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Notice:
Treasures and trinkets for the heavy ordnance enthusiast. Unless otherwise noted, All items are inert, unloaded, and harmless (unless you drop on your foot. Most are heavy.) Unless otherwise described, all are in good condition with about 50% paint and visible markings; some rust on bare metal surfaces.  Folks collect these because they remind them of their prior military service, or as interesting examples of different approaches to design of cheap, effective ordnance items for a specific application. These are not hazardous to you, your children, or anyone else. In most areas, these are legal for private ownership , but if you live in an area run by idiot politicians who restrict such things, we cannot sell them to you.

NOTE- VOLUME 1 and 2 of "Gun for all Nations" available again- limited supply!
We talked the author out of the handful of remaining copies he had of these two superb reference books. The good news is that Volume 3 is almost ready for publication!

634-1 A GUN FOR ALL NATIONS: THE 37MM GUN & AMMUNITION. VOLUME 2-1914-1924 -
Volume 2 continues Robert Mellichamp’s definitive study of all things 37mm. This covers the period 1914-1924 encompassing World War 1 usage and innovations, and the post-war advancements, including Browning’s entry into the competitive world of 37mm guns, and the growing interest in 37mm mountings in aircraft (and anti-aircraft) use. This is projected to be a four volume set when completed, but so far only Volumes 1 and 2 have been published. Most highly recommended! $72.00 with FREE SHIPPING IN THE U.S.! (View Picture)

19054-2 A GUN FOR ALL NATIONS: THE 37MM GUN & AMMUNITION. VOLUME I- 1870-1913 -
Robert Mellichamp’s massive work (627 pages, 8.5” x 11” soft covers) is accurately subtitled “A history of 37mm guns, ammunition and manufacturers in 4 volumes from 1870 to the present day.” And it delivers what it promises! This could also be considered a tangential partial biography of a diversely talented and experienced arms inventor, Benjamin B. Hotchkiss, who worked with Colt on revolvers; invented an artillery projectile prior to the Civil War; designed a bolt action repeating rifle for Winchester in the 1870s; and went to Europe to work on artillery designs. There, and later with Vickers and Maxim Hotchkiss developed single shot artillery pieces for Navy and Army use (the ubiquitous 1, 3 and 6 pounders); revolving guns mainly in 37mm; and eventually a 37 machine gun. Hotchkiss’ self contained artillery ammunition introduced in 1870 was the first successfully used in artillery, initially with an external friction primer and cartridge cases made of three pieces riveted together, but later with modern drawn cases and centerfire primers. After some introductory and biographical information on Hotchkiss, the next 250 pages details the myriad 37mm guns designed by Hotchkiss, PLUS those designed by other such as Driggs Seabury, Nordenfelt, Skoda, Krupp, with line drawings of nearly all, and with lots of detailed information on numbers procured, when, from whom, and how employed- naval broadside or fighting top mounts, fortress flank defenses, field carriages, etc, often down to the specific site or vessel. This covers virtually the whole globe, from European powers to backwater nations of Asia or South America. This includes 37mm guns which were used as sub-caliber guns in or on larger guns. There is also some information on subcaliber cartridges used in the 37mm guns (from .22 rimfire up to centerfire rifle or pistol cartridges) and a bit of information on the tools used to reload 37mm cartridges. Pages 263 to 593 detail various types of 37mm ammunition from the many, many nations which used 37mm guns. This includes the initial “one pounder” 37 x 94mmR cartridge up through the one pounder- heavy and up to the 37 x 332mmR Skoda anti-balloon gun of 1908. Dimensioned drawings are provided for the case and projectiles, and in many cases there are details of the fuze as well. I used to think that collecting 37mm ammunition would require maybe 20 rounds for a good collection (from 1870 to the present) but I was totally off base. With another three volumes coming to cover the remaining time, this is a huge field! Remember, they used 37mm guns in the P-39 aircobra, on PT boats, and even in an abortive Gatling gun in recent years, as well as the main gun for the M3 and M5 light tanks, an anti-tank gun, and an anti-aircraft gun. I expect to see all of these in the future volumes of this set. Another 25 pages list all known maker of 37mm cartridges (during the period of this volume 1870-1913) all over the world, which is a great reference source for collectors of any artillery ammunition. This is a truly impressive work, with far more information of interest to the historian or arms collectors with only passing interest in the cartridge themselves than might be expected. For a cartridge collector, it is absolutely essential. Highly recommended reference, sure to be a classic. OUT OF STOCK- OUT OF PRINT! (View Picture)

20715 U.S. MILITARY AMMUNITION REFERENCE LIBRARY ON CD - Covering all types of ammunition for small arms, mortars, artillery, grenades, bombs, rockets, pyrotechnics, and signals! Seven of the most important official references, with over 2,600 pages of information, loaded with detailed drawings, specifications, markings, etc. Dates range from 1923 to 2003, with most WW2, Korea and Vietnam vintage ammo covered in detail. High quality .pdf files that are fully searchable using the free Adobe Acrobat. You can copy and paste selected text or images into other documents for collectors or historians. This material is all on a single CD. Free shipping in the U.S. $20.00 (View Picture)


**NEW ADDITION** 22781 U.S. 37 MM BRASS CASE AND M51 ARMOR PIERCING-CAPPED PROJECTILE M51A2(37 x 223R) - Good case with 1943 date, somewhat tarnished and having a small ding at the shoulder. Primer has been removed. The M51A1 projectile is a training version of the the armor piercing type using a steel body, a hardened steel cap for penetration and an aluminum ballistic cap for better ballistics. In this case, the body and cap are machined of a single piece of mild steel, not hardened. The pointed ballistic cap is present, but has come loose, allowing it to be removed to see the construction details. However it could be reattached with a dab of epoxy and look great. One ding in the rotating band. About 50-60% of the original light blue paint remains. These were made for the 37mm Gun, M3 the cute little towed anti-tank gun, and the M5 and M6 guns mounted in the M3 and M5 light tanks and the M8 armored car. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22775 11-52 RED STAR PARACHUTE SIGNAL- SIGNAL PYROTECHNIC CO. LOS ANGELES - “DISTRESS SIGNAL FOR MERCHANT VESSELS/ 20,000 CANDLEPOWER/ USE ONLY WHEN AIRCRAFT OR VESSEL IS SIGHTED/ DIRECTIONS- FIRE UPWARD FROM SIGNAL PISTOL” is ink stamped on the thin aluminum case of the flare signal The short aluminum cartridge case headstamp identifies the maker and patent info along with date of November 1952. These, along with “PISTOL-PROJECTOR RED FLARE PARACHUTE/ USCG APP NO and maker name SIGNAL PYROTECHNIC, Los Angeles, CA are also stamped on the flare case body near the mouth. This is a 37mm cartridge with the case about 1 1/4” long and overall length of 7 3/8”. Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These were used with the International Flare Signal and Kilgore Model 52 flare guns, and probably all the other heavy 37mm flare guns with barrels about 8-8.5 inches long. $55.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22772 9-57 RED STAR PARACHUTE SIGNAL- SIGNAL PYROTECHNIC CO. LOS ANGELES - “DISTRESS SIGNAL FOR MERCHANT VESSELS/ 20,000 CANDLEPOWER/ USE ONLY WHEN AIRCRAFT OR VESSEL IS SIGHTED/ DIRECTIONS- FIRE UPWARD FROM SIGNAL PISTOL” is ink stamped on the thin aluminum case of the flare signal The short aluminum cartridge case headstamp identifies the maker and patent info along with date of September 1957. These, along with “PISTOL-PROJECTOR RED FLARE PARACHUTE/ USCG APP NO and maker name SIGNAL PYROTECHNIC, Los Angeles, CA are also stamped on the flare case body near the mouth. This is a 37mm cartridge with the case about 1 1/4” long and overall length of 7 3/8”. Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These were used with the International Flare Signal and Kilgore Model 52 flare guns, and probably all the other heavy 37mm flare guns with barrels about 8-8.5 inches long. $55.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22666 81mm and 60mm MORTAR FINS - What you see is what you get. One WW2 style 60mm fin in excellent condition and one fin and tail section from 81mm M301A1 Illuminating round dated 1953, also in excellent condition. Great for restoration projects, or for “trench art” projects. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. Both for $22.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22520 U.S. NAVY WW2 3 INCH ARMOR PIERCING PROJECTILE MARK 29 MOD 2 for 3”/50 guns (red trace) - This is technically an AP-C-BC-T or “Armor Piercing- Capped- Ballistic Cap- Tracer” design where the mild steel projectile body has a hardened steel cap that does the penetration, and then a lightweight cap that screws on to provide the best streamlined shape for ballistic performance. Projectile is unfired and has good markings on the rotating band LOT [number with 42 date] MK 29 MOD 2 - 3 IN AP and maker code and [anchor] inspector marks. Base is marked 3” AP- MK 29 MOD 2 and the weight. These were initially issued without any explosive filler intended strictly as an armor piercing round without any explosive. These had a base plug installed with only a tracer cavity, instead of a fuze. Projectile is VG-fine except for some dents and handling dings on the rotating band, and markings are a bit rough, and s small token demil hole in the windshield. Later loadings included a yellow painted nose to indicate loading with explosive filler. The white band with red dots indicates it had a red tracer element. Black color of the projectile indicates it is the Armor Piercing round. Black paint and white nomenclature markings are chipped and scraped and mostly illegible, but could be repainted if you want to do that. Some rust on the exposed bare steel areas. During WW2 the 3"/50 slow fire gun was main battery for the Destroyer Escorts and also used to arm merchant ships, and sometimes as secondary battery aboard larger vessels. In the post-WW2 era the rapid fire 3"50 mounts replaced the 40mm as the main (only) guns aboard amphibious and auxiliary ships. AP ammunition would have been fired only for anti-ship use, while HE or VT fuze rounds were widely used for anti-aircraft and surface and gunfire support roles. Neat item for WW2 Navy display. I have heard but cannot verify that some of the Army "Tank Destroyer (motor gun carriages) actually used USN 3" guns as well.) INERT, non-explosive display item only. $149.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22046 PRE-WWI GERMAN NAVY 37mm CARTRIDGE CASE C/97.98- 1902 - Made at Karlsruhe in August 1902 these were intended for use in both the c/97 Grusonwerke/Krupp Schnellfeuer Kanone (Quick Firing gun) and the c/98 Maxim Automatic Cannon. Although the powder charges were different, these were basically a slightly evolved version of the earlier Hotchkiss Revolving Cannon cartridges . Note the corwn/M marking indicates Navy use. An exceptionally nice example with good markings and nicely polished. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $45.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21515 SCARCE U.S. WW1 3 INCH (81mm) STOKES MORTAR ROUND- EXCELLENT! - Developed by the British in 1915, the “Stokes” design for lightweight mortars has changed little in the subsequent 100 years. A simple tube with a firing pin at the base allowed projectiles (or “bombs” in Brit speak) to be dropped by gravity from the muzzle and still achieve a rate of fire of 15-30 rounds per minute. We have had a couple of these over the years, one nicely restored example and 3 or 4 pretty ratty relic examples. This one is near mint unissued, and probably was never loaded with any explosive filler (and still does not have one). And, it has the complete fuze unit, a rarity by itself. Overall length is about 17 inches with the main body about 11.5 inches long. This has the heavy perforated tube at the base where a 12 GA shotshell type ignition/propelling cartridges would be inserted, and additional propellant “doughnuts added around the outside of the tube if needed. Only markings noted are on the base with small number 77 and what looks like BE-18 with an ordnance bomb and 8. The gray paint may be original or possibly a later primer coat, but no evidence of pitting underneath. The Stokes mortars were used by U.S. troops during WW1 and finally replaced by improved 81mm mortars in the late 1930s. A very scarce example of an important U.S. WW1 infantry weapon. Best we have seen. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $450.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 14164 LOT OF 3 U.S. 57mm RECOILLESS RIFLE PROJECTILES - What you see is what you get. Left to right: A- Unmarked, excellent condition. B- M306A1 with 1-74 date, unissued but with some minor paint damage C- Same as B, except someone turned down the rotating band to remove the pre-engraved rifling, and repainted it. The lot of 3 for $125.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 9610 WW2 40mm BOFORS CARTRIDGE- HE-T (SELF DESTRUCT) - This is an original unrestored example, with the wartime steel case having a protective finish that looks like brass at first glance. Projectile has original paint with a green body marking of High Explosive rounds (but lacking the red tip added to indicate incendiary as well). The white band indicates it was equipped with a tracer element. Self Destruct (SD) rounds were drilled at the base so that when the tracer element burned all the way, it would ignite the HE charge, fragmenting the shell, and reducing the chance of friendly fire casualties from an accidental HE hit when firing in the direction of friendly units. The HE-T (SD) and HE-I-T (SD) loads were pretty much the standard for most U.S. Navy 40mm Bofors guns during WW2 and surplus ammo has been used since then. This has the Navy Mark 3 case dated March 1944, and Mark 2 Mod 12 projectile dated April 1943. Some corrosion on one side, and assorted scrapes on the case, but pretty nice overall. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 7194 U.S. 20 x 110mm (Hispano Suiza) Dummy Cartridge M18A3 - The 20 x 110mm (Hispano-Suiza) aircraft cannon was widely used by the British and U.S. aircraft during WW2. These guns were more lethal than the more widely used .50 caliber Browning machine guns, but reliability problems slowed their introduction into service. The Brits used two Hispano cannons in the later Spitfire fighters. U.S. variants of the gun included the M1, M2 (AN-M2) and M3. Eventually they were mounted in some (but not all) P-38 Lightning and P-61 Black Widow fighters, the B-29 Superfortress, and mainly in the Navy’s F4U-1C Corsair and later post-war Navy fighters. These gas operated cannons fired at about 600 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 2,800 feet per second. Some of the Hispano-Suiza type guns were also mounted as anti-aircraft weapons in army tanks or halftrack variants. The M18A3 cartridges are turned from steel and then chrome(?) plated. New condition, fresh from a sealed 25 round can which was marked “25 Cartridges, Drill M18A3, Lot No. SC-1-3, Loaded 1-50”. Totally inert, no flammable or explosive components. Price for a FULL SEALED SPAM CAN of 25 rounds is $75.00. Lots of five rounds for $20, or single rounds are priced per round at $5.00 each $125.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 10677 WW1 U.S. 75mm SHRAPNEL PROJECTILE (INERT) - This is a fired example with recovered nose section and INERT fuze which will slip into the nose. Rifling marks on the rotating band. The portion of the projectile body below the rotating band has been turned down to a slightly smaller diameter than it should be. (Former owner had is stuffed into a later incorrect case.) You can wrap a couple turns of tape around the projectile and it will then fit nicely into any of the WW1 75mm or 3 in ch cases. CHEAP- INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 12290 U.S. M31 PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE AND SHIPPING TUBE- - These have been fairly common over the years, but nearly all have been "demilitarized" by having the fins boogered up, and/or a large dent in the nose. This one escaped the DEMIL process and is in excellent collector condition. Official nomenclature and markings "Grenade, Rifle, Practice M31 (Inert)" with lot number and date of manufacture October 1963. Comes with an original shipping tube, although dated April 1964 and a later lot number. Some black rubber marks on the nose area from contact with rubber cushions, but should clean off with some WD-40 or 409 cleaner. There is an extremely minor ding in the main part of body, but not the serious “DEMIL” destructive stuff. A nice item to go with your M1 Garand or M14 grenade launcher. Remember, this is an excellent condition example, with the shipping tube, not a demilled one. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $149.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 13271 U.S. NAVY 16”/50 BATTLESHIP PROJECTILE SET- HEAVY ORDNANCE COLLECTION CENTERPIECE! - These were used by the USS IOWA class battleships during WW2, Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf War. A single one of these 1,900 pound projectiles will make a hole 50 feet wide and 20 feet deep, or clearing a 200 yard diameter landing zone in the Vietnamese jungle. They are capable of hitting within 250 yards of the aiming point from over 19 miles away! Muzzle velocity was around 2,600 feet per second. The best summary of the 16”/50 guns and ammunition is on the superb site: http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNUS_16-50_mk7.php This is the “High Capacity” projectile which only weighs 1,900 pounds loaded, much easier to move around than the Armor Piercing projectiles weighing 2,700 pounds. Plus, it does not have the 153 pounds of explosive filler so it is even lighter! Still, it is big enough to anchor your garage or whole house in place during the worst hurricane or tornado. At 64 inches tall, it will be a real conversation piece if you put it in your living room (assuming it is on the ground floor with a concrete slab, otherwise it will be a real eye catcher in your basement). This example was demilitarized by torch cuts in the nose, but that has been cosmetically repaired and the round totally restored and repainted to the spectacular, sexy appearance in the photo. It comes with the necessary adapter rings and a Mechanical Time Fuze, booster, and aux booster (all INERT, of course). Some might quibble about the details of the stenciled markings, or if the bourrelet should be painted or left bare metal, but it is still beautiful! This comes with one original 16”/50 silk powder bag with the stenciled markings as shown in the photo, indicating original manufacture in1945, and last overhauled at Naval Ammunition Depot, Oahu, HI, in May 1968. The bag is filled with foam, instead of 110 pounds of gumpowder grains (each grain being a cylinder 1” diameter by 2” long). Six of these bags made up a full charge for firing the gun, but there is only one available. We are listing this for a client and will not be handling shipping, but will connect you with the owner to work out details. The owner does have access to a crane which can load this on a low trailer (such as a U-Haul 6’ x 12’ which can carry 2600 pounds) and you can tow it home, from it’s present location near Philadelphia, PA, covered with a tarp to avoid envious glances from other motorists. INERT- no flammable or explosive components, but still wicked heavy and will kill you if it falls on you. Price, fully restored as seen in the photos is only $2750.00 (View Picture)

21825 RARE WW2 U.S. NAVY BATTLESHIP 14” POWDER TANK - All U.S. battleships BB-34 through BB-44 built between about 1914 and 1922 were armed with 14 inch guns, and many of these continued to serve until the end of WW2. These were all “bag type guns” where the powder charge was issued in several cloth bags which were loaded into the barrel behind the projectile. From the time of manufacture until they were loaded into the gun the powder bags were shipped and stored in large metal containers usually called “powder tanks.” Relics of any sort from those ships are scarce, especially ordnance related items. This may be your only chance to get something like this. The tank is about 16” diameter by 48” tall, made from steel with a galvanized type coating. It is stamped on the side of the tank: “14 IN TANK MK 2/ F.W.CO. 1945/ G.W.H. 325446” The cap is missing, but you can put a piece of wood painted gray to fit in the opening and it will make a nice place to put a photo of one of the battleships or a descriptive plaque or something. We are listing this for a client and will not be handling shipping, but will connect you with the owner to work out details to ship from it’s present location near Philadelphia, PA. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $225.00 (View Picture)

21438 U.S. 60mm MORTAR SMOKE (WHITE PHOSPHOROUS) ROUND M302 - This is a semi-fixed, fin stabilized, central bursting type round used with WP for spotting, screening, anti-personnel and limited incendiary effects. The round is composed of six major components - the body, PD fuze, fin assembly, propelling charge of four increments, ignition cartridge and primer. The body is a thin-wall steel casing with cylindrical side walls, and conical base which is threaded to receive the shaft of the fin assembly. The front end is closed with an adapter which holds the fuze and the burster casing. The burster tube extends about three fourths the length of the body, which upon functioning bursts the casing to release the chemical contents. The WP ignites and burns spontaneously on contact with air. Used with 60mm mortars M2 and M19. This is one of the ones which were “demilitarized” by punching a hole in the side, but the hole has been filled with epoxy and smoothed to the proper contours and repainted in olive drab. Actually, the color should have been gray for the early marking system, or light green under the later specifications. Very nice set of fins installed, but, no fuze included. Original or restored example of this type 60mm round is pretty hard to find as most were demilled and scrapped. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

19859 U.S. Navy 6 pounder (57 x 307mmR) brass case - WNY, 1904 - Headstamped W.N.Y. (Washington Navy Yard) 11-1904 6 Pdr with inspector initials and anchor stamp. Brass case has been nicely cleaned and looks good even some much of the lacquer coating has flaked/worn off. Entering service in 1884, the 6 Pounder guns (initially designed and made by Hotchkiss, later production was by Driggs) went through many Marks and Mods, but the ammunition was limited to a few basic types. These were secondary battery weapons for use against torpedo boats, and later used as primary weapons on smaller vessels as late as WW1. Most were phased out of service by the end of WW1, but a few returned again during WW2. A very nice representative example of this important naval round. No flammable or explosive components- INERT $135.00 (View Picture)

18665 WW2 USN 40mm BOFORS CASE AND PROJECTILE - This is an exceptionally nice example, with an unpainted projectile that can be painted any color you like. The BRASS case is Mark I Mod 2, dated February 1943, and the Mark 2 Mod 1E projectile is undated. Nice ink stamped lot number on the case. Impressive addition to WW2 USN display, although these remained in service into the 1960s or 70s with the US Navy, mainly on amphibious and auxiliary ships, and small craft like PT boats. These were also used on the U.S. Army’s M40 “Duster” armored vehicles which mounted twin 40mm Bofors guns well into the 1970s. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

18576 U.S. 40mm Bofors (40 x 311mmR) round with M81A1 AP-T projectile - Case is a U.S. Navy steel case dated 1956, with a really nice 1943 dated M81A1 AP-T projectile with nearly all of its original black paint. Impressive addition to WW2 USN display, although these remained in service into the 1960s or 70s with the US Navy, mainly on amphibious and auxiliary ships, and small craft like PT boats. These were also used on the U.S. Army’s M40 “Duster” armored vehicles which mounted twin 40mm Bofors guns well into the 1970s. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $135.00 (View Picture)

18208 WW2 U.S. ARMY 40mm BOFORS CASE & PROJECTILE - This is an exceptionally nice example, with an unpainted projectile that can be painted any color you like. The M25B1 steel case is dated 1943, and the projectile is unmarked. The fuze cap is a USN Mark 27 Mod 1 dated July 1983, but is interchangeable with any other Bofors fuze cap if you want to switch it. Nice ink stamped lot number on the case. Some light rust on the projectile that should clean off easily before you paint it. Impressive addition to WW2 USN display, although these remained in service into the 1960s or 70s with the US Navy, mainly on amphibious and auxiliary ships, and small craft like PT boats. These were also used on the U.S. Army’s M40 “Duster” armored vehicles which mounted twin 40mm Bofors guns well into the 1970s. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

16581 U.S. 75mm GUN BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE (75 x 350mmR) WW2 or PREWAR - Nice condition with good headstamp including EMC Lot 2025 that appears to be 1920s-30s vintage, but these cases continued in use through WW2. Primer is dated 1918, but surplus stocks were used up into WW2. The 75mm gun included those mounted on wheeled carriages as field guns, and also as the main armament in the M3 Grant/Lee and M4 Sherman tanks, as well as on some self-propelled guns. Overall pretty nice except for one lemon wedge size area of corrosion on the rim and end of the case as shown in the photo. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $89.00 (View Picture)

15012 WW1 RUSSIAN 76.2mm FIELD GUN BRASS CASE WITH PROJECTILE - (76.2 x 385mmR). This was identified by the previous owner as being made in the U.S. under Russian contract and I believe that is correct but cannot confirm it. Headstamp markings include 5.11.16 date, LOT 12, D MFG CO. and the number 7, letter N and what appears to be two concentric circles or maybe a circle around the letter C. The primer is a large screw in type with three places for a wrench. The projectile seems a bit longer than most others of that period and the nose configuration is different, with no markings noted. A really nice example. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $325.00 (View Picture)

14318 WW1 GERMAN FIELD GUN BRASS SHELL CASE FOR 10CM KANONE 1917 and others - 105 x 505mm Rimmed. This was used with all three of the main German 105mm field guns during WW1, along with an earlier 1898 model. The Model 1904 was the first with a modern recoil system, followed by the Model 1914 and finally the Model 1917. Some of these remained in use into the 3rd Reich era. These models are very well discussed by the Lovetts, on their great page at http://www.lovettartillery.com/Development%20of%20the%2010cm%20Kanone.html This case is in excellent condition, with sharp headstamp markings: 490/Karth./ POLTE/ MAI 1918/ MAGDEBURG/ Sp406. Fired primer remains in place. Overall mellow patina and free from any significant dents or dings. An important German WW1 artillery artifact. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

14166 -WW2 40mm BOFORS CARTRIDGE- HE-T (SELF DESTRUCT) - This is an original unrestored example, with the wartime steel case having a protective finish that looks like brass at first glance. Projectile has original paint with a green body marking of High Explosive rounds (but lacking the red tip added to indicate incendiary as well). The white band indicates it was equipped with a tracer element. Self Destruct (SD) rounds were drilled at the base so that when the tracer element burned all the way, it would ignite the HE charge, fragmenting the shell, and reducing the chance of friendly fire casualties from an accidental HE hit when firing in the direction of friendly units. The HE-T (SD) and HE-I-T (SD) loads were pretty much the standard for most U.S. Navy 40mm Bofors guns during WW2 and surplus ammo has been used since then. This has the Navy Mark 3 case dated March 1944, and undated projectile. Some corrosion on one side, and assorted scrapes on the case and tip of fuze, but pretty nice overall. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

14164 LOT OF 3 U.S. 57mm RECOILLESS RIFLE PROJECTILES - What you see is what you get. Left to right: A- Unmarked, excellent condition. B- M306A1 with 1-74 date, unissued but with some minor paint damage C- Same as B, except someone turned down the rotating band to remove the pre-engraved rifling, and repainted it. The lot of 3 for $125.00 (View Picture)

13334 RUSSIAN 37 x 252mmR MODEL 38/39 ANTI-AIRCRAFT CARTRIDGE with armor piercing projectile - The 37 mm automatic air defense gun M1939 (61-K) was a Soviet 37 mm caliber anti-aircraft gun developed in 1938 from smaller caliber Bofors designs. In practice, it was pretty comparable to the ubiquitous Bofor 40mm guns of WW2. The Russian version was widely used during WW2, and although replaced by the ZSU-57-2 57mm AA guns in the 1950s, the 37mm guns remained in use throughout the Communist bloc countries until recent years. These were widely used in Vietnam, and the Chinese have made many variations of them on a wide variety of mountings as well. These have been used in single twin and quadruple naval mountings as well. Very nice example with faint ink stamped markings as shown in the photos, with headstamp pretty clear and some stamped marks on the projectile that are hard to decipher. A metal ball has been placed in the empty case to signify that it is an inert unloaded round. This has the solid Armor Piercing projectile with a ballistic cap crimped in place. INERT, no propellant, explosive or flammable components. $225.00 (View Picture)

10882 U.S. 37 x 145 mmR Mark IIIA2 BRASS CASE WITH M55A1 PROJECTILE - These were used with the aircraft guns M4 and M10 used in the Bell P-39 Cobra and P-63 King Cobra fighters and also on some PT-Boats which had the M4 guns mounted on them. Headstamp on the brass case includes 1941 date, as does the primer. Fuze is marked EMPTY. Projectile has most of the original light blue pain on the body and orange paint on the fuze. Rotating band is stamped 37MM M55A1- 1942. Overall a pretty nice example of a scarce round. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

7328 U.S. 37 MM BRASS CASE AND M55A1 PROJECTILE (37 x 223R) - Excellent brass case with no headstamp markings. The rotating band on the projectile is dated 1941. Dummy fuze M50 is solid aluminum. Blue painted projectile has stenciled markings 37G SHELL M55A1- PRACTICE WITH TRACER. Assorted dings and scrapes but overall a pretty nice example of a scarce round. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

3491 U.S. NAVY 3"/50 MK 7 MOD 1 BRASS SHELL CASING DATED 1942 - (76.2 x 585mm Rimmed) Nice clean brass case with desirable early WW2 1942 date. These were used during WW2 with the 3"/50 caliber slow fire guns which were the main battery on the Destroyer Escorts for use against surface ships, aircraft, and shore bombardment targets. On cruisers and larger ships, the 3"/50 was mainly used in an anti-aircraft role. Around the end of WW2, the rapid fire 3"/50 mounts were introduced which used the same ammunition and remained in service well into the 1980s, mainly as anti-aircraft guns, but also as the main (only) gun mounts for amphibious attack ships, and auxiliaries (oilers, ammunition ships, tenders, etc). Headstamp marking Mark 7 Mod 1 with 11- 1942 date. Fired primer dated 43 is still in place. Tough to find as most were thrown overboard after being fired, or returned for scrap. This one has a number of moderate dings around the shoulder and mouth area and numerous smaller dings in the rest of the case which has been polished, but the job has not been finished yet. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $135.00 (View Picture)

21823 HARPOON GUN AND "AHAB" BRAND HARPOON GUN CARTRIDGES - Probably the most famous name associated with harpoons is Captain Ahab, Herman Melville’s fictional monomaniacal Captain of the whaling ship Pequod in his 1851 novel Moby Dick. So, what better name for a brand of cartridge for harpoon guns? However, as famous as the Captain might be, the makers of these cartridges have escaped any notice at all. There is nothing to be found about “Sportsmen’s Products Company, Box 82, Northford, CT 06472” Since they include a ZIP code, it has to be after 1963, and we guess no more recent than maybe the 1980s when excitement over the move “Jaws” subsided. There is no information found on the “Sportsmen’s The Ahab Harpoon Gun” other than mention on the paper label of the box. The cartridges are R-P .45 Colt headstamped, and have a six petal rosette crimp, so likely the gun is a single shot devices similar to the Greener Light Harpoon guns, but using a .45 Colt cartridge. The box is a typical commercial plastic ammo storage box, and 35 original rounds remain. The Harpoon was found at the same time as the cartridges and it is assumed they go together, but there is no proof that is correct. The harpoon is about 14.25” overall and the piston at the rear is about .405 diameter. The only markings are a small GWH on the shaft. There are two pivoting flukes that spread out as shown in the photos. The tip is needle sharp, showing signs of sharpening, (with a tiny bend at the very point). Overall about excellent condition and the cartridges are live, unfired. Price for the harpoon and cartridges as a package deal is $149.00 (View Picture)

21793 M11A3 PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE - This is the practice version of the M9 Anti Tank grenade used with all the U.S. WW2 Grenade Launchers for the M1903, M1917 and M1 rifles and M1 carbine. Once fairly common, these have almost entirely disappeared from the marketplace. Overall about good except for the tail fins being bent quite a bit, and very loose. Would looks lot better repainted after the fins are fiddled with. Totally inert, but we will not sell or ship to Kalifornia or other places run by idiots. $65.00 (View Picture)

21159 WW1 FRENCH 37 x 93mm HOTCHKISS CARTRIDGE (9-16) - This was the ubiquitous round used by a wide variety of 37mm guns circa 1875-1930 including the Hotchkiss single shot guns, the Hotchkiss revolving cannons (sort of the Gatling gun on steroids) and even the Puteaux SA 1918 cannon used in the primitive Renault FT-18 tanks. Headstamp and fuze markings as shown in the photos indicate the basic nomenclature for the case (37-85), the date of manufacture September 1916, and place of manufacture PDPS 260. Fuze has 1530 and 18 (date) and. Traces of original paint on the High Explosive projectile and nice clean fuze, although the striker mechanism has been completely removed. Primer dented and punctured. The projectile was once shoved back into the case which left a slight wrinkle on the lip, not bad, but we like to point out any noted defects. As seen in the photo, it disassembles easily and there are no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

20372 RARE EARLY HOTCHKISS 37mm HEAVY 1 POUNDER COILED BRASS CASE CARTRIDGE - See Mellichamp “A Gun for All Nations, Volume I, p. 484 for a drawing of this type round. This has the flat pointed fuze and crimping groove adopted circa 1876 and the HOTCHKISS PATENT PARIS over the logo with his initial (BBH) stamped along the seam instead of on the base. Projectile is marked HOTCHKISS. These were used in one of the Hotchkiss revolving cannon models. Nominally 37 x 120mmR, this actually measures about 118mm. The later drawn cases are fairly common, but the coiled cases are extremely rare. Several dents in the case walls but overall VG condition. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $325.00 (View Picture)

17851 40mm BOFORS ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN CLIP COLLECTION (4 DIFFERENT) - The 40mm Bofors gun was widely used by nearly every country engaged in WW2, and nearly every U.S. Navy ship had one or more in single, twin or quadruple mounts as the primary intermediate range AA gun, covering the gap between the larger 5” guns and the smaller 20mm Oerlikons. The Bofors guns used a clip to hold four rounds and the loaders would insert these into the top of the gun as fast as they could to keep the guns firing, and this is shown in most videos of WW2 combat. After WW2 the 40mm Bofors continued to be used from 1952 to 1988 in the Army’s M42 “Duster” which used a twin gun mount on the chassis of the M41 Bulldog tank. The Navy used these on many of the patrol boats in Vietnam, just as they had been the main armament of most of the WW2 PT boats. Even today they are used by the USAF in the AC-130 gunships. While the 4 round clips all do the same thing and interchangeable in use, they show the ingenuity of the American manufacturers during WW2 with differences in design, and especially manufacturing methods. This is a collection of four different examples, the U.S. Navy Marks 3,4,5 and 6. All are fully functional and condition ranges from good with a few rust spots to nearly new, although a couple have some dents and dings from use. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. The collection of four different for $49.00 (View Picture)

16532 WW2 40mm BOFORS CARTRIDGE- HE-T (SELF DESTRUCT) - This is an original unrestored example, with the wartime steel case having a protective finish that looks like brass at first glance. Case is pretty good, but has a couple small areas of corrosion on one side, as shown in the photos. Projectile has original paint with a green body marking of High Explosive rounds (but lacking the red tip added to indicate incendiary as well). The white band indicates it was equipped with a tracer element. Self Destruct (SD) rounds were drilled at the base so that when the tracer element burned all the way, it would ignite the HE charge, fragmenting the shell, and reducing the chance of friendly fire casualties from an accidental HE hit when firing in the direction of friendly units. The HE-T (SD) and HE-I-T (SD) loads were pretty much the standard for most U.S. Navy 40mm Bofors guns during WW2 and surplus ammo has been used since then. This has the Navy Mark 3 case dated March 1944, and Mark 2 Mod 12 projectile dated April 1943. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $129.00 (View Picture)

15340 U.S. 105MM GUN BRASS CASE XM148E3 DATED 1962 (105 x 607mmR) - Headstamp is 105mm XM148E3 with lot number FAE 302 and 1962 date. This has a steel insert in the case for a large screw in primer and an offset filler plug. I believe the XM148 was an attempt to come up with a common US/UK/German/NATO standard design which would be compatible in all NATO 105mm tank guns of the period. This was adopted as the M148 and a later M148A1 version also exists with reported dates into the late 1970s. However, this is the XM148E3 and differs from the M148 by having a separate “filler plug” in the base. These were used with specific types of projectiles, usually Armor Piercing Fin Stabilized types where the long tail boom and stabilizing fins made it impossible to safely load like most cartridges where you dump the powder in and then press the projectile into place. The APFS rounds sometimes used the long primer tube inside the case (part of which is the steel portion visible around the brass primer) to center the projectile, and sometimes was threaded into it to hold it in place. With any of these rounds, the projectile would be seated first, then the powder loaded through the filler hole in the base and then the plug would seal the hole for firing. I have not been able to determine This is a once fired 1962 dated brass case used in the M68 gun installed in the U.S. M48A5, M60/M60A1/M60A3 and M1 tanks. Someone drilled a 5/16” hole in the side of the case as shown in the photo, but otherwise it is pretty nice although lightly tarnished. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $175.00 (View Picture)

20943 U.S. M12 ANTI-TANK PRACTICE MINE - Light blue practice mine about 12 inches in diameter with moveable "plug, arming, AT Mine, M4” with three position switch- Armed/Danger/Safe. This is a metal version made as a practice mine. However, the practice mine has four oval slots cut in the pressure plate for visual ID to distinguish it from the combat mine. These slots have been filled with Bondo or something so this looks just like the real one with OD paint. INERT no explosive components. $75.00 (View Picture)

20788 WW1 GERMAN 77 X 230MM R ARTILLERY BRASS CASE- MAI 1917 - Made for the 7,7 cm Feld Kanone 96, the widely used German counterpart of the French 75mm light field gun. The headstamp markings include St (strengthened case) G 83 (lot number) , date MAI 1917. and HL (Haniel Luege Düsseldorf- brass factory) over 25 inspector mark. Overall fine to excellent, nicer than usual for these. INERT no explosive components. $55.00 (View Picture)

20720 U.S. WW1 ERA 75mm BRASS CASE WITH HIGH EXPLOSIVEP ROJECTILE AND FUZE - The brass cartridge case is headstamped 75mm F[ield]G[un] with a 1918 lot number. Very nice case, and a tight fit on the projectile, which is not fully seated. We left it this way in case the new owner wants to refinish the projectile before seating, but you can probably seat it by some gentle heating of the case, inserting the projectile than thumping the base of the case on a padded surface and allowing the inertia and mass of the projectile to seat it all the way. The projectile is unfired, with a mellow and some light roughness near the nose. Rotaing band is excellent. The Mark V Point Detonating Fuze was used on mobile and seacoast 75mm, 4.7 inch, and 5, 6, 8, 10 and 12 inch guns, and is essentially an American made version of a successful French design. A very nice example of the WW1 HE round. Although made in huge numbers, they do not seem to have survived in nearly the numbers of shrapnel rounds seen on the market. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $250.00 (View Picture)

20575 WW1 FRENCH 37 x 93mm HOTCHKISS CARTRIDGE (1-17) - This was the ubiquitous round used by a wide variety of 37mm guns circa 1875-1930 including the Hotchkiss single shot guns, the Hotchkiss revolving cannons (sort of the Gatling gun on steroids) and even the Puteaux SA 1918 cannon used in the primitive Renault FT-18 tanks. Headstamp and fuze markings as shown in the photos indicate the basic nomenclature for the case (37-85), the date of manufacture January 1917, and place of manufacture PDPS 284. Fuze has 12 16 (date) and a naval anchor, but since the ammo was interchangeable between so many different guns, some switching between services is sure to have happened. Lots of original paint on the High Explosive projectile and nice clean fuze. As seen in the photo, it disassembles easily and there are no flammable or explosive components. One of the nicest we have had in a long time. $125.00 (View Picture)

20545 PROJECTILE 90mm, HEAT-T M431 CIRCA 1960’s FOR M48-M60 TANKS AND OTHERS - This is a Cold War-Vietnam era round for use against armored targets by the 90mm tank and anti-tanks guns, mainly in the M48 and M60 tanks and the M56 Scorpion self propelled anti-tank vehicle. The projectile consists of a steel body, a threaded stand-off spike assembly, and an aluminum chamber, fin and boom. The body contains a funnel-shaped copper liner and was to be loaded with 1.2 pounds of Comp B explosive. The chamber, which adapts the fin and boom assembly to the body also had provisions for the base detonating fuze. It is also fitted with a plastic obturator band. The spike assembly is fitted with a nose cap and contains a piezoelectric element. The tail fin and tracer assembly is missing from the back of the chamber, but you can peek inside to see the copper cone which focused the shaped charge, and that part will be hiding inside a case anyway. These were used with the M114 cartridge case with the base having a threaded loading plug, offset from the primer. During the projectile’s :flight, the tracer burns for a minimum of 2,500 yards. On impact, the fin-stabilized projectile is detonated by fuze functioning and the cone collapses, creating a high velocity shock wave and a jet of metal particles which penetrate the target. The 8.25 pounds of propellant powder give a screaming 4,000 feet per second muzzle velocity. Total weight for a complete round is about 33 pounds. About 60% of original black paint finish remains, the balance being mostly light rust. No stencil markings and no stamped markings found, but may be T300E59 if there are any. Missing the cap for the spike, but looks like a metal cap from a can would be pretty close match for appearance. This will look great when it is cleaned up and loaded in a case, even a standard 90mm case if that is all you have handy. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $150.00 (View Picture)

18910 105mm HOWITZER STEEL CASE- VIETNAM ERA- SUPERB- - Standard U.S. 105mm (105 x 371mmR) as used from pre-WW2 to the present. These have been made from brass or steel over the years, with several different construction methods. This is the M14B1 which is the drawn case the same as the most common brass case, the M14, but made from steel instead of brass. The steel is given a coat of tough lacquer type finish to resist corrosion and the reflections from polished metal. This gives it a dark honey color appearance so it almost looks like brass. The lot number indicates the case was made in 1969, at the height of the Vietnam War, with a M444 High Explosive Projectile. These were actually an Anti-Personnel Improved Conventional Munition used to deliver M39 anti-personnel grenades. The M39 grenade was a gold ball size explosive munition which would bounce up on hitting the ground before exploding. In theory, anyway, but in reality the dud rate was over 50% and commanders refused to use them in areas which they might have to maneuver through later. As a result, many of these rounds remained in storage and were later downloaded, which is how these cases ended up on the market in such nice condition instead of burnt and scarred once fired cases. Except for the white stencil markings on the base, the cases are identical to those used in the common High Explosive, Illuminating, White Phosphorous, or training projectiles. These were used with the towed field guns, as well as the M109 “Paladin” Self Propelled guns and several other mountings. A great item for anyone wanting a superb condition 105mm Howitzer case for display. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $49.00 (View Picture)

18863 RUSSIAN PFM-1 “BUTTERFLY OR TOE-POPPER” LANDMINE (INERT) - The Russian PFM-1 toe popper landmine, also known as the “Butterfly bomblet” had the NATO name “Green Parrot.” This mine was used during the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan to prevent insurgents from using certain roads and areas of operation. However civilians often fell prey to the mine. The mine was deployed by helicopters and infantry. This one is the INERT practice version, confirmed by the Cyrillic "Y" stamped through the plastic body and the white mark around the fuze. For those not familiar with this mine, here is some more info taken off a mine website... “PFM-1 is a small, scatterable Anti-Personnel (AP) mine with a body made from low-density polythene. [The combat version] comes in two varieties, both identical in external appearance other than a Cyrillic C (English S) cast into the plastic on one side of the flat wing, which indicates it has a self-destruct mechanism. In the centre of the mine is a cylindrical fuze made mostly of aluminum. The fat wing section of the mine is filled with a liquid explosive. The fuze is sealed into the plastic casing by a metal compression band, with the end of the fuze protruding slightly. The fuze operates hydraulically from pressure on the fat wing. Prior to dispensing, metal strips run through slots in the end of each mine's fuze to retain an arming plunger. The current dispenser is designated KSF-1s; it holds 64 mines…. These mines are made in green, brown and white. Some markings are stenciled in black, while others are impressed into the plastic.” INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

14139 90MM GUN BLANK M394, CARTRIDGE CASE (BRASS) - Nominally 90 x 183mmR, reflecting the bore diameter of the gun and case length, but the case mouth measures about 114mm. These were arsenal converted from standard 90mm gun cases M19 (90 x 600mmR) specifically for use as blank cartridges for saluting, training, parades, etc. They are also a handy “souvenir” size, about 7 inches tall and can be polished up for use on a desk, or as a lamp base, or bookends or something. Because of the use with black powder for the blank load, these tend to have a fair amount of residue and corrosion but with work all will clean up. The headstamp is 90mm with the original M19 marking cancelled by XXX. The new designation was usually stenciled on the side and may or may not be visible. We have five available when listed so if you need a pair for bookends or lamp bases or a motorcycle project check to see how many are left. Typical example shown but each may vary somewhat. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $22.00 (View Picture)

13442 U.S.WW2 155mm M101 HIGH EXPLOSIVE PROJECTILE- 1945 dated- Lot GL-12 1945 155MM M101 stamped on the projectile body. This has an ugly decorative red and while paint job what has some scrapes and patches of light rust. This needs to be stripped and repainted in the correct OD color with yellow stencil markings. Photo shows with incorrect plug in the nose, probably installed for use with some sort of chain for a driveway decoration. This should be removed and a suitable fuze installed instead. We will include a loose M557 PDF which is grungy looking as in the first two photos, but will easily clean to the condition shown in the third photo. THe M101 is eh basic HE projectile, but were replaced by the M107 which differed only in the details of the rotating band, and many of the M101s were modified and redisignated as M107B2, but this one appear to be in the original WW2 configuration. Weight about 95 pounds. These projectiles were standard for all the 155mm guns and howitzers from WW2 through Vietnam and into the Cold War. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $325.00 (View Picture)

20798 SCARCE WW2 U.S. NAVY 37MM SIGNAL CARTRIDGES, TWO-STAR, (WITH TRACER), MARK IV - Used for identification by aircraft or signaling, and usually fired from the AN-M8 Pyrotechnic (flare) pistol. This signal is similar in appearance and functioning to the Signals, Aircraft, AN-M53 to AN-M58 series. The color of the stars is indicated on the cartridge case by two wide bands near the paper end of the case ; a narrow band indicates the color of the tracer. The names of the colors of the stars and the tracer are printed on the paper closing wad. Information for identifying the signal cartridge is printed on the cartridge case. After the primer is hit by the firing pin, igniting the propelling charge, the inner container is propelled from the barrel of the projector, and the tracer is ignited by the propelling charge. The tracer becomes visible after traveling about 20 feet, and burns for about four seconds, then ignites the bursting charge and the two stars within the inner container. In effect, upon leaving the barrel of the projector, the tracer appears as a single star and rises to a height of about 250 feet when fired from the ground ; at this point, the star separates into two stars, which fall separately. The tracer and stars can be seen about five miles at night, and about two or three miles in daylight. These were made in six different variations: (1) Red-red with red tracer; (2) Green-green with red tracer; (3) Red-red with green tracer; (4) Red-yellow with yellow tracer; (5) Red-green with red tracer; and (6) Red-green with green tracer. All of these are pretty scarce, and I was totally unfamiliar with them until we recently found an old stash of them. This is the green tracer with red and green stars, made in April 1944 by International Flare and Signal Division of Kilgore. (Sorry, no other color variations available.) Perfect condition, fresh from a sealed box, a single live round, ready to signal your distress. $35.00 (View Picture)

22755 U.S. 155mm M438A1 “DISPENSER” PROJECTILE FOR DIPCM, FASCAM, ADAM RAAM SUBMUNITIONS - The 155mm M483A1 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) is an early technology cargo round. It delivers 88 dual-purpose grenades to defeat armor and personnel targets. The projectile body is made of steel with an aluminum ogive and a metal rotating band and a plastic obturating band are located close to the base. The base would be closed by a short, boat tailed aluminum plug which is not with this projectile. This would be loaded with 64 of the M42 and 24 of the M46 dual purpose anti-material and anti-personnel grenades. The M46s are located at the base of the projectile and are heavier/thicker and have a smooth interior surface that enables it to withstand the shock of firing and set back. The M42 grenades are scored for greater fragmentation and are place to the front of the M46 grenades. The submunitions have a shaped charge warhead that penetrates 2.75 inches of homogeneous armor. Antipersonnel effects are obtained by fragmentation of the submunition body. The M577 fuze is the only authorized fuze, and when it activates, an expulsion charge expels the payload and base plug. The projectile is painted olive drab, with about 95% or more of that remaining. This is an unloaded round, never marked, but when loaded it would have yellow markings including a row of yellow diamonds stenciled approximately 3.50 inches behind the nose, and nomenclature, lot numbers, and loading data. The same M483A1 body is used as the basis for later dispenser munitions in a larger family of US Army rapid minelaying systems known as the FAmily of SCAtterable Mines (FASCAM). in the 155 mm M692 and M731 ADAM carry anti-personnel mines, while the 155 mm M718 and M741 RAAM, also known as Remote Anti-Armor Mine System (RAAMS), carry anti-tank mines. This comes with an INERT M577 mechanical time fuze, correct for use with this type projectile. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $425.00 (View Picture)

22560 U.S. 105MM HOWITZER BRASS CASE 1945 - Standard 105mm Howitzer brass case M14. This is in nice shape with only minor bruising and scrapes and should polish up nicely. It has the sort of yellow-silver look from the cleaning process used last time they were processed for reloading. Good stencil markings on the base. Headstamp date for initial manufacture is 1945. Mouth of case has some bent areas that should be easy to tap back into shape. $75.00 (View Picture)

21711 WW2 U.S. 2.36" BAZOOKA ROCKET, PRACTICE M7A1 - This is the most typical WW2 2.36" bazooka rocket type with the pointed nose and long tail fins. It is an excellent condition example that has been stripped and painted with gray primer. Originally these training versions were painted black with white stencil markings but the visually identical combat round loaded with HE was painted olive drab with yellow stencil markings, so you can finish the restoration either way. Fins are all there and straight, not the usual bent up fired examples. Hard to find these any more. INERT warhead, no propellant, totally inert not dangerous. $165.00 (View Picture)

20541 U.S. 76mm BRASS CASE FOR WALKER BULLDOG TANK- EARLY T19E1 - This is a 76.2 x 580mm Rimmed brass case T19E1 made by converting a 3 inch Mark II case (76 x 585mmR) which had been made in 1944 for WW2 use in anti-tank guns, both wheeled and the M10 Tank Destroyer. That case shared a lineage with the U.S. Navy 3”/50 gun, and the Army’s Model 1902 Seacoast gun. The Walker Bulldog was adopted in 1951, and rushed to Korea to counter the Russian T-34 tanks. The Bulldog was basically an improved version of the M24 Chaffee chassis upgunned with the much more powerful 76mm Gun, M32 developed especially for the Bulldog. The ammunition for this gun is nearly unique in that most of the rotating band was seated inside the mouth of the cartridge case, with just a tiny lip at the front to seat against the front of the case, so the mouth of the case is actually slightly larger than the nominal 76mm. The Bulldog was a pretty effective light tank, serving in Korea and in Vietnam (where the smaller Vietnamese crews loved them) and many went to other U.S. allies around the world. The M41 was retired in 1965 with adoption of the high-tech M551 Sheridans. Ammunition for the M32 gun of the M41 Bulldog was loaded as Canister, High Explosive, High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT- a shaped charge projectile), Armor Piercing (with a solid shot depending on brute force for penetration), High Velocity Armor Piercing (HVAP), or High Velocity Armor Piercing-Discarding Sabot (HVAP-DS). The latter two used a very dense, but smaller diameter tungsten carbide slug encased in an outer 76mm casing, transferring energy to the target from the smaller diameter tungsten carbide core concentrated in a smaller area for greater penetration. These latter two depended on extremely high muzzle velocity, or HYPERVELOCITY for penetration, around 4100 feet per second compared to 3200 fps for earlier rounds. This case is one of the early test cases, marked “FOR GUN T91” (the developmental form of the M32) and the primer in the case is dated 1951. It was loaded as a Cartridge, Shot, High Velocity Target Practice-Tracer T74E1” according to the red painted stencil markings. The side of the case is stenciled “HYPER 4100.” This is a scarce case, and even the later standardized 76mm case M88 or M88B1 are hard to find. One large dent in the side, shown in the photos, and the mouth is a little dinged up, and overall a mellow chocolate brown. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $175.00 (View Picture)

20314 M11(series) PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE - This is the practice version of the M9 Anti Tank grenade used with all the U.S. WW2 Grenade Launchers for the M1903, M1917 and M1 rifles and M1 carbine. Once fairly common, these have almost entirely disappeared from the marketplace. Overall G-VG except for the tail fins being bent some, and it has been repainted and stenciled, probably during its period of service. These were reusable items where damaged cparts could be replaced instead of scrapping the entire round. Totally inert, but we will not sell or ship to Kalifornia or other places run by idiots. $79.00 (View Picture)

7162 WW2 40 MM BOFORS BRASS SHELL CASINGS- lot of four - Standard 40 x 311mmR type for the ubiquitous 40mm Bofors /L60 AA guns used by nearly every nation during WW2. Left to right: 1- USN, Mark 2, December 1943 dated 2- USN, Mark 2, January 1944 dated 3- U.A. Army M25, 1944 dated 4- USN Mark 2, June 1945 dated All are fired VG-fine with minor dings around the case mouth, but should clean up okay. Your choice $35 each or take all four for only $110.00 (View Picture)

20426 RED STAR PARACHUTE SIGNAL- KILGORE #52 - “# 52 RED STAR PARACHUTE SIGNAL APPROVED BY U.S. COAST GUARD MERCHANT MARINE INSPECTION manufactured by the International Flare Signal Division of the Kilgore Mfg. Co. Tipp City, O.” is ink stamped on the thin aluminum case of the flare signal The short aluminum cartridge case headstamp identifies the maker and patent info along with date of May 1945,and also stamped on the flare case bodynear the mouth. This is a 37mm cartridge with the case about 1 1/8” long and overall length of 7 1/8”. Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These were used with the International Flare Signal and Kilgore Model 52 flare guns, and probably all the other heavy 37mm flare guns with barrels about 8-8.5 inches long. $65.00 (View Picture)

21102 RARE WW1 37mm BRITISH FLARE GUN CARTRIDGE- NOV 1918 - Paper case with brass base marked ELEY – LONDON- and closing wad marked “CARTRIDGE, 1 ½ in. SIGNAL, Without Parachute, Changing Colour, for Aircraft.---- Made by WILDER, BIRM. November 1918.” Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These would have been used in the Royal Flying Corps signal guns, either for signaling from the ground to aircraft or vice versa. These would include the No. 1 Mark I signal pistol with a shoulder stock, or the No. 2 Mark I Pyrotechnic Pistol based on a Webley frame, and the Mark III Signal Pistol based on the Mark IV Webley introduced in 1915. Very scarce and no information found after a diligent search of everything I could think of. This is a November 1918 dated example with very clean top wad markings. $125.00 (View Picture)

20442 -RARE WW1 37mm BRITISH FLARE GUN CARTRIDGE- NOV 1918 - Paper case with brass base marked ELEY – LONDON- and closing wad marked “CARTRIDGE, 1 ½ in. SIGNAL, Without Parachute, Changing Colour, for Aircraft.---- Made by WILDER, BIRM. November 1918.” Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These would have been used in the Royal Flying Corps signal guns, either for signaling from the ground to aircraft or vice versa. These would include the No. 1 Mark I signal pistol with a shoulder stock, or the No. 2 Mark I Pyrotechnic Pistol based on a Webley frame, and the Mark III Signal Pistol based on the Mark IV Webley introduced in 1915. Very scarce and no information found after a diligent search of everything I could think of. This is a November 1918 dated example with the top wad markings dirty and slightly faded. $110.00 (View Picture)

19995 RARE WW1 37mm BRITISH FLARE GUN CARTRIDGE- DEC 1918 - Paper case with brass base marked ELEY – LONDON- and closing wad marked “CARTRIDGE, 1 ½ in. SIGNAL, Without Parachute, Changing Colour, for Aircraft.---- Made by WILDER, BIRM. November 1918.” Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. These would have been used in the Royal Flying Corps signal guns, either for signaling from the ground to aircraft or vice versa. These would include the No. 1 Mark I signal pistol with a shoulder stock, or the No. 2 Mark I Pyrotechnic Pistol based on a Webley frame, and the Mark III Signal Pistol based on the Mark IV Webley introduced in 1915. Very scarce and no information found after a diligent search of everything I could think of. This is a December 1918 dated example with the top wad markings clean and legible. $95.00 (View Picture)

15791 WW2 U.S. 37mm FLARE CARTRIDGE AN-M53A1 - WW2 U.S. 37mm FLARE CARTRIDGE AN-M54A1 $25.00 (View Picture)

11691 WW2 U.S. 37mm FLARE CARTRIDGE AN-M54A1 - Signal, Aircraft, Tracer Double Star AN-M54A1, lot USF-10-37 and date April 1945 along with ordnance bomb are ink stamped on the side of the case along with two wide red strips indicating the double stars are red and red, and a narrow green strip indicating it is a green tracer. Cases are multi-part construction, not the more common deep drawn single piece type. Loaded, live round, but due to age and apparent poor storages sold as display item only and not safe for actual use. See photo for details. $29.00 (View Picture)

23230 SCARCE U.S. 3 INCH 15 POUNDER COASTAL DEFENSE GUN MODEL 1903 - BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE WITH SECTIONED SHRAPNEL PROJECTILE This is the 76.2 x 690mm Rimmed case for the Model 1903 3 inch gun known as the 15 Pounder to distinguish it from the less powerful 3 inch guns used by the field artillery. These guns (and the predecessor M1898 and M1902) were emplaced in coastal fortifications to defend the protective minefields around harbor mouths against possible enemy minesweeping efforts, or attacks by torpedo boats or destroyers, so they are sometimes called “mine defense guns.” These were usually mounted on pedestal mounts with a protective shield, placed in a sunken concrete pit to provide partial protection for the gun crew. These were the result of the Endicott Board recommendations in 1895 to upgrade our coastal defenses. In 1918 the M1903 guns were adapted for anti-aircraft use with different mountings, but still limited to a coastal defense role, remaining in service until replaced by 90mm guns during WW2. Looks like a 1916 date is part of the lot number 1-4294-16 on the case and also a 16 on the base of the projectile. The projectile is a Shrapnel type, but I cannot identify the exact designation. It has a 45 degree section removed to show the inner details, including the numerous lead balls in some sort of pitch matrix, the nose fuze cavity with the flash tube leading to the base of the projectile where the expelling charge would push against the pusher plate at the rear and blow all contents forward. Most of the information I found indicated that these guns usually used common (solid) projectiles, so it is possible that this projectile is not correct for this type case, but it certainly is neat and would look great on whatever case it was originally designed for. Overall in excellent condition as shown in the photos. INERT- no flammable or explosive materials. $595.00 (View Picture)

21163 U.S. 105MM HOWITZER BRASS CASE 1942 - Standard 105 x 371mm rimmed M14 TYPE I brass case for the 105mm Howitzers. This is in good condition with minor dings around the mouth which should straighten out easily. Case body has dark patina all over except for one narrow lengthwise section where it was protected by something and is shiny brass. Headstamp date for initial manufacture is 1942 and the fired primer is also 1942 dated. INERT- no flammable or explosive materials. $59.00 (View Picture)

20800 WW2 Japanese 7CM brass cartridge case (75 x 294mmR) (Variously called either 70mm or 75mm) - These cases were used with both the Type 38 75mm Field gun adopted in 1905, basically a licensed Krupp design, which ended production prior to WW2 but continued to see service. It was also used with the Type 94 Mountain Gun adopted in 1935. The Type 94 was a much improved replacement for the Type 41 Mountain Gun with better range and velocity, hence a longer case. This is one of the four different types of cases for the 7CM (75mm) Japanese Army guns in WW2. Case has a 93mm rim diameter, and the headstamp markings are as shown in the photos. The case has an overall mellow heavy patina and dirt accumulation, with some shallow denting on one side, but rest of the case is in great shape. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

20789 WW1 GERMAN 77 X 230MM R ARTILLERY BRASS CASE- NOV 1917 - Made for the 7,7 cm Feld Kanone 96, the widely used German counterpart of the French 75mm light field gun. The headstamp markings include St (strengthened case) G 274 (lot number) , date NOV 1917. and 67% Cu which indicates the case is made with only 67% copper content due to wartime shortages. HL (Haniel Luege Düsseldorf- brass factory) over 31 inspector mark. Overall fine to excellent, nicer than usual for these. INERT no explosive components. $55.00 (View Picture)

19172 WW1 GERMAN FIELD GUN BRASS SHELL CASE FOR 10CM KANONE 1917 and others - 105 x 505mm Rimmed. This was used with all three of the main German 105mm field guns during WW1, along with an earlier 1898 model. The Model 1904 was the first with a modern recoil system, followed by the Model 1914 and finally the Model 1917. Some of these remained in use into the 3rd Reich era. These models are very well discussed by the Lovetts, on their great page at http://www.lovettartillery.com/Development%20of%20the%2010cm%20Kanone.html This case is in excellent condtion, withi sharp headstamp markings: Karth./ 584/ DEZ 1917/ PATRONENFABRIK KARLSRUH/ Sp255. Fired prime remains in place. Oveall mellow patina and free from any significant dents or dings. An important German WW1 artillery artifact. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

3520 WW1 GERMAN 17cm MINENWERFER FUZE Z.S.U.M.T. - This is an excellent example of an inert time and percussion Fuse for the WW1 German Heavy Minenwerfer. Used to great effect throughout WW1 as a 'Trench Mortar' this fuse is correctly stamped Z.s.u.m. W.M (Werfe Mortar) and dated 1918. It is made from Brass with an alloy cap and has a time ring which indicates that it could be used between 7 and 25 seconds before detonation. This is a nice original inert fuse in great condition. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $175.00 (View Picture)

22557 U.S. 105MM HOWITZER BRASS CASE 1944 - Standard 105mm Howitzer brass case M14. This is in nice shape with only minor bruising and scrapes and should polish up nicely. It has the sort of yellow-silver look from the cleaning process used last time they were processed for reloading. Good stencil markings on the base. Headstamp date for initial manufacture is 1944. $95.00 (View Picture)

19393 U.S. HAND GRENADE SET- WW2 PINEAPPLE AND VIETNAM M67 - Both are INERT, DUMMY, practice grenades, made with a hole in the bottom. In use, these have a normal fuze and a small bag of black powder in the body to make a puff of white smoke when the fuze goes off. The practice versions are painted a light blue, but these have been repainted olive drab to look like the combat versions. What you see is what you get. Both for $35.00 (View Picture)

19163 WW1 GERMAN FIELD GUN BRASS SHELL CASE FOR 10CM KANONE 1917 and others - 105 x 505mm Rimmed. This was used with all three of the main German 105mm field guns during WW1, along with an earlier 1898 model. The Model 1904 was the first with a modern recoil system, followed by the Model 1914 and finally the Model 1917. Some of these remained in use into the 3rd Reich era. These models are very well discussed by the Lovetts, on their great page at http://www.lovettartillery.com/Development%20of%20the%2010cm%20Kanone.html This case is in excellent condtion, withi sharp headstamp markings: 494/ Karth./ MAI 1918/ POLTE MAGDEBURG/ Sp406. Fired prime remains in place. Oveall mellow patina and free from any significant dents or dings. An important German WW1 artillery artifact. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

14445 WW2 GERMAN FLAK 88 CARTRIDGE CASE (88 x 571mmR) - used by Anti-Aircraft, Anti-Tank and Tank guns.
Probably the iconic artillery piece of WW2 was the feared German 88mm dual purpose gun, originally designed as an anti-aircraft gun, but used with great effectiveness as an anti-tank gun, especially in the North African desert campaigns by Rommel.
The 88mm Flak name applies to a series of guns firing the 88 x 571mmR ammunition, the first one officially called the 8,8 cm Flak 18, the improved 8,8 cm Flak 36, and later the 8,8 cm Flak 37. Flak is a contraction of German Flugzeugabwehrkanone meaning "aircraft-defense cannon", the original purpose of the eighty-eight. In English, "flak" became a generic term for ground anti-aircraft fire. In informal German use, the guns were universally known as the Acht-acht ("eight-eight"). However the pilot’s use of the term “Ack-Ack was a recycled WW1 phrase derived from the British phonetic alphabet of the time where AA fire was reported as “Ack-Ack.”)
The versatile mount allowed the eighty-eight to be fired in a limited anti-tank mode when still on wheels, and to be completely emplaced in only two-and-a-half minutes. Its successful use as an anti-tank gun led to the development of a tank gun based upon it- the 8.8 cm KwK 36, (KampfwagenKanone or "tank cannon") which used the same ammunition. These guns were mounted in the Tiger I tanks, but a more powerful gun was used in the later Tiger II or “King Tiger” tanks. Flak 88 guns were also mounted on some of the U-boats. At least 20,700 88mm Flak guns were made in Germany during WW2, and they took a dreadful toll of allied bombers and their crews.
Following WW2, captured German guns were used by some other countries, including Finland, where the captured ammunition was overhauled. This is one of the cases that was overhauled by the Finns(circa 1999?), given a new coat of paint to protect the steel casing, and new markings to reflect the new load data. Most we have seen were painted gray, but this is mostly a gold or brass tone with some gray. Subsequently the guns were declared obsolete when replaced by newer guns, and the ammunition downloaded, so the projectile, powder and primer have been removed. While the Finnish markings are clear, some of the original WW2 German markings are faintly visible on the base. We have a couple of these available and the photo shows a typical example, but markings (stamped ins stenciled) will vary slightly. Will be glad to provide photos of a specific case if you want to see exactly which one you will get. A great display piece for any WW2 collection, especially one with a focus on bomber raids or tank warfare.
INERT- no flammable or explosive components. . $250.00 (View Picture)

22439 81MM MORTAR SHELL, HIGH EXPLOSIVE, M374A3-INERT LOADED - The U.S. Army developed these from a British design in the 1950s, and they served through Vietnam and after. These rounds are no longer in service in the US but may be found in other countries. This resembles the earlier M362 shell, but has a plastic obturating ring in a groove behind the bourrelet and has a plain fin assembly instead of the shrouded drum tail. The M374 has straight fins, while the M374A2 has the fins canted 5° to induce spin stabilization during flight and to improve consistency. The body may be of forged steel or Pearlitic Malleable Iron (PMI). The percussion primer and ignition cartridge system is in the tailboom and the actual propelling charge is contained in nine fabric increment bags assembled on the boom on the A2. The M374A3 switched from fabric increment bags to “doughnut” style increments. This example has a 1971 dated body and fuze, but the lot number looks like it was finally loaded circa 1980s. This has about 80% original paint and markings, but is faded and weathered looking, not damaged from firing. This is a nice representative example for a Vietnam collection, where the ubiquitous 81mm mortar M29 was found nearly everywhere, and various 81mm mortars and ammo were even used on some of the riverine boats and on gun trucks. This was specifically loaded to be an INERT round and even the fuze is marked INERT. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $325.00 (View Picture)

21431 U.S. 37 X 223 mmSR CARTRIDGE AS USED IN P-39 AIRCOBRA, SOME PT-BOATS AND M1A2 ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN - This scarce round is a semi-rimmed cartridge developed prior to WW2 for use in the M1A2 anti-aircraft gun, and also used briefly in the ANM9 aircraft gun in the P-39 Aircobra during WW2. During WW2 some PT Boats were fitted with the 37mm M4 guns, and when those were obsolete the M9 guns were sometimes used. Projectile is the M55A1 High Explosive type, but inert loaded and painted blue for use as a target practice round, with inert Dummy Fuze M50. The Brass 37mm case M17 is semi-rimmed, and while similar to the rimmed M16 case used with the M3 anti-tank gun, the rounds are different and not at all interchangeable. A very nice clean example of this scarce round. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $149.00 (View Picture)

20934 U.S. Army Cartridge case plug for 120mm Anti-Aircraft gun Cartridge Case - This is an exact replica cast from a resin material that duplicates the real ones precisely, down to the markings (although there are no markings on these). This is crimped into the end of the cartridge case after loading and not removed when loading the gun. The originals are made of a Bakelite type material, but this is a high strength resin type material that is probably just as strong, or stronger. This is correct for the M34 120mm case which used the plastic type plugs, but a good substitute that should display okay with the M24 cases which used a palmetto wood type plug. This is an item made by Roy White who makes top quality replicas of several scarce ordnance items. Only have one available. (Note- fired cases are slightly expanded at the mouth, so this may be loose on those, and on an unfired, unloaded case it may be a tight fit and require minor trimming to fit in the mouth.) $49.00 (View Picture)

20794 RIFLE GRENADE SMOKE RED STREAMER WOOD SHIPPING CRATE - An impressive item to add to a collection of rifle grenades or military signal devices. This wood crate is in excellent condition with clear markings, but the rope carrying handle at the top has failed from age, but could be easily replaced if you desired. This has a 1955 date and is for the M23A1 Red Smoke Streamer Rifle Grenades, but these were used for all of the signal type rifle grenades just having different markings. Measurements about 18 inches long by 7 wide and 12 high. Great cargo for a military vehicle. If you need some rifle grenades to fill it up, check out item 21747 SIGNAL, GROUND WHITE PARACHUTE M17A1 - Dated July, 1944, which are packed in the same style fiber tubes that are used in this crate. Normally $75 each, I will sell up to 10 to fill this crate at a special bargain price of $35 each. Only one crate available. $49.00 (View Picture)

19380 WW1 GERMAN 15 CM HOWITZER BRASS SHELL CASE (150 x 113R) - Headstamp POLTE, DEZ. 1917, MAGDEBURG. Really nice clean example of the case used in the “15 CM schwere Feldhaubitze 13” (15cm sFH 13) howitzers during WW1. These were the real workhorses of the battlefield, churning mud, men and equipment into the murderous mess known as “no man’s land” as well as decimating allied trench lines. For a ton of info and photos on these, and many other WW1 era artillery items, check out http://www.lovettartillery.com/index.html. INERT- no explosive or flammable materials. $149.00 (View Picture)

19088 U.S. NAVY 3"/50 CARTRIDGE CASE (76.2 x 585mmR) - Standard case used with the U.S. Navy 3”/50 guns on many classes of ships from WW1 through Vietnam. However, this is a steel case which would make it late WW2 through Vietnam, and someone has painted it gold/brass color and drilled a few holes in it, probably to use as a quarterdeck ornament of for a jaunty nautical décor at home. Some rust on the sides near the base, and the base itself is rusted and pitted. Cheap! INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $25.00 (View Picture)

18679 U.S. 37 x 145 mmR Mark IIIA2 brass case with M55A1 projectile - These were used with the aircraft guns M4 and M10 used in the Bell P-39 Cobra and P-63 King Cobra fighters and also on some PT-Boats which had the M4 guns mounted on them. Headstamp on the brass case includes 1940 date, with 1941 primer date. The fuze is an inert loaded version of the M56 Point Detonating Fuze. There are some serious gouges on the rotating band, possibly from a malfunctioning feed system. Most of the projectile paint and markings remain with mostly legible 37G SHELL M55A1- PRACTICE WITH TRACER. Assorted minor dings, dents and scrapes on the case, but overall a pretty nice example of a scarce round. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

18336 SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR CLUSTER, M159 - The M126 series of Ground Pyrotechnic Signals are used for signaling and illuminating missions, and will rise to a minimum altitude of 200 yards before functioning, Essentially they are a lightweight handheld unit that replaced to tasks formerly performed by rifle grenade signals. There are made in five star clusters, single star parachute, and smoke parachute versions, in several different colors, so there are a lot of M designations for the various types and colors. Red, white, or green stars are current issue, but many other variations can be found. Each is a self contained unit, basically an aluminum tube with a primer on the “breech” end and the other end open, but covered with an aluminum cap for shipping. The signal and the expelling charge are packed inside the tube. To use, the end cap is removed and placed over the primer end. The muzzle end is pointed in the desired direction and that tube smacked against the ground. A firing pin in the center of the cap will then ignite the primer and the signal will be fired. This is a SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR CLUSTER, M159 which as been fired, leaving the launching tube and end cap. Instructions are intact and legible with November 1969 date. Great for a display of Vietnam era or more recent military equipment. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $15.00 (View Picture)

12185 U.S. 105MM GUN STEEL CASE WITH HEAT M456 PROJECTILE (RESTORED) - This type of cartridge used the M456A1 HEAT-T projectile and was standard from 1966 until replaced by the M456A2 in 1980. While obsolete in U.S. service, it is still in use by a number of allied nations, and presumably saw use in Vietnam. The projectile assemblies were rigidly secured to the cartridge case by a series of crimping indentations. The projectiles are steel-bodied, and all have plastic obturators and seals. The front of the projectile is occupied by a standoff spike assembly with an impact switch assembly at the tip which activates the M509A1 Base-Detonating (BD) fuze and about two pounds of Composition B formed into a shaped charge behind a conical copper liner. These were used with the 105mm cannons M68 used in several of the M48, M60 and M1 series tanks, and also on the Stryker vehicles with a large gun. This is a very handsome round, with a very nice case with only a few minor dings and scrapes. The 1964 dated M456 projectile has been nicely restored with sharp stencil markings. The primer has been removed and there are illegible ink stamped markings of the lot number and FOR GUN M68. One of the nicest 105mm tank gun rounds we have had. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $450.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 21523 WW1 BRITISH ROD TYPE RIFLE GRENADE No. 35 (INERT) - From 1908 throught he end of WW1 the British went through a number of different rod type rifle grenade designs. The common feature was use of a rod fitting into the bore of the rifle, with a grenade attached at the front. The differences were mainly in fuze mechanisms and design of the body for a better fragmentation effect. But, in 1917 the simpler cup type launchers for the French VB and the British Mills Number 36 launcher were introduced and soon rendered the rod type grenades obsolete. (See these two web sites for excellent history information and some great photos, including one we included in the photo of this item: http://www.inert-ord.net/rod02h/no35/ http://www.passioncompassion1418.com/decouvertes/english_grenades_gb.html The basic concept for a rod grenade included a weighted firing pin restrained in flight by a creep spring, locked before firing by a pair of restraining bolts, held in place by a safety collar. The Number 35 grenade adopted in 1918 simplified the design to only 12 parts with very few needing precision machining. This is a mostly complete example, including the easily lost creep bolts, safety pin, and the creep spring, although the latter is somewhat distorted and does not move freely. The detonator cap (which is NOT included!) fits against the filler plug in the nose. No markings found except a triangle symbol on the brass nose plug. One of only two rod type rifle grenades we have ever found. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $350.00 (View Picture)

22150 105mm HOWITZER H.E. PROJECTILE WITH STEEL CARTRIDGE CASE AND M557 FUZE (INERT) - Mint, unissued, never loaded projectile, dated 1977 but other than the stamped date is identical to those used all during WW2 through Vietnam. Projectile body originally only had primer coat of paint, but has been painted olive drab (a slightly lighter than regulation shade, but close). The 1969 dated M14B1 steel case has the usual brown lacquer coating to prevent corrosion. The cartridge case base stencil markings indicate it was originally loaded for use with a M444 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition projectile which had a payload of 18 M39 submunition bomblets. However, the case was identical for all of the 105mm Howitzer rounds with just different stencil marks when loaded. This is from a round that was downloaded, not fired and only has a couple of minor scratches or blemishes to the finish. The M557 Point Detonating Fuze is a DEMIL example that was incinerated to remove all the energetic (BOOM!) stuff and is now inert. Together this is the typical WW2 through present day 105mm Cartridge High Explosive, M1 except for the stencil on the base of the case, and being inert, and not having the yellow stencil markings on the projectile. Super nice condition, not rusty old range scrap. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $295.00 (View Picture)

23240 SCARCE RUSSIAN COLD WAR 125mm APFSDS PROJECTILE - I think this is the 3BM -9 or 3BM-10 projectile made with “maraging” steel and lacking the tungsten carbide penetrator slug adopted in the 3BM-13 design, and were less efficient against armor. The -9 and -10 projectiles were usually the ones supplied with the early exported Russian T-72 tanks. During time in the bore, the sabot around the forward part of the projectile rode in the bore, along with the small studs on the tips of the five tail fins. After leaving the muzzle, the sabot would break up and separate from the penetrator. The sabot still has a lot of the case material attached to it. The best reference I have found on these is http://fofanov.armor.kiev.ua/Tanks/ARM/apfsds/ammo.html These were similar to the U.S. 120mm rounds for the M1A1 Abrams tanks, with combustible cartridge cases enclosing the projectile. All Russian munitions are scarce, and this is a great example of what might have come thundering through the Fulda Gap on a very bad day, and what was sent to a lot of commie allies and puppet regimes. Overall fine to excellent condition with some storage scratches and chips and rust as shown in the photos. Markings are few and vague, so I have no idea what they might mean. INERT- no explosive or flammable components (except perhaps the remnants of the case on the edge of the sabot. $695.00 (View Picture)

21905 U.S. 75mm GUN BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE (75 x 350mmR) WW2 or PREWAR - Nice condition with good headstamp including EMC Lot 1272-15 that appears to be 1920s-30s vintage, but these cases continued in use through WW2. The 75mm gun included those mounted on wheeled carriages as field guns, and also as the main armament in the M3 Grant/Lee and M4 Sherman tanks, as well as on some self-propelled guns. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

21514 WW1 GERMAN 77 X 230MM R ARTILLERY BRASS CASE- 1917 dated - Made for the 7,7 cm Feld Kanone 96, the widelyused German counterpart of the French 75mm light field gun. The headstamp markings include St (strengthened case) 122 (lot number) Rh.M.F. 105, date NOV 1914. and maker name or location DUSSELDORF. Overall fine to excellent, nicer than usual for these. INERT no explosive components. $45.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 21098 U.S. WW1 ERA 75MM/3-INCH HIGH EXPLOSIVE ARTILLERY PROJECTILE - This is not one of the often seen WW1 Shrapnel shells, but the thick walled High Explosive projectile with the adapter ring at the nose for taking a fuze. Shell body has ordnance bomb and several sets of numbers which do not reveal any secrets to me. The fuze ring has the ordnance inspection stamp (crossed cannons and belt) and marking BOOST M III.W.P. I am pretty sure this is a completely finished shell, with a very slight tapered cut below the rotating band for crimping the cartridge case in place, but it is possible this is scrapped unfinished work in progress at the Armistice, and that the crimping groove(s) for 75mm or 3 inch were not yet cut. Whatever it is, it is in superb condition, mostly bright steel with some areas of staining, and only a few dings on the rotating band. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $175.00 (View Picture)

18772 SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR PARACHUTE, M127A1 - The M126 series of Ground Pyrotechnic Signals are used for signaling and illuminating missions, and will rise to a minimum altitude of 200 yards before functioning, Essentially they are a lightweight handheld unit that replaced to tasks formerly performed by rifle grenade signals. There are made in five star clusters, single star parachute, and smoke parachute versions, in several different colors, so there are a lot of M designations for the various types and colors. Red, white, or green stars are current issue, but many other variations can be found. Each is a self contained unit, basically an aluminum tube with a primer on the “breech” end and the other end open, but covered with an aluminum cap for shipping. The signal and the expelling charge are packed inside the tube. To use, the end cap is removed and placed over the primer end. The muzzle end is pointed in the desired direction and that tube smacked against the ground. A firing pin in the center of the cap will then ignite the primer and the signal will be fired. This is a SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR PARACHUTE, M27A1 which as been fired, leaving the launching tube and end cap. Instructions are intact and legible, but lot number and date have been crossed out. Great for a display of Vietnam era or more recent military equipment. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $15.00 (View Picture)

18734 SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR CLUSTER, M159 - The M126 series of Ground Pyrotechnic Signals are used for signaling and illuminating missions, and will rise to a minimum altitude of 200 yards before functioning, Essentially they are a lightweight handheld unit that replaced to tasks formerly performed by rifle grenade signals. There are made in five star clusters, single star parachute, and smoke parachute versions, in several different colors, so there are a lot of M designations for the various types and colors. Red, white, or green stars are current issue, but many other variations can be found. Each is a self contained unit, basically an aluminum tube with a primer on the “breech” end and the other end open, but covered with an aluminum cap for shipping. The signal and the expelling charge are packed inside the tube. To use, the end cap is removed and placed over the primer end. The muzzle end is pointed in the desired direction and that tube smacked against the ground. A firing pin in the center of the cap will then ignite the primer and the signal will be fired. This is a SIGNAL, ILLUMINATION, GROUND, WHITE STAR CLUSTER, M159 which as been fired, leaving the launching tube and end cap. Instructions are intact and legible but no date visible, probably Vietnam era. Great for a display of Vietnam era or more recent military equipment. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $15.00 (View Picture)

15342 60mm Mortar Ignition Cartridge, M4 by Winchester - This type was used early in WW2 through Korea and replaced later for most uses by the M5 Ignition Cartridge which used a screw in brass base and a separate cardboard case for the charge. The M4 was very similar to a shogun shell, but with a bulged area just ahead of the base to hold it in place in the base tube of the mortar. When the mortar round was dropped down the barrel, the primer hit the firing pin which ignited the primer and the 47 grain charge of ballistite powder. This provided some pressure for launching but mainly blew hot gasses out the side of the base tube which would ignite the attached bags of propelling powder increments. Headstamp WINCHESTER 60mm M4, Closing wad marked W.R.A. 60 m/m Lot 1-15 and date 6-53. $12.00 (View Picture)

9485 WW2 VINTAGE WOOD SHIPPING CRATE FOR 10 GAUGE RED VERY SIGNALS - This originally had 24 boxes of 10 rounds each, but is now empty. (ten boxes are shown in place to illustrate the proper packing layout, but are NOT included). Stenciled on both sides: SIGNAL KIGHTS MK 2 VERY RED STAR IN CARTONS CODE- 20020-B LOT- [number painted over]/ Just the thing to spice up your flare gun collection. Overall excellent condition. No lid. Other than the 10 boxes of ammo inside, what you see is what you get. $40.00 (View Picture)

7730 U.S. PRACTICE BOMB, 250 LB. AN-M57 or AN-M57A1 TYPE (RED) - Approximately 11 inches in diameter with overall length of about 36 inches. This is the bomb body or casing only, with no fins or fuzes. These were assembled with varying types of explosive and fuzes. They could be equipped with WW2 style box, or the later streamlined conical fin assembly which would then determine the final overall length. The HE version is designated AN-M57, but the practice version may have a different designation which we did not find. It is made from sheet metal, and weight is about 30 pounds. These are basically a WW2 design retained in service until replaced by the “low drag" Mark 80 series of bombs in the 1960s. Was originally painted light blue to signify practice status, but has been painted red for decorative purposes, but the photo shows an identical one that had been painted black. Only the second 250 pounder we have found. Empty, INERT- no explosive or flammable components $195.00 (View Picture)

23216 U.S. 90MM CANISTER CARTRIDGE M335- SCARCE! - This cartridge is intended primarily for antipersonnel use at close range. The canister consists of a thin steel cylindrical body which is welded to a heavy steel cup-shaped base with a gilding metal rotating band assembled it. The body has four equally spaced axial slits which extend from the forward end of the canister for approximately half its length. The canister body is filled with approximately 1,280 stacked steel cylindrical pellets which are held in place by a closing disk soldered in place. Immediately after the canister leaves the muzzle of the gun, air pressure on the closing disk and centrifugal force acting on the body and pellets cause the canister to break at the four slits on the body with resultant conical dispersion of the pellets. Just like a gigantic shotgun shell. It has a maximum effective range of 200 yards. The canister body has a 1954 date along with a lot number. The case is a 1969 dated XM200 90mm steel case with about 95% of its brown lacquer finish remaining. Most of the original black paint remains on the canister, which is full of the pellets. The later M377 replaced the 1,280 cylindrical pellets with 5,600 lightweight flechettes which doubled the effective range. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $425.00 (View Picture)

23215 U.S. 90MM CARTRIDGE- ARMOR PIERCING-TRACER M318A1 - Among the last of the armor piercing solid projectiles made of hardened steel for punching through armor by brute force. This has a blunt nose, but a pointed aluminum nose cap for better ballistics and to minimize deflection upon initial impact with the target. These had a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet per second. The 90mm gun was used in the M36 and M41 guns used in the M47 and M48 tanks and even in some WW2 tank destroyers, and on artillery carriages and the M56 “Scorpion.” The 90mm guns was used in the M48 series of tanks until the M48A5 was upgunned to 105mm. Overall fine condition with a few minor dings on the rotating band. The body has been repainted olive drab but should be a flat black color with white markings and “TTT” in the color of the tracer element. Steel case with brown lacquer finish has headstamp 90MM XM200 and lot number and 1969 date. Rotating band is marked with 3-71 dates and AP-T M318A1. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $395.00 (View Picture)

19958 U.S. NAVY 6”/47 BRASS SHELL CASING MARK 6 MOD 0 WITH CORK CLOSING PLUG- DATED 1943 (152 x 972mmR) - The headstamp markings are clearly Mark 6 Mod 0, overstamped from Mark 4. Obviously this was made as a mark 4 and then modified to Mark 6 which I believe was the change from a 27mm diameter primer to a 30mm size. The Mark 4 and Mark 6 cases, nominally 152 x 972mm Rimmed (about38 inches long) were the standard full charge case for the 6”/47 Mark guns, and weighed 65 pounds when loaded with powder. The USS Brooklyn and USS Cleveland classes of light cruisers, which were the vast majority of U.S. light cruisers in WW2 had three 6 inch/47 caliber rapid fire Mark 16 guns in each of the turrets. Projectile weights varied from 65 to 130 pounds, depending on type, with a maximum range of about 14.5 miles. Case has been polished, and has much more reddish copper tone than usually found on USN cases, but I am not sure why. This comes complete with an original cork closing plug installed, the ONLY example of the cork plugs for any of the Navy guns we have ever encountered. . Great for display with Navy or Marine Corps WW2 items, as the 6 inch guns were very effective in a Naval Gunfire Support role, with more effectiveness than the usual 5 inch guns on the destroyers. More info at http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNUS_6-47_mk16.htm. INERT- No flammable or explosive materials. $650.00 (View Picture)

18885 U.S. 60mm MORTAR ILLUMINATING PROJECTILE M721 - The M721 60mm mortar illuminating cartridge was adopted in 1984 for use with the M224 lightweight company mortar system (LWCMS) in all light infantry battalions including Airborne, Air Assault and Ranger. The M721 provides visible light illuminating capability at the same effective range as the M720 High Explosive (HE) Cartridge with a similar max range of about 3,800 meters. It gives off about 350,000 candle power and burns for about 35-40 seconds. These have the M776 mechanical time fuze, and we assume that is what is in place here. When the fuze activates, it ignites and expelling charge which blows off the tail section and expels the flare and parachute assembly, igniting the flare material. The M27 fin assembly uses the M702 ignition cartridge and M204 or M235 propelling charge. The M767 infrared illuminant rounds are identical except for the composition of the illuminant and markings. This is a reconstructed fired example with the usual fuze damage and scrapes found on these, however it should clean up with a little work and a paint job and maybe some Bondo on the fuze nose. INERT, no flammable or explosive components, or flare or parachute. $165.00 (View Picture)

18584 U.S. NAVY 3”/50 SALUTING BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE - These were shortened versions of the regular 76.2 x 583mmR cases, cut to an appropriate length to eliminate the neck and ability to hold a projectile. This one is 76.2 x 455mm R now (The convention is to use “bore size” for the initial number, not the actual mouth measurement which is about 90mm.) Headstamp 3 IN 50 CAL MK 7 MOD 0 NS 1948, D.C.M. [anchor] and SALUTING. I believe that this case was made as a short one for saluting use, but it may have been cut down. For a while after WW2, major combatants did not have dedicated 40mm saluting batteries, so they would use the 3"/50 secondary armament with saluting charges. (Reminds me of the story when a U.S. Warship fired on the Spanish fort on Guam in 1898, and a rowboat hastily proceeded to the ship to apologize for being unable to return the salute, only to be informed that Spain and the U.S. were at war, and their immediate surrender was required.) Overall pretty nice condition, having been polished once buyt now ready for a good cleaning again. For reference in case you want to restore the markings, NAV OP 2238 states: “Cartridge Cases for Saluting Cartridges- The word "SALUTING’’ is die-stamped on the base of each cartridge for 3- and 5-inch saluting cartridges. The letters are 3/16-inch high for 3-inch cartridges and 1/4-inch high for 5-inch cartridges. This word is not die-stamped on the base of cartridge cases for 3- and 6 pounder saluting cartridges. The following information is lettered in a longitudinal direction on the side of each case for saluting cartridges. The lettering is 3/8 inch high and black in color. 1. The words " SALUTING CTG”. 2. Size and caliber of the gun. 3. Weight of the black powder charge, in pounds.” INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

16485 UNFINISHED DUTCH BRASS CARTRIDGE 120 x 835mmR CASE FOR BOFORS 130mm/L50 MODEL 1950 TWIN NAVAL MOUNT - This is one that was not yet threaded for the primer, or final neck sized and trimmed to length. Some scattered splashes of green corrosion and deformed at the mouth, otherwise a very nice, large and impressive case. Perhaps something for a special art, car or motorcycle project, not necessarily just a collector. About 33 inches long, 5” at the open end, maybe 6.5” at the bottom of the case and 7.4” across the rim. A very big impressive case for one of Bofors’ largest designs. The twin mounts were installed on Swedish Halland class destroyers, and on two similar ships built for Colombia. Also used on the Netherlands destroyers of the Holland and Friesland classes, and on their Tromp class guided missile destroyers. These were very rapid firing (21 rounds per minute per barrel) but heavy, complex and expensive. The last of these ships was decommissioned in 2001. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $185.00 (View Picture)

16099 EARLY U.S. NAVY 37 x 137mmR “HEAVY 1 POUNDER” CASE AND PROJECTILE- MADE BY WINCHESTER MAY 1891 - Clear Winchester markings on headstamp and the rotating band. Projectile is the “Common” type, basically early used for armor piercing or high explosive with a solid nose and base detonating fuze. Fuze and filler have been removed. Body has most of the red paint finish remaining. Very nice example, and one of the earliest dates we have seen, even earlier than the Spanish American War. This was for use in the many variations of the “Heavy 1 Pounder” guns of the Span-Am and WW1 era. These included Hotchkiss or Driggs-Schroeder single shot guns, the Maxim-Nordenfeldt and Baldwin machine cannons used as anti-aircraft guns. Unpolished brass is a mellow brown, and the whole round displays very nicely. Empty, INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $110.00 (View Picture)

21141 U.S. 155mm GB or VX NERVE AGENT PROJECTILE M121A1 (INERT- SIMULANT FILLED) - The M121A1 155mm projectile started as a forged hollow steel shell (155mm projectile M101). About 6.5 pounds of GB or VX nerve gas agent was added and sealed inside by pressing the burster well into the body. The M37 tetrytol burster was then installed into the burster well. Then the fuze adapter was screwed in and staked to the body, and the lower interior threads of the fuze adapter were coated with sealing compound or cement, and the fuze well cup was screwed down into the fuze adapter. The lifting plug was then screwed into the fuze adapter for storage and shipment, and a fuze would be installed in the field prior to firing. This is a round that was loaded with a “stimulant” instead of actual GB or VX nerve gas agent, and no explosive burster charge, specifically for testing of the demilitarization process used as the U.S. began destruction of all chemical warfare material. This round has had the nose section cut (probably using a lathe type device inside a vacuum chamber in case there were any leaks) so the burster charge could be removed. For display purposes it would be very easy to replace the loose nose section with a bit of epoxy, using a couple of thin spacers to get the ogive contour correct. Weight is about 95 pounds, so don’t list by the lifting rang after you do this! Later stages of the demil process involved making holes in the side of the projectile body to drain the contents- and most of the examples we found had the holes made by drilling, punching or torch cutting, making them less suitable for display. Have a few of these rounds and photo shows typical example and condition. INERT- no flammable, explosive or chemical warfare agent components present. $225.00 PRICE REDUCED TO $125.00 (View Picture)

13545 U.S. 81MM MORTAR TARGET PRACTICE PROJECTILE M43A1 - Fine condition with original paint and stencil markings. Excellent base fins with wires to hold the powder increments in place and an expended ignition cartridge in the base tube. Body stamped with date 1953 and 81MM M43A1B1. The M52A2 fuze is dated 1954. This is identical to high-explosive cartridge M43A1 except for the projectile filler. The target-practice projectile is loaded with an inert materiel (plaster-of-paris and stearic acid). When used, a small black powder pellet is placed under the fuze to provide a spotting charge for observation purposes. The projectile duplicates the weight of the high-explosive projectile and has the same ballistic characteristics. Best example of these we have had. No flammable or explosive components. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $249.00 (View Picture)

7256 U.S. WW2 STYLE PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE M11A1- DATED 12-42 - Type used during WW2 until the mid 1950s, with minor variations in the M11A1, A2, A3 and A4 models that are almost impossible to figure out. Overall VG-fine condition with 80-90% of the original black paint and exceptionally clear and legible white stenciled markings dated 12-42. The tail assembly has a lot of scratches and chips and the fins are dinged and bent and one weld has popped loose, but still looks pretty good. The round nose cap is not dented, but does have some scrapes as shown in the photo. I have seen a number of the later versions, but the M11A1 is pretty scarce. (You do need an example of EVERY variation, right?) INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

21913 SCARCE WW2 U.S. NAVY 3”/50 BRASS CASE “NOT TO BE REFORMED” (76.2 x 585mmR) - During WW2 there was a serious shortage of brass and copper, used in all sorts of military weapons, vehicles, ships aircraft and ammunition. One of the methods of coping with this problem was the use of “scrap brass” to make cartridge cases for some Navy ammunition. The composition of this was not as consistent as virgin cartridge brass, and while it was suitable for use at least once, the lower copper content made reloading a very bad option. Therefore these cases were marked at the time of manufacture “NOT TO BE REFORMED” so they could be segregated prior to any attempt to reload them. This is the only one we have encountered in all our years collecting this sort of neat junque. It is a once fired case with a few minor dings, but one hand size area near the shoulder that was previously dented but has been worked back into shape pretty well, but that is the side you will want to put in the back. This is a 3”/50 case Mark 7 Mod 1 from SMC with a 10-43 date, the year they resorted to making steel pennies to save copper for the war effort. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $165.00 (View Picture)

19621 U.S. RIFLE GRENADE, PRACTICE, ANTI-TANK, M29 (T42) "ENERGA" - Invented by the French in the early 1950s, manufactured by the Swiss, and used by U.S. forces. Much larger than the earlier M9A1 Anti-Tank grenade, but aluminum instead of steel construction kept the weight the same. However, it had a much larger explosive charge which could penetrate the armor of any tank then in use. Muzzle velocity of 174 feet per second and a maximum effective range of about 100 yards for direct fire. Externally this M29 practice version it is nearly identical to the M28 High Explosive version. Normally these have the nomenclature and a 1953 date stenciled in white, but this one is all black, probably repainted. A couple of places where the paint has chipped or flaked but still a great looking example. I have only seen about a dozen of these in the last 20+ years, making them much scarcer than the M11 or M31 practice rifle grenades. Unlike all but two of the otherM29s, this one has all the fins intact. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $149.00 (View Picture)

18881 U.S. 81mm MORTAR PROJECTILE, TRAINING PRACTICE, M879 - Developed from British designs, this is one of a family of rounds for the M252 Light Weight 81mm Mortar adopted in 1986. This system increased the range of the 81mm mortars by nearly 25% over the older M29 series! This is the full range practice version of the H.E. round, using a M879 body made in 1993 and a M24 tail assembly. The fuze assembly is not quite correct for this model, and looks like an older M52 series missing the upper portion. Otherwise it is overall near excellent condition. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $195.00 (View Picture)

17696 U.S. 60mm MORTAR SMOKE M302 SECTIONED BODY & BURSTER TUBE - A neat item to show the inner workings of the M302 series White Phosphorous Smoke rounds used in the 60mm mortars. The is the body section only, the complete round shown at the top is not included but shown to provide an example of what the assembled round looks like. Unlike the fragmentation High explosive rounds which have thicker casings, the smoke round uses a thin casing, and the burster charge in the tube in the center will blow the casing apart when fired by the nose PDF fuze, and scatter and ignite the white phosphorous charge to provide smoke. Overall fair to good condition, but this was made from a body that has lost most of its paint and is rusty overall (except on the cut edges) and somewhat pitted on the outside, so it really needs to be cleaned up and repainted. If desired, you could use inert materials like plaster or expoxy to simulate the burster and WP materials. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

17333 BIG BRASS SHELL CASE- GREAT FOR THAT PROJECT! (ABOUT 5” x 24”) - People are always asking us for brass cases for crazy (to our way of thinking) projects that sound perfectly reasonable to their way of thinking. We hate to see them cut up a collector grade case, but here is one that they are welcome to fiddle with. Nominally, this would be called a 105 x 608mm Rimmed case by collectors. But project guys want to know the measurements, so here: Overall length is about 24 inches. The rim at the base measures about 5 ¾” diameter, and the body of the case ahead of the rim is about 5 ¼” diameter. The case tapers to about 4 ¾” at a point about 4 inches from the mouth, where there is a slight shoulder and the case reduces to just over 4”. However, the mouth of the case is dinged as shown in the photo, so it needs to be straightened out, or maybe you were going to cut it off shorter anyway. There is a large hole in the base of the case where the primer would go, and it is drilled, but not tapped, and is 1 1/2” diameter on the outside and has two steps down to about 1 ¼” diameter. This will polish up great. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $95.00 (View Picture)

14220 10 LINK, BELT, METALLIC, CAL .50 M9 for .50 caliber Browning Machine Gun - Full mint box of 10 links for the Browning .50 caliber machine guns. These were used with the .50 BMGs mounted in aircraft, vehicles and on tripod mounts by the infantry. New old stock, fresh from a sealed crate. SPECIAL- 10 boxes total 100 links for $40.00, or a single box of 10 links for only $5.00 (View Picture)

9076 SCARCE U.S. 3-INCH FIELD GUN MODEL 1902, 1904, 1905 BRASS SHELL CASE (76.2 x 184mm Rimmed) - These early cartridge cases used a groove near the edge of the base which was filled with different color paint to indicate the type of cartridge for easy identification. The limber carrying the ammunition had the cartridges stuck into individual tubes with the base facing out when the access cover was opened. This case was altered long ago by some barbarian for some decorative use by adding two threaded holes in the base, which drops the price considerably to a bargain $49.00 (View Picture)

22064 WW2 40mm BOFORS CARTRIDGE- DUMMY MARK 4 (RESTORED) - This is a nicely restored example with the brass case polished up, and the projectile repainted in the appropriate color. The Dummy nature is indicated by three holes in the case, and the projectile is held in place with a threaded rod seated in the primer pocket. February 1943 dated U.S. Navy case with September 1942 dated projectile. The case show use with assorted dents and dings as these were used in maintenance and trouble shooting the guns as well as loading drills. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

21697 20 x 110MM U.S. NAVY DUMMY CARTRIDGE (Mark 100 or Mark 103 Mod 1) FOR Mark 11 and Mark 12 AIRCRAFT CANNONS - Circa 1965-1966 The Mark 12 cannons were used in most U.S. Navy aircraft through the 1970s when the 20 x 102mm M61 "Vulcan" gun replaced it. The USN did not initially share the USAAF/USAF's interest in new revolver and rotary guns. Instead, they improved the performance of the old Hispano design by speeding up its rate of fire and rechambering it for a powerful new round, the 20x110 USN. This was developed by taking the base dimensions of the 20x102, but stretching the case length to the maximum which the Hispano could handle. It hardly seemed worth the effort as the performance is only marginally better than the 20x102. The Mk 12 was standard cannon armament on gun-armed Navy and Marine Corps fighters from the early 1950s to the early 1960s, including the F4D Skyray, F3H Demon, A-4 Skyhawk, F-8 Crusader and early Navy versions of the A-7 Corsair II. As well as being used in the Mk 12 gun, the new round was also used in the Mk 11. This was a twin-barrel eight-chamber revolver with a mixture of recoil and gas operation and with partly smoothbored barrels. It was used only in the Mk 4 gunpod. These cartridges use regular cartridge cases and INERT projectiles with a heavy crimp, empty primer pocket and bronze colored projectiles to indicate INERT drill status. New old stock or lightly used. $10.00 (View Picture)

21645 U.S. 20 x 110mm (Hispano Suiza) Dummy Cartridge M18A3 (Single round) - The 20 x 110mm (Hispano-Suiza) aircraft cannon was widely used by the British and U.S. aircraft during WW2. These guns were more lethal than the more widely used .50 caliber Browning machine guns, but reliability problems slowed their introduction into service. Variants of the gun included the M1, M2 (AN-M2) and M3. Eventually they were mounted in some (but not all) P-38 Lightning and P-61 Black Widow fighters, the B-29 Superfortress, and mainly in the Navy’s F4U-1C Corsair and later post-war Navy fighters. These gas operated cannons fired at about 600 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 2,800 feet per second. Some of the Hispano-Suize type guns were also mounted as anti-aircraft weapons in army tanks or halftrack variants. The M18A3 cartridges are turned from steel and then chrome(?)plated. New condition, fresh from a sealed 25 round can which was marked “25 Cartridges, Drill M18A3, Lot No. SC 49, Loaded 17-50”. Totally inert, no flammable or explosive components $5.00 (View Picture)

21250 SWEDISH 75 x 241mmR MOUNTAIN GUN BRASS CASE - 90mm base diameter with headstamp Bofors (logo) CM 75mm. Mod 28 NP, and 505 (lot number?). Unfired, never loaded case with some corrosion storage. Comes complete with a filler plug which would be used for easy removal to adjust the number of charge increments desired for use in the Swedish Mountain gun. $50.00 (View Picture)

21248 81mm MORTAR ILLUMINATING CARTRIDGE M853A1 - This cartridge is an illuminating round developed in 1986 for use by the U.,S. Marine Corps in the M252 improved 81mm mortar system and is used for illumination a desired point or area. The complete round consists of a time fuze with and expulsion charge, the projectile body containing an illuminant canister and parachute assembly, the propelling charge comprised of four horse-shoe type propellant increments, a fin assembly, and an ignition cartridge with integral percussion primer. Total weight of a loaded round is about 8.8 pounds with 1.4 pounds being the illuminant material. When the time fuze functions, it ignites the expelling charge and the illuminant canister assembly and the rear section separate from the body to allow the illumination canister and parachute to escape. The parachute deploys to slow the descent of the illuminant canister assembly to provide 50-60 seconds of 525,000 candle power illumination over the desired point or area. This is a fired round which has absolutely minimal scraping of the paint or metal. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $195.00 (View Picture)

19186 REPLICA 37mm APCBC PROJECTILE FOR 37 x 233mm CASE USED IN M3 ANTI-TANK GUN AND M3, M5 LIGHT TANKS - This is an exact replica cast from an original and duplicating all features. Even the ballistic cap unscrews. It is made a durable polymer type material. Paint the rotating band copper and you cannot tell it from an original, unless you pick it up and note that it is about ¼ of the weight of a steel projectile. Photo shows the replica with the silver colored nose next to a real one. California legal (for now). $25.00 (View Picture)

9119 6 POUNDER SOLID SHOT "CANNON BALL"- CIVIL WAR ERA - Mellow iron patina with limited pitting. Standard 3.58 inch diameter as used with 6 Pounder guns from the Revolution to the end of the muzzle loader era, but I think this is probably from the Civil War era. $250.00 (View Picture)

22836 WW2 ERA U.S. CARTRIDGE CASES/PROJECTILES 37mm, 40mm, 75mm- SET OF FIVE - These all came from the same previous owner, and all are totally finished cases but NONE have any markings to identify the maker or model on either the cases or the projectiles. I am certain that these were part of a motivational display set in a factory that made them, or used for war bond drives, etc showing what a local industry was doing for the war effort. They all have some mellow patina and are dirty, but free from dings and will clean up nicely. Projectiles are as shown, with some rust on the steel surfaces but not really pitted so will clean up nicely. The fuzes are stuck in place, probably due to rusty threads. Will sell them individually, or as a set.

22836A- 37 x 223mm Rimmed- for the 37mm tank and anti-tank gun. Finished case with Armor Piercing Capped Ballistic Cap projectile M51B1 $125.00 (View Picture)
22836B- 37 x 223mm Rimmed- for the 37mm tank and anti-tank gun. Finished case with Armor Piercing Capped Ballistic Cap projectile M51B1 $125.00 (View Picture)
22836D- 40 x 311mm Rimmed Bofors with HE projectile (unsure what Model/ Mark-Mod) with Bakelite “Fuze, Dummy, T34” $110.00 (View Picture)
22836E- 40 x 311mm Rimmed Bofors with HE projectile (unsure what Model/ Mark-Mod) with aluminum or pot metal fuze cover. $110.00 (View Picture)
22836F- 75 x 350mm Rimmed Case (M18) for most U.S. 75mm field and tank guns of WW2, including the M3 Grant and Lee and M4 Shermans. No projectile associated with this one. $95.00 (View Picture)

Individual prices add up to $565.00 but price for the lot of six items described above is only $465.00 (View Picture)

20951 USAF AC-130 GUNSHIP 105mm HOWITZER CARTRIDGE (CASE AND PROJECTILE)- Adopted prior to WW2, the 105mm Howitzer has been the workhorse of the field artillery ever since. The same basic gun has been mounted on a variety of armored vehicle hulls (USMC AMTRACS; M4 Sherman hulls as the M7 Priest, or later M52 and M108 guns), and even mounted in the AC-130 Spectre gunships. All of these use the same basic M14 series cases, like this one. This case is dated 1969 and has the fired primer in place. The USAF modified 105 Howitzer rounds have the projectiles crimped to the case, instead of being a loose fit. The USAF uses the same charge all the time, while the ground gunners usually pull one of more increments of propelling charges to vary the range or trajectory to fit the mission. The base of the case is ink stmped with the lot number and "USAF ONLY" and the mouth shows that it was cromped, but upon firing this was stretched out abit, so the projectile is now a tight fit instead of firmly attached, The projectile is a new old stock and never loaded 105mm High Explosive M1, dated 1968-1974, correct for this use. Projectile has been repainted OD color but no stencil markings added. A demilled (INERT) M557 point detonating fuze is installed. Photo shows typical example of the few we have (all in similar condition), but not necesessarily the exact round you will receive. The AC-130 Spectre gunship is a tremendously effective weapons system, with variations in the guns used in the different models, but generally they included a 105mm Howitzer, a 40mm Bofors or 30mm gun, and a 20mm Gatling Gun. This is in excellent condition 105mm USAF used case and projectile much scarcer than the ground fired rounds. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $425.00 (View Picture)

20781 LOT OF 3 DIFFERENT U.S.20MM DUMMY CARTRIDGES - Lot consists of one of each of the 20mm Oerlikon, 20mm Hispano-Suiza and 20mm US Navy, described in detail below, and shown left to right in the photos. All these are Dummy Drill versions and are totally INERT with no explosive or flammable material. 1- U.S. NAVY 20MM OERLIKON (20 X 110MM RB[REBATED]) DUMMY DRILL CARTRIDGE FOR ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUNS- Circa 1943 This cartridge was used in the thousands of 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft guns mounted aboard nearly every type of Navy ship in WW2. The fired cases are unique as the gun begins to recoil while the case is still being extracted, blowing the neck diameter out to nearly the diameter of the body. They are also nearly unique in their having a rim diameter much smaller (or "rebated") than the base of the case. The U.S. Navy adopted the 20mm Oerlikon guns shortly before WW2 to replace the .50 caliber machine guns previously used for close in anti-aircraft use. By the end of the war about 125,000 of the guns had been made in the U.S. mainly for use aboard ships. Between December 1941 and September 1944, Oerlikons accounted for 32% of all Japanese aircraft downed by the USN. Beginning in 1943 the 40mm Bofors began to replace the 20mm Oerlikons with greater range and stopping power and all Oerlikons were removed from the fleet by the mid-1950s.. The Oerlikon rounds are easily spotted by their distinctive “rebated” rim which is smaller than the case diameter. These dummy cartridges were made for training use, and feature a regular case with three holes drilled in it, and a regular (bur empty) projectile which is silver soldered to the neck to withstand harsh use. The manufacturing process leave tiny splashes of flux on some of the cases which has caused some mild corrosion, and some of the brown paint on the projectiles may have chipped or flaked off. 2- U.S. 20 x 110MM HISPAN SUIZA DUMMY DRILL CARTRIDGE M18A3 – Circa 1950 The 20 x 110mm (Hispano-Suiza) aircraft cannon was widely used by the British and U.S. aircraft during WW2. These guns were more lethal than the more widely used .50 caliber Browning machine guns, but reliability problems slowed their introduction into service. The Brits used two Hispano cannons in the later Spitfire fighters. U.S. variants of the gun included the M1, M2 (AN-M2) and M3. Eventually they were mounted in some (but not all) P-38 Lightning and P-61 Black Widow fighters, the B-29 Superfortress, and mainly in the Navy’s F4U-1C Corsair and later post-war Navy fighters. These gas operated cannons fired at about 600 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 2,800 feet per second. Some of the Hispano-Suiza type guns were also mounted as anti-aircraft weapons in army tanks or halftrack variants. The M18A3 cartridges are turned from steel and then chrome(?)plated. New condition 3- 20 x 110MM U.S. NAVY DUMMY CARTRIDGE (Mark 100 or Mark 103 Mod 1) FOR Mark 11 and Mark 12 AIRCRAFT CANNONS- Circa 1965 The Mark 12 cannons were used in most U.S. Navy aircraft through the 1970s when the 20 x 102mm M61 "Vulcan" gun replaced it. The USN did not initially share the USAAF/USAF's interest in new revolver and rotary guns. Instead, they improved the performance of the old Hispano design by speeding up its rate of fire and rechambering it for a powerful new round, the 20x110 USN. This was developed by taking the base dimensions of the 20x102, but stretching the case length to the maximum which the Hispano could handle. It hardly seemed worth the effort as the performance is only marginally better than the 20x102. The Mk 12 was standard cannon armament on gun-armed Navy and Marine Corps fighters from the early 1950s to the early 1960s, including the F4D Skyray, F3H Demon, A-4 Skyhawk, F-8 Crusader and early Navy versions of the A-7 Corsair II. As well as being used in the Mk 12 gun, the new round was also used in the Mk 11. This was a twin-barrel eight-chamber revolver with a mixture of recoil and gas operation and with partly smoothbored barrels. It was used only in the Mk 4 gunpod. These cartridges use regular cartridge cases and INERT projectiles with a heavy crimp, empty primer pocket and bronze colored projectiles to indicate INERT drill status. New old stock or lightly used. The set of three cartridges for $20.00 (View Picture)

23387 WW2 Japanese 7CM Type 41 Mountain Gun brass cartridge case (75 x 184mmR) - The Type 41 Mountain Gun which was a license-built copy of the Krupp M.08 mountain gun. Originally it was the standard pack artillery weapon. After it was superseded by the Type 94 75 mm mountain gun (circa 1935), it was then used as an infantry "regimental" gun, deployed 4 to each infantry regiment. The Type 41 guns were in service from 1908 to 1945. In Japanese service the gun was crewed by thirteen men. The ammunition used included various types of HE, AP, Shrapnel and chemical munitions. The maximum ranges was about 7,500 yards. This is an excellent brass case (except for some dents along the back side) with good markings as shown in the photos. INERT- no flammable or explosive material.The Type 41 Mountain Gun which was a license-built copy of the Krupp M.08 mountain gun. Originally it was the standard pack artillery weapon. After it was superseded by the Type 94 75 mm mountain gun (circa 1935), it was then used as an infantry "regimental" gun, deployed 4 to each infantry regiment. The Type 41 guns were in service from 1908 to 1945. In Japanese service the gun was crewed by thirteen men. The ammunition used included various types of HE, AP, Shrapnel and chemical munitions. The maximum ranges was about 7,500 yards. This is an excellent brass case (except for some dents around the shoulder area) with good markings as shown in the photos. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $125.00 (View Picture)

23246 U.S. NAVY 5"/38 CARTRIDGE CASE FOR ROCKET ASSISTED PROJECTILES - Standard Mark 10 Mod 1 steel case, dated July 1972, as used with most of the post WW2 5”/38 ammunition. However, this has the white nylon(?) or plastic type plug with the deep hole in the center to ensure positive ignition of the Rocket Assist Projectile (RAP) which reached service late in the Vietnam War. The plug is marked “Cartridge Plug, 5/38 Mark 11 Mod 1 with drawing number and 8/73 date. The same powder cartridges would be used with either RAP or conventional projectiles, but the older type plugs did not reliably ignite the RAP motors when fired so the newer powder cartridges were reserved for RAP use while the older ones were used with the conventional rounds. Only one of these 5”/38 RAP style plugs we have ever seen, although we have a bunch of the 5”/54 plugs which are similar, but not interchangeable. Overall good condition with the usual scraped and spots found on the steel cases. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $175.00 (View Picture)

23239 BRITISH- -three 30MM Warrior IFV rounds on clip with three different projectiles (projectiles I think are US) - -three 30MM Warrior IFV rounds on clip with three different projectiles (projectiles I think are US) $250 $150.00 (View Picture)

23213 U.S. 76MM HEAT ROUND FOR M41 WALKER BULLDOG TANK GUN (76.2 x 539mmR) - These were used in the M32 gun mounted in the M41 and M41A1 Walker Bulldog tanks, and also in the M48 gun which was a two wheel anti-tank gun. The M495 High Explosive Anti-Tank-Tracer (HEAT-T) round is about identical to the M496 with a cylindrical body, tapered at the rear with about 1.1 pounds of Comp B loaded around a copper cone for a shaped charge effect on impact. The stand-off spike in the nose is needed for the Point Initiated Base Detonating fuze. This 1965 dated M495 projectile has the plastic plug over the nose spike and in the base, as it was never loaded with explosive and the fins which would be invisible inside the case. Some exposed rust spots through the black paint. Firmly seated in a M26B1 steel case with 1952 headstamp date. The case was last loaded with a HE shell M42A1, as indicated by the stencil markings, but except for the difference in the stencil, this is a correct configuration. A nice example of a scarce round. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $350.00 (View Picture)

21436 U.S. Mine, Antipersonnel, Fragmentation, Bounding, M26 (INERT) Vietnam era - This is a newer antipersonnel mine. The lot number on this one looks like 1968 date. It is not mentioned in the 1966 manuals, but appears in the 1977 editions, but mot in the 1995 manuals, so the service period is roughly late 1960s to 1990s. These function much like the earlier M16 mine. The dual fuze can operate either by pressure of tripwire. When the fuze is functioned, a charge at the bottom of the mine projects a fragmentation assembly into the air which will detonate one to two meters above the ground. It is simpler to used, with spools of trip wire and other accessories packaged with the mine as a complete unit. Combat versions are olive drab color with yellow markings and training versions are light blue with white markings. This is an example that has had the expelling charge and fuzing removed by burning and the “bounding” fragmentation charge removed and destroyed separately. The cover plate which served as the arming switch is included, but will drop inside, so you will need to fill the body with a spacer of some sort before attaching the cover plate with epoxy or construction adhesive. Size is about 3.5” diameter by 6” tall and loaded weight about 2.2 pounds. In the photos, the one on the left has been cleaned up, but you will get one like the one on the right which has lots of dirt and clay stuck on it and will need to be soaked and scrubbed a bit. What you see is what you get. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

23391 U.S. ANTI TANK MINE, Practice, Heavy, M20- MINT! - About 13" diameter by 5" high made of blue painted steel. Externally it is the same as the heigh explosive M15 Anti Tank mine, but has filler holes around its periphery, and perforations around the arming plug and secondary fuzing wells, indicative of inert status. The mine is empty, with arming plug M4 assembled, but lacking either primary or secondary fuze. It is to be loaded with sand and fuzed in the field. Empty weight is about 5 pounds, but when sand filled about 31 pounds. A wire carrying handle is provided. The mine, when fitted with a M604 fuze, is activated by the weight of an intermediate or heavy tank. Lighter equipment or personnel will not overcome the spring system of the mine and actuate the fuze. These could alos be rigged with a variety of other firing devices for emplacement as booby traps. Will look great with a coat of OD paint as an AT mine M15 for display with military vehicles or mine detectors. Mint, unissued. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $95.00 (View Picture)

23229 WW2 GERMAN PZKPFW III 50mm ARMOR PIERCING CARTRIDGE (50 x 289mmR) for 5cm/L42 gun - Officially this was the “5cm Panzergranatparton 39” used in the PAK 38/L60 anti-tank gun, and the KwK 38/L42 installed in the Kpfw III tank used early in WW2. This was the German short 50MM gun, used in only in the early model Panzer III tank. That tank began life with a 37MM gun but Hitler wanted it to have a bigger gun. The German Army heads didn’t agree and the 42 caliber 50MM was a passive aggressive response to Hitler’s demands. It could defeat 37MM of armor at 1000 meters with a muzzle velocity of 685 meters per second. This round is heavily restored, as the cases were steel and nearly all found today are badly rusted and pitted if not total junk. This has been cleaned up and patched somewhat and repainted brass color with appropriate markings added, although somewhat crudely. The AP projectile has the base fuze and explosive charge removed. It has been cleaned up and repainted as well. I wish it were better, but the is the ONLY one we have ever encountered, and consider that a stroke of luck. INERT, no flammable or explosive material. $450.00 (View Picture)

21980 U.S. 105mm GUN UNIDENTIFIED APFSDS TYPE CARTRIDGE (105 x 607mmR) - I was told by one expert that this is some sort of High Pressure Test or proof round. The totally unmarked projectile seems a lot heavier than the usual APFSDS types, and the aluminum collar does not seem to be designed to shed upon firing, and the blunt nose would certainly cause a shorter range and possible instability, so I am pretty sure this is not some sort of combat load. The blue indicates an inert projectile. This is a very snug fit in a steel M148A1B1 case. This certainly is a very different looking round. If anyone knows what it is, please let me know. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $350.00 (View Picture)

21963 90mm TANK CARTRIDGE HEAT-T M431 SHAPED CHARGE TYPE (INERT) - This is a dummy display round made up with an excellent condition U.S. 90mm brass case M19 dated 1953 married up with a dummy HEAT-T projectile. This would have been a typical load used on any of the tanks with the 90mm gun, such as the M48-M48A3. These were developed during the late 1960s and replaced the earlier M348 series HEAT rounds. Although no longer in service with the US armed forces, the 90 mm HEAT-T M431 series is still used by some nations. The 90 mm HEAT-T M431 series are all fixed rounds with the projectiles crimped into their brass cartridge cases. The projectile consists of a steel body, a threaded standoff spike assembly, an aluminium chamber and a fin and boom assembly. The aluminium chamber adapts the fin and boom assembly to the body and contains the base detonating fuze. The projectile nose cap contains a piezoelectric element. On impact the piezoelectric fuze functions to ignite the shaped charge formed from 544 g of Composition B under a funnel-shaped liner. The resultant high-temperature metal particle jet can penetrate approximately 190 mm of steel up to an effective range of 1,000 meters The 90 mm HEAT-T M431 projectiles have a muzzle velocity of 3,700 fps. and while the maximum range is 8,138 meters the maximum effective range is limited to 1,000 meters. The dummy training projectile seems to be a steel casting, and has stamped markings that look like “90 K DM 68 LOS PH -1-32” which sounds like a German style marking, but that is pretty much a guess. Most U.S. tank ammo was standardized across NATO so that may explain it. Visually a good looking example of one of the shaped charge HEAT rounds of the cold war era, but totally INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $275.00 (View Picture)

22213 U.S. NAVY FACTORY LOADED 3"/50 (76.2 x 585mmR) ARMOR PIERCING MARK 29 MOD 2 DUMMY INERT CARTRIDGE - The steel cartridge case is circa 1950s and the projectile is dated 1942, but it was likely loaded in this configuration in the 1980s-90s. This is a complete fixed round of 3"/50 ammunition which was specially loaded (actually remanufactured) for testing of the process used to demilitarize ammunition. To do this they needed a round that was actual size and weight and had an inert material substituted for the powder and projectile charges and inert primers and fuzes. This used a standard steel case with the old load information removed and new stencil markings "3"/50 CARTRIDGE CASE/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST" on the case. The projectile is a Mark 29 Mod 2 Armor Piercing type. It is painted gold, and (almost illegibly) stenciled "3"/50 MARK 29/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST." Overall condition is fine to excellent with some minor dings and scrapes. Could be very easily repainted/stenciled to combat appearance. Do not confuse this with the common loading machine drill rounds made of a combination of wood and metal, or all metal construction. This uses regular conventional components, just loaded without any explosive or flammable materials so that it would be safe for use during testing. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $325.00 (View Picture)

14589 U.S. Navy Cartridge case plug Mark 4 Mod 1 for 6”/47 Cartridge Case - This is an exact replica cast from a resin material that duplicates the real ones precisely, down to the markings. This is crimped into the end of the cartridge case after loading and not removed when loading the gun. The originals are made of a Bakelite type material, but this is a high strength resin type material that is probably just as strong, or stronger. This is an item made by Roy White who makes top quality replicas of several scarce ordnance items. Only have one available. (Note- fired cases are slightly expanded at the mouth, so this may be loose on those, and on an unfired, unloaded case it may be a tight fit and require minor trimming to fit in the mouth.) $49.00 (View Picture)

10571 U.S. ARMY CARTRIDGE, DRILL, M15B1 FOR 3 INCH GUNS M1918, M1, M3, M5, M6 AND M7 (76.2 x 585mmR) - This is a completely inert assembly provided for loading and fuze setting training of crews serving these various types of 3 inch guns. These were a series of guns starting with the Model 1918 anti-aircraft gun. This was subsequently improved by use of a removable barrel liner, which was the M1 gun. The M3 used a different form of liner. The M5 was an adaptation for anti-tank gun use. The M6 gun was in the self-propelled 3 inch Gun Motor Carriage M5. The M7 was the version of the gun mounted in the M10 Tank Destroyer (also known as the 3 inch Gun Motor Carriage, M10) which was based on a M4 Sherman hull. The fixed ammunition used in all of these was based on the same 76.2x585R cartridge case - designated 3 inch Cartridge Case Mk IIM2. Although not specified on the base of the cartridge, TM9-1901 dated 1942 indicates that this Drill Cartridge was for use with all the M1918 series 3 inch guns, and the 3 inch guns M1, M3, M5, M6 and M7 and also the 3 inch (15 Pounder) Gun M1902M1. The Drill Cartridge is a hollow metal body with a bronze base plate and a replaceable Dummy Fuze M59 that duplicates the exterior of the M48 Point Detonating Fuze. The M15 Drill cartridge used a bronze body while the M15B1 used a malleable iron or steel body. This cartridge is unissued, new old stock, still in the original shipping tube from 1943. We have several and some are still sealed and on others the adhesive on the tape failed after 70 years, but the cartridge has not been out of the tube except for taking the photos. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $149.00 (View Picture)

7251 yellow- 20 x 110mmRB OERLIKON CANNON DUMMY CARTRIDGE - This is a WW2 cartridge case and projectile, emptied of all explosive or powder and neatly repainted in original colors. The cases vary as to headstamp markings, and some have no primer, while others have a dented or undented primer. The 20 x 110mmRB indicates it has a 20mm projectile diameter, the case is 110 mm long, and it has a “Rebated” head, where the head is smaller diameter than the rest of the case. Good Oerlikon cases are nearly impossible to find as the shoulder and neck are blown out to the full case diameter upon firing by the residual pressure as the extraction cycle starts. These were made from unfired cases, or factory seconds. We have several different as follows: Black projectile with slightly different contours- Armor Piercing (AP) Red projectile- High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) White projectile- High Explosive with tetryl filler (HE) Yellow projectile- High Explosive with pentolite filler (HE) Your choice of one round (as long as limited supply lasts) $19.00 (View Picture)

7250 Black-20 x 110mmRB OERLIKON CANNON DUMMY CARTRIDGE - This is a WW2 cartridge case and projectile, emptied of all explosive or powder and neatly repainted in original colors. The cases vary as to headstamp markings, and some have no primer, while others have a dented or undented primer. The 20 x 110mmRB indicates it has a 20mm projectile diameter, the case is 110 mm long, and it has a “Rebated” head, where the head is smaller diameter than the rest of the case. Good Oerlikon cases are nearly impossible to find as the shoulder and neck are blown out to the full case diameter upon firing by the residual pressure as the extraction cycle starts. These were made from unfired cases, or factory seconds. We have several different as follows: Black projectile with slightly different contours- Armor Piercing (AP) Red projectile- High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) White projectile- High Explosive with tetryl filler (HE) Yellow projectile- High Explosive with pentolite filler (HE) Your choice of one round (as long as limited supply lasts) $19.00 (View Picture)

7194 U.S. 20 x 110mm (Hispano Suiza) Dummy Cartridge M18A3 - The 20 x 110mm (Hispano-Suiza) aircraft cannon was widely used by the British and U.S. aircraft during WW2. These guns were more lethal than the more widely used .50 caliber Browning machine guns, but reliability problems slowed their introduction into service. The Brits used two Hispano cannons in the later Spitfire fighters. U.S. variants of the gun included the M1, M2 (AN-M2) and M3. Eventually they were mounted in some (but not all) P-38 Lightning and P-61 Black Widow fighters, the B-29 Superfortress, and mainly in the Navy’s F4U-1C Corsair and later post-war Navy fighters. These gas operated cannons fired at about 600 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 2,800 feet per second. Some of the Hispano-Suiza type guns were also mounted as anti-aircraft weapons in army tanks or halftrack variants. The M18A3 cartridges are turned from steel and then chrome(?)plated. New condition, fresh from a sealed 25 round can which was marked “25 Cartridges, Drill M18A3, Lot No. SC-1-3, Loaded 1-50”. Totally inert, no flammable or explosive components. Price for a FULL SEALED SPAM CAN of 25 rounds is $75.00. Lots of , or lot of five rounds for $20, or single rounds are priced per round at $5.00 (View Picture)

19001 81mm mortar shipping tube- M880 short range practice - Cardboard shipping tube for 81mm mortar ammunition, in this case the M880 short range practice round. Measures about 3 ¾” diameter by 16 inches long. As shown in the photos. Good cargo for a military vehicle or to add to a mortar collection, or Iraq/Afghanistan collection. Most of these were destroyed or trashed and few reach the collector market. Only one available. $10.00 (View Picture)

21975 81mm Mortar “Cartridge, Ignition, M6” - These were the replacement for the earlier “shotgun style” ignition cartridges. The M6 ignition cartridge consists of a red cardboard container with about 120 grains of double base gunpowder. It is closed on both ends with a roll crimp over a wad with a hole in the center and a thin inner seal. These fit in the base tube of the mortar cartridge, and then an M33 aluminum head with a percussion primer was screwed into the end of the tube. This solved the problem where the earlier shotgun style ignition cartridges would sometimes set back from the mortar round and foul the tube. The M6 ignition cartridge was used most of the 81mm rounds from mid WW2 onward, including many of the M43A1 High Explosive and practice rounds, the M68 Training, the M56 HE, M57 Chemical (White Phosphorous), and M301 Illuminating. One mint, unissued M6 ignition cartridge as shown in the photo. These are live, and contain a powder charge similar to most small arms ammunition, NOT an explosive. Price for one cartridge $8.00 (View Picture)

20315 BOMB SUSPENSION LUG MS3314- Vietnam era- set of two - Beleive these are for the Mark 80 series and probably other types of air dropped ordnance (underwater mines, etc) Set of two lugs, mint unissued, new old stock, with 1971 date $18.00 (View Picture)

7250 Black-20 x 110mmRB OERLIKON CANNON DUMMY CARTRIDGE - This is a WW2 cartridge case and projectile, emptied of all explosive or powder and neatly repainted in original colors. The cases vary as to headstamp markings, and some have no primer, while others have a dented or undented primer. The 20 x 110mmRB indicates it has a 20mm projectile diameter, the case is 110 mm long, and it has a “Rebated” head, where the head is smaller diameter than the rest of the case. Good Oerlikon cases are nearly impossible to find as the shoulder and neck are blown out to the full case diameter upon firing by the residual pressure as the extraction cycle starts. These were made from unfired cases, or factory seconds. We have several different as follows: Black projectile with slightly different contours- Armor Piercing (AP) Red projectile- High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) White projectile- High Explosive with tetryl filler (HE) Yellow projectile- High Explosive with pentolite filler (HE) Your choice of one round (as long as limited supply lasts) $19.00 each (View Picture)

22141 10 LINK, BELT, METALLIC, CAL .50 M2- ORIGNAL WW2- NEW OLD STOCK - Full original box of 10 links for the Browning .50 caliber machine guns. New old stock, fresh from an old crate which had the 1943 dated packing slip shown. SPECIAL- 10 boxes total 100 links for $40.00, or a single box of 10 links for only $5.00 (View Picture)

23404 U.S.Navy Training Version of the Mark 36 Mod 1 Demolition Charge or “Limpet Mine” used by UDT/SEAL swimmers to attack ships - The Mk 36 Mod 1 is a pan-shaped limpet mine designed primarily for sabotage of shipping by divers. The pan-shaped aluminum body of the charge as a wide flange around the rim of it; this flange had six powerful curved magnets, in essence making it a type of limpet mine. (The magnets have been removed, but you can make wooden ones and attach them for display if you like.) The explosive used in the combat version is based upon H-6 high explosive, which is quite a bit more powerful than plastic explosive. The casing of the charge has two charge wells, which used internal booster charges. These can accept firing devices (fuzes) or antidisturbance devices. An activator well on the rear end of the casing has a further booster charge for use with the Mk 39 Mod 0 arming and safety device as well as any additional fuzing or firing devices required for the mission. Mk 36 Mod 1 charges have been known to totally break the keel of a small-to-medium warship, and blow gaping holes in larger ones. (Check out http://www.pmulcahy.com/explosives/explosives.html as a great demo reference source!) This one is a training version, INERT loaded and deeply stamped INERT and painted blue. Condition as shown in the photo. A scarce item for the SEAL/UDT collector. INERT- no flammable or explosive material. $135.00 (View Picture)

22556 U.S. 105MM HOWITZER BRASS CASE 1943 - Standard 105mm Howitzer brass case M14. This is in nice shape with only minor bruising and scrapes and should polish up nicely. It has the sort of yellow-silver look from the cleaning process used last time they were processed for reloading. Good stencil markings on the base. Headstamp date for initial manufacture is 1943. $95.00 (View Picture)

22523 U.S. NAVY 3 INCH ARMOR PIERCING PROJECTILE MARK 29 MOD 1 for 3”/50 guns (white trace) - This is technically an AP-C-BC-T or “Armor Piercing- Capped- Ballistic Cap- Tracer” design where the mild steel projectile body has a hardened steel cap that does the penetration, and then a lightweight cap that screws on to provide the best streamlined shape for ballistic performance. Projectile is unfired and has good markings on the rotating band LOT [number] MK 29 MOD 1 - 3 IN AP and maker code and [anchor] inspector marks. Base is marked 3” AP- MK 29 MOD 1 and the weight. These were initially issued without any explosive filler intended strictly as an armor piercing round without any explosive. These had a base plug installed with only a tracer cavity, instead of a fuze. Projectile is fine-excellent except for some dents and handling dings on the rotating band, and markings are a bit rough. Unlike the ones we previously had, there is NO token demil hole in the windshield. Later loadings included a yellow painted nose to indicate loading with explosive filler. The white band without any red or orange dots indicates it had a white tracer element. Black color of the projectile indicates it is the Armor Piercing round WITHOUT the explosive filler or base fuze. Black paint and white nomenclature markings are chipped and scraped and basically illegible, but could be repainted if you want to do that. Some rust on the exposed bare steel areas. During WW2 the 3"/50 slow fire gun was main battery for the Destroyer Escorts and also used to arm merchant ships, and sometimes as secondary battery aboard larger vessels. In the post-WW2 era the rapid fire 3"50 mounts replaced the 40mm as the main (only) guns aboard amphibious and auxiliary ships. AP ammunition would have been fired only for anti-ship use, while HE or VT fuze rounds were widely used for anti-aircraft and surface and gunfire support roles. Neat item for WW2 Navy display. I have heard but cannot verify that some of the Army "Tank Destroyer (motor gun carriages) actually used USN 3" guns as well.) INERT, non-explosive display item only. $149.00 (View Picture)

7959 LOT OF FOUR ROUNDS WITH CLIP- BOFORS 40 X 364 MMR (BOFORS 40MM/L70) DUMMY, M851 - The Swedish Bofors firm has worked hard at improvements on their famous 1930s vintage WW2 era guns known as the 40mm/L60 which fired the 40 x 311 mmR cartridge in the four round clips. In the post-WW2 period they adopted a longer 40 x 263 mmR case for greater range and velocity when fired through a barrel 70 calibers long (compared to the shorter 60 caliber length barrels.) Their new gun design boosted the rate of fire from 140 rounds per minute to 280, then 300 and currently 330 rounds per minute. This impressive rate of fire and range was made more effective by coupling it with sophisticated fire control and radar systems. The 40mm/L70 guns are in service in many countries today in Anti-Aircraft, anti-armor, or anti-shipping roles. Polymer type projectile is a semi-transparent brownish color with heavy steel “rebar” type rod which give the cartridge its weight. Tip of projectile has metal (brass?) cap. Projectile is unmarked. Primer pocket area only shows a neatly finished epoxy type substance. Inkstamped markings on side of the case: 40mm L/70, DUMMY M851, GRT85G016-001. In U.S. Service, these were made for use in the abortive "Sergeant York" Divisional AIr Defense system, basically a twin 40mm L/70 Bofors mounted on the hull of a M60 tank. However, it was a failure and cancelled in 1985. This is a lot of four in their original loading clip. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $225.00 (View Picture)

23254 U.S. 37mm (37 x 223mmR) Cartridge with Armor Piercing Projectile M80 - Good case, although with some minor scrapes and dings on the shoulder. No headstamps, but side of case is ink stamped with ID “37MM M16/ LOT SMC/ 1943/ [ordnance wheel]. No primer ever installed. Projectile is the early M80 Armor Piercing type made without either the hardened cap, or the ballistic cap. Armor Piercing projectile is marked 37MM M80 on the band, and retains most of the original black paint, correct for this type round. These were made for the 37mm Gun, M3, the cute little towed anti-tank gun. However, the ammo was also used in the M5 and M6 guns mounted in the M3 and M5 light tanks and the M8 armored car. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $135.00 (View Picture)

23165 CW CANISTER BALL - .95 inch diameter iron ball from a 3 inch rifled gun canister load. Many variations wre used in different guns and types of loads, but this particular type was used in 3" rifled guns. 48 or 55 of these iron shot were stuffed in basically a tin can with a wooden base to which the powder charge in a cloth bag was tied. At close range, a double load of canister was sometimes used. With canister, it truly is better to give these than to receive! One iron canister ball for $8.00 (View Picture)

23163 M31 RIFLE GRENADE - The explosive version will penetrate 10 inches of armor, or 20 inches of concrete. It can be used for direct fire up to 115 meters, or indirect fire at 185 meters. Explosive version has olive drab body/yellow markings, but otherwise looks same as this inert M31 Practice version shown here which has the blue with white markings used on practice ammunition. This was used in the 1960s with the M1 Garand rifle, and later with the M14 rifle. Overall excellent condition with a tiny token demil dent near the nose, and one fin slightly bent, but now straightened with the rivets still intact. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

23133 37MM NON-LETHAL RIOT RUBBER BUCKSHOT PROJECTILES - hard rubber balls, three large ones about .50 caliber and two smaller ones about .30 caliber, use for non-lethal riot control. The lot for $3.00 (View Picture)

23132 37MM NON-LETHAL RIOT RUBBER PROJECTILES - Lot of four semi-soft rubber projectiles for firing from 37mm riot control munitions. The lot for $8.00 (View Picture)

23131 37MM NON-LETHAL RIOT WOODEN BATON PROJECTILES - Lot of three wooden "batons" used for riot control when fired from 37 caliber guns. The lot for $10.00 (View Picture)

22894 WW2 U.S. NAVY WHITE CARTRIDGE FOR VERY PISTOL - These were used in Navy (and other) flare guns chambered for the 10 gauge shells, starting around 1877 when LT. Edward Very invented his flare. The guns were originally made by the Washington Navy Yard, and by WW1 were being made by Remington with brass frames, blued steel barrels and walnut grips. By WW2 the design was much simplified and the Mark V signal pistol made by Sedgley became the most commonly used gun. The flares (officially called “signals”) were made in red, white and green versions, by about six or eight different manufacturers, using essentially the commercial 10 gauge shotshell with varying heights of brass bases and various headstamps. These usually were secured on the end with a roll crimp. The closing wad was colored to indicate the color of the flare, and usually (but not always) the cardboard body was the same color. These also had a “tactile” identification feature so they could be selected in the dark by touch. Green closing wads were smooth; red had several ridges, and the white had a bump or tit in the center of the wad. This is a single white cartridge in excellent condition with VFM headstamp. $12.00 (View Picture)

22793 U.S. WW2 STYLE PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE M11A3- NEAR MINT UNISSUED - Type used during WW2 until the mid 1950s. Near perfect condition with 98% of the original black paint and exceptionally clear and legible white stenciled markings and complete with the "safety" pin. This one is dated 5-46. Except for some minor chipping of the paint on the nose piece this is as nice an example as we have had. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $135.00 (View Picture)

22792 U.S. WW2 STYLE PRACTICE RIFLE GRENADE M11A2- EXCELLENT 12-43 DATED - Type used during WW2 until the mid 1950s. Excellent condition with 98% of the original black paint and exceptionally clear and legible white stenciled markings and complete with the "safety" pin. This one is dated 12-43. Except for some surface rust on the tube, this is an excellent example, and should clean up pretty well. INERT, no flammable or explosive components. $135.00 (View Picture)

18918 U.S. 155mm Howitzer Projectile, Illuminating M485E2 - Body has stamped markings LOP 2-14 5-68 155mm M485E2. A nice unfired projectile with excellent rotating band and intact nylon obturation band. Has about 75% original paint, but really should be cleaned up and repainted and restenciled with correct markings. No baseplate. No fuze, but these use the M565 Mechanical Time Fuze and they are not too hard to find. Loaded projectile weight is about 93 pounds which included the baseplate, expelling charge and the flare canister and parachute. The flare generates 1 million candlepowers of light, and burns for 2 minutes and can be fired to a maximum range of about 16,000 yards. A very handsome example of a round that played a key role on the battlefield until the advent of night vision devices in the 1970s. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $325.00 (View Picture)

19672 U.S. NAVY 40MM BOFORS SINGLE ROUNDS (REPAINTED) - These 40x311mm Rimmed cases are known by various names in their service as the most widely used Anti Aircraft guns of WW2 by the U.S., England, Germany, Italy and Sweden. The guns are known as Bofors M/40, the L-60, or the Mark I or Mark II, pushing a 900-940 gram projectile at about 850 meters per second. (you do the math if you want feet per second velocity or weight in pounds). Cartridge cases are USN Mark 3 dated 1945, made of steel but with a brass colored coating that was ugly. We repainted the cases a brass color for display, but be careful or you can scratch or chip the pant. Projectiles are marked extensively on the rotating band (most seem to be something like "40MM ADL 10001 B SFM 87C 001-[various numbers] Rotating bands have token DEMIL heat melt. Primers have been pulled for the empty cases, and the projectiles are empty with red and yellow painted fuze covers unscrew to reveal that they too are empty. Projectiles were never loaded, so they are in their original red lead primer finish, ready to be painted in any color scheme you like if you don’t like the red Impressive addition to WW2 USN display, although these remained in service into the 1960s or 70s with the US Navy, mainly on amphibious and auxiliary ships, and small craft like PT boats. These were also used on the U.S. Army’s M40 “Duster” armored vehicles which mounted twin 40mm Bofors guns well into the 1970s. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $65.00 (View Picture)

18918 U.S. 155mm Howitzer Projectile, Illuminating M485E2 - Body has stamped markings LOP 2-14 5-68 155mm M485E2. A nice unfired projectile with excellent rotating band and intact nylon obturation band. Has about 75% original paint, but really should be cleaned up and repainted and restenciled with correct markings. No baseplate. No fuze, but these use the M565 Mechanical Time Fuze and they are not too hard to find. Loaded projectile weight is about 93 pounds which included the baseplate, expelling charge and the flare canister and parachute. The flare generates 1 million candlepowers of light, and burns for 2 minutes and can be fired to a maximum range of about 16,000 yards. A very handsome example of a round that played a key role on the battlefield until the advent of night vision devices in the 1970s. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $325.00 (View Picture)

22724 U.S. NAVY 3"/50 MK 7 BRASS SHELL CASING DATED MARCH 1943 - (76.2 x 585mm Rimmed) Nice, but heavily tarnished, brass case with desirable 1943 date. These were used during WW2 with the 3"/50 caliber slow fire guns which were the main battery on the Destroyer Escorts for use against surface ships, aircraft, and shore bombardment targets. On cruisers and larger ships, the 3"/50 was mainly used in an anti-aircraft role. Around the end of WW2, the rapid fire 3"/50 mounts were introduced which used the same ammunition and remained in service well into the 1980s, mainly as anti-aircraft guns, but also as the main (only) gun mounts for amphibious attack ships, and auxiliaries (oilers, ammunition ships, tenders, etc). Headstamp marking Mark 7 MOD 1 with sharp 9-1943 date. Also stamped “NOT TO BE REFORMED” which I have never seen before. Fired MK 14 primer dated 193 is still in place. Ink stamped “FLASHLESS PELLETS 0.3 LBS” on side of the case. One shallow dent as shown in the photo, and one almost imperceptible very shallow longitudinal flattened spot that is hard to see, even in photos. These early war cases are tough to find as most were thrown overboard after being fired, or returned for scrap. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $135.00 (View Picture)

22680 U.S. M69 PRACTICE GRENADE BODY- UNISSUED - The M67 “Baseball” grenade was adopted in the early 1970s, replacing the M26/M61 “Lemon” style used during Vietnam, which had replaced the earlier WW2/Korean War “Pineapple” grenades. This is the blue practice version of the M67 fragmentation "baseball" grenade. New old stock, not rusted and beat up range scrap. Has the original paint and markings although there may be a few scrapes of chips from storage. Have several and condition will be similar to the ones in the photo. This is the hollow steel body only, no fuze. These were issued to be loaded with a fuze and a small packet of black powder to serve as a spotting charge on the range. No flammable or explosive contents, totally INERT. Price for one M69 practice grenade body is $18.00 (View Picture)

22444 U.S. 90MM GUN CANISTER CARTRIDGE M336 - This is intended primarily for antipersonnel use at close range. The canister consists of a thin steel cylindrical body which is welded to a heavy steel cup-shaped base with a gilding metal rotating band assembled it. The body has four equally spaced axial slits which extend from the forward end of the canister for approximately half its length. The canister body is filled with approximately 1,280 stacked steel cylindrical pellets which are held in place by a closing disk soldered in place. (Think of it as a gigantic version of a shotgun shell!) Immediately after the canister leaves the muzzle of the gun, air pressure on the closing disk and centrifugal force acting on the body and pellets cause the canister to break at the four slits on the body with resultant conical dispersion of the pellets. The round has a maximum effective range of 0 to 200 yards. The minimum pattern density for the canister is one complete penetration per 6 square feet of a target area 8 feet high by 90 feet wide at a range of 400 feet. Note that this is the M336 Canister, but there is a later M377 Canister round where the canister body is filled with approximately 5,600 eight-grain steel flechettes, which ois often called the “Beehive” round. This is a nice representative example, although technically incorrect as it is assembled on a M19 brass case instead of the M108 brass case (slightly different style crimp/cannelure at the mouth). There is a small hole (about ½” diameter in the case near the base that is not shown in the photos. The canister slug load has been removed, but it displays as a full loaded round. Traces of the original white stencil marking “90G/ CANISTER M336” remain on the black painted body. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $350.00 (View Picture)

22357 U.S. WWI “VICTORY- Nov. 11, 1918, 75mm Shell” SOUVENIR PROJECTILE - At the end of WW1 American industries had their contracts ended, but leaving them with huge quantities of now useless material in various stages of completion. Some was merely disposed of as scrap, but many companies took advantage of the opportunity to turn out souvenir items to be given to past and potential customers. One such item was a projectile with “VICTORY- Nov. 11, 1918, 75mm Shell” roll marked onto the body. Also, engraved on the rotating band is the admonition “They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks: Nations shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore. These were sometimes fitted out as “Victory Lamps” with the projectile mounted on a wooden base, fitted with a lamp socket at the projectile tip, and then used a M1917 “Doughboy” helmet as a lamp shade. The projectile is the neatest and most collectable item, and what you see in the photos is what you get. There is a fair amount of rust (but seemingly not much if any pitting underneath) on this one, and it has pretty much obliterated the roll marked “VICTORY- Nov. 11, 1918, 75mm Shell” but maybe it will be revealed when the rust is carefully cleaned off. The finish on these was just a simple gloss black paint, so a bit of work stripping the old paint and rust and a quick paint job and this should look pretty good. Base has been drilled for a lamp cord. $110.00 (View Picture)

21916 WW2 U.S. NAVY 5 INCH PROJECTILE, SPECIAL COMMON MARK 46 MOD 2 USED IN 5"/38 GUNS - This is only the second time we have been able to offer one of these. The “special common” is a projectile intended for use against heavy targets such as cruisers and the like with much thicker armor than the “tin can” destroyers. The projectile body is very thick with a blunt nose for better penetration, and a hollow core fitted with a base fuze. For better ballistics, there is a thin sheet metal ballistic cap so that it resembles the more streamlined designs. The hollow cap was filled with dye marker (various colors) for assistance in spotting, as if the round missed the target the splash of the impact would be colored by the dye in the cap. There are several weakened spots on the cap (similar to the “knockouts” on electrical boxes) to ensure spreading of the dye on impact. The explosive charge (2.04 pounds of Composition D) was removed and the base plug removed, as shown in the photos, and it can be screwed back in for display, but the fuze hole will remain open. Loaded weight was 55.18 pounds. Exterior paint is in poor condition, but enough remains that you get an idea of where the markings were, so it can be properly repainted for display. (We have a couple so paint condition will vary somewhat from that in the photo, but none are much better or worse. ) A scarce WW2 era projectile used by destroyers, auxiliaries or even cruisers and battleships as their main or secondary armament. INERT- no explosive or flammable components in the case. $350.00 (View Picture)

21910 U.S. NAVY 3”/50 CARTRIDGE (76.2 x 585mmR) WITH MARK 33 HE PROJECTILE (INERT LOADED) - Case and the projectile are dated circa1953-54, but it was likely loaded in this configuration in the 1980s-90s. This is a complete fixed round of 3"/50 ammunition which was specially loaded (actually remanufactured) for testing of the process used to demilitarize ammunition. To do this they needed a round that was actual size and weight and had an inert material substituted for the powder and projectile charges and inert primers and fuzes. This used a standard steel case with the old load information removed and new stencil markings "3"/50 CARTRIDGE CASE/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST" on the case. The projectile is a Mark 33 Mod 1 with dummy nose fuze. It is painted gold, and stenciled "3"/50 MARK 33/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST." I am unable to locate any information at all on the 3 inch/50 Mark 33 projectile but assume it was probably a very limited production item that was discarded in favor of other designs, leaving some in inventory for use in tests like this. Overall condition is fine to excellent with some minor dings and scrapes. Could be very easily repainted/stenciled to combat appearance. Do not confuse this with the common loading machine drill rounds made of a combination of wood and metal, or all metal construction. This uses regular conventional components, just loaded without any explosive or flammable materials so that it would be safe for use during testing. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $295.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 22361 CIVIL WAR 12 POUNDER BORMANN OR COMMON SHELL - Cast iron hollow shell about 4.5 inches diameter. Fuze hole is stepped, with the larger portion fitting a Bormann fuze, which had to be large for a circular powder train running around the outside. A hole was punched at the appropriate point for the desired time, and when fired, the powder train ignited there, and when it reached the end, it fired the main charge in the shell. These are sometimes called “common shell” or “Bormann shell” to distinguish them from the similar looking “Spherical case shot” which were basically the same thing, but with the addition of a number of iron or lead balls on the inside of the shell to multiply the number of fragments flung about at the time of explosion. This is a very nice non-dug example with good clean threads and while the surface is rusted, it is not badly pitted. Looks like an old cannon ball should. It was the “shells bursting in air” above enemy positions that took a deadly toll on men and horses during battle while the artillery dueled. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $249.00 (View Picture)

22360 CIVIL WAR 12 POUNDER SOLID SHOT - Cast Iron cannon ball about 4.6" in diameter as specified for use in 12 pounders, such as the famous Model 1857 bronze Napoleans which were one of the main artillery pieces used by both sides during the Civil War. Mellow old coat of dry rust and some pitting, but really looks like an old cannon ball should. This is believed to have come from Bannerman's Island Arsenal in the 1960s, which at one time held an immense amount of Civil War era artillery ammunition, much of it still loaded! As a solid round shot, not an explosive shell or spherical case shot, this is guaranteed inert and harmless. Unless you drop it on your foot or something in which case, we are not to blame! $175.00 (View Picture)

19022 CIVIL WAR 3" ABSTERDAM PROJECTILE (TYPE 3) - An excellent design for the 3" Parrot Rifles and the 3" Ordnance Rifles adopted late in the Civil War and lasting through the end of the muzzle loading era (and perhaps with some of the early breechloading conversions?). Few of these actually reached the field during the War, but the are considered to be Civil War era anyway. These used a brass band around the base which would expand into the rifling, very similar to the Parrot Projectiles in appearance. This is the explosive shell version, with a brass fuze holder in the nose. Flash from the powder charge would reach up to the front of the projectile, igniting the powder train time fuze. This is the third type with brass rotating band, while the earlier types used lead bands. Unfired, with one side pretty good where it was protected by paint, but the other side with light to moderate pitting and lots of rust and bits of concrete. The brass band in VG condition (with a slight ding as shown in the photos. This needs a good cleaning and some soaking with WD-40 to loosen the rust and cement and paint, and it will clean up pretty nicely with some patient scraping followed by a coat of wax or lacquer or black paint. The fuzes and bursting charge were removed long ago. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $225.00 (View Picture)

21908 U.S. NAVY FACTORY LOADED 3"/50 (76.2 x 585mmR) ARMOR PIERCING MARK 29 MOD 2 DUMMY INERT CARTRIDGE - The BRASS cartridge case is circa 1940s-50s and the projectile is dated 1942, but it was likely loaded in this configuration in the 1980s-90s. This is a complete fixed round of 3"/50 ammunition which was specially loaded (actually remanufactured) for testing of the process used to demilitarize ammunition. To do this they needed a round that was actual size and weight and had an inert material substituted for the powder and projectile charges and inert primers and fuzes. This used a standard brass case with the old load information removed and new stencil markings "3"/50 CARTRIDGE CASE/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST" on the case. The projectile is a Mark 29 Mod 2 Armor Piercing type. It is painted gold, and (almost illegibly) stenciled "3"/50 MARK 29/ DUMMY-INERT/ FOR WESTERN DEMIL TEST." Overall condition is fine to excellent with some minor dings and scrapes, although the brass case is heavily tarnished to a chocolate brown. Could be very easily repainted/stenciled to combat appearance. Do not confuse this with the common loading machine drill rounds made of a combination of wood and metal, or all metal construction. This uses regular conventional components, just loaded without any explosive or flammable materials so that it would be safe for use during testing. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $350.00 (View Picture)

20713 U.S. Navy 76mm 62 caliber Dummy Cartridge Mark 197 (C118) Non-rammable (76.2 x 636mmR) - The U.S. navy adopted the Italian designed 76mm/62 caliber OTO Melara Mark 75 rapid fire gun in 1971 and they have been used on the FFG-7 class frigates, hydrofoils and on some of the larger Coast Guard cutters. It has been one of the most popular naval weapons ever, being used by at least 51 navies around the world. Many different types of ammunition are provided for these guns with point detonating, variable time, radio frequency or infrared fuzing. The ammunition is issued as a fixed round with the projectile firmly crimped to the steel or brass cartridge case. In addition to the combat loads, there are training versions made, including two dummy types. This one is the “non-rammable” type used by crews to test of the ammunition handling system but not including actual ramming into the gun. A separate “rammable” dummy (Mark 207, C097) was made with a steel rod connecting the projectile to the base with shock pads to allow use in the ramming cycle without coming apart. This is the non-rammable dummy cartridge, which consists of a modified projectile body, a dummy nose plug, a steel cartridge case, an inert primer, and dummy propellant. The non-rammable dummy cartridges are used to exercise gun crews in loading and testing the gun's ammunition handling system, except for ramming. Overall fine condition. Cartridge case has been repainted with silver colored paint, and the projectile repainted with light blue, obviously a shipboard attempt to “pretty up” rounds that had been used a suffered scrapes and dings. This one has a shallow dent in the side of the case near the shoulder, and a few chips and scrapes in the paint. Dummy primer shows firing pin impact. Only one of these we have ever had. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $375.00 (View Picture)

18869 U.S. 4.2" MORTAR IMPROVED LIGHTWEIGHT CARTRIDGE M329A1E1 - The first 4.2-inch mortar in U.S. service was introduced in 1928 as the M1, and later a strengthened version designated the M12 was adopted. Initially these were exclusively for chemical warfare use, but at the start of WW2 the Army added a high explosive shell to the inventory, which made the 4.2 inch mortar extremely useful in mountain or jungle terrain where wheeled artillery could not move easily. In 1951 the M30 version of the 4.2 inch mortar was adopted, and eventually these were mounted on halftracks and armored personnel carriers to provide mobile firepower with either HE, Illuminating, WP smoke or chemical rounds. In the last few years the 4.2 inch mortars were superceded by a new 120mm mortar. The stronger M30 mortar could achieve longer ranges than the earlier mortars using the M329 projectile with a boat tail shape and pre-engraved roatating band. The M329A1Ei was a further improvement with a nylon or plastic discarding obturator. This was standardized as the M329A2 and extended the max range to 7,400 yards (a 1,200 yard improvement over the M329A1). This example has been rendered “EOD INERT” with several extra holed drilled in it, and EOD INERT markings engraved on the body. About 90% of the original blue paint and white markings remain, and the obturator is intact. Fuze has been removed although part remains in place. Body is 1970 dated, so this is Vietnam era piece. The tube for the ignition cartridge and propelling charge is installed. INERT- no flammable or explosive contents. $225.00 (View Picture)

22311 U.S. WW2 2.36 INCH BAZOOKA PRACTICE ROCKET M7A1 - Has about 60% of the original black paint finish but no traces of the white markings on the pointed warhead. Fins are all there, properly aligned and in good shape. Head is firmly attached and properly aligned. This is the most typical WW2 2.36" bazooka rocket type with the pointed nose and long tail fins. Overall VG-fine condition. Hard to find these any more. INERT warhead, no propellant, totally inert not dangerous. $249.00 (View Picture)

22293 40MM BOFORS L/60 DUMMY CARTRIDGE - A good example of a WW2 style 40mm Bofors Anti-Aircraft round. This has been assembled using a steel case with the prime removed, and the case painted gold to simulate the appearance of a brass case. The projectile is a genuine WW2 style projectile without any explosive filler, and the guts of the fuze removed, but the cap remains. Projectile rotating band has a token demil torch cut, but display with that at the back and it still looks pretty impressive. Tip colors may vary (red//white, yellow/red, etc). Although a serious collector may want to spend more for a real brass case (instead of a steel one) and a projectile without the token demil spot, this is an inexpensive filler for a general WW2 collection. The 40mm Bofors was a ubiquitous weapons system used by nearly every nation on land or sea. One round as shown in the photo. $45.00 (View Picture)

21931 U.S. WW2 57MM ANTI-TANK GUN DRILL CARTRIDGE M22 (OR BRITISH 6 POUNDER 7 CWT) - This is the 57 x 441mm Rimmed cartridge for the U.S. 57mm anti-tank gun, M1, and also used by the British under the designation “Ordnance Quick Firing 6 pounder, 7 cwt.” This was a British design finalized in 1941 to replace their puny 2 pounder anti-tank guns. The U.S. adopted the design in order to begin production as “Lend Lease” material, but after disappointing results with the U.S. puny 37mm Anti-Tank Gun, M3 in North Africa, decided it would be good to divert most of the U.S. made guns to U.S. service. Some 15,637 of the guns were made in the U.S 1941-1945 with only about 4,200 going to the British. These 57mm/6 pounder guns were effective against the PzKpfw IV and similar tanks, but seldom penetrated the Panther or Tiger series armor. This drill cartridge has the projectile solidly held in place with heavy crimps and a steel rod threaded to the base of the projectile and secured at the primer end. Although visually nearly identical to the combat round, these were made for use in training gun crews proper (and rapid) ammunition handling and loading of the gun. Photo shows one round that we opened, but we have several, mostly in sealed fiber shipping tubes, and all should be similar in markings and condition. The steel case has a 1943 date and M23AB1 designation for the case ink stamped on the case. Crisp markings on the rotating band, and stenciled markings on the black painted projectile. Mint unissued, complete with the original fiber shipping tube. Shipping tube may be dirty and weathered. Impressive looking round for display with other efforts to stop tanks, such as bazooka rounds, rifle grenades, mines, etc. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $225.00 (View Picture)

21930 U.S. WW2 2.36 INCH BAZOOKA PRACTICE ROCKET M7A1 - Has about 60% of the original black paint finish with traces of the white markings on the pointed warhead. Fins are all there, but slightly bent from careless handling. Head is slightly wiggly on the body, but fine for display. This is the most typical WW2 2.36" bazooka rocket type with the pointed nose and long tail fins. Overall G-VG condition. Hard to find these any more. INERT warhead, no propellant, totally inert not dangerous. $135.00 (View Picture)

21921 -SCARCE WW1 ERA U.S. 3 INCH STOKES MORTAR PROJECTILE (81mm) (RELIC) - The 3 inch Stokes mortar was well known and widely used by the men of the A.E.F. during WW1. Originally developed and manufactured by British companies, production of Stokes mortar shells was contracted out to American firm. The Stokes (and other mortars) enabled trench bound forces to directly attack enemy positions or advancing enemy infantry during an attack. The high explosive shell was composed of three components: a screwed on dome containing a modified hand grenade fuse, the 11 inch body which typically contained 2.75 pounds of nitrostartch explosive, and a propellant cartridge container attached to the base of the mortar and used to launch the shell. The body was made from 3 inch pipe, hence the nominal “3 inch Stokes Mortar” designation, but the end plates at the top and bottom were actually 81mm in diameter machined to closely fit the bore, while allowing use of less critical pipe for the main part of the body. The domed fuse has two holes drilled into it for attaching a safety pin used to prevent premature detonation while handling the shell. To fire the Stokes, the safety pin was removed to both arm the shell and allow it to fit inside its launcher. Then, the entire shell was dropped down the launch tube, at the bottom of which a firing pin struck a primer on the propellant cartridge, which was basically a common shotgun shell casing. This action ignited the propellant charge and launched the shell. Once launched, the shell detonated after a predetermined amount of time dependant upon the time of the fuse. Stokes mortars had a maximum effective range of 1,200 yards. This example is in rusty relic condition, but very few people have ever seen a Stokes mortar round in any condition. The propelling tube is intact with the fired Winchester marked shotshell in place. The iron or steel parts are all heavily rusted and pitted. They could be sandblasted and smoothed up with some Bondo and a fresh paint job. Or, you could try rust removal and stabilization with a simple electrolysis rig instead of sandblasting. No fuze and no domed cover for the fuze (and not one of the three other Stokes projectiles I have ever seen had them either!) The Stokes mortars and projectiles were replaced in U.S. service when the improved Stokes-Brandt or Brandt type mortars (essentially the U.S. 81mm Mortar M1) were adopted prior to WW2. $149.00 (View Picture)

21920 SCARCE WW1 ERA U.S. 3 INCH STOKES MORTAR PROJECTILE (81mm) (RELIC) - The 3 inch Stokes mortar was well known and widely used by the men of the A.E.F. during WW1. Originally developed and manufactured by British companies, production of Stokes mortar shells was contracted out to American firm. The Stokes (and other mortars) enabled trench bound forces to directly attack enemy positions or advancing enemy infantry during an attack. The high explosive shell was composed of three components: a screwed on dome containing a modified hand grenade fuse, the 11 inch body which typically contained 2.75 pounds of nitrostartch explosive, and a propellant cartridge container attached to the base of the mortar and used to launch the shell. The body was made from 3 inch pipe, hence the nominal “3 inch Stokes Mortar” designation, but the end plates at the top and bottom were actually 81mm in diameter machined to closely fit the bore, while allowing use of less critical pipe for the main part of the body. The domed fuse has two holes drilled into it for attaching a safety pin used to prevent premature detonation while handling the shell. To fire the Stokes, the safety pin was removed to both arm the shell and allow it to fit inside its launcher. Then, the entire shell was dropped down the launch tube, at the bottom of which a firing pin struck a primer on the propellant cartridge, which was basically a common shotgun shell casing. This action ignited the propellant charge and launched the shell. Once launched, the shell detonated after a predetermined amount of time dependant upon the time of the fuse. Stokes mortars had a maximum effective range of 1,200 yards. This example is in rusty relic condition, but very few people have ever seen a Stokes mortar round in any condition. The propelling tube is intact with the fired Winchester marked shotshell in place. The iron or steel parts are all heavily rusted and pitted. They could be sandblasted and smoothed up with some Bondo and a fresh paint job. Or, you could try rust removal and stabilization with a simple electrolysis rig instead of sandblasting. No fuze and no domed cover for the fuze (and not one of the three other Stokes projectiles I have ever seen had them either!) The Stokes mortars and projectiles were replaced in U.S. service when the improved Stokes-Brandt or Brandt type mortars (essentially the U.S. 81mm Mortar M1) were adopted prior to WW2. $149.00 (View Picture)

21818 VIETNAM ERA CLUSTER BOMB BDU 28/B - The BDU-28B is the Dummy Fragmentation Bomb variant of BLU-3/B high explosive version. These were dispensed from the Cluster Bomb Unit CBU-9/A or the SUU-7A/A (which held an amazing 406 of these!). This has the bright reddish-orange body for tracking purpose after dropping during training. Typical cluster bomb with stainless steel cap and some sort of coating on the fins. The stainless flat end is a spring loaded fuze section. Prior to launching, the fuze is pressed tight against the body and the fins folded over, restraining the fuze and the fins are wrapped by a retaining strap and “spoon” type latch. The restraining band and latch are missing as has been the case with nearly every one of these we have ever encountered. The spring loaded folding fins retard rate of descent and cause greater dispersion to ensure larger target area is covered. Fins have some areas of corrosion, but overall VG-Fine condition. Marked "DUMMY BOMB, BDU 28/B Lot LOP-1-3 and 11-66 date. INERT $45.00 (View Picture)

21814 SOLID NOSE PLUG FOR MARK 80 SERIES GENERAL PURPOSE BOMBS - I think this is the MXU-735, but it may be something similar. The MXU-735 solid nose plug is designed to provide better penetration of hard targets, without the likelihood of nose plug shearing during oblique impact. This is a heavy steel casting machined to thread into the nose well of the bomb. Weight about 6 pounds. Largest diameter is 4 5/8” and about 3 ½” high. Threads are about 3 ½” diameter. No moving parts or any explosive components. Civilian uses are endless. Handy to have around as a paperwight; or as flotation device if your neighbor’s cat wants to swim. New old stock but rusty from outdoor storage. $20.00 (View Picture)

21677 U.S. WW2 STYLE 60MM HE M49A3 MORTAR ROUND- 1973 VINTAGE - This is nearly identical to the WW2 version except for the manufacturing dates on the body and the newer style fuze. Markings as shown in the photos with 1973 date on the body and 1966 on the fuze. Fuze M525 is complete (except for any powder or explosive material). The body has been poorly stored and has moderate to heavy rust, but this can be cleaned off with sandblasting or even hand work with scrapers, files and wire brushes then repainted OD. The fins are in excellent shape, not all rusty or dented like so many. This is an excellent display example for any WW2 or Vietnam era display, or with one of the deactivated mortars that have been sold. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $185.00 (View Picture)

21676 U.S. WW2 STYLE 60MM HE M49A3 MORTAR ROUND- 1973 VINTAGE - This is nearly identical to the WW2 version except for the manufacturing dates on the body and the newer style fuze. Markings as shown in the photos with 1973 date on the body and 1973 on the fuze. Fuze M525 is complete (except for any powder or explosive material). The body has been poorly stored and has moderate to heavy rust, but this can be cleaned off with sandblasting or even hand work with scrapers, files and wire brushes then repainted OD. The fins are in excellent shape, not all rusty or dented like so many. This is an excellent display example for any WW2 or Vietnam era display, or with one of the deactivated mortars that have been sold. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $185.00 (View Picture)

21638 U.S. NAVY FUZE CAP FOR PROJECTILES (LATE STEEL TYPE) - This is the late WW2 and post –war style made of stamped steel instead of cast brass, to conserve critical materials. Navy 5” and larger projectiles were issued with the fuzes installed. (The Army usually had lifting plugs in 155mm and larger projectiles to make them easier to handle, and then fuzes of the desired type were installed prior to firing.) Navy projectiles were moved about the ship by hand, then downloaded into the magazines using projectile hoists and stacked in racks, and then subject to shifting around a bit as the ship rolled and pitched at sea, so it was good to protect the fuze from damage in all this. The top of the projectile body had threads cut into it, and these were for a fuze protector, such as this one. Several types were made, with the brass version most common for WW2 and earlier, but later a simple stamped steel type was adopted. The caps were removed before the projectiles were sent up to the gun mount, and later turned in for salvage, or thrown overboard. I have only seen a few of these loose and was fortunate enough to find a couple more. Used on all the 5", 6", 8" and 16" U.S. Navy gun projectiles, and perhaps others as well. Typical example shown- type of finish may vary but all in excellent condition. One steel fuze protector nose cap, used excellent. $40.00 (View Picture)

21032 U.S. BOMB FUZE- M904E2 (VIETNAM ERA) FOR MARK 80 SERIES BOMBS- MINT! - The M904 series fuze is a mechanical impact nose fuze used in the Mk 80 series low-drag general-purpose (LDGP) bombs. The M904 fuze is installed in the nose fuze well of the bomb along with an adapter booster charge. The fuze is detonator-safe, and it contains two observation windows through which you can determine the safe/arm condition of the fuze. There is no special locking feature designed into the fuze for shear safety if the bomb is accidentally dropped. However, detonation is unlikely if the collar (forward end of the fuze) is sheared off by an accidental drop before arming is complete. The fuze may be configured for a number of preselected arming and functioning delays needed by a mission. There are nine arming delays from 2 to 18 seconds in 2-second increments, and any combination of six functioning delays from instantaneous to 250 milliseconds (0.250 seconds) may be selected. An internal governor, driven by the permanently mounted arming vane, allows relatively constant arming times at release speeds ranging from 170 to over 525 knots. Functioning times can be varied by use of any of six M9 delay elements in the hole in the side of the lower portion of the fuze. This fuze is abut mint unissued with storage and warning tags in place, ready for installation on your Mark 80 series bomb. Have several and all seem to be dated 1967-70 period. INERT- No explosive or flammable components. $95.00 (View Picture)

19924 U.S. VIETNAM ERA 60MM HE M49A3 MORTAR ROUND - This is identical to the WW2 version except for the 5-73 manufacturing date on the body. Body is rusty with most of the original paint, but would look a lot better if refinished. Markings as shown in the photos with 1973 date on the body. Fuze is the M52B1 type with the Bakelite or plastic body, and has some assorted dings and scars but does have the safety wire. Fired ignition cartridge in the tail. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $150.00 (View Picture)

18835 U.S. 90MM GUN (90 x 600mmR) BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE- 1953 dated- SUPER NICE! - This is a really super condition brass case, M19, Lot number FA 4-4 1953 that has been arsenal downloaded and deprimed. The 90mm cannons M36 and M41 were mounted in the M46, M47 and M48-M48A3 series tanks and the M54 cannon on the nifty M56 “Scorpion” anti-tank vehicle. These guns all used the same 90mm ammo. Marry this case up with a nice 90mm projectile of your favorite type (or whatever you are lucky enough to find…) and it will be a great display piece. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $175.00 (View Picture)

21239 ARMING WIRE, M19 WITH 3 CLIPS (FOR AIRCRAFT BOMBS) - Mint unissued in the original wrap. One end of the arming wire was attached to the aircraft bomb rack and the other end passed through the bomb fuze to hold the arming propeller in place. As the bomb was dropped, the wire pulled out of the fuze, allowing the propeller to turn and start the arming sequence. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $10.00 (View Picture)

21165 -CHARGER, GUN, .50 CALIBER, PNEUMATIC - Not sure of the exact designation on these (but very similar to the Type H-50A, Part number 870246 made by Walter Kidde company) but no marking found. Used to cycle the .50 caliber Browning machine guns in aircraft in flight. Perfect for restoring that old WW2 fighter you have in the back barn…. $55.00 (View Picture)

21157 CHARGER, GUN, .50 CALIBER, PNEUMATIC TYPE H-50A - Part number 870246 made by Walter Kidde company. Used to cycle the .50 caliber Browning machine guns in aircraft in flight. Perfect for restoring that old WW2 fighter you have in the back barn…. $65.00 (View Picture)

21138 USAF BOMB FUZE FMU-112/(D-1)B (TRAINER VERSION) - The FMU-112/B fuze was developed by the Air Force as an electronic impact or short delay fuze designed to fit the standard 3-inch fuze well on guided or unguided series bombs such as the M117 or MK-80. These were often preferred for use on bombs using retarders or low-level laser guidance kits. This was procured specifically as a training example with an INERT booster with no flammable or explosive components. About mint unissued condition with just some storage soiling. $195.00 (View Picture)

21045 U.S. 40mm/L70 BOFORS HEI-PD PROJECTILE BODY (No fuze) - Mint, unissued, never loaded, with yellow body and red band, stenciled: 40MM/L70, HEI PD M811 and lot number TRE84G100-004. These were intended for use with the aborted “Sergeant York” 40mm gun system of the late 1970s which failed to live up to its promises for use against either air or surface targets. The correct fuze for this projectile was the M761 Point Detonating Fuze. I have seen a few dummy fuzes made for these, but do not know the source. INERT- No explosive or flammable components. $15.00 (View Picture)

20964 U.S. 90MM AP-T PROJECTILE M318A1- (FIRED- NO ROTATING BAND) - This was the standard armor defeating projectile for the M48 series of tanks until the M48A5 was upgunned to 105mm. The projectile is hardened steel, and originally had a pointed windshield to achieve maximum velocity, and minimize deflection upon initial impact. This is a fired example that lost both the rotating band and the aluminum windshield on impact. Overall rusty condition. Good for the EOD guys who need objects for burial, instead of messing up a nice collectible condition example. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $75.00 (View Picture)

20967 U.S. ARTILLERY FUZE, DEMILLED - The Point-Detonating Fuze (PDF) M557 was standardized in 1967 and is one of the most widely used of all Western-bloc fuzes, as it is used with ammunition fired from guns and howitzers of virtually all standard calibers as well as with 4.2 in mortars. It is also manufactured in several allied countries, and is a NATO standard fuze. The M557 PDF can be set as either a Super-Quick (SQ) or 0.05 second delay impact fuze. The function is selected by turning a setting screw on the side of the fuze. This fuze is a DEMIL one that went thru the furnace to remove the energetic materials, and then stored outside for a long time. We have several and most seem to be early 1970s dates. Condition is presently fair to good, and all need to be cleaned up and probably will look best if wire brushed and then repainted in silver-gray color for display. INERT- No explosive or flammable components. $20.00 (View Picture)

20833 U.S. NAVY 5"/38 FUSE PROTECTOR CAP - Not sure about the exact Mark and Mod on this, but these are probably post-WW2, and were used well into the 1970s and later. Excellent plus with most of the OD paint. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $40.00 (View Picture)

20613 Chinese 75 x 185mm R Brass cartridge case for the Japanese Type 41 Mountain Gun - The Type 41 Mountain Gun was a license-built copy of the Krupp M.08 mountain gun. Originally it was the standard Japanese pack artillery weapon. After it was superseded by the Type 94 75 mm mountain gun (circa 1935), it was then used as an infantry "regimental" gun, deployed 4 to each infantry regiment. The Type 41 guns were in service from 1908 to 1945. At the conclusion of WW2 the Chinese Army ended up with many of these guns, and began producing ammunition for them, and most likely were among the weapons used against us in the Korean War. This is an excellent brass case with good markings, probably a remarked Japanese made case. Headstamp includes D51, 1951-1. Jap Type 90, 94 or 97 HE rounds weighed from 9 to 12 pounds, but I am not sure exactly what the Chinese used. No explosive or flammable components, totally INERT. $125.00 (View Picture)

20570 WW2 U.S. Army 40mm Bofors (40 x 311mmR) Dummy cartridge with HE type projectile - Typical WW2 Bofors loading, but made as an inert dummy for use in training and maintenance. The brass case is the M25 designation used by the Army. Projectile has 90%+ of the original blue paint. These use a steel rod in lieu of a primer, which is threaded into the projectile to ensure it stays in place. Three holes in the case to visually identify it as a dummy round. Case is tarnished and may have a few minor dents or dings, but overall is near excellent condition. Have several and headstamps will vary slightly from the photo with some 1943 dates and some 1944 dates. The 40mm Bofors was widely used by virtually every combatant in WW2, and in U.S. service they were the main anti-aircraft gun for close in defense, and also were used on wheeled mounts, or later on the tracked M42 “Duster” by the Army. INERT- no flammable or explosive components. $125.00 (View Picture)

18184 CIVIL WAR NAVAL ORDNANCE- lot of 3 booklets - Eugene Canfield was the leading authority on U.S. Navy ordnance of the Civil War period, at least at the time of the Civil War Centennial in the 1960s. He wrote a great booklet for that occasion, published by the American Ordnance Association in 1960. This one is titled “Notes on Naval Ordnance of the American Civil War,1861-1865” 23 pages with blue paper covers, and we have TWO COPIES of this one in this lot. This has good tables and line drawings and notes and bibliography. This led to his selection to write a monograph for the U.S. Naval History Division in 1969 with the catchy title “Civil War Naval Ordnance” which is well illustrated with period photos and drawings, and has notes and bibliography in its 24 pages. All of these are about 8” x 10.5” with paper covers. The lot of 3 for only $12.00 (View Picture))

20100 U.S. 76MM AP-T PROJECTILE T128-E6 - I cannot find any info on this projectile, but believe it was made for use with the short-lived 76mm Anti-Tank Gun M124 which was basically the 76mm gun from the late versions of the M4 Sherman tank mounted on alight weight carriage for use by Airborne units in the 1950s. The projectile is dated 1955, which would fit with this, but it may have been for use in the Sherman tank guns (instead or also?). The projectile is very heavy and solid with a copper rotating band which has assorted dents and dings. Projectile retains about 95% of the old original??) black paint finish. The markings seem to be more of a stick on letter type than just a plain stencil or ink stamp type, so this may have been repainted and marked by a previous owner. The late 1950s and early 1960s saw the end of the ancient “cannon ball” approach for artillery where they would fire a bore size solid projectile of some sort to destroy a target by the sheer kinetic energy. Admittedly, some had ballistic improvements with ballistic caps but some, like this, were just blunt nosed solid projectiles. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $249.00 (View Picture)

19847 2.36 INCH BAZOOKA ROCKET, PRACTICE M7A1B1 - With original blue painted head and OD colored motor and fin sections. Stenciled markings are hard to read, but mostly intact, ROCKET, PRAC M7A1B1, Lot 1-42, 3-45. Fins are slightly misaligned, as is usually the case, but the body is straight, and the head not dented. Decent example of a nice WW2 dated rocket with original paint. $175.00 (View Picture)

16111 U.S. 155mm M438A1 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) Projectile - The 155mm M483A1 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) is an early technology cargo round. It delivers 88 dual-purpose grenades to defeat armor and personnel targets. The projectile body is made of steel with an aluminum ogive and a metal rotating band and a plastic obturating band are located close to the base. The base is closed by a short, boat tailed aluminum plug which is not with this projectile. This would be loaded with 64 of the M42 and 24 of the M46 dual purpose anti-material and anti-personnel grenades. The M46s are located at the base of the projectile and are heavier/thicker and have a smooth interior surface that enables it to withstand the shock of firing and set back. The M42 grenades are scored for greater fragmentation and are place to the front of the M46 grenades. The submissions have a shaped charge warhead that penetrates 2.75 inches of homogeneous armor. Antipersonnel effects are obtained by fragmentation of the submissions body. The M577 fuze is the only authorized fuze, and when it activates, an expulsion charged will expel the payload and base plug. The projectiles are painted olive drab, and about 95% or more of that paint remains. This is an unloaded round, never marked, but when loaded it would have yellow markings including a row of yellow diamonds stenciled approximately 3.50 inches behind the nose, and nomenclature, lot numbers, and loading data. The same M483A1 body is used as the basis for later dispenser munitions in a larger family of US Army rapid minelaying systems known as the FAmily of SCAtterable Mines (FASCAM). in the 155 mm M692 and M731 ADAM carry anti-personnel mines, while the 155 mm M718 and M741 RAAM, also known as Remote Anti-Armour Mine System (RAAMS), carry anti-tank mines. This projectile body comes with a nylon grommet to protect the rotating band, and the base is protected with a plastic cap. $450.00 (View Picture)

19458 U.S. 90 x 600mmR GUN BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE M19 dated 1954 - Made for use in the 90mm gun M36 and M41 used in various models of tanks, and also the M54 gun used as a self propelled anti-tank weapon. You see lots of the steel 90mm cases, but few of the brass. Headstamp 90mm M19, maker code and 1954 date. Some ink stamped loading markings remain. Nice case, just a bit dirty with minimal dings. INERT- no explosive or flammable components in the case. $149.00 (View Picture)

19456 U.S. 90 x 600mmR GUN BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE M19 DATED 1953 (POLISHED) - Made for use in the 90mm gun M36 and M41 used in various models of tanks, and also the M54 gun used as a self propelled anti-tank weapon. You see lots of the steel 90mm cases, but few of the brass. Headstamp 90mm M19, maker code and 1953 date. Some ink stamped loading markings remain. Nice case, nicely polished but with two moderate dings on one side and one ding on the opposite side of the case. INERT- no explosive or flammable components in the case. $149.00 (View Picture)

19454 U.S. 105 x 607mmR STEEL CARTRIDGE CASE M148A1B1 DATED 1976 - This is the correct case for use with the M735 APFSDS-T projectile, and probably the HEAT rounds as well. This is in excellent condition, except Bubba drilled four pairs of holes in the neck, to remove the crimp and pull a projectile. What you see is what you get. You can load it up with any type projectile you like. $65.00 (View Picture)

18259 U.S. NAVY 5"/38 BRASS SHELL CASING- NWL Dahl - The 5”/38 caliber gun was the main battery of the U.S. Navy’s Destroyers and secondary battery on Cruisers, Battleships, Carriers and also used on many other ships as well. The 5”/38 was a dual purpose gun used for anti-aircraft firing and also against ships and shore targets during WW2, Korea and Vietnam. While the brass cases were often returned to be reloaded and used again, huge numbers got thrown overboard as there is no space for storing stuff like this in combat. After the 5”/38 was retired from service, most of the brass cases undoubtedly got scrapped, and they are pretty hard to find, especially with WW2 dates. This one is a Vietnam era case, last loaded at NAD St. Julien’s Creek in 1968. Side of case has stencil “To be used only at NWL Dahlgren/ combination primer.” The mouth of the case is dinged up a bit but can be straightened out, and there are two or three creases behind the mouth that will be a little harder to straighten out. Still, this should clean up to be a nice representative example. $165.00 (View Picture)

19116 French 10.5cm Model 1913 Schneider Howitzer brass case- (105 x 390mmR) - In the early 1900s, the French company Schneider et Cie working with the Russian Putilov firm developed a gun using the Russian 107 mm round, featuring an interrupted screw breech that swung to the side. This proved to be a successful design, and Schneider then decided to modified it for a French 105 mm round. Initially the French were not interested as they already had plenty of 75 mm field guns. Finally in 1913 the French army purchased a small number under the designation Canon de 105 Mle 1913 Schneider; also known as the L 13 S. The lighter 75 mm guns were of limited use against trenches, so the French army ordered large numbers of the L 13 S, which with its larger 15.74 kg (34.7 lb) shell was more effective against fortified positions. These guns were also sold to other nations after WW1, and many were captured and used by the Germans in WW2. Although these look about the same as the familiar U.S. 105mm Howitzer cases, they are actually a bit longer (390mm compared to 371mm) and are not interchangeable. The headstamps definitely look French, and we believe it is WW1 era, but it may be a later WW2 era case. This one has been nicely polished and lacquered and looks great. $149.00 (View Picture)

19107 WW2 U.S. NAVY 20MM OERLIKON (20 X 110MM RB[REBATED]) DUMMY DRILL CARTRIDGE - This cartridge was used in the thousands of 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft guns mounted aboard nearly every type of Navy ship in WW2. The fired cases are unique as the gun begins to recoil while the case is still being extracted, blowing the neck diameter out to nearly the diameter of the body. They are also nearly unique in their having a rim diameter much smaller (or "rebated") than the base of the case. Two fired, empty, INERT cases The U.S. Navy adopted the 20mm Oerlikon guns shortly before WW2 to replace the .50 caliber machine guns previously used for close in anti-aircraft use. By the end of the war about 125,000 of the guns had been made in the U.S. mainly for use aboard ships. Beginning in 1943 the 40mm Bofors began to replace the 20mm Oerlikons with even greater range and stopping power and all were removed from the fleet by the mid-1950s.. Between December 1941 and September 1944, 32% of all Japanese aircraft downed by the USN were credited to the Oerlikons, with the high point being 48.3% for the second half of 1942. The Oerlikon rounds are easily spotted by their distinctive “rebated” rim which is smaller than the case diameter. These dummy cartridges were made for training use, and feature a regular case with three holes drilled in it, and a regular (bur empty) projectile which is silver soldered to the neck to withstand harsh use. The manufacturing process leave tiny splashes of flux on some of the cases which has caused some mild corrosion, and some of the brown paint on the projectiles may have chipped or flaked off. Most of these are still in the original cardboard shipping sleeves, never issued. Special quantity price for volume purchasers is 10 rounds for $40.00, but single rounds are $5.00 each. (View Picture)

19120 81mm mortar ammunition fiber shipping tubes- lot of 3 - These are similar to the fiber shipping tubes for 81mm mortar ammunition ever since Vietnam, differing slightly in length and internal packing filler for the various types of 81mm rounds. These are stenciled for the M889 rounds adopted in 1991, and is the PDF fuzed round that would be called the M821 if fuzed with the M734 multi-option fuze. Will sell these three tubes as a lot, great for use as “cargo” for your military vehicle. The photo shows a foam piece that was used to position and cushion the tubes in a wooden or metal crate, and that is included free, but if you want us to trash it instead of shipping it, that would be fine too. Price for the three tubes in excellent condition, but no ammo $30.00 (View Picture)

18766 RARE EARLY WINCHESTER 6 PDR HOTCHKISS 3 PIECE BRASS CASE (57 x 307mmR) - This uses the early Hotchkiss patent case comosed of three pieces secured by rivets. Excellent markings on the base including 11-89 date and patent dates 1874 and 1877. $249.00 (View Picture)

18265 WW1 Trench Art- 75mm brass shell case - Very nice example with seven neatly done flutes. Highly polished and lacquer coated. Headstamp is only partially visible, but definitely that of the famous “French 75” 75mm field gun, the main allied field gun of WW1. $95.00 (View Picture)

21461 5"/38 CARTRIDGE PLUG MARK 7 MOD 0 - For semi-fixed or separate loading ammunition the projectile and cartridge case are handled separately on their way into the gun. This means the end of the cartridge case has to be plugged with something to keep the powder in and water and crud out. For many years thick plugs of cork were used. However, during WW2 the Navy started using synthetic materials such as Bakelite and later other plastics, such as polyurethane foam for the cartridge plug. This is a brown Bakelite type material used in the 5”/38 cartridge cases, shaped in sort of a bowl configuration. New old stock, but there may be some chipping or cracks in the portion that fits into the case mouth. Every 5”/38 case should have one of these (or a similar plug made from cork) to give the correct unfired appearance. $20.00 (View Picture)

18430 French 10.5cm Model 1913 Schneider Howitzer brass case- (105 x 390mmR) - In the early 1900s, the French company Schneider et Cie working with the Russian Putilov firm developed a gun using the Russian 107 mm round, featuring an interrupted screw breech that swung to the side. This proved to be a successful design, and Schneider then decided to modified it for a French 105 mm round. Initially the French were not interested as they already had plenty of 75 mm field guns. Finally in 1913 the French army purchased a small number under the designation Canon de 105 Mle 1913 Schneider; also known as the L 13 S. The lighter 75 mm guns were of limited use against trenches, so the French army ordered large numbers of the L 13 S, which with its larger 15.74 kg (34.7 lb) shell was more effective against fortified positions. These guns were also sold to other nations after WW1, and many were captured and used by the Germans in WW2. Although these look about the same as the familiar U.S. 105mm Howitzer cases, they are actually a bit longer (390mm compared to 371mm) and are not interchangeable. The headstamps definitely look French, but we are not sure if this is WW1 era, or a later WW2 era case. $149.00 (View Picture)

16958 U.S. Navy 5”/54 Test Case (127 x 389mmR) Mark 6 - These are cut down from regular cases, and fitted with a steel bushing where a separate primer can be inserted. The case is then loaded into the breech of the gun, and fired with the electrical firing circuit, and then again in percussion mode after the test case is reloaded with a new primer. This one has the old primer in place, and someone has peened over the fingers at the mouth of the primer to hold it in place, but this can be removed and the old primer driven out without too much work. I believe that the same case can be used on either the 5”/38 or the 5”/54 guns, but his is marked “54 cal” and has a 1945 date, which indicates it was originally made for the 5”/54 slow fire mounts initially installed on the CV41, 42, 43 class carriers. Overall excellent but the steel bushing is rusty. $149.00 (View Picture)

13378 U.S. 152mm Target Practice- Tracer projectile M411A3 - About 6 inches in diameter and about 20 inches long this has a heavy steel body with a thin sheet metal windshield for ballistic purposes. Projectile is M411A1 but complete round designation is the M411A3. This is the projectile only, no case or propellant. Weight about 35 pounds. Excellent, unfired with just some minor storage scuffing and scrapes and one token demil puncture in the windshield that can be touched up with bondo and repainted to look like new. These were used in the 152-mm gun cannon M81, a versatile, lightweight gun/launcher capable of firing both missiles and conventional ammunition. It is the main armament on airborne reconnaissance combat vehicle M551. Ammunition for this weapon is issued in the form of fixed rounds and is easily identified by its distinctive combustible cartridge case which is light yellow and has a texture similar to fiber-board. The cartridge case body, which holds the bagged propelling charge, is attached to the projectile base with epoxy resin and an aluminum locking ring. The cartridge case base, fitted with a consumable primer is cemented to the sidewall of the case body with nitrocellulose lacquer. This ammunition was made with two types of projectiles: a high-explosive antitank multipurpose projectile with tracer (HEAT-T-MP) and the one we offer here, an inert target practice projectile with tracer (TP-T) which is a ballistic match for the HEAT-T-MP round. (Note the tracer element has been removed so these are totally inert). Price is for projectile only, we do not have any of the cases or primers or propelling charges. $125.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 17946 U.S. 75 x 350mm Rimmed Brass Cartridge Case- Nice stencils - This is the standard 75mm field gun case as used with the WW1 75mm guns through WW2 where it was used as a tank gun. The sides of the case are stenciled in large letters: FLASHLESS, DP X 3494 1928, and what looks like V 805. The base is stenciled with less legible (blurred or double stamped) marks that look like 75mm over PD with a horizontal line and also SHELL MK 1 and something like AMM LOT [number]. The actual headstamp is 75MM GUN, LOT 1241 65 GM CO. and near the edge 1874-3. Case has a sort of acid cleaned appearance, but it was that way before it was stenciled. Former owner reported it was from the Great Lake where the Navy or Coast Guard did practice firing, but I suspect that is not even close to correct. Small hole (about ¼” diameter) has been drilled into the side, near the rim, probably por use as a lamp. Still a nifty case, and probably dates to the 1920s-30s. No flammable or explosive components, INERT. $95.00 (View Picture)

17935 VIETNAM ERA 105 x 607mmR STEEL CASE FOR 105mm TANK GUN - This type of cartridge used the M456A1 HEAT-T projectile and was standard from 1966 until replaced by the M456A2 in 1980. While obsolete in U.S. service, it is still in use by a number of allied nations, and presumably saw use in Vietnam. The projectile assemblies were rigidly secured to the cartridge case by a series of crimping indentations. The projectiles are steel-bodied, and all have plastic obturators and seals. The front of the projectile is occupied by a standoff spike assembly with an impact switch assembly at the tip which activates the M509A1 Base-Detonating (BD) fuze and about two pounds of Composition B formed into a shaped charge behind a conical copper liner. These were used with the 105mm cannons M68 used in several of the M48, M60 and M1 series tanks, and also on the Stryker vehicles with a large gun. This is a good representative case. The primer has been drilled out but it retains good ink stamped markings CRTG HEAT-T M456A1/ FOR GUN M68. Headstamp included 105MM M148A1B1 and 1972 date. INERT- no explosive or flammable components in the case. $65.00 (View Picture)

17102 RARE .58 CALIBER GATLING GUN SHORT RIMFIRE CARTRIDGE- FIRST U.S. MACHING GUN CARTRIDGE - The first machine guns were Richard J. Gatling’s hand cranked guns, the Model 1862. These set the basic pattern for general mechanics of the Gatling gun, but the ammunition was troublesome with separate cylindrical steel chambers bored out at the front to be loaded with standard .58 caliber rifle musket paper cartridges, and the rear of the chamber had a nipple for a percussion cap. Essentially, the chamber became a primitive form of a metallic cartridge. However, reloading the chambers in the field was tedious and slow, greatly reducing the effectiveness of the Gatling gun for any sort of sustained fire. The next step in the evolution was to modify the chambers by boring them all the way through and modify the strikers to hit the edge instead of the center where the nipples had been. This allowed use of a rimfire cartridge loaded into the chambers for much quicker reloading and sustained fire. Since the barrels were .58 caliber, the same 60 grain powder charge and bullet previously used were adopted for the rimfire cartridge for these guns. This was the origin of the .58 caliber Gatling gun cartridges. The .58 caliber Gatling cartridges were basically experimental, as the Civil War ended about the time they were proven to be successful, and the Army switched to .50-70 caliber center fire cartridges for their rifles. For the sake of uniformity the settle on that caliber for Gatling guns as well. By this time Gatling had modified his design to eliminate the separate chambers so that the guns fed the .50-70 cartridges directly into the barrels and extracted the cases at the end of the cycle. Thus the .58 rimfire Gatling cartridge had a very brief career, making them extremely scarce. This .58 Short Gatling is sometimes called the “.58 Mountain Gun Gatling” but origin of that name is unclear. Subsequently Gatling guns were made in .50-70, .45-70, .30-40, and .30-06 caliber and even 1 inch caliber for U.S. military use. Reportedly they were made in 29 different calibers for 25 different countries over their 56 year history. By WW1 the hand cranked Gatling was obsolete, but in 1947 an experiment hooking an electric motor to an old Gatling gun produced rates of fire around 4,000-6,000 rounds per minutes. The “new” Gatling guns included the 20mm Vulcan used in fighter jets to the 7.62mm “Mini-guns” in helicopters and even an experimental 37mm anti-aircraft gun. While the .58 Gatling has an important role in U.S. military arms history, it would be an interesting challenge to get an example of every different caliber cartridge ever used in Gatling guns. This round is from the estate of Colonel B.R. Lewis, a former Commanding Officer of Frankford Arsenal, and later author of the highly respected “Small Arms and Ammunition in the United States Service.” Price for one original .58 Gatling short rimfire cartridge in excellent condition- $135.00 (View Picture)

17848 CONFEDERATE 3 INCH READ-PARROTT SHELL - (Melton & Pawl Guide to CW Artillery Projectiles Figure III, A-101 shows the slightly smaller early 10 Pounder version for 2.94” bore) Parrott had purchased the right to use Read’s design for a wrought iron cup serving as a sabot or obturating/rotating band. These were shaped and then placed into the mold prior to pouring the cast iron projectile body. Robert P. Parrott remained loyal to the Union during the Civil War, running the West Point Foundary at Cold Spring, NY. John B. Read, however, was from Alabama, and his design was used by Confederate makers during the war. One easily noted design difference is that the Confederate Read projectiles almost always have a “late dimple” in the center of the base associated with turning the projectile to final dimensions. This projectile measures 2.99 inch diameter and is 9 inches long, weighing 9 pounds 12 ounces. The copper or brass fuze plug is in place, for use with the tapered paper fuzes. This was a “common” shell where only the projectile body provided fragmentation, there being no canister balls inside. Some of the edges of the sabot cup are missing, the result of being fired. This was unloaded long ago and is INERT with no explosive or flammable components. The 3 inch Parrott-Read shell was used with any of the 3 inch rifles in the Confederate inventory, such as the Ordnance Rifle, or the later 10 Pounder Parrotts. $425.00 (View Picture)

17847 CONFEDERATE 3 INCH BROUN SHELL (SHORT PATTERN) - (Melton & Pawl Guide to CW Artillery Projectiles Figure III, A-56) An interesting variation on the theme of having a softer metal sabot at the rear of the projectile, along the lines of Parrot, Read and later Absterdam designs. This used a thick brass or copper ring (or sabot) at the base with the rest of the projectile being cast iron. The nose is drilled with a tapered hole for a wooden fuze plug unlike the more sophisticated federal shells which used threaded plugs. This was a “common” shell where only the projectile body provided fragmentation, there being no canister balls inside. This example is heavily pitted, but the sabot is excellent. Diameter about 2.95 inches, length 7.5 inches and weight about 8 pounds 6 ounces. This is an unfired example that was unloaded years ago and is now INERT, with no explosive or flammable components. Lieutenant Colonel William Leroy Broun (commander of the Richmond Arsenal beginning in June 1863), is considered to be the developer of this projectile pattern. Since the copper sabot was designed to serve as a bourrelet, only one bearing surface was needed on the body of the projectile, just behind the curved portion of the nose. The bourrelet and the sabot were machined on a lathe to the proper tolerance required. This is the more common short variety, although a longer version approximately 8 ¼ inches long is known to exist. There are two saw cuts in the sabot to aid in the expansion of the sabot into the grooves of the gun. Fired specimens almost always have the high, thin sabot blown off, revealing the slightly rounded base of the projectile body. The Broun projectile is found mainly on late-war battlefields, such as Petersburg. LT COL Broun was a distant cousin of General Pickett, and except for his wartime ordnance career, he was an academic, connected to schools such as the Georgia A&M, Auburn, and the Universities of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. The 3 inch Broun shell was used with any of the 3 inch rifles in the Confederate inventory, such as the Ordnance Rifle, or the later 10 Pounder Parrotts. $475.00 (View Picture)

17725 Lot of five 20 x 102mm dummy cartridges M51E8(BLUE TIP) - This is the type of ammunition used with the M61 “Vulcan” gun in many fighters, and also with the older M39 series of aircraft guns. The dummy ammunition is used for training crews in the various operations (loading, unloading, troubleshooting, etc) and for mechanical testing of the guns while ensuring there will not be any unexpected loud noises or sudden holes in buildings or other nearby stuff (or soiled skivvies). While dimensionally identical, various types of dummy cartridges have been made. Some are a solid metal pieces machined to the proper size, others use regular type cases and projectiles with inert fillers, and others use nylon or other materials as substitutes. This lot consists of five M51E8 dummies made with regular blue painted TP type projectiles crimped into a steel case that has a plated type finish. Nomenclature is stenciled on the projectile. Used, good but cases are gray and ugly and dirty. INERT no flammable or explosive comonents. $35.00 (View Picture)

17642 Danish WW2 Practice Hand Grenade - Officially the: Øvelseshaandbombe M/23 (Drill hand bomb M/23) has 1mm thick walls except for the centre piece which is 2,5mm. When used, these would be loaded with a special drill cartridge called "Øvelsetændpatron M/23" (Drill igniter cartridges M/23) for practice throw. When it explodes the expanding gasses escapes through the hole in the brass nut located at the bottom of the grenade. These were to be reused. Retains about 10% of the original gray paint. Circa 1942 date is sometimes found on the brass end plunger of these. Inert, no explosive or flammable components. $50.00 (View Picture)

17433 U.S. 75MM (75 x 272mmR) BRASS CASE M5A1 for M1A1 Pack Howitzers - Fired case, fine with primer intact, both primer and case dated 1944. The 75-ram howitzer cannon M1A1 is a general purpose, towed light field artillery weapon that can be used for either direct or indirect fire. The weapon can be readily disassembled into major components for either packing by animal or for airborne operations. The weapon is also used as a subcaliber gun for 280-ram gun cannon M66 Except for the HEAT cartridge, which is fixed, ammunition is semifixed; that is, the cartridge case is a loose fit over the projectile so that the propellant may be accessible for adjustment. Type of projectiles used include high explosive (HE), smoke (WP), high-explosive antitank (HEAT), blank, dummy and training. All 75-ram pack howitzer ammunition, except HEAT rounds, contain propellant M1, which is composed of a base charge (charge 1), and three increments (numbered 2, 3 and 4) for fire adjustment. Percussion primers of the M1 series, M64 and M23A2 are used. Besides the brass cartridge case M5A1 we offer here, steel cases (M5A1B1) were used. $55.00 (View Picture)

17350 BOFORS 40 X 364 MMR (BOFORS 40MM/L70) DUMMY, SEMI-TRANSPARENT PROJECTILE - BOFORS 40 x 364 mmR (Bofors 40mm/L70) Dummy, Semi-transparent Projectile The Swedish Bofors firm has worked hard at improvements on their famous 1930s vintage WW2 era guns known as the 40mm/L60 which fired the 40 x 311 mmR cartridge in the four round clips. In the post-WW2 period they adopted a longer 40 x 263 mmR case for greater range and velocity when fired through a barrel 70 calibers long (compared to the shorter 60 caliber length barrels.) Their new gun design boosted the rate of fire from 140 rounds per minute to 280, then 300 and currently 330 rounds per minute. This impressive rate of fire and range was made more effective by coupling it with sophisticated fire control and radar systems. The 40mm/L70 guns are in service in many countries today in Anti-Aircraft, anti-armor, or anti-shipping roles. Polymer type projectile is a semi-transparent brownish color with heavy steel “rebar” type rod which give the cartridge its weight. Tip of projectile has metal (brass?) cap. Projectile is unmarked. Primer pocket area only shows a neatly finished epoxy type substance. Heastamp RNO 83 B0001-009 over 40MM L/70. INERT- No flammable or explosive components. $59.00 (View Picture)

17261 U.S. NAVY MARK 90 VT-IR (INFRARED PROMITY) FUZE - Externally this is excellent and complete, but the electronic guts and explosive components have all been removed from the innards. This is the type made for use with the 5"/38 caliber guns. Have several and markings may vary, but looks like all are 1969 or 1970 dated. INERT. $85.00 (View Picture)

16957 U.S. 5"/38 MK 10 STEEL CASING, CUT DOWN - Cut to 13 inch length for unknown purpose. Looks like 12-68 date. Primer removed. INERT- no explosive or flammable components. $20.00 (View Picture)

21645 U.S. 20 x 110mm (Hispano Suiza) Dummy Cartridge M18A3 (Single round) - The 20 x 110mm (Hispano-Suiza) aircraft cannon was widely used by the British and U.S. aircraft during WW2. These guns were more lethal than the more widely used .50 caliber Browning machine guns, but reliability problems slowed their introduction into service. Variants of the gun included the M1, M2 (AN-M2) and M3. Eventually they were mounted in some (but not all) P-38 Lightning and P-61 Black Widow fighters, the B-29 Superfortress, and mainly in the Navy’s F4U-1C Corsair and later post-war Navy fighters. These gas operated cannons fired at about 600 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 2,800 feet per second. Some of the Hispano-Suize type guns were also mounted as anti-aircraft weapons in army tanks or halftrack variants. The M18A3 cartridges are turned from steel and then chrome(?)plated. New condition, fresh from a sealed 25 round can which was marked “25 Cartridges, Drill M18A3, Lot No. SC 49, Loaded 17-50”. Totally inert, no flammable or explosive components. [SPECIAL- Lot of five for only $20.00] Price per round $5.00 (View Picture)

16795 WW2 U.S. 105MM HOWITZER BRASS CASE- 1944 dated - One small dent in one side (about 1’ x 3/8” by 1/8” deep) and the usual minor straightening required at the mouth, otherwise an excellent case. This has been chemically cleaned prior to the last time it was loaded leaving is a slightly frosty yellow appearance. Good ink markings on the base indicating suitable for use in Howitzer M2A2, M103 and M137. Primer removed. $95.00 (View Picture)

15870 120 X 648MM TANK GUN BRASS SHELL CASE - 25.5 inch case length with very heavy rim about 1/4" thick, nearly double that on most cases. $195.00 (View Picture)

16234 GRENADE LAUNCHER FOR FN-49 SEMI-AUTO RIFLES (COLOMBIAN .30-06 VERSION) - This is a spigot type grenade launcher made in Belgium by MECAR (who made launchers for many different rifles, and is still a major munitions maker today). Most of these were used by Belgium on their FN-49 rifles, but are a neat accessory to display with any of the FN-49 rifles. This one is in mint unissued condition, complete with the leather carrying case, although the case shows some storage dirt. $135.00 (View Picture)

16056 U.S. Navy 3”/50 brass cartridge case dated 1945 - The 3”/50 gun was widely used as a dual purpose (surface or AA) gun aboard a wide variety of vessels over about 50 years. Originally a slow fire manually operated gun introduced during WW1, a rapid fire version reached the fleet near the end of WW2 and these remained in service until the 1980s. Aboard larger ships, these were the secondary battery, but aboard smaller ships like Destroyer Escorts and Amphibious ships they were the main armament. This is a typical brass case from the WW2 period (most later cases were steel). It was polished at one time and coated with lacquer which is starting to chip and flake. This one has three small holes drilled in the neck, probably to secure a wooden projectile for use as decorative items on a quarterdeck or similar. The case has a number of small and medium dents, the worst being the one on the shoulder shown in the photos. It will still polish up and look pretty good, just position it with the worst dings to the back. Getting very hard to find these any more. $95.00 (View Picture)

15893 WW2 40 x 311mm Bofors Dummy Cartridge Mark I - 4-42 dated headstamp. These had a steel rod from the projectile to the base of the case so that the projectile would not become stuck in the bore during testing of the loading mechanism of the 40mm Bofors. Used with mellow chocolate patina to the brass case. Projectile is smoothly rusted and pitted, but should clean up with a bit of file work and a paint job. Three holes in side of the case are correct, used for visual ID of this round as a dummy. $65.00 (View Picture)

15191 U.S. Navy 37 x 137 mmR case and AP projectile - UMC Company 6-98 headstamped case with the projectile marked on the base 1901 and B in star inspector marks and partially legible letters that look like S.T. LS&Co. Brass base plug with square socket with seemingly recently stamped "PLUG." A bit of red paint remains near the tip. A good representative Spanish American War round, even though the projectile is dated a bit later. INERT- no flammable or explosive components $125.00 (View Picture)

14585 U.S. NAVY 6 POUNDER CARTRIDGE CASE & PROJECTILE MADE BY WINCHESTER DATED 8-1897 - The 6 pounder rapid fire gun was widely used by the U.S. Navy from about 1884 to about 1920. Two different models were used, one by Hotchkiss, the other by Driggs-Schroeder with many variations. These fired a 6 pound projectile (duhh!) which was about 57mm in diameter. They were mounted on pedestal type mounts, usually open with no shield. Smaller ships used these as their main battery, while larger ships had them as secondary armament. This round was made by WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS Company and the headstamp also includes an August 1897 date. The Armor Piercing projectile is marked AP on the rotating band along with naval anchor inspector markings on the band and the body. The brass casing has some dings and one moderate dent as shown, but overall is a mellow brass color and displays very nicely. This is one of a handful of pre-Span-Am War naval cartridges we have ever seen, and I believe that the 6 pounder/57mm may have been the largest that Winchester made. I doubt if we will ever find another one of these. INERT no explosive components. $495.00 (View Picture)

13993 U.S. NAVY 40MM BOFORS SINGLE ROUNDS - These 40x311mm Rimmed cases are known by various names in their service as the most widely used Anti Aircraft guns of WW2 by the U.S., England, Germany, Italy and Sweden. The guns are known as Bofors M/40, the L-60, or the Mark I or Mark II, pushing a 900-940 gram projectile at about 850 meters per second. (you do the math if you want feet per second velocity or weight in pounds). Cartridge cases are USN Mark 3 dated 1945, made of steel but with a brass colored coating. Various lot number type markings are ink stamped on the case. Projectiles are marked extensively on the rotating band (most seem to be something like "40MM ADL 10001 B SFM 87C 001-[various numbers] Rotating bands have token DEMIL heat melt. Primers have been pulled for the empty cases, and the projectiles are empty and the black painted fuze covers unscrew to reveal that they too are empty. Projectiles were never loaded, so they are in their original red lead primer finish, ready to be painted in any color scheme you like. Some minor corrosion or scuffing on most of the once fired cases. Impressive addition to WW2 USN display, although these remained in service into the 1960s or 70s with the US Navy, mainly on amphibious and auxiliary ships, and small craft like PT boats. These were also used on the U.S. Army’s M40 “Duster” armored vehicles which mounted twin 40mm Bofors guns well into the 1970s. Condition varies, so we show one of the worst and a nice one in the photo, say overall good to very good except as noted. INERT $49.00 (View Picture)

13405 WOOD AMMO CRATE FOR 56 ROUNDS 20MM TP T199 FOR M39 GUN - About 13” x 15 “ x 10” high. Looks like a 1946 lot number. This was for the M39 revolver cannon developed by Springfield (based on the German MG 213 design) which first saw service late in the Korean war and through Vietnam on some variants of the F-86, F-100, F-101 and the F-5. Crate is in excellent condition with heavy folding metal handles and metal strapping. Missing the cover, but easy to make one out of ¾” pine boards. Great for a display of USAF uniforms or weapons, or as cargo in a military vehicle I think another one may be available if you need two instead of one. Price for one crate as shown in the photos $20.00 (View Picture)

5225 Model Cannon- circa 1770-1815 - High quality hand made piece (probably 30-50 years old, not an antique). Not a true scale model, but pretty darn close, capturing all the essential details. Brass barrel about 12 inches long with .50 caliber bore. Shows signs of being fired with black powder, perhaps with ball, but we believe it only safe with blank charges of black powder. Very finely crafted oak carriage with detailed brass fittings and leather straps. Ammunition chest on the trail is removable, opens and has fuzes and a sample ball stored in it. Very decorative reminder of the cannoneer's contention that "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl." Perhaps just the thing to add dignity to your marital situation, or at least a martial atmosphere. Overall length about 21 inches, width 14 inches, and wheel height 9 inches. $350.00 (View Picture)


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