colors, almost no scuffing and only a slight bit of deformation at the corner from the pressure from the rims of the shells. But there is some damp staining of the bottom flap along with an old price of $2.25, and a puncture hole in one of the side panels about the size of a pencil. Still a very nice box. $135.00 (View Picture)

19311 +WINCHESTER 12 GA BRASS CASE 00 BUCK- FULL BOX OF 25 ROUNDS - “25 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gage, Brass, 00 Buckshot, Lot WRA 22048, Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Division of Olin Industries, Inc.” printed on the outer kraft wrapper, and repeated on the box inside (based on a separate box without wrapper from the same lot). The kraft wrapper has been opened, and we are not sure if it was enough to pull the box out, or just Bubba wanting to peek inside. This is sealed in plastic wrap for display, but there is a small tear in the plastic on the front and it should be redone, or display it without the plastic. This is the correct ammunition used late in WW2 with all of the various trench guns. The brass case ammo was made by both Winchester and Remington, while the earlier paper case 00 Buck ammo was made by Peters, Federal, Western, as well, in a wide variety of box types. As nice a box as we have seen in a long time. $450.00 (View Picture)

19310 WINCHESTER 12 GA BRASS CASE 00 BUCK- FULL BOX OF 25 ROUNDS - “25 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gage, Brass, 00 Buckshot, Lot WRA 22048, Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Division of Olin Industries, Inc.” printed on the box. This is sealed in plastic wrap for display. Like most of the loose boxes this has suffered some tears and bursting of the corner seams of the box, nearly repaired and not obvious to the casual observer. This is the correct ammunition used late in WW2 with all of the various trench guns. The brass case ammo was made by both Winchester and Remington, while the earlier paper case 00 Buck ammo was made by Peters, Federal, Western, as well, in a wide variety of box types. An above average box, even with the minor problems. $395.00 (View Picture)

18728 "U.S. PROPERTY" 00 Buck for Trench Guns- Nitro Express Kleanbore by Remington- NICE! - Green and cream color box. This is probably the best condition of any box of this type we have had, nice bright colors, and no worn or burst corner seams. Still full of the original contents, and wrapped in plastic for display. These are the paper case shells that were standard combat issue for most of WW2, brass cases not being adopted until late in the war. $149.00 (View Picture)

18277 -U.S. PROPERTY REMINGTON “ARROW” 00 BUCK- FULL BOX - Full with original ammunition. This is one of the less common military buckshot loads used with trench or riot guns during WW2. The most common is the cream and green colored Remington “Kleanbore” box, followed by the Peters Victor, Western, and Federal boxes. The least common, at least in my decades of collecting U.S. martial shotguns, is this cream and red Remington “Arrow” box. Apparently these were only procured very early in WW2, and perhaps for a few years prior to WW2. This box has bright colors, a bit of scuffing and soiling, with two spots where corner seams have been burst by the pressure from the rims of the shells. Lot number as shown in the photo, probably indicating 1941 manufacture. $145.00 (View Picture)

18276 U.S. PROPERTY REMINGTON “ARROW” 00 BUCK- FULL BOX - Full with original ammunition. This is one of the less common military buckshot loads used with trench or riot guns during WW2. The most common is the cream and green colored Remington “Kleanbore” box, followed by the Peters Victor, Western, and Federal boxes. The least common, at least in my decades of collecting U.S. martial shotguns, is this cream and red Remington “Arrow” box. Apparently these were only procured very early in WW2, and perhaps for a few years prior to WW2. This box is the best we have ever seen of this type, with bright colors, almost no scuffing and only a slight bit of deformation at the corner from the pressure from the rims of the shells. Probably better than the one in my collection, but I don’t have time to pull and compare. Lot number as shown in the photo, probably indicating 1941 manufacture. $175.00 (View Picture)

16788 WW2 U.S. PROPERTY 12 GAGE SHOTGUN AMMUNITION- FEDERAL MONARK #8 SHOT- 25 ROUND BOX - Full box in the original kraft paper overwrap, which has been opened enough to read the top of the box. This is the type of ammo issued for use in training aerial gunners with the various long barrel military marked shotguns. Trap and skeet type shooting gave the prospective gunners a better feel for the concept of “leading” a target. While the )00 Buckshot loads used with the trench guns are popular with collectors, the training ammunition like this is often overlooked, but it has been getting much harder to find in recent years. This is a nice clean box that also shows how the military loads were specially wrapped before being shipped in the commercial style wooden crates. $85.00 (View Picture)

16787 U.S. PROPERTY WESTERN EXPERT 12 GA #8 TRAP LOADS ST12 - Some types of U.S. military shotshell ammunition are relatively common, but most of what was not used for training of aerial gunners during WW2 was eventually sold off as surplus, and then shot up by civilians. This particular box type is one of the scarcer variations. We have seen only a handful of these “Super Trap Load” boxes in more than a dozen years collecting U.S. Property shotshells. Overall VG condition with just some minor scuffing on the edges. Will shrink wrap in plastic if requested. Nice for display with the long barrel “training” shotguns used during WW2. $85.00 (View Picture)

13767 BOX WW2 WINCHESTER 25 ROUNDS 12 GA BRASS CASE 00 BUCK AMMUNITION FOR TRENCH GUNS - Nice clean full box or 25 rounds of the brass cased 00 buck ammunition used with the Trench and Riot guns during WW2 and after. Most of these boxes are well used and have problems with burst seams at corners, etc. This has a smudged area on the top as shown in the photo, otherwise is excellent throughout. The “For use in hunting small game” marking was used briefly while the JAG types argued about the legality of using buckshot in combat, but procurement continued and it was issued regardless of the marking, mixed under the same stock numbers as the ammo without that marking. As nice as box as we have had in several years. Sealed in plastic for display. $450.00 (View Picture)

16325 10 CTGS, 12 GAGE/ SHOTGUN PLASTIC CASE/ NO. 4B SECIAL XM257 - Lot WCC 60-[ink stamped] 1 , Olin Corp. printed on the tan paper/foil overwrap. There is a June 1974 date on the overwrap material so these are just after Vietnam era. This is the first time we have had any of the XM257 loads for the trench guns using Number 4 buckshot. Since this is still sealed, I have no idea what the contents actually look like, or the headstamps or case markings. Nice, full sealed box. $59.00 (View Picture)

16178 10 SHELLS, SHOTGUN, PAPER, 12 GAGE, NO. 8 CHILLED SHOT Lot WCC 6489 Western Cartridge Company - U.S. Military issue shotshells issued for use for training of aerial gunners and/or competition. This has the “pie wedge” type of crimp instead of the rolled crimp most often seen. Side of case is marked “SUPER TRAP/ 3-1 1/8-8/ LOAD” and low brass head has standard Western Xpert headstamp. Nice clean ammo in nice clean box. Perfect for display with WW2 or later U.S. military shotguns. One box of 10 rounds for $35.00 (View Picture)

14161 WW2 WESTERN XPERT US PROPERTY 16 GA NO 1 BUCK AMMUNITION - Western XPERT brand in yellow, blue and red box. Top flap marked 25 16 Ga. Xpert 2 9/16 in.length U.S. PROPERTY, No. 1 Buckshot, 15 pellets. Cartridges are low brass with salmon colored body and Winchester Ranger No 16 headstamp. Closing wad is dirty gray color with black 1B in circle. Many 16 GA guns were procured early in the war and issued for industrial security, etc, not combat use. This 16 GA ammo is very rarely encountered, and most of the boxes I have seen have been pretty ratty. Have several of these now that are well above average, with some staining and scuffing but nice bright colors and good markings. Photo shows one of the least attractive. A nice addition to a WW2 military shotgun collection, and a reminder to keep checking for those elusive US marked non-standard shotguns out there. $59.00 (View Picture)

15412 U.S. MILITARY SHOTSHELL SHIPPING CRATE- WW2 VINTAGE "U.S' PROPERTY" - Nice clean box with sharp markings. This held 500 rounds of 12 Gage shotshells (20 boxes of 25 rounds each) loaded with Number 8 shot for use in the long barrel military shotguns. These were for training aerial gunners to shoot at moving targets. A box like this will add a lot of interest to a display of U.S. martial shotguns. Loaded by Federal Cartridge Company and one end has the date 9-25-43 and ordnance wheel inspector marks. Very few of these shipping crates have survived as most were burned up as soon as they were empty or busted up after years of use collecting junk. This one is missing a small piece off the bottom, and it lacks the top. A top could be made from a piece of plywood for use in a display. $95.00 (View Picture)

12936 U.S. WW2 16 GA SHOTGUN AMMUNITION - Western XPERT brand in yellow, blue and red box. Top flap marked 25 16 Ga. Xpert 2 9/16 in.length U.S. PROPERTY, No. 1 Buckshot, 15 pellets. Cartridges are low brass with salmon colored body and Winchester Ranger No 16 headstamp. Closing wad is dirty gray color with black 1B in circle. Many 16 GA guns were procured early in the war and issued for industrial security, etc, not combat use. This 16 GA ammo is very rarely encountered, and most of the boxes I have seen have been pretty ratty. This is a better than average example on the face and top, and the corner seams are pretty good. The sides and bottom have a lot of peeled areas. Still above average overall as these go. $49.00 (View Picture)

8453 10 CTGS, 12 GAGE/ SHOTGUN PLASTIC CASE/ NO. 00 BUCKSHOT XM162 - Lot WCC 50-1, Olin Corp. printed on the brown kraft/foil overwrap. June 1974 date on the overwrap material so these are slightly post-Vietnam era. Nice clean, full sealed box of the ammunition used in trench and riot guns during Vietnam and until the present. $40.00 (View Picture)

12125 U.S. military XM162 00 Buck shipping crate - I believe this dates to 1967 (from lot number 56-67) so it is probably early Vietnam era. Standard military markings on one side and both ends and SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION on the lid. It is interesting that they use the Ammunition Logistics Code (ALC) of A011 which is the same used for 12 GA 00 Buck loads as far back as WW2. Outside dimensions about 10.5" x 10.5" x 16". Only crate of this style I have seen, and later contracts were filled packed in the .50 caliber size cans packed two to a wire-bound crate. Used good. Get this quick before I change my mind and keep it. $150.00 (View Picture)

11794 10 SHELLS, SHOTGUN, PAPER, 12 GAGE NO. 8 - CHILLED SHOT, LOT RA [ink stamped] 5813 over 330-8R" Black printing on natural kraft color box. These were used for training purposes in the long barreled shotguns during WW2, and to a lesser extent for recreational trap and skeet shooting during peacetime. Bright clean full box, sealed in plastic for display. $29.00 (View Picture)

10644 WW2 RIOT GUN AMMUNITION- 16 GA - Western XPERT brand in yellow, blue and red box. Top flap marked 25 16 Ga. Xpert 2 9/16 in.length U.S. PROPERTY, No. 1 Buckshot, 15 pellets. Cartridges are low brass with salmon colored body and Winchester Ranger No 16 headstamp. Closing wad is dirty gray color with black 1B in circle. Many 16 GA guns were procured early in the war and issued for industrial security, etc, not combat use. This 16 GA ammo is very rarely encountered, and most of the boxes I have seen have been pretty ratty. This is a better than average example, with some light dirt and stains but good legible military markings. $59.00 (View Picture)

7555 XM257 BUCKSHOT (27 NO. 4 BUCKSHOT) - Full box of 25 rounds- Winchester 12 Gage plastic case loads. Side of case is printed "NO. 4BSPL-27P over XM257" Otherwise commercial headstamp WINCHESTER 12 GA. packed in commercial style gray boxes with addition of red section with "FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT USE ONLY/ NOT FOR RETAIL SALE" End flap has printed marking Q1398 MAX LOAD 27 PELETS 4 BUCK. XM257 loads were combat tested in Vietnam in 1967-68, and the XM162 with nine 00 buck was found to be a more effective load, and further work on the XM257 was dropped. $65.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD**4702 WW1 era Trenchgun Ammo- US PROPERTY - Remington UMC full two piece box. Some edges broken open (typical) but label pretty good. WW2 Trench gun ammo is scarce, but I have only seen about 6 boxes from the WW1 period (4 REM-UMC and 2 Winchester). Ammo is virtually identical to later WW2 production but sealing varnish is thicker and has some age cracks over the orange closing wad with OO Buck marked. Brass case headstamped REM-UMC/No 12/BEST with blue lacquer primer seal. Photos show box before being wrapped for protection. (View Picture)

U.S Military Pistol  Ammunition

18582 WW2 MILITARY .38 SPECIAL AMMUNITION FOR VICTORY MODEL REVOLVERS - All .38 special ammunition procured during WW2 was made by Remington, and aside from some tracer rounds and a very small number of lead bullet rounds for police or guard use, this was made with 158 grain steel jacketed bullet in cases headstamped REM UMC 38 SPL. (Technically they are gilding metal clad steel so they have a copper covering, a process used for much US military ammo in WW2 to conserve copper supplies.) This was delivered in 50 round boxes with typical commercial style green and red markings, and lot numbers in the 5000 range. This is described in Hackley, Woodin & Scranton’s History of U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition, Volume 2 pages 4-6. After many years of looking we found several boxes of this ammo, perfect for display with a Victory Model, Colt Commando, or other .38 Special military revolvers as described in Charles Pate’s U.S. Military handguns of WW2. Boxes show a bit of scuffing and minor storage soiling but are in VG-fine condition. Full box, sealed in plastic for display with a single loose round to illustrate the contents. $80.00 (View Picture)

17694 LOT OF 50 ROUNDS OF WW2 ERA .38 SPECIAL TRACER AMMUNITION - This is the type of ammo issued to Navy and Marine Corps pilots for use in their .38 Special caliber S&W "Vistory" Model revolvers for signaling. This ammo was removed from the original boxes and stored loose resulting in much of the red paint on the tips being lost. Lot of 50 rounds for $49.00 (View Picture)

15788 50 Cartridges, Pistol high pressure test cal. .45 M1 (PROOF LOADS) - Full box with tinned cases, loaded at Frankford Arsenal with FA 42 headstamp. Printing on the box is yellow, a bit hard to read in the photo, but pretty darn obvious that this is not just ordinary ball ammo. Extremely scarce stuff, only about the fourth box I have ever encountered. This is VERY hot stuff producing extreme pressures used ONLY for Proof firing under carefully controlled conditions. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FIRE THIS AMMUNITION! SOLD AS DISPLAY/COLLECTOR ITEM ONLY $135.00 (View Picture)

15546 WW2 MILITARY .38 SPECIAL AMMUNITION FOR VICTORY MODEL REVOLVERS - All .38 special ammunition procured during WW2 was made by Remington, and aside from some tracer rounds and a very small number of lead bullet rounds for police or guard use, this was made with 158 grain steel jacketed bullet in cases headstamped REM UMC 38 SPL. (Technically they are gilding metal clad steel so they have a copper covering, a process used for much US military ammo in WW2 to conserve copper supplies.) This was delivered in 50 round boxes with typical commercial style green and red markings, and lot numbers in the 5000 range. This is described in Hackley, Woodin & Scranton’s History of U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition, Volume 2 pages 4-6. After many years of looking we found several boxes of this ammo, perfect for display with a Victory Model, Colt Commando, or other .38 Special military revolvers as described in Charles Pate’s U.S. Military handguns of WW2. Boxes show a bit of scuffing and minor storage soiling but are in VG-fine condition. Full box, sealed in plastic for display with a single loose round to illustrate the contents. $80.00 (View Picture)

13686 WW2 MILITARY .38 SPECIAL AMMUNITION FOR VICTORY MODEL REVOLVERS - All .38 special ammunition procured during WW2 was made by Remington, and aside from some tracer rounds and a very small number of lead bullet rounds for police or guard use, this was made with 158 grain steel jacketed bullet in cases headstamped REM UMC 38 SPL. (Technically they are gilding metal clad steel so they have a copper covering, a process used for much US military ammo in WW2 to conversve copper supplies.) This was delivered in 50 round boxes with typical commercial style green and red markings, and lot numbers in the 5000 range. This is described in Hackley Woodin & Scranton’s History of U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition, Volume 2 pages 4-6. After many years of looking we found several boxes of this ammo, perfect for display with a Victory Model, Colt Commando, or other .38 Special military revolvers as described in Charles Pate’s U.S. Military handguns of WW2. Boxes show a bit of scuffing and minor storage soiling but are in VG-fine condition. Full box, sealed in plastic for display with a single loose round to illustrate the contents. $80.00 (View Picture)

U.S Military Miscellaneous Ammunition, componments, tools, manuals,

17158 M16 BANDOLEER REPACK SETS - Consisting of one U.S. GI bandoleer with 7 cardboard inserts, 14 stripper clips, 1 charger guide. Markings and lot numbers may vary from photos. Some can be dated from markings on the back. Most are 1973 and newer. (Post Vietnam dates, but same style as used in Vietnam.) Great for repacking all that loose 5.56mm ammo so that it can be swiftly loaded into magazines when needed. $7.00 (View Picture)

2769 "20 Primed Cases, Cartridge Cal .30 (Primer T53) - W.O. 4305 MI, March 1949 "No Waterproofing at Mouth" Sealed box. Cases have FA 49 headstamp and the zinc colored primer being tested for adoption as one of the early non-corrosive primiers for .30-06 ammunition. Interesting item which illustrates the complexity of evolving ammuniton to meet new technology or overcome old problems. $10.00

2218 20 Caliber .30 Rifle and Carbine Shells Model 1898 (primed) Manufactured at FRANKFORD ARSENAL- Empty two piece box with salmon colored label printed in black as above. Date stamp "JUL 2 1908" on top of box. Excellent box but unfortunately empty. $12.00

3926x M1 Carbine Stripper Clips Hold 10 rounds each, issued in cloth bandoleers. Used once, excellent, good tabs on the ends. Lot of 12, enough to refill one bandoleer. $15.00


U.S. Military Cartridges 1865-1965 (Single rounds)
Single Cartridge 
item number
Caliber
Description
Headstamp
Price
    1
.45-70-500 Ball, Reloading, Rifle, tinned case.  F (month)
(year)
$6.00
    2
.45-55-405 Ball, Reloading, Carbine, tinned case F (month)
(year)
$6.00
    3
6mm Navy

(.236 cali)

Winchester-Lee Navy commercial load
112 gr. soft point bullet
W.R.A. Co.
6m/m U.S.N.
$3.50
    4
12 GA 00 Buck, Brass case, M19 for 
WW2 trench guns
REM-UMC
No.12/BEST
$10.00
    5
12 GA Tracer, WW2 issue for training aerial
gunners **TEMPORARILY OUT OF STOCK**
RA/12 GA
TRACER
$5.00
    6
410 GA M35 shot for USAF survival guns.
aluminum case
WCC 52 $3.00

Collectors Cartridge Sets
Examples of different cartridges to display with your firearms.
Each set comes with card to identify items in the set.
Order as: Cartridge Set (Caliber- Set number)


Caliber and Set Number
Contents
Price
.30-06 Set
No. 1
Ball M1, Ball M2, Armor Piercing M2, Tracer M1, Tracer M25, Blank M1909 (View Picture)
$4.00
.30-06 Set
No. 2
Incendiary M1, Guard M1906, Gallery Practice M1919, Frangible Ball M22, Grenade Launching Blank M3
$10.00
.30-06 Set
No. 3
Ball M1 National Match, Ball Match M72, Dummy M1906, Dummy M2, Armor Piercing Incendiary M14 (View Picture)
$10.00
.30-06 Set
No. 4
Ball M1906 for aircraft machine guns 1918 dated, Ball M2 Clandestine (CIA "Bay of Pigs"). Tracer M1917, Unfinished case prior to necking and flash hole operations. (View Picture)
  $8.00
.30-06 Set
No. 5
Ball M2 Frankford Arsenal 50th Anniversary- US FA 1906-56; Blank M1906 (paper bullet), Dummy M40
$18.00
.30-06 Set
No. 6
.30-03 used in rod bayonet and  early M1903 rifles prior to adoption of .30-06.  (Commercial load- split neck); Blank M1903 (.30-03)- arsenal "remodeled to fit M1903 rifles chambered for Model 1906  ammunition" by crimping the long neck (paper bullet); Cartridge Case, Caliber .30 M1,Primed Prepared for test loading or sale (headsamp FA 36); Cal.30 Auto Pistol Ball Cartridge Model of 1918 Used with "Pedersen Device" in M1903 Mark I rifle  (Headstamp  RA H 19)
$10.00
.45 ACP
Ball M1911regular crimp, Ball M1911stake crimp for M1917 revolvers, Ball M1911WW2 steel case, Ball M1911 Match, Shot M15 for WW2 survival issue
$5.00
.30 Carbine
Blank Grenade Launching M6, Tracer M27, Dummy M13, Ball M1 from 3 differnt makers
$5.00
.30-40 Krag
Ball M1898 Frankford Arsenal, Ball M1898 contract, Blank with paper bullet, Blank (1898) M3 with 1909 style crimp
$7.00
7.62 mm NATO
Ball M59, Ball M80, Tracer M62, Dummy M63, Blank M82, Grenade Launching Blank M64 (View Picture)
$6.00
**NEW**
U.S. Military Dummy Cartridge Set
One of each: .30-06 Dummy Model 1906 (fluted case); .30-06 Dummy M2 (holes in case); .30 Carbine Dummy M13 (no primer); 7.62mm Dummy M63 (fluted case); 5.56mm Dummy XM199 (fluted case); .50 Browning Machine Gun, Dummy M2 (holes in case); 20 x 110mmRB Oerlikon Dummy (holes in case); 20 x 110mm Hispano-Suiza Dummy M18A3 (View Picture)
$20.00
U.S. Military Shotgun Set
12 GA, 00 Buck, paper case for WW1, WW2 Trench Guns (paper case); 12 GA, Brass, 00 Buck, M19 for WW2 & later Trench Guns (brass case); 12 GA XM257, #4 Buck, 27 pellets, Vietnam experimental load (plastic case); 12 GA XM262, 00 Buck, Vietnam experimenta (plastic case); 12 GA Paper, #8 shot, WW2 load used for training aerial gunners (paper case); 410 GA Aluminum case #6 shot, for survival guns **TEMPORARILY OUT OF STOCK**

**NEW**
WW2 Japanese

set

3 rounds 7.7x58mm Armor Piercing in a section of the brass feed strip for Type 92. 97, 99 or Type 1 machine guns; 1 round 7.7x58mmSR (Semi-Rimmed) Ball used only in Type 92 machine guns; 1 round 7.7x58mm Ball for Type 99 rifles; 1 round 6.5x50mm for Type 38 and Type I rifles; 1 round 8x21mm pistol round for Type 14 pistols. All live, original WW2 Japanese military issue, with typical unmarked headstamp.

21528 US Military Rifle Dummy Cartridge set $20.00 per set. (View Picture)
One of each:
            .30-06 Dummy Model 1906 (fluted case)
            .30-06 Dummy M2 (holes in case)
            .30 Carbine, Dummy M13 (no primer)
            7.62mm NATO, Dummy M63 (fluted case)
            5.56mm, Dummy XM199 (fluted case)
            .50 Browning Machine Gun, Dummy M2 (holes in case)
            20 x 110mmRB Oerlikon Dummy (holes in case )
            20 x 110mm Hispano -Suiza Dummy M18A3 (solid metal)


5430 US Military Machine Gun Ammo set $20.00 per set. (View Picture)
Consists of:
  • . 30-06 Web Belt  section with 4 ball M2 and 1 Tracer M1 as used in Browning Machine Guns M1917 and 1919 types circa 1917 to 1945.
  • . 30-06 Disintegrating Metal Links M1 with 4 AP M2 and 1 Tracer M25 as used in Browning Machine Guns M1917 and 1919 types circa 1943 to 1970.
  • 7.62mm Disintegrating Metal Links M13 with 4 ball M80 and 1 Tracer M62 as used in M60 Machine Guns circa 1968 to present
  • 5.56mm Disintegrating Metal Links M27 with 5 Ball M193 as used in "FN Minimi" Squad Automatic Weapon circe 1988 to present

Foreign Military Ammunition for Collectors

22739 .577-450 MARTINI SCARCE BRITISH COILED CASE CARTRIDGE CIRCA 1880-1885 - Officially the “Cartridge, Small Arms Ball, Breech loading Martini Henry Carbine Rolled Case Mark III” adopted in 1879 and in 1880 the specification was changed to use a red colored paper patch (instead of white). This is one of the post-1880 production, probably made prior to 1885 when conventional drawn or solid cases were adopted. The coiled case was first used in the .577 Snider and they are made with a steel base with a crass head piece and thin sheets of brass and paper rolled up to form the case body. This was a natural progression from rolled paper cartridges to a self contained cartridge holding primer, powder and bullet as a single unit. They were cheap and easily made, and the military supply folks were addicted to cheap and easy as opposed to more expensive and harder to make drawn metallic cartridge cases, resulting in use of the coiled cases until 1885 (and even later in India). Actually, the paper shotshells in use until the 1960s were more or less a form of rolled or coiled case construction. This is a scarce example to go with any of the early .577-450 Martini Henry rifles or carbines to show the now unfamiliar type of cartridges. Except for the use of red instead of white color of the paper patch around the bullet, this is visually identical to the rifle cartridge. This is a live loaded round, with some corrosion around the neck area from the powder, and the red paper patch is in pretty good condition. $22.00 (View Picture)

22239 ORIGINAL WW2 GERMAN BOX OF 16 ROUNDS 9mm LUGER AMMUNITION DATED 1944 (mog 17) - Full box, with complete label, although it has been opened. This was shrink wrapped in plastic after the photos were done, and displays almost like a full sealed box. Headstamp dnh St+ and (month) 6 and (year) 44. The Germans used 16 round boxes to avoid waste from having left over rounds from 20 or 50 round boxes. The P-08 Luger and P-38 pistols both had 8 round magazines, and the MP-38 or MP-40 submachine guns used 32 round magazines, so the 16 round boxes made a lot of sense. $35.00 (View Picture)

22227 ORIGINAL WW2 GERMAN BOX OF 16 ROUNDS 9mm LUGER AMMUNITION 1944 DATED (dark blue label) - Full box, with complete label, although it has been opened. This was shrink wrapped in plastic after the photos were done, and displays almost like a full sealed box. Headstamp something like dnh St+ and (month) 6 and (year) 44. The Germans used 16 round boxes to avoid waste from having left over rounds from 20 or 50 round boxes. The P-08 Luger and P-38 pistols both had 8 round magazines, and the MP-38 or MP-40 submachine guns used 32 round magazines, so the 16 round boxes made a lot of sense. $35.00 (View Picture)

22027 WW2 GERMAN 15 ROUND BOX OF 8MM MAUSER AMMUNITION FOR K98K RIFLES - Nice bright clean 1937 dated German military issue ammunition as used in the 8mm Mauser rifles and the G/K-43 and many others. Good legible label reads Patronen s.S. has ammo specifications and it was manufactured in 1937 and packed in 1937 by manufacturer code P186, but I do not know the identify for that facility. This stuff is over 65 years old and sold for display purposes only, not considered safe to shoot. Sealed in plastic shrink wrap for display. One box of 15 rounds $20.00 (View Picture)

21253 .577 Snider or .577-450 Martini “Cartridge, Small Arms Blank All Arms Boxer Breech-Loading Service Mark III” - was approved in December 1868, and the nearly identical Mark IV was adopted in 1872 with loose powder instead of a compressed pellet, so we are not sure which version this is. Since the cartridge body was the same for both the .577 Snider and the .577-450 Martini, this cartridge was used for both since there was no bullet diameter issue to worry about for blanks. $20.00 (View Picture)

21252 .577 Snider “Cartridge, Small Arms Ball Breech-Loading Boxer for .577 Snider Rifles 2 ½ Drams mark VIII” - Easily identified by the two black rings printed on the paper over brass wrapped body of the cartridge. This round did NOT have a plug in the nose cavity of the Mark VII bullet, just the lead spun closed over the cavity. $25.00 (View Picture)

21246 WW2 JAPANESE 6.5mm BALL AMMUNITION- STRIPPER CLIP WITH 5 ROUNDS - Typical Japanese military ammunition which did NOT use any headstamp markings. The red sealant around the case mouth indicates this is Ball ammunition. This is a lot of five rounds on the original stripper clip, with the smooth back peculiar to the Japanese clips. Nice for display with a Type 30 or 38 rifle (with due respect for the fact that this is LIVE ammunition!). $25.00 (View Picture)

20860 LOT 100 ROUNDS 7.65MM ARGENTINE AMMUNITION & 140 FIRED CASES - This is the ammunition made for use in the Argentine Mausers Model 1891 and 1909, and also used by a few other South American countries and also Belgium. This lot came in with a rifle we bought, and includes five boxes (total 100 rounds) of recently made Privi Partizan ammo with 174 grain FMJ bullets. These have boxer primed reloadable brass cases. Also included are another seven boxes of fired cases (140 rounds), so you have enough to justify reloading. The lot of 100 rounds and 140 fired cases for $100.00 (View Picture)

20851 7.62 x 39mm softpoint by Norma- Lot of 80 Rounds - Factory loads to Norma's famous high quality standards, not Chinese slave labor or Slobovian surplus. Boxer primed reloadable. Four full boxes for $50.00 (View Picture)

20334 Packet of military .303 British blanks - Typical British format for packing ammunition until the post-WW2 period when conventional boxes were almost exclusively used. Ten rounds of .303 military blanks, wrapped in a paper wrapper with description of contents. $15.00 (View Picture)

19863 -SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR SPANISH 11MM ROLLING BLOCK AMMUNITION- BOX OF 20 ROUNDS - This is the 11.5 x 57R mm SPANISH REFORMADO cartridge which was adopted by the Spanish Government about 1867. ~. Remington & Sons supplied many of their Rolling Block Rifles to Spain chambered for this cartridge. A good number of these rifles and ammunition were captured in Cuba during the Spanish-American War and are thus fairly common. These have the thin brass jacket on the bullet which tended to easily corrode in the tropics, and turn an ugly green color from the verdigris. Propaganda claims were widespread at the time that these were “poison bullets” but virtually any bullet at the time would drag along plenty of germy stuff and medical conditions did little to deter infections from numerous causes, so the claims seemed valid at the time. Headstamps on these cartridges vary greatly and often are nearly illegible and are mixed within the box. Most likely these are part of the captured ammunition from Cuba that was sold to Bannerman, and repacked for resale by them, using boxes that are plain brown cardboard. Still, it is a good representation of a box of Spanish ammunition for their rolling block rifles of the time. Boxes are scuffed and worn, and some of the seams are torn. Boxes can be shrink wrapped in plastic for display upon request at no charge if you like. One box of 20 rounds $49.00 (View Picture)

19859 SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR SPANISH 11MM ROLLING BLOCK AMMUNITION- BOX OF 20 ROUNDS - This is the 11.5 x 57R mm SPANISH REFORMADO cartridge which was adopted by the Spanish Government about 1867. ~. Remington & Sons supplied many of their Rolling Block Rifles to Spain chambered for this cartridge. A good number of these rifles and ammunition were captured in Cuba during the Spanish-American War and are thus fairly common. These have the thin brass jacket on the bullet which tended to easily corrode in the tropics, and turn an ugly green color from the verdigris. Propaganda claims were widespread at the time that these were “poison bullets” but virtually any bullet at the time would drag along plenty of germy stuff and medical conditions did little to deter infections from numerous causes, so the claims seemed valid at the time. Headstamps on these cartridges vary greatly and often are nearly illegible and are mixed within the box. Most likely these are part of the captured ammunition from Cuba that was sold to Bannerman, and repacked for resale by them, using boxes with a brown geometric pattern. Still, it is a good representation of a box of Spanish ammunition for their rolling block rifles of the time. Boxes are scuffed and worn, and some of the seams are torn. Boxes can be shrink wrapped in plastic for display upon request at no charge if you like. One box of 20 rounds $49.00 (View Picture)

20445 9mm FROMMER STOP (.380) EMPTY CARTRIDGE BOX- HUNGARY - Neat old two piece box with light green and black label featuring a picture of a Frommer Stop pistol. Condition as shown, and it is an empty box. Great for display with one of the Pisztoly 39M pistols, the onley ones made in 9mm kurz (.380) caliber. Probably circa 1939-45. $20.00 (View Picture)

19703 .577 Snider “Cartridge, Ball Boxer for .577 Snider Rifle .577 inch (Mark unknown) - This is at least a Pattern IV because it has the iron rim, but it appears NOT to have had any paper over wrapping the brass coil case construction. The 480 grain lead bullet appears to have the lead was turned over to cover the nose cavity. So, it is being sold as “Old .577 Snider cartridge, exact Mark uncertain. (View Picture)

11419 .577 Snider “Cartridge, Ball Boxer for .577 Snider Rifle .577 inch Bore Pattern IV(?)” - This was the first Mark or Pattern of the Snider cartridges to use the steel base disc (rim) instead of brass. The coiled brass case body was covered with a layer of white paper. The 480 grain lead bullet should have a sycamore wood plug in the nose cavity, but it cannot be seen, so perhaps the lead was turned over to cover it. This lacks the stripes on the outer layer of the case which should be there if this was one of the later Marks which used the bullets with lead turned over instead of a wood plug. So, it is being sold as “Old Snider cartridge, exact Mark uncertain. (View Picture)

22809 7 x 57mm Mauser Ball Ammunition- lot of about 100 rounds - Venezuela military surplus- with one rough condition box with 15 rounds on 5 round stripper clips plus another 40 rounds on stripper clips and about 50 loose rounds. Headstamps on some are FN 36 and others are FNT 52. Undoubtedly it is all corrosive primed, and no guarantee that it is safe to fire or will all be duds or potentially hazardous misfires or hangfires. Good for filling cartridge belts or bandoleers for display. What you see is what you get- the entire lot as shown for $35.00 (View Picture)

22045 WW2 GERMAN 15 ROUND BOX OF 8MM MAUSER AMMUNITION FOR K98K RIFLES - Nice bright clean 1937 dated German military issue ammunition as used in the 8mm Mauser rifles and the G/K-43 and many others. Good legible label reads Patronen s.S. has ammo specifications and it was manufactured in 1937 and packed in 1937 by manufacturer code P186, but I do not know the identify for that facility. This stuff is over 65 years old and sold for display purposes only, not considered safe to shoot. Sealed in plastic shrink wrap for display. One box of 15 rounds $20.00 (View Picture)

8955 FN HERSTAL, BELGIUM 9MM AMMO - Full 25 round box of FMJ ball ammo headstamped F N 51. Good to go with any Korean war or more recent vintage 9mm Parabelum caliber pistols. $29.00 (View Picture)

7639 WW2 US/UK 9MM AMMO CRATE - Wooden box with tin liner, about 8.5" wide, 10" tall and 17" long. Faded stencil on outside "3840 Cartridges, 9mm Ball M1, 1305 308 5810 A360, Lot RR-137530" These were packed with ammo in 64 round boxes, just right for filling two STEN gun magazines. I believe these were late WW2 or Korean War era procurement from Canada, but under US contract for Lend Lease, hence the U.S. style markings. The 9mm Ball M1 was standardized in 1942, and procurement from US sources was mainly for use by the OSS and probably Lend Lease as well. Great for display with OSS or UK or Lend Lease collection, or with Sten guns, or for living history use.. Wooden top is secured by two metal strips, one of which is hinged, and a cotter pin which hold the lid in place. Wooden box with tin liner, but missing wooden lid or top to the liner. Make a top out of plywood and will display okay. . $25.00 (View Picture)


(SPECIAL SALE PRICES POSTED!)
Collectible Reloading Tools, Bullet molds, Powder Flasks, Powder cans, Powder Horns, etc.

18633 DUPONT “EAGLE- RIFLE SHOOTING” POWDER CAN- 1 POUND SIZE CIRCA 1870-1890 - Dupont used the “Eagle” brand for different powder types (mainly different granulations?) including “rifle shooting” and “duck shooting” with the “duck” being more common. This is a nice early can circa 1870-1890 with part of the sealing ribbon intact, but some loss of the label. A fairly scarce early can in presentable, but not super, condition. $275.00 SALE PRICE $125.00 (View Picture)

17453 NEW ENGLAND SPORTING POWDER BOSTON ¼ POUND CAN - One quarter pound size, about 2 ¾’ x 2 ¾” x 1 3/8” with black japanned finish once stenciled NEW/ENGLAND/SPORTING/POWDER/BOSTON but the stenciled markings are very difficult to make out except under favorable light and holding the can just right and you can eventually make out about 2/3 of the marks. Nearly identical to the example shown in Baczk & Rowe “Gun Powder Cans & Kegs” volume II, page 293. The exact maker is unidentified. $25.00 SALE PRICE $15.00 (View Picture)

17452 RARE VENEZUEALAN BLACK POWDER CAN - The chipped paper label includes the word VENEZUEALA at the bottom, and other clues elsewhere, but the exact maker and date are unknown. This came from the estate of a distinguished collector who was once stationed in Venezuela and probably added to his collection at that time. Looks larger than one pound size, perhaps a kilogram or half-kilogram size can? This is an odd shape, sort of an oval with pointed tips. Size is about 4” wide by 8” tall by 3” deep. The label is composed of a small oval above a large one. The larger contains a scene with a hunter shooting birds separated by the powder type FFF, and the word VENEZUEALA at the bottom. The smaller oval includes a deer like animal with the words “MARCA REGISTRADA. Arched around the top are the words: [P?]OLVO[R?} PARA CACERIA EL CAZADOR which roughly translates to “powder for the hunter.” I am not sure if this was made in Venezuela, or merely labeled for sale there. Date is estimated to be circa 1880-1920, but that is only a guess. Overall condition is good to very good with an overall “old” appearance. The cap is missing from the stamped tin spout which is lightly rusted. $195.00 SALE PRICE $95.00 (View Picture)

16969 POWDER CAN- 1 POUND- CIRCA 1860-1890 - Nice early can that looks “old” and will be great to display with a muzzle loader or even an early black powder cartridge rifle. About 80-90% of the original red painted finish remains. Complete with the lead or pewter cap. $25.00 SALE PRICE $15.00 (View Picture)

14399 HANDSOME OLD ANTIQUE POWDER HORN- 15 INCH, 1827 DATED - A very attractive plain powder horn, about fifteen inches long. The wood plug (pine?) is recessed slightly from the end of the horn, and secured by about six brass tacks. Where the edges of the orn extended past the plug, they were originally finished off with a nice scallop type design, but most of the pieces have been broken off over the years. Recent screw hole in the center of the plug probably from a screw eye (missing) for attaching the strap. Looks like there was originally an iron staple attached to the top of the horn for that purpose, but it is now missing. Nice quality workmanship with the body of the horn scraped thin enough to be translucent to view how much is left. Pouring end has a wooden plug with a brass tip that looks to be a modern replacement. A farily large horn typical of those used in the period 1750 to about 1840 with the large bore muskets, fowlers and heavy caliber rifles of the period. Great for display with an original or a nice modern copy. My guess is that the 1827 date is authentic, but have no way to verify that. Overall G-VG condition except for the chipped areas around the plug. Still a nice old horn. $95.00 (View Picture)

4650 FRANKFORD ARSENAL PRIMERS- FULL CAN (Label replaced) - Paper label would read "500 Cartridge Primers. This primer is suitable for black powder charges only. It is used in all Cal..45 and shotgun ammunition, and in Cal..30 gallery practice cartridges. Manufactured at Frankford Arsenal. " [One can had a rubber stamped May 1902 date on the label] Believe it is full, but a few primers may have been lost over the years. When screw top of the tin plated can is removed, the primers are housed in ten pasteboard discs with holes to individually hold 50 primers on each disc. Layer of cotton fabric on top of each disc and a string holds the stack together. These were issued at the unit level for reloading the tin plated cases commonly used circa 1882-1910 in .45-70, .30-40, and.30-06 cartridges. Reloading was done with both the "tong" type tool sets widely issued (and still fairly common) and the scarce bench type sets. Only one empty can encountered in my collecting experience prior to finding this small lot. (Reproduction label has been glued in place after the photos was taken) $95.00 (View Picture)

5948 Embossed brown leather shot pouch with charger top - Overall length about 8.5 inches. Very nice quality with a good measure built into the spout. Both sides have embosed game scene in excellent condition with no wear or scuffing and only a few flex-cracks. Only marking is “2 Lbs” below the rivet holding the spout assembly. Probably American made. Looks like a leather tab at the base has been torn off. Still, a really handsome piece to display with an old muzzle loading fowler or shotgun anywhere from about 1830 to the end of the muzzle loader era. $45.00 (View Picture)

5946 HANDSOME ZINC POWDER FLASK WITH CHARGER TOP - Zinc flasks are often found in lousy condition as the metal is easily crushed and tends to be eaten away by certain chemical reactions. This one is in great shape with nice embosses pattern on both side. Measure has non-adjustable measuring spout with internal spring. No markings noted, probably American made, but perhaps an import. Overall length about 7.5 inches. Date is probably circa 1840-1870 but these remained in use until the end of the percussion era. Based on the size of the powder measure, this is probably for a rifle in the .40-50 caliber range, and would be nice for display with a half stock or full stock rifle of that era. Nice mellow patina to the brass. $55.00 (View Picture)

3090 Powder Can- American Powder Mills "Triple Refined Dead Shot Sporting Powder manufactured by the American Powder Mills, Boston" on the label of this neat old can. One pound size with oval body and shallow brass cap. Can is bright red but the paint is alligatoring and rusting through making the labels hard to read. Label on back shows a bird in flight above name American Powder Mills, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis. Believe this one dates to about 1880-1900. $50.00  (View Picture)

3092 Powder Can- 1/2 pound size, black Cap missing, paint rough. Probably circa 1880-1900. Has character. $22.00 (View Picture)

3093 Powder Can- 1 pound size, Oval, red paint, no label or cap. Probably circa 1880-1900. $18.00 (View Picture)

3095 Powder Can- 1 pound size, Basically rectangular with beveled corners on the sides. Tin spout with cork, not threaded. Diamond pattern embossed on front and rear. Red pait but no labels. Old name and Newark, Ohio scratched on the bottom. Estimated to be 1840-1870- vintage. $45.00  (View Picture)

3096 Powder Can- 1 pound size Flask type A clever marketing scheme where the can was shaped like a flask complete with two loops for a carrying cord. About 40% red paint remains and about 50% of the label featuring a dog and [?]graph Sporting Gun Powder Probably circa 1880-1900. $25.00   (View Picture)


Collectible Commercial Ammunition and Components

19054 .22 LR Box Collection- Lot of 10 different vintage full boxes .22 Long Rifle ammunition - See the photo for details of the boxes included. All have the original contents with bright and clean boxes, not scuffed or price marked or anything. A great start for someone who wants to get into .22 Box collecting, or have a colorful assortment to display with one or more guns in .22 Long Rifle caliber. Dates are mostly circa 1960s-1980s, I think. The lot of 10 boxes for $55.00 (View Picture)

11802 BOX OF 50 WINCHESTER .380 AUTO UNPRIMED BRASS - White label box circa 1960s, opened but still full. Old price inked on one corner. Headstamp WRA 380 AUTO. $5.00 (View Picture)

7796 HAZARD POWDER COMPANY FRAMED MAP - Detailed map of Hazardville, in Enfield Township, Hartford County, Connecticut, circa 1869. Image size about 13" x 16" with neatly done hand tinting. Details of the property include numerous mills and magazines and other production facilities, taking up about one third of the total area depicted. Nice addition to display with ammunition or arms of the black posder era, either military or civilian. Professionally framed with burled walnut and a neat gold liner. Overall size about 16.5" x 19.5" Photocopy of title page of the "Atlas of Hartford City and County" dated 1869 from which this was taken. $65.00 (View Picture)

6009 REMINGTON 7.62X54R RUSSIAN - Full factory box of 20 rounds with 150 grain bronze point bullets. Nice Boxer primed ammo with some tarnish. Box is not collector grade. $45.00 (View Picture)

6008 REMINGTON 7.62X54R RUSSIAN - Full factory box of 20 rounds with 150 grain bronze point bullets. Nice clean green box with only a few scuffs on the edges. Nice clean Boxer primed ammo. $45.00 (View Picture)

6007 WINCHESTER 7.62X54R RUSSIAN - Full factory box of 20 rounds with 145 grain copper hollow point (although look like FMJ to me). Old blue, yellow & red box. Scuffed on the corners and one end flap is messed up although mostly there. Will display better when wrapped, or get it for the boxer primed ammo. Nice for display with old Winchester 95 in 7.62 Russian caliber. $45.00 (View Picture)


Modern Ammunition and Reloading Supplies

22273 .577-450 Reloading die set- for Martini-Henry rifles - Highly regarded die set for reloading the .577-450 Martini cartridge. Made by Lee, and is a three piece set, complete with the shell holder. NOTE: these are very large rugged dies, but you need one of the big Lee presses with 1 ¼” x 12 threads to use them. But, with the cost of factor ammo being so high, you will save some money anyway. Gently used and well cared for. $85.00 (View Picture)

17784 LYMAN four cavity mold and handles 35891 (148 grain) - Lyman has been the largest maker of bullet molds for nearly 100 years now. These are usually found in single, double or four cavity versions, with the larger molds obviously being more productive in terms of bullets per hour. These are all precision manufacture tools and when properly cared for will last a long time. Besides a lower cost per bullet than buying them from commercial sources, there is also the benefit of not being dependent on commercial sources as you can cast your own bullets using an electric casting pot, or even an iron pot on your kitchen stove. (The latter practice invites nasty comments from mothers and spouses, I have learned.) By tinkering with the lead alloy and lubes and sizing procedures cast bullets can achieve excellent accuracy, and with gas checks they can get good velocity, although not as high as jacketed bullets. This is a used mold, casting the bullet described above. It comes complete with handles. Overall condition fine to excellent showing just normal wear. Note that the wooden grips on the handles are damaged but usable, but the blocks should work just fine $95.00 (View Picture)

17782 LYMAN four cavity mold and handles 35863 (148 grain) - Lyman has been the largest maker of bullet molds for nearly 100 years now. These are usually found in single, double or four cavity versions, with the larger molds obviously being more productive in terms of bullets per hour. These are all precision manufacture tools and when properly cared for will last a long time. Besides a lower cost per bullet than buying them from commercial sources, there is also the benefit of not being dependent on commercial sources as you can cast your own bullets using an electric casting pot, or even an iron pot on your kitchen stove. (The latter practice invites nasty comments from mothers and spouses, I have learned.) By tinkering with the lead alloy and lubes and sizing procedures cast bullets can achieve excellent accuracy, and with gas checks they can get good velocity, although not as high as jacketed bullets. This is a used mold, casting the bullet described above. It comes complete with handles. Overall condition fine to excellent showing just normal wear. $95.00 (View Picture)

17780 LYMAN four cavity adjustable length swage core 44S and handles - Lyman has been the largest maker of bullet molds for nearly 100 years now. These are usually found in single, double or four cavity versions, with the larger molds obviously being more productive in terms of bullets per hour. These are all precision manufacture tools and when properly cared for will last a long time. Besides a lower cost per bullet than buying them from commercial sources, there is also the benefit of not being dependent on commercial sources as you can cast your own bullets using an electric casting pot, or even an iron pot on your kitchen stove. (The latter practice invites nasty comments from mothers and spouses, I have learned.) By tinkering with the lead alloy and lubes and sizing procedures cast bullets can achieve excellent accuracy, and with gas checks they can get good velocity, although not as high as jacketed bullets. This is a used mold, casting the bullet described above. It comes complete with handles. Overall condition fine to excellent showing just normal wear. Note that the wooden grips on the handles are badly damaged but usable, and the blocks should work just fine. $95.00 (View Picture)

14636 RELOADING DIES- .30-06 TWO DIE SET - Nice clean well cared for set made by Pacific with original box. Probably circa 1950s or early 1960s. Box is a bit faded and scuffed but dies look to be about perfect. Standard 7/8 x 14 threads used on most reloading presses. $12.00 (View Picture)

5504 .577 N SHELL HOLDER - RCBS made. Rim diameter is just a little smaller than on the .577/450 case, so I believe this is for the .577 Nitro express, or other cases derived from it. $12.00

2502 Reloading Dies- .41 Magnum- - Three die set, carbide dies (no lube required). Compete with shell holder. Made by Lee. Appear to be new unused in plastic holder. $20.00 (View Picture)


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