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Collectable U.S. Militaria- before WW2

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(Remember, many WW1 era items were also used during WW2.)


We have grouped these into several categories:

Pre-1865 (Civil War and earlier items)
1865-1900 (Indian War, Spanish American, British Empire, etc.)
1900-1936 (Including WW1 and pre-WW2 items)


Pre-1865 (Civil War and earlier items)

9119 6 POUNDER SOLID SHOT "CANNON BALL"- CIVIL WAR ERA - Mellow iron patina with limited pitting. Standard 3.58 inch diameter as used with 6 Pounder guns from the Revolution to the end of the muzzle loader era, but I think this is probably from the Civil War era. $250.00 (View Picture)

22372 CIVIL WAR CAVALRY CARBINE SNAP HOOK FOR SADDLE RING - Unmarked, and may be a repro, but came out of an old collection of miscellaneous leather goods, and might be original, but you will have to decide which it is. Made for the standard 2 ½ inch wide shoulder sling, and repros of these are available from S&S Firearms. $25.00 (View Picture)

22816 Civil War Saddle Ring Carbine sling and swivel snap - What you see is what you get. The swivel and snap assembly appear to be original Civil War issue, but the sling leather is probably a replacement, perhaps Indian War period or ????. Good looking buckle, but normally these would have a chevron shaped brass plate on the tongue end of the strap. Fine for display with a Civil War or Indian War era Saddle Ring Carbine, but one of the totally original examples priced at $650 and up would be nicer. You decide if the savings make this an acceptable substitute. $125.00 (View Picture)

21679 U.S. MODEL 1861 .58 CALIBER CARTRIDGE BOX WITRH ORIGINAL BOX PLATE - This is the most typical of all Civil War era cartridge boxes, produced from mid 1861 until March of 1864. The Model 1861 features belt loops on the back that are sewn and riveted, and the closing tab is sewn to the flap only. The March 1864 pattern added a rivet to the sewing for the tab on the flap, and in July 1864 they did away with the heavy box plate and merely embossed its oval and US design on the flap. This is one of the examples made with a hemlock tanning process that resulted in a brownish color to the leather, while the preferred oak tanned leather was more of a true black color. This has no makers markings noted, so it was probably made before such markings became mandatory in late 1861. The leather is dry but flexible with the expected surface flaking and cracking from flexing. Some insect damage to the surface of the inner flap. The iron roller buckles on the bottom of the box for attaching the shoulder strap have been removed, probably during the period of use. The lead filled stamped brass cartridge box plate is absolutely original and has been with this box since the 1860s, and is in excellent condition, along with the untouched attaching thong passing through the iron loops on the back of the plate. The leather closing tab is intact, and the tins remain in place. Each tin held a packet of 10 .58 caliber paper cartridges in the lower section, and in the upper section the packets would be opened and the individual cartridge placed with four in the small compartment and six in the larger, for a total of 40 rounds. (See Paul D. Johnson’s “Civil War Cartridge Boxes” for more than you ever dreamed possible about all types of CW cartridge boxes!) This is in exactly “as found” condition, never cleaned, treated or polished in any way. $525.00 (View Picture)

22532 CIVIL WAR ARTILLERY SHELL FUZE IGNITER - Stamped tinned sheet metal with black japanned finish. These were attached to the nose fuzes of muzzleloading projectiles to help direct the flash from firing the main powder charge to the fuze so it would ignite and not end up being a dud. S&S price is $55, but our price is $45.00 (View Picture)

19947 CIVIL WAR EARLY SMOOTH SIDE CANTEEN- NO COVER - This is a good example of a typical Federal Model 1858 smoothside canteen as was issued to Union forces early in the war. One of the most important accoutrements of any soldier's gear outside his weapon was his canteen. This specimen is a product of the New York Depot and has three iron strap loops, one of which has a small hole drilled in it to secure a small link chain that connects to the cork pull ring. This canteen consists of two circular sections of pressed tin formed to an oblate spheroid pattern that is soldered together along the rim. No cover remains, but the original stopper and cork are still in place. Canteen body seems to be free from dents with just a bit of rust as shown in the photos. There is one tiny hole in the tin cap around the spout, visible in the photos. Although Civil War “bullseye” canteens turn up fairly often, the early smoothside examples are hard to find. A very nice representative example. $275.00 (View Picture)

19946 CIVIL WAR FEDERAL MODEL 1858 'BULLSEYE' CANTEEN- NO COVER - Here is an original Civil War specimen of the Model 1858 Bullseye canteen, or what is often referred to as a corrugated-pattern tin canteen, in good condition. Issued to all Union troops in the field, this Philadelphia Depot-style canteen exhibits seven reinforcing rings extruded on each side. Pewter spout bears the maker's stamping of "HADDEN, PORTER & BOOTH" of Philadelphia. The corrugated or bullseye-pattern with its series of concentric rings began in 1861 as an effort to increase the durability of canteen equipment. Fluid capacity of the canteen was three pints and its liquid contents were kept cool by means of a damp or wet wool cover. Canteen consists of two circular sections of pressed-tin, formed in an oblate spheroid pattern and soldered together at the rim. The Philadelphia Depot produced over 1,500,000 such 'corrugated' canteens for the US Army. This 'corrugated' pattern tin canteen is a good example of what the Civil War soldier, and later the Indian War cavalryman carried on his person, day in and day out. For the collector seeking an original Civil War canteen at a most reasonable price, this would make an ideal addition to any grouping. Many of these have one or both sides dented inward by the users, to make them more comfortable when being carried. The body of the canteen has oxidized to a fairy uniform dull gray tone with some areas of light surface rust. Will include a stopper and cork from the period although that is not shown in the photo. $225.00 (View Picture)

19945 CIVIL WAR PISTOL CARTRIDGE BOX (.36 caliber?) - The Civil War era pistol cartridge boxes were made in three sizes to accommodate the many different calibers of arms in use. This is the smallest of the regulation sizes with the interior of the pocket measuring about 4 5/8” wide by 3” tall and about ½” deep. Troops would carry three of the six round packets of cartridges in the box, and the heavy leather construction, with double thickness on the front and back, would protect the fragile cartridges from damage by rough handling or from exposure to the weather. This is an extremely nice example, with minimal amounts of cracking or flaking, and the leather still nice and flexible and tight stitching. Sharp markings including script US on the left of the flap, maker and inspector names J. Davy & Co, Newark, NY and Shephard. The asterisk shaped marks found on leather goods are not any sort of “marking” but rather the impression left by the clamps used to hold the pieces together during the manufacturing process. Overall fine to excellent, although soiled from long storage. $225.00 (View Picture)

19941 Civil War federal Model 1858 Bullseye Canteen with replaced cover - Classic US Model 1858 Bullseye Canteen with Philadelphia makers mark of 'J. H. Rohrman/Cont./Phila DEC 29 64' on pewter spout. The cover in place now is a brown canvas type replacement probably done in the 1870s-1890s. Comes with a cork and stopper with some chain, but not attached. Pewter mouth slightly misshapen as shown in the photos. Nice representative example of the classis Civil War “bullseye canteen.” $195.00 (View Picture)

19684 Reproduction Confederate sword belt and holster set - Inexpensive reproduction brown leather belt, sword slings, cap box and holster. CS markings on buckle and holster flap. Holster and cap box are darker color than the belt, but the were not very picky as long as gear would work. Not totally authentic in all the construction details, but looks okay for a reenactor on a budget, or for events where total authenticity is not a big deal. Belt will fit from about 34 waist up to a big guy about 46 inch. Gently used. The lot for only $65.00 (View Picture)

19234 U.S. NAVY “SINGLESTICK” WOODEN TRAINING CUTLASS - Scarce, late 19th century Naval training sword known as a singlestick. Made of carved oak or hickory for the blade and grip, with a large stiff leather basket guard around the hilt. Overall, this imposing weapon measures 35 ½ inches long. The guard slides over the “blade” and should be secured at the front by a brass pin (missing but the hole is there for it) while the pommel is a simple brass washer with metal wood screw. Overall this practice sword is in excellent plus original condition, probably never issued. Colonel Robert H. Rankin’s “Small Arms of the Sea Services,” has a photo showing these in use, captioned as: “Singlestick practice aboard a U.S. warship in the 1890’s. Enlisted members of the crew, including Marines, were encouraged to attain proficiency in swordsmanship by fencing with singlesticks. After the need for proficiency in using the cutlass had waned, fencing was encouraged as a form of physical exercise.” While an interesting Navy or Marine Corps collector item, this would also fit into a collection of U.S. (or all military) “fencing equipment” used for training with edged weapons such as swords and bayonets. You could make something like this for the kids to play with using a dowel from the home center, and a guard made from leather or even plastic from a milk jug- so they won’t be tempted to play with this great condition collector item. $295.00 (View Picture)

18457 Binoculars- Civil War- Spanish American War style - Most binoculars were made in France throughout the 19th Century, and not until WW1 did the U.S. optical industry begin large scale production for either military or commercial markets. Therefore most U.S. military forces used French made binoculars during the Civil War, Indian Wars and the Spanish American War. This is a typical pair, in average condition with decent optics (in need of a good cleaning) and part of the leather wrapping on the barrels missing. One of the thin brass eye cups is bent as seen in the photos. Fine for display or a reenactor. $55.00 (View Picture)

17232 CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX TIN FOR .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET BOXES M1855 or M1864. - The cartridge box used two of the tins, made to hold ten loose cartridges in the upper section, and a packet of ten in the lower section, for a total of 40 rounds per box. This tin measures 1 3/8” x 3 3/8” x 5” with upper section divided into two compartments. Two of these tins were issued in each of the Model 1855 or M1864 cartridge boxes for the .58 caliber rifle muskets. Overall fine condition. Hard to find these loose. Price for one tin. $110.00 (View Picture)

17229 .69 CAL CARTRIDGE BOX TIN WITH WOOD BLOCK TO CONVERT TO.58 CALIBER - The cartridge box used two of the tins, made to hold ten loose cartridges in the upper section, and a packet of ten in the lower section, for a total of 40 rounds per box. This tin measures 1 ½” x 3 7/8” x 4 ½” which is correct for the .69 caliber box. The divider has been removed from the upper section and a wooden block bored for 8 .58 caliber cartridges inserted. This was done as an expedient means of providing suitable cartridge boxes for troops who turned in .69 caliber muskets during the war for .58 caliber rifle muskets being received in huge numbers. Scarce to find these loose. Original Civil War issue item. Price for one tin with wooden block $125.00 (View Picture)

15134 CIVIL WAR “BATTLE RATTLE” - That is the common collector term for all of these, although in reality they were made and used well into WW1 era for various applications, including fire or gas alarms, or other occasions where you needed a distinctive sound that will get people’s attention in a hurry, and wake even sound sleepers. You can grap the crank handle and then swing the body of the rattle around and the cams on the gear teeth will raise and release the two wooden reed which give off a very annoying “clackity clackity clackity” cacophony. In addiont to the later uses mentioned above, these were used in Civil War days and up until the advent of the 1MC speaker systems aboard warships to get attention in case of fire, general quarters, etc. More on these in Francis Lord’s Civil War Collectors Encyclopedia page 203 and Flayderman Catalog 104 item 413. Repaired crack on one of the frame pieces, otherwise VG. Great for your collection, or an anonymous gift for your ex-wife’s bratty step-kids. $95.00 (View Picture)

15048 Civil War Leather Cartridge Box for Sharps (and similar) Carbines - Exact match to the example noted in Todd et al U.S. Military Equipage 1851-1872 volume 1, page 193 and shown in plate 51. This has the outer flap only, with a large implement pocket on the face of the box, and an undivided tin insert. Two belt loops on the back, with no buckles on the bottom. This is sometimes called the “late war” pattern, and was intended to carry 20 rounds of cartridges in paper packets, while some of the other boxes had wooden blocks inside drilled to hold individual cartridges. Internal dimensions about 6” x 1.5” x 3.5”. Maker mark H.A. DINGEE partially obscured by the top of the implement pocket. Initials PB neatly cut on the back of the box but meaning unknown. Overall excellent with leather pretty flexible, but one of the soldered seams on the liner is broken. A very nice original box. $295.00 (View Picture)

8318 REPRODUCTION CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX- BROWN - Brown leather with CS embossed on the flap. Medium quality workmanship, probably typical of a lot of Confederate stuff. This has been used by a reenactor a bit, so it is scuffed and show a little use, not quite as obvious as a brand new repro. Fine for display or for collector on a budget who cannot yet afford one of the megabucks originals. $39.00 (View Picture)

8315 REPRODUCTION CIVIL WAR CARTRIDGE BOX- BLACK - Black leather with CS embossed on the flap. Medium quality workmanship, probably typical of a lot of Confederate stuff. This has been used by a reenactor a bit, so it is scuffed and show a little use, not quite as obvious as a brand new repro. Fine for display or for collector on a budget who cannot yet afford one of the megabucks originals. $39.00 (View Picture)

5699 War of 1812 Almanac - The New England Almanack or Lady's and Gentleman's Diary for the year of our Lord Christ 1813 by Isaac Bickerstaff. Printed and sold by John Carter, Providence, RI. Twelve sheets about 5" x 7.5" printeed on both sides and crudely sewn on the left margin. Includes astronomic data, calendars for every month, medical tips (burns, dysentary, consumption) wine making, poetry, and schedules for federal and state courts in the New England states. Well worn, yellowed, tattered edges and some ripped pages. Wonderful item to display with your collection of War of 1812 artifacts. These were considered to be expendable items and most were trashed at the end of the year. Neat. $85.00 (View Picture)

CIVIL WAR DISCHARGES - Preprinted form with fancy eagle at the top detailing the date and location of a soldier's discharge, along with the reason, his physical characteristics (place of birth, age, height, color of eyes and hair, complexion] previous occupation, and date of enlistment. Signed by the soldier and one or more officers. Most entries are neatly written in ink. (View Picture) of a typical sample


1865-1900 (Indian War, Spanish American, British Empire, etc.)

22994 U.S. MODEL 1874 CAVALRY CURB STRAP VARIANT- BROWN - Used with the Shoemaker bit, these attached to the large rings and passed under the horse’s chin. This is one of the recognized variations with a standing loop included. Mint unissued condition, no horse ever slobbered all over this one. $175.00 (View Picture)

22993 U.S. MODEL 1874 CAVALRY CURB STRAP- BLACK - Used with the Shoemaker bit, these attached to the large rings and passed under the horse’s chin. Excellent plus condition, I doubt if any horse ever slobbered all over this one. $125.00 (View Picture)

22198 U.S. M1885 CARBINE SLING AND SWIVEL SNAP (ORIGINAL- BUT ROUGH)) - The swivel assembly, marked ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL is about mint unissued, just dirty from long term storage. The leather shoulder sling is rolled up and tied with string, probably by Bannerman or some old ordnance sergeant 120 years ago, and left that way ever since. There is one spot of deterioration to the leather by the knot on the string, and towards the middle of the roll you can see the strap is torn most of the way through. Surface is cracked and the finish badly flaking. The brass chevron shape tip and buckle are in good shape. It would be easy to reuse the old hardware on a new leather strap if you want a really handsome Indian War style trapdoor carbine shoulder sling. However, if you cherish “all original” then you will love the stiff, dry flaking leather, and either leave it rolled up or, unroll it for better viewing. Wish it were nicer, but it is what it is, and the price is $275.00 (View Picture)

19344 U.S. MODEL 1874 MESS KIT (SCARCE) - This is the same basic design as the WW1 mess kit, but instead of being made of aluminum it is made of tinned sheet iron, probably not a real healthy choice of materials, but popular for most sheet metal goods of the era. The only marking is US on the end of the handle. Outside has much of the tinned finish remaining, but the inside has been scoured bare, and now is somewhat rusted. This is the most common type of the 1874 model (collector term) actually introduced about 1883 with the lifting ring offset to the side. Hard to find these, and this is only the second or third we have found in 20+ years. $125.00 (View Picture)

19197 U.S. Model 1885 leather sling for Trapdoors or Krags- (2nd Wisconsin ID’d!) - Early type with the very thin brass claw hook. This is marked on the back “[?] SMITH 2 WIS Co H” which is undoubtedly Claude Smith who served in Company H when the unit was engaged in the Spanish American War, participating in the invasion and occupation of Puerto Rico. Company H was mainly from the Manitowac area. (Learn more about this regiment at http://spanamwar.com/2ndwischistory.htm) This is the only sling I have ever encountered with a name, and it will be a nice addition to a Spanish American War collection Faint illegible inspector marks but no traces of the usual ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL marks. Leather is reasonably pliable, but not suitable for actual use, and of course has some cracking at stress points and rubbing and flaking all over. The brass button is missing and one of the hooks has broken off the brass claw. Nice history makes up for marginal condition. $95.00 (View Picture)

18798 Spanish American War Hurlburt 45 round Cartridge Belt with “C” type buckle - (Dorsey American Military & Naval Belts pp. 323-328) Single row, 45 loops with the captive wire ends that are the full loop used on some variations. These are for issue with the .45-70 rifles used most of the volunteer units in Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines. The Hurlburt belts were similar to Mills, but were unmarked, and had sewn loops instead of woven integral loops. This example has the three dark blue lines woven in, and does not have the eyelets for bayonet attachment. This one is in excellent condition with no fraying and bright colors. This has one stamped brass keeper, but the Hurlburts are found (with no seeming rhyme or reason) with none, one or two of them. A nice addition to a Span-Am display or collection. $295.00 (View Picture)

18457 Binoculars- Civil War- Spanish American War style - Most binoculars were made in France throughout the 19th Century, and not until WW1 did the U.S. optical industry begin large scale production for either military or commercial markets. Therefore most U.S. military forces used French made binoculars during the Civil War, Indian Wars and the Spanish American War. This is a typical pair, in average condition with decent optics (in need of a good cleaning) and part of the leather wrapping on the barrels missing. One of the thin brass eye cups is bent as seen in the photos. Fine for display or a reenactor. $55.00 (View Picture)

17517 SPAN-AM WAR ERA BLUE CARTRIDGE BELT FOR .45-70 WITH CAPTIVE WIRE ENDS - (Dorsey American Military & Naval Belts pp.288-289) This resembles the common 45 loop belt of the period, but the brass tabs on the ends of the belt include a wire loop to keep the ends captive instead of flopping around loose. Dorsey speculates that these were modifications from earlier non-captive belts, but little is really known about them. This example is in excellent condition, but the dark blue color still pretty good (most are badly faded) and showing little use. Comes with the standard brass wire “C” closure. These are typical of the belts from the Spanish American War and the Philippine Insurrection, until the volunteer and state units finally received Krags. $225.00 (View Picture)

17516 U.S. SPAN AM WAR SPALDING CARTRIDGE BELT (KHAKI) VARIANT - This is a variant of the Spalding belts discussed in Dorsey’s American Military & Naval Belts pp.329-331. Those are 60 loop models made for .30-40 cartridges or reworked to 60 rounds of .45 caliber ammunition. This example is made with 45 loops, not 60, even though the sewing pattern lines on the back are laid out for 60. Perhaps this is an experimental piece or a previously unknown type, or a militia contract. Also, unlike most Spalding belts, this has three distinct woven lines of a darker brown thread. Brass wire “C” closure using the thinner material common to the Spalding belts. One damaged area adjacent to the leather trim strip on one end, but displays fine since that is out of sight. $125.00 (View Picture)

17228 WOODEN BLOCK TO CONVERT MUSKET CARTRIDGE BOX TO .45-70 - 1 3/8” x 4 3/8” x 6 7/8” poplar block with 20 holes bored to accept .45-70 cartridges. Green verdigris on the back and bottom show that it has been in an old cartridge box for quite a while. Otherwise, overall excellent condition. A good example of how the parsimonious (cheap!) Army and militia had to make do with adapting left over equipment to meet new needs in the decades after the Civil War. Original U.S. army or militia issue circa 1873-1880s. $45.00 (View Picture)

16426 U.S. MCKEEVER .30 CALIBER CARTRIDGE BOX - (Dorsey Indian War Cartridge Pouches, etc, p. 78) The McKeever boxes were mainly used for garrison or parade or guard duty, while the Mills belts were used for active campaigning in the field. This version is sometimes called the “Fourth Model,” the earlier ones being for .50-70 or .45-70 ammunition. Made of russet leather. Most of these were made circa 1900-1910 during the period when both the Krag and M1903 Springfields were in service, and they were used with both. This one is dated Rock Island Arsenal 1910. Overall fine condition, but a bit dirty and needs to be cleaned with some saddle soap and leather treaded. The interior webbing is in excellent condition. Will be a nice one when cleaned up some. $110.00 (View Picture)

16124 FARRIER'S PICK (?) - Well made tool with a large curved hook on one end and the other end is a combination hammer, flat scraper/screwdriver and another hook with a shallow curve. No markings. Smooth black-blue finish, not rusted. $25.00 (View Picture)

16118 U.S. Model 1896 Revolver Cartridge box for .45 caliber, with M1910 alteration - The brown leather box was originally made for the .38 caliber double action revolvers using a wooden block inside with holes to hold the cartridges. The identical box, without the wooden block was later issued with .45 caliber revolvers, presumably the Colt Artillery Single Action and Model 1902 and 1909 Double Action revolvers. After adoption of the pistol belts using wire loop type attachments some of the pistol boxes were altered by installation of two eyelets in the back of the box and a brass wire such as those usually associated with the very early M1910 first aid pouches. This box was made at Rock Island in 1907, and is used good, except the hinge for the flap is weak and looks like it was previously repaired with glue at one time. Fine for display, but not real sturdy. Scott Meadows’ superb U.S. Military Holsters & Pistol Cartridge Boxes covers these on pages 409-410. We have had a number of the M1896 boxes, but this is the only one in .45 caliber or altered for he belt hooks that I can recall. $95.00 (View Picture)

15113 MCKEEVER .45-70 CARTRIDGE BOX (Second Pattern) - The standard method for carrying cartridges for most of the Trapdoor Springfield era. These held 20 rounds in two 10 round rows of loops on the inside of the box. The first pattern lacked an provisions for the tool at the end of the pouch; the second had the tool pocket and brass reinforcements on the corners and on the tab. The third pattern had the tool pocket but eliminated the brass reinforcements, and used woven loops to reduce the contact of the cartridges with the leather which caused verdigris (green crud) to form. There is a bulge in one end of the box for a tool for the rifle (although only the early 1876 tool actually fits). This is a standard second model in G-VG condition although having a greasy layer of leather treatment on everything. $125.00 (View Picture)

13612 SPANISH AMERICAN WAR .45-70 CARTRIDGE BELT BY SPALDING - This is sewn construction, not the patented woven construction used by Mills. During the Spanish American War the Mills factory lacked capacity to met the demand, so Spalding and Hurlburt were given contracts for cartridge belts with sewn construction. This one is made by Spalding, tan or khaki color with a brass “C” closure (buckle). Used fine to very fine, mainly just some minor storage soiling. Not sure if this is for .30 caliber or .45 caliber ammo. Missing one of the brass wire loops that holds the loose ends in position, but this can be made from a piece of brass rod or even a brazing rod. Price reflects this problem. $125.00 (View Picture)

12060 MCKEEVER .30-40 CARTRIDGE BOX - Nice brown leather overall fine-excellent condition. The McKeever boxes were mainly used for garrison or parade or guard duty, while the Mills belts were used for active campaigning in the field. Most of these were made circa 1900-1904 but I did not see a date on this one. $125.00 (View Picture)

11972 McKeever Cartridge box (Third pattern)FAIR-GOOD - The standard method for carrying cartridges for most of the Trapdoor Springfield era. These held 20 rounds in two 10 round rows of loops on the inside of the box. The third pattern used woven loops to reduce the contact of the cartridges with the leather which caused verdigris (green crud) to form. There is a bulge in one end of the box for a tool for the rifle (although only the early 1876 tool actually fits). Made at Watervliet Arsenal, and so marked on the closing tab. This example is in fair to good condition although dirty and the leather has crazing and some flaking. Stitching is broken for about 3/4 inch on one end flap, but still will display okay. Will look much better when cleaned and polished with shoe polish. $89.00 (View Picture)

11971 McKeever Cartridge box (Third pattern) G-VG - The standard method for carrying cartridges for most of the Trapdoor Springfield era. These held 20 rounds in two 10 round rows of loops on the inside of the box. The third pattern used woven loops to reduce the contact of the cartridges with the leather which caused verdigris (green crud) to form. There is a bulge in one end of the box for a tool for the rifle (although only the early 1876 tool actually fits). Made at Rock Island Arsenal in 1904, and so marked on one end. This example is in G-VG condition although dirty and the leather has crazing and some flaking. Will look much better when cleaned and polished with shoe polish. $110.00 (View Picture)

10509 U.S. Model 1885 watering bridle and bit for cavalry - (Steffen, Horse Soldier III, 37) Although similar to the later M1902, the M1885 had the bridle sewn to a fixed length, while the M1902 used a buckle to adjust length. Used VG with the leather bridle somewhat stiff and not suitable for actual use. $125.00 (View Picture)

10092 TRAPDOOR CARBINE WOODEN BARRACKS CLEANING ROD - These were easier to use and more effective than the cleaning rods carried in the butt trap of the carbines. Made from a wooden dowel with a jag type tip to hold the patch on one end and a wooden ball about 1.5" diameter on the other. Overall length about 29 inches, for use with any of the trapdoor carbines. Longer versions were also made for use with the cadet rifle and the regular infantry rifle (So a truly addicted collector will compulsively need one of each....) Mint unissued circa 1880s military issue, with just a mellow aged appearance tot he wood and maybe a bit of light storage soil $35.00 (View Picture)

9481 U.S. MODEL 1874 (TYPE 2) CANTEEN - (See Doug McChristian's U.S. Army in the West 1870-1880 pages 210-211). Excellent example of this uncommon conversion of surplus Civil War M1858 canteens for later use. This retains the original mousy brown wool cover and three loops for the shoulder strap. The conversion to M1874 included installation of a drab webbing sling with brass "Chambers" style buckle, and installation of a brown duck cover with a leather welt between the two pieces of the cover. McChristian notes that the cover stitching is crudely done, as is the case in this example, and the stitching on the upper portions has come undone, but could easily be resewn. Except for the stitching problem, overall excellent condition. Cover Stenciled FULLER (upside down) over BATTERY and number 37. It is possible that this refers to a Brattleboro, Vermont unit (photo at http://historicphotographs.com/index.php?page=search&keyword=Fuller+Battery ) which was established in 1874 and evolved into a Vermont National Guard unit. First canteen of this type we have ever encountered, and condition is exceptional. $295.00 (View Picture)

9442 U.S. M1885 CANTEEN- NGSM (NATIONAL GUARD, STATE OF MAINE) - Nifty old relic savaged from Bannerman's Island Arsenal in the 1960s. U.S. Model 1885 canteen with only a few minor dents, but still displays nicely with the N.G.S.M. markings standing out nicely. Artillery markings on back with illegible letter above, crossed cannons, then numbers 1 and 91. Nice addition to Span-Am War collection. This retains the early style brass ring around the spout with chain to hold the cork. First NGSM example we have had. $125.00 (View Picture)

1742 Tan Single Row .45-70 Cartridge Belt- Hurlburt - manufacture with sewn on loops instead of Mills design with loops woven in. Soldier's name and unit marked inside "CECIL TROTTER/Co K. 3RD KY VOL" and another set of numbers that I cannot decipher. Has nice quality repro stamped brass "H" buckle with US. Catch plate is original, and has number 21 stamped. Couple of small dirty spots, and light storage soil, but overall excellent. Very nice Span-AM piece worth researching to find out more about Pvt Trotter and the 3rd KY Vols. Two small brass "keepers" have been removed, but S&S has excellent repros available. $295.00

1741 Tan Single Row .45-70 Cartridge Belt- Hurlburt - manufacture with sewn on loops instead of Mills design with loops woven in. Heavy brass wire "C" closure. Slightly dirty overall and top of one loop frayed. Good Span-AM piece representative of method most of the volunteers used to carry ammo for the obsolete .45-70 rifles. $225.00

3081 Spanish American- WW1 era Sewing Kit (?) Colorful cardboard folder about 3" x 5" with Great White Fleet style US warhsips on the front and legend "The Army and Navy Needle Book". Back features spread eagle perched on a US stars and stripes shield against a starry blue background. Inside are four folded over packets with different sizes of needles and a paper apparently for more needles or maybe just pins. probably 20-25 needles remain. Labels indicate manufacture in Germany so evidently pre-WW1. This may just be fancy packing for selling needles rather than a sewing kit but it is very colorful and has martial appearance. Some pieces missing at two corners on the cover, but displays nicely. $15.00

2187 .45-70 McKeever Cartridge Box Second model, with pocket at end for tool. Has brass staple at corners and brass ring on the tab. Marked on back Watervliet Arsenal. Black leather is cracked and about 10-20% flaked off. Unfortunately quite common in these early boxes. Leather bellows inside and woven loops to hold 20 cartridges. Small hole in the leather at the bottom of the box but really have to look to see it. Good representative early box, much scarcer than the later one which are usually in better condition. $55.00



1900-1936 (Including WW1 and pre-WW2 items)

**NEW ADDITION** SMA2590 (JTW) U.S. "OILER & THONG CASE" (CLEANING KIT) WWI VERSION NICKEL PLATED BRASS. - These were used with US 1903, 1903A3, M1917 and M1 Garand rifles. The nickel plated brass tube is in very good condition with one or two small dings or dents. Comes with thong (pullthrough) and a brass or bristle type bore brush, these would also be carried in the end with the thong. $40.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMA2591 Stock And Handguard Set M917 Eddystone - Duffle Bag Cut Repaired - - Stock is in excellent condition with good markings. There are a few dings and scratches. The duffel bag cut has been expertly repaired and is very hard to spot (that is how I ended up with it). Stock is slightly short, 42 inches long. 1917 stocks are getting hard to find at any price, this will make a nice in-expensive stock and hanguards for an Eddystone rifle restoration project. $75.00 (View Picture)

18890 WW1 U.S. M1910 BACKPACK (HAVERSACK) COMPLETE- MINTY! - Great example of the classic WW1 Doughboy’s knapsack, officially called the haversack. This is complete with the meat can pouch that fastens to the outside flap, and also the seldom found “pack carrier” which attaches to the bottom and was called “the diaper” by the troops. Haversack is Rock Island 1918, pack carrier is LCC Co. 1918, and the meat can pouch is unmarked, but from the same period. All are unissued condition but a bit dusty and dirty from nearly a century of storage. Best set we have had in many years, and almost never found in this condition any more. This year marks the start of the 100th anniversary of WW1, and collector interest is rising (along with prices). The set for $195.00 (View Picture)

18400 U.S. WW1 MESS KIT & UTENSILS - Well above average example of the WW1 mess kit made by Landers, Frary & Clark in 1917 and so marked. Unit mark SI 8 D marked on handle and initials HW scratched on the lid. Knife is the aluminum handle type dated 1917, and the fork is the tinned stamped steel type with a maker mark that is not legible. The spoon is tin coated and unmarked. Typical WW1 style mess gear, although I think the fork and spoon may go back to Span Am or even Indian War styles. A nice set. $49.00 (View Picture)

21110 SCARCE U.S. MODEL 1912 MOUNTED PISTOL BELT WITH SABRE RING AND MAGAZINE POUCH- MINTY! - Belt made by MILLS in April 1918, and pouch by L.C. Chase in 1918. Both are minty. The snap wad added for the magazine pouch in 1917 and earlier pistol belts did not have it. Minty condition, a great item for a WW1 collection. $149.00 (View Picture)

21109 U.S. WW1 PISTOL BELT- NICE! - No maker markings noted, but a very nice old example although there are a couple of snags or loose threads around a few of the grommets. $95.00 (View Picture)

21108 SCARCE U.S. MODEL 1912 MOUNTED PISTOL BELT WITH SABRE RING - This has the curved shape and stitching on the end for the female part of the buckle used during early production, but has the snap for the magazine pocket added in 1917. Two old issue markings on the inside. Used, some soiling but still a very nice example of this scarce belt. Needs a good cleaning but overall VG-fine condition. $125.00 (View Picture)

15431 RARE MODEL 1905 LEATHER SLING FOR M1898 KRAG RIFLE - This virtually unknown sling is listed in the 1905 Pamphlet 1719 “Horse Equipments and Equipments for Officers and Enlisted Men, and quoted on page 434-435 of Brophy’s Springfield 1903 Rifles book, where he inconsistently calls it the Model 1904 and 1905 name. It is described as: “…48 inches long and has three sets of holes at the end opposite the hook for tightening the sling, while that for the [M1903 Springfield] is 50 inches long and has two sets of holes for tightening. Both have 20 holes equally spaced over 22.625 inches of the middle portion of the body to allow adjustment for convenience in carrying the rifle. “ A description of the hook follows and the button, and a statement “The sliding loops pass around both folds of the sling close to the swivels.” This sling, in both the Krag and M1903 rifle version was short lived, replaced in 1906 by a version without any holes past the button, and it was almost immediately replaced by the familiar Model 1907 sling which remains in use to this day. This sling is in rough condition, with the leather flaking badly, and somewhat weak, definitely not for actual use. One extra pair of holes has been added a few inches in from the inner slot for the button, but does not detract much. I do not recall ever seeing another example of this model sling, so for the guy who has to have one of everything, this may be a once in a lifetime opportunity. I am sure I will regret not keeping this for myself, but I’m feeling generous today…. $65.00 (View Picture)

23388 WW2 U.S. NAVY HAMMOCK AND BLANKET - Yes, the Navy still used hammocks on most ships during WW2. The hammock has a canvas body about 36” x 69” and both sets of clew lines are in excellent condition. No markings at all. The wool blanket is white with a blue stripe and U.S. NAVY at each end. Owner’s name V.H. Darling marked near the corner. Hammock is in excellent condition, but blanket has some moth damage, but still displays nicely. Basic hammock design changed little from the earliest days of the U.S. Navy (and indeed from what the Royal Navy had been using since about 1597.) While the U.S. Navy was phasing out hammocks in the 1920s, they remained in use aboard some ships until WW2 and perhaps even later aboard a few ships. Construction is pretty similar on all the examples I could find (for both US and foreign navies). Traditionally sailors slung their hammocks from hooks on the deck beams on the gun deck at night, and in the morning would roll them up and stow them in the hammock nettings atop the bulwarks on the weather deck, where they would provide some added protection during battle, and at least be out of the way during normal ship’s routine. Note that the clew lines are made so that the outer ones are shorter than the inner ones, giving the hammock a nice cup type shape. Some hammock trivia: In the Napoleonic era and earlier, the Royal Navy allowed wives aboard ship, and the command “shake a leg” was used to confirm that hammock occupants were not sailors supposed to be up and about. When a sailor died at sea, they were wrapped in their hammock, a cannon ball placed between their feet and the hammock sewn up with the final stitch taken through the nose tissue (the lack of any response confirming that the sailor was indeed dead!), and then the body was buried at sea. This set came from a WW2 PT Boat sailor, but we are not certain if these were actually used on a PT Boat, or on another U.S. Navy ship, but these are very seldom encountered. This would be a great addition to a display of Naval uniforms or weapons. Hammock and blanket for $185.00 (View Picture)

9120 U.S. M1907 LEATHER SLING- WW1 BRASS HOOK TYPE - Used, very good except dark from old leather treatments. The leather has flex marks and a small amount of minor surface cracking. The leather is pretty flexible. No markings located, but definitely WW1 GI quality and age. One of the keepers is an old replacement with staples instead of the usual sewn construction, but it works okay and looks good enough. There are two spots on the back that look like some white paint or maybe old tape residue that may or may not clean off. This is the standard sling used on the M1903 and M1917 rifles and trench guns during WW1, and also with the M1 Garand during WW2 when all the WW1 slings were used again. $89.00 (View Picture)

23248 WW1 mess kit - Nice example of the classic WW1 mess kit with 1918 date visible on the handle. $35.00 (View Picture)

12291 WW1 Mess kit- with names - Nice example of the classic WW1 mess kit with legible maker JWBM Co. and 1918 date visible on the handle. This one has numerous names and other stuff scratched on the outside, including presumably the owner Harry Walker, and relatives or friends Mickey Walker, and Florence Lowrey; location Lafayette, IND, and (unit number?) F-154. Several minto dents and dings of a used item. The small wire loop for the plate is missing, but the strap that holds it is still in place. $30.00 (View Picture)

21100 RARE U.S. MARINE CORPS MODEL 1912 SWIVEL HOLSTER FOR M1911 .45 AUTOMATIC- WITH MOUNTED PISTOL BELT - From 1912 through 1916 the .45 holsters employed a "drop" and a swivel as the pistol was seen mainly as a weapon for mounted troops. In 1916 the holster was redesigned into the familiar design which is hooked directly below the pistol belt. The few early swivel holsters made were used hard during the Mexican border campaign and in WW1, and survival rate is very small, and we have only had a few over the years, usually in pretty ratty condition. The Marine Corps procured a small fraction of the small number of M1912 Swivel Holsters, and the number surviving is tiny. This is the ONLY one we have ever had. Scott Meadows’ superb U.S. Military Holsters and Pistol Cartridge Boxes describes these on page 363, as differing from the Army pattern by having the USMC instead of US embossed in the oval on the flap, and only one instead of two loopsonteh back for leg straps. He shows an example that also has two rivets pinching the top of the swivel, just below the belt hook. This example has the USMC and single loop, but does not have the rivets at the top, but there is no doubt that it authentic USMC item. COnditoin is well used with the leather soft and the embossing now faint, and hard to photograph, but clearly USMC. The fold on the swivel where it rides on the belt hook is very worn and torn on the ends, but still intact. No maker markings noted (nor are there any in the Meadows example). This comes with a well used and dirty M1910 Mounted Pistol Belt from the WW1 era that can be used to display the holster, and is a freebie to go with it. I know I will regret selling this, but I have too much junque already so out it goes to a new home. $550.00 (View Picture)

23294 SCARCE WW1 ERA CARRYING POUCH FOR VB GRENADE LAUNCHER - Scarce item, although not a scarce as the extremely rare VB launchers themselves. New old stock, unissued, but slightly soiled from 90 years storage. Made at Rock Island in 1920, and so marked on the flap. Have seen less than a handful of these over the years. Will display nicely with some rolled up cardboard inside if you do not have a launcher (yet). $85.00 (View Picture)

22826 WW1 MESS KIT ("Meat Can") - Used G-VG condition with legible 1918 date on the handle and U.S./ JWB maker initials. Probably a veteran of WW1 plus many years of Boy Scout use, with the bottom still black and in need of a good cleaning. Remember, we are coming up soon on the 100th anniversary of the start of WW1. This is the version where the cover has a much deeper dish to the cover. $29.00 (View Picture)

22825 WW1 MESS KIT ("Meat Can") - Used G-VG condition with legible 1918 date on the handle and illegible maker initials. Probably a veteran of WW1 plus many years of Boy Scout use, with the bottom still black and in need of a good cleaning. Remember, we are coming up soon on the 100th anniversary of the start of WW1. This is the version where the cover has only a very shallow dishing, compared to the later ones that had a much deeper dish to the cover. $29.00 (View Picture)

22824 WW1 MESS KIT ("Meat Can") - Used G-VG condition but markings on the handle are illegible. Probably a veteran of WW1 plus many years of Boy Scout use. Remember, we are coming up soon on the 100th anniversary of the start of WW1. $25.00 (View Picture)

17567 U.S. M1907 Leather sling for M1903, M1917 M1 rifles and trench guns - Standard WW1 leather sling as used on the M1903 and M1917 rifles and later on the M1 Garand and combat shotguns. Shows little use, but long storage with lots of Verdi gris green crud built up between the leather and the brass fitting, popping one of the heads off a rivet on the adjusting claw. Brass hooks retain most of the original darkened finish. Leather is stiff, but still reasonably flexible. Overall dirty and needs a good cleaning. Both pieces are marked, the short strap with the Chicago Belting mark in the photo, and the long strap with faint maker initials and inspection initials and looks like 1918 date, but we did not get a photo of those. The two sling keepers are both made using staples instead of the usual sewn construction, and we are not sure if they are GI or someone replaced the originals with commercial types. Will look a lot better after a good cleaning. $135.00 (View Picture)

17525 U.S. MODEL 1917 TRENCH GUN AMMO POUCH FOR 28 ROUNDS (SCARY GOOD REPRO!) - This ultra rare pouch is little known except among advanced collectors, and they bring very step prices when found. Bruce Canfield’s superb U.S. Infantry Weapons of the First World War covers these on page 137. I found one for my collection about 20 years ago, and recently stumbled across another one and was excited to find it. However, after careful scrutiny and examination of some of the seller’s other items, I think this is a very, very good reproduction, or a clever fake meant to deceive. The material texture seems correct, the colors look good, the hardware seems right, but it all feels just a little “too new” to be authentic. The deciding factor is the [alleged] maker markings ink stamped on the inside of the flap: “U.S.M.C./ PHILA DEPOT/Talbert 1917”. I believe these are totally bogus and that the USMC never contracted for any of these, but the faker just had to add that extra sexy USMC tidbit to lure in buyers. Therefore we are selling this as a REPRODUCTION. However, since most collectors will never see, let alone have a chance to own an original, this fills a niche for a neat item to display with a WW1 trench gun, either Remington Model 10 or Winchester Model 97. Super condition pouch, looks like it was made yesterday (and probably was…) but is still a nice addition to a collection. Just as a warning, the same seller had apparently bogus early cartridge belts, suspenders, and other types of web gear. I think it is coming out of India, as the inside of some of the snaps are a bit sloppy compared to originals I have seen, and have a maker name or location that is probably Indian. Be careful out there, not every dealer will tell you something is a reproduction. $125.00 (View Picture)

14451 USMC RIFLE SHARPSHOOTER SHOOTING BADGE- M1936 TO KOREAN WAR STYLE - This Excellent shooting badge is USMC issue pattern of 1936. the style of this one with the pin back style is typical of the Korean War ear. By 1958 they added clutches to the back. Excellent condition and ready for your dress USMC uniform. $25.00 (View Picture)

14450 U.S. Army Marksmanship Qualification Badge- EXPERT with no Bar - What you see is what you get. Pin type fastener. Probably Korean War era. A Marksmanship Qualification Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces presented to service members upon successful completion of a weapons qualification. They are issued in three grades: Expert (a Maltese cross with target circles surrounded by a wreath), Sharpshooter (Maltese cross with target circles in the center), and Marksman (Maltese cross with no circles). Marine Corps and Army recruits cannot exit initial training until a qualification of at least Marksman has been obtained. The Marine Corps only issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for the pistol and rifle, while the Army issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for a variety of weapons, as indicated by a suspended bar beneath the badge. Only three bars are authorized at a time, but the following is a list of current qualifications possible: Qualification bars are authorized for the following weapons (listed with exact inscription): Rifle, Pistol, AA Arty, Auto Rifle, Machinegun, Field Artillery, Tank Weapons, Flamethrower, Submachine Gun, Rocket Launcher, Grenade, Carbine, Recoilless Rifle, Mortar, Bayonet, Small Bore Rifle, Small Bore Pistol, Missile, and Aero-weapons.. Other types were authorized in the past. $10.00 (View Picture)

14449 U.S. Army Marksmanship Qualification Badge- EXPERT with Rifle and Machine Rifle bars - What you see is what you get. Pin type fastener. Probably Korean War era. Missing the small silver loops to connect the bars to the badge. A Marksmanship Qualification Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces presented to service members upon successful completion of a weapons qualification. They are issued in three grades: Expert (a Maltese cross with target circles surrounded by a wreath), Sharpshooter (Maltese cross with target circles in the center), and Marksman (Maltese cross with no circles). Marine Corps and Army recruits cannot exit initial training until a qualification of at least Marksman has been obtained. The Marine Corps only issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for the pistol and rifle, while the Army issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for a variety of weapons, as indicated by a suspended bar beneath the badge. Only three bars are authorized at a time, but the following is a list of current qualifications possible: Qualification bars are authorized for the following weapons (listed with exact inscription): Rifle, Pistol, AA Arty, Auto Rifle, Machinegun, Field Artillery, Tank Weapons, Flamethrower, Submachine Gun, Rocket Launcher, Grenade, Carbine, Recoilless Rifle, Mortar, Bayonet, Small Bore Rifle, Small Bore Pistol, Missile, and Aero-weapons.. Other types were authorized in the past. $12.00 (View Picture)

14448 U.S. Army Marksmanship Qualification Badge- EXPERT with no Bar - What you see is what you get. Pin type fastener. Probably Korean War era. A Marksmanship Qualification Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces presented to service members upon successful completion of a weapons qualification. They are issued in three grades: Expert (a Maltese cross with target circles surrounded by a wreath), Sharpshooter (Maltese cross with target circles in the center), and Marksman (Maltese cross with no circles). Marine Corps and Army recruits cannot exit initial training until a qualification of at least Marksman has been obtained. The Marine Corps only issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for the pistol and rifle, while the Army issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for a variety of weapons, as indicated by a suspended bar beneath the badge. Only three bars are authorized at a time, but the following is a list of current qualifications possible: Qualification bars are authorized for the following weapons (listed with exact inscription): Rifle, Pistol, AA Arty, Auto Rifle, Machinegun, Field Artillery, Tank Weapons, Flamethrower, Submachine Gun, Rocket Launcher, Grenade, Carbine, Recoilless Rifle, Mortar, Bayonet, Small Bore Rifle, Small Bore Pistol, Missile, and Aero-weapons.. Other types were authorized in the past. $10.00 (View Picture)

14447 U.S. Army Marksmanship Qualification Badge- EXPERT with FIELD ARTY. Bar (Sterling) - What you see is what you get. Pin type fastener. Probably Korean War era. A Marksmanship Qualification Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces presented to service members upon successful completion of a weapons qualification. They are issued in three grades: Expert (a Maltese cross with target circles surrounded by a wreath), Sharpshooter (Maltese cross with target circles in the center), and Marksman (Maltese cross with no circles). Marine Corps and Army recruits cannot exit initial training until a qualification of at least Marksman has been obtained. The Marine Corps only issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for the pistol and rifle, while the Army issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for a variety of weapons, as indicated by a suspended bar beneath the badge. Only three bars are authorized at a time, but the following is a list of current qualifications possible: Qualification bars are authorized for the following weapons (listed with exact inscription): Rifle, Pistol, AA Arty, Auto Rifle, Machinegun, Field Artillery, Tank Weapons, Flamethrower, Submachine Gun, Rocket Launcher, Grenade, Carbine, Recoilless Rifle, Mortar, Bayonet, Small Bore Rifle, Small Bore Pistol, Missile, and Aero-weapons.. Other types were authorized in the past. $20.00 (View Picture)

14445 MARKSMANSHIP MEDAL with 6 bars - What you see is what you get. U.S. military with bars for Rifle, Bayonet, Pistol-D, Auto Rifle, Submachine Gun, Carbine. (View Picture)

14444 U.S. Parachute Jump Wings insignia - What you see is what you get. U.S. military parachute jump wings. (View Picture)

7969 U.S. WW1 TRENCH MIRROR THAT FITS ON BAYONET - OD Painted tin case with a swivel bracket on the back. Mirror inside the case, protected by a cover that folds over. Theoretically these could be attached to the end of the bayonet and stuck up so one could observe events out in "no man's land" without getting shot by a sniper. That is the sexy explanation. In reality, I suspect that they were mostly used for shaving, picking lice, and unglamorous stuff like that. First one of these we have had in many years. $65.00 (View Picture)

SMA2432 SLING US M1907 WWI - This is a WWI vintage sling. The sling has brass hardware which was used until late 1942 when it was conserved for higher priority items. The sling is in very good condition with very little stretching but some cracking. The sling is marked but the markings are hard to read. This is the correct sling for the 1903, 1903A3, P17 or M1 Garand rifles. $125.00 (View Picture)

22992 U.S. CAVALRY SPUR COLLECTION- LOT of THREE WITH LEATHERS - Two are pretty close, possibly identical except for the markings. I believe these are the Model 1885 spur with the improvements of 1902 (a small stud on the outside to keep the leathers from slipping). One marked simply R.I.A. and the other R.I.A. over 1903. No idea if the leathers are correct or original, but they have been with these for a long time, and I believe them to be period. The other spur is a single Model 1911 marked US over R.I.A., so all three were made at Rock Island Arsenal. The lot of three spurs with leathers for $125.00 (View Picture)

22990 PAIR OF CAVALRY BOOT HOOKS - Boots have straps on the inside to assist in pulling them onto your feet. Boots are usually snug, and your arms a a bit short, so these handy tools are nearly essential for the cavalryman or other boot wearers to dress themseslves. Black painted wooden handles, and my guess is that they date to circa 1880-1940 period. $8.00 (View Picture)

22980 HORSEY JUNQUE- LEATHER STRAP AND TWO METAL THINGS - What you see is what you get. Someone probably knows what the stuff in the picture is, but I only know that is is cheap at only $5.00 (View Picture)

22839 U.S. MODEL 1909 HOLSTER FOR M1909 OR M1917 REVOLVERS- 1918 DATED - Holster was made in 1918 by Graton & Knight, and so marked on the back. A good representative example that is somewhat dark from leather treatment over the years. These were worn on the right side, butt forward for the traditional cavalry "crossdraw" where the saber could be held with the right hand and the pistol drawn with the left. These continued to be issued throughout WW2, although a later holster was produced then for conventional wear on the right side for right hand draw. A good display piece. These M1909 holsters have just about disappeared from the market in the last couple of years. $125.00 (View Picture)

22808 WW1 BROWNING AUTOMATIC RIFLE (BAR) BANDOLEER- RIGHT SIDE - What you see is what you get. These were made when the BAR was first being introduced, and apparently not retained in service very long as tactical doctrine and the TO&E evolved until the gunner and assistant gunner were the only ones carrying BAR mags, and then in BAR belts. Khaki web bandoleer with three pockets to carry BAR magazines. These were made as both right and left side patterns, and this one is a Right side, made by Plant Brothers in November 1918. Condition is used good. Hard to find WW1 bit of web gear. $55.00 (View Picture)

22434 WW1 U.S. NAVY BATTLESHIP TRENCH ART "HEAVY 1 POUNDER CARTRIDGE- USS MICHIGAN - We do not normally mess with any of the “trench art” cases, most of which were more or less mass produced in small shops, mainly in France. However, this one is pretty unusual. It is almost certainly a shipboard made item, aboard the USS Michigan (BB-27) sometime in 1918 or early 1919. Quite likely the craftsman and/or original owner is shown in the 1918 dated photo of the ship and the crew at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/USS_Michigan_%28Battleship_27%29.jpg (but it was probably not the dog visible in the life ring). The brass case is a common 37 x 137mm rimmed “Heavy 1 Pounder” case of the type used on numerous ships in the early 1900s, and this ship had four of these guns installed. Headstamp is W.MFG CO, 2-1918, 1-Pdr., Lot 69 [anchor] J.B.S. The steel projectile is rusty but should clean up leaving only slight pitting. Unfired copper rotating band is marked on the rotating band EPF and a logo consisting of a crown looking object with H in the center. Overall size about 1.5” by 8.75” length The brass case has a stippled background around a spread eagle perched on a globe with crossed U.S. flags behind. WORLD WAR, U.S.S. MICHIGAN and 4-6-17 - o- 11-11-18 incised into the metal diagonally wrapped around the case. At one time this was used as a lamp or something, as the primer has been drilled out, and the projectile drilled through and the nose (crookedly) drilled and tapped. It would be easy to mount on a base and use it as a flag holder for a Navy display. The brass has a mellow chocolate patina, but if polished this would be a very handsome piece. Sailor folk art has always been fascinating, especially scrimshaw and ropework, but we have only seen a few examples of Navy shell cases turned into decorated “trench art” although thousands of cases were cut down for use as ash trays in the old days before smoking was made unacceptable behavior. U.S.S. Michigan history during WW1 (from Wikipedia): Assigned to Battleship Force 2 on 6 April 1917, the warship escorted convoys, trained recruits, and engaged in fleet maneuvers and battle practice. The battleship suffered two notable accidents, one in September 1916 when a twelve-inch gun of her second turret burst while being fired and the second in January 1918 when her "cage" foremast collapsed during a storm at sea. On 15 January 1918, while steaming in formation with the fleet off Cape Hatteras, Michigan's foremast buckled and was carried away over the port side as the battlewagon lurched violently in the trough of a heavy sea. Six men were killed and 13 injured, five seriously, in this accident. Michigan proceeded to Norfolk where the next day she transferred her casualties to Solace. On 22 January, she entered the Philadelphia Navy Yard for repairs. Early in April, she resumed operations off the East Coast and trained gunners in Chesapeake Bay until World War I ended. $135.00 (View Picture)

22540 U.S. M1907 STYLE LEATHER SLING - Pre-WW2 style with the brass claw hooks. No maker marks noted, but all GI quality construction, except one of the keepers is an incorrect civilian replacement that is not the military sewn construction. Price reflects this, but 99% of the people looking at this would think it is G.I. all the way. $75.00 (View Picture)

22417 U.S. ARMY DECAPPING AND CLEANING TOOLS FOR SMALL ARMS CARTRIDGES- COMPLETE KIT! - About mint unissued, complete with all components, even the original instruction manual dated 1917. Prior to WW1 and again after the War, Army regulations called for fired cartridge cases to be cleaned and repacked into the wood crated and returned to the arsenals where they would be reloaded into blanks, or practice ammunition. With the corrosive primers of the day, it was essential that the cases be cleaned and deprimed promptly to get rid of the extremely corrosive residue from firing. Thus, these kits were widely issued. The main tool is an evolutionary version of a reloading tool which had been used by the Army since the 1880s, differing only in the absence of inspector markings on these 1917 kits and tools. The tools turn up from time to time, and the kits occasionally, but they are usually missing some of the small components. This one is 100% complete, with three of the primer punch pins remaining. The box retains most of its original reddish brown shellac type finish. An exceptionally nice example of a scarce accessory for the Krag or M1903 Springfield collector. (Discussed on pages 176 and 214 of Brophy’s Krag book, and pages 417-419 of his Springfield 1903 Rifles book.) $350.00 (View Picture)

22299 U.S. MODEL 1918 SADDLE SCABBARD FOR M1903 SPRINGFIELDS (NICE!) - Probably the best we have had, not all dark and oil soaked, or squashed flat from poor storage. This one is complete with the correct attaching straps (often missing!) and retains a nice medium brown color and it is open so a rifle will fit in it easily. Some splotchy colors (dang sweaty horses!) and a few scrapes and scratches, but overall pretty nice. Could not locate the usual US/JQMD/1918 or similar markings, but no doubt that it is real, and old. $195.00 (View Picture)

22200 U.S. Model 1903 Cavalry Officer spurs with original straps - These are the last of the regulation spurs with rowels, as the subsequent model went with a stubby sold point instead of rotating rowels. The enlisted version of these was made of bronze, but the officers’ spurs were polished white metal. The inside of this pair, made at Rock Island Arsenal in 1913 are both marked R.I.A./1913/NS, the latter probably indicating Nickel Steel, which they hoped would be more corrosion resistant. Well, hope is not a plan, and the nickel steel does indeed rust, quite a bit, but would probably clean up with some careful scraping of heavier rust clumps and then polishing with fine grit emery cloth or some sort of other abrasive material. Straps are a bit stiff and weak, but original, and easily replaced with new straps. First time we have had any of the Model 1903 spurs. $85.00 (View Picture)

22292 WW1 Medical(?) belt with rimmed eagle snaps - Not sure of the exact designation, or if it is a military issue item, or possibly privately purchased. It has one large pocket flanked by two smaller pockets, each with two rimmed eagle snaps to hold them shut. Belt and buckle as shown in the photos, probably fits about size 30. Back of the large pocket has period ink marking: “Sgt. Bert A. Rhoads, Bat. E. 148th F.A.” Made of lightweight tightly woven cotton type material, very sturdily made. Not sure if this was to hold medical tools, forms, or medical supplies, or perhaps a general purpose belt which could accommodate a flask for whiskey, with other pockets for money, cigarettes, or ??? Some age soiling, but overall fine to excellent. It would be interesting to research the unit and Sgt Rhoads, who may have been from Wyoming. $40.00 (View Picture)

21662 U.S. WW1 HIP HOLSTER FOR M1909 OR M1917 .45 CALIBER DOUBLE ACTON REVOLVERS - What you see is what you get. Made in 1918 by Graton & Knight for use with the Model 1917 Colt or S&W .45 ACP revolvers. Dirty, somewhat stiff, cracked and flaking, but stitching is intact and has the plug and lanyard loop in the tip. While not really suitable for actual use (even by a reenactor) it should clean up a lot and would be okay for a display of WW1 equipment. $45.00 (View Picture)

20430 Scarce Circa 1910-1916 Frankford Arsenal Metal Crate (for Phillips Pack Saddle?) for1200 rounds of .30-06 ammunition - I have never been able to get a positive ID on the exact nomenclature for these, but I believe they were specially made in small numbers for use in the field with the Phillips Pack Saddle. Similar containers had been used earlier for mountain artillery ammunition so the crate would fit on brackets on the saddle, and be pretty sturdy. During the Spanish American War there were lots of complaints about old style wooden ammo crates (basically unchanged since the Civil War) being damaged and the ammo wasted. Circa 1900-1917 the Army shipped small arms ammunition in long, square crates, but in 1917 they adopted a wooden crate (about the same size as this metal one) that continued in use (with changes in markings) until the end of WW2 when smaller crates holding multiple Spam cans or Ammo cans became the normal packing method. This can is painted OD color with the red stripe used to indicate “Ball” ammunition, and also a large Ordnance bomb to help identify the contents at a glance. One side of the crate has a complicated metal cover with a clamp handle to lock it shut. This side is marked: “AMALL ARMS AMMUNITION, CAL. .30, MODEL 1906, 1-14-1916 [date?], and 15 88 C 42 (inventory number?]. The other side is marked: 1200 CAL..30 BALL CARTRIDGES, MODEL 1906 FOR MODEL 1903 RIFLE, P.A. PYRO D.G. .30 CALIBER LOT 364 OF 1915. MUZZLE VELOCITY 2700 FEET PER SECOND. FRANKFORD ARSENAL. Crate retains about 90% of the OD and red paint and markings are nice an clear. The inside of the can has some remnants of a felt type padding material probably used to provide cushioning and some insulation protection. However they also retain moisture so the inside is rusty and there are two small (under ¼” diameter) holes rusted through one panel. There is also some tarry material smeared on one edge that may be waterproofing material over another leak, or maybe Bubba just spilled some on it. These are extremely rare crates, and some likely ended up in France, as well as on the Mexican Border campaigns, with few surviving examples. I have only seen three or four of these in 30+ years of collecting. $135.00 (View Picture)

20505 U.S. MODEL 1910/1918 MESS KIT OR MEAT CAN DATED 1918 - Officially this was first known as a “meat can” intended to hold part of the ration issued to each man, and carried in the “meat can pouch” attached to the back pack. However, it was mainly used as a frying pan for preparing meals, or as a serving piece when going through the chow line to load up with the good stuff “Cookie” had prepared for the unit. The 1918 pattern is a bit deeper than the M1910, but I have a hard time telling them apart. RIA 1918 marking on the handle is just about illegible from the heavy tin plating on the handle. Despite huge numbers made, these have become relatively scarce in recent years. Used excellent. $45.00 (View Picture)

20118 MAGAZINE POUCH FOR PEDERSEN DEVICE - Khaki web construction with pockets to hold five of the special 40 round magazines for the super-secret Pedersen device. Made at Rock Island Arsenal with 1919 date. Mint unissued but with slight storage soiling. These were to be attached to the regular rifle cartridge belt when Pedersen devices were issued and troops would carry both the regular .30-06 and special .30 Pedersen ammo. You can cut some wooden strips to fill the magazine pockets for display (unless you happen to have 5 loose Pedersen device magazines....) $45.00 (View Picture)

20430 Scarce Circa 1910-1916 Frankford Arsenal Metal Crate (for Phillips Pack Saddle?) for1200 rounds of .30-06 ammunition - I have never been able to get a positive ID on the exact nomenclature for these, but I believe they were specially made in small numbers for use in the field with the Phillips Pack Saddle. Similar containers had been used earlier for mountain artillery ammunition so the crate would fit on brackets on the saddle, and be pretty sturdy. During the Spanish American War there were lots of complaints about old style wooden ammo crates (basically unchanged since the Civil War) being damaged and the ammo wasted. Circa 1900-1917 the Army shipped small arms ammunition in long, square crates, but in 1917 they adopted a wooden crate (about the same size as this metal one) that continued in use (with changes in markings) until the end of WW2 when smaller crates holding multiple Spam cans or Ammo cans became the normal packing method. This can is painted OD color with the red stripe used to indicate “Ball” ammunition, and also a large Ordnance bomb to help identify the contents at a glance. One side of the crate has a complicated metal cover with a clamp handle to lock it shut. This side is marked: “AMALL ARMS AMMUNITION, CAL. .30, MODEL 1906, 1-14-1916 [date?], and 15 88 C 42 (inventory number?]. The other side is marked: 1200 CAL..30 BALL CARTRIDGES, MODEL 1906 FOR MODEL 1903 RIFLE, P.A. PYRO D.G. .30 CALIBER LOT 364 OF 1915. MUZZLE VELOCITY 2700 FEET PER SECOND. FRANKFORD ARSENAL. Crate retains about 90% of the OD and red paint and markings are nice an clear. The inside of the can has some remnants of a felt type padding material probably used to provide cushioning and some insulation protection. However they also retain moisture so the inside is rusty and there are two small (under ¼” diameter) holes rusted through one panel. There is also some tarry material smeared on one edge that may be waterproofing material over another leak, or maybe Bubba just spilled some on it. These are extremely rare crates, and some likely ended up in France, as well as on the Mexican Border campaigns, with few surviving examples. I have only seen three or four of these in 30+ years of collecting. $135.00 (View Picture)

19915 U.S. MODEL 1904 SABER ATTACHMENT - (Steffen, Horse Soldier, III, page 210). This is what snapped on the saber chape of the cartridge or waist belt to carry the Model 1860 or Model 1906 Cavalry Saber. Overall excellent condition with legible RIA 1905 markings. The officer attachment was similar but had an extra leather flap behind the snap at the top, to prevent soiling of the uniform. $125.00 (View Picture)

19660 SCARCE WW1 WOODEN FENCING MUSKET MADE AT ROCK ISLAND - Borphy’s book describes these in detail on pages 102-105, along with the other fencing equipment used to teach soldiers the techniques of bayonet fighting. Up until about 1916 the Army converted obsolete trapdoor muskets to “fencing muskets” by cutting them to the length of a M1903 Springfield, removing the sights and hammers, grinding off some other protruding parts, and filling the barrel with lead for proper weight. A bayonet was provided that attached to the barrel and had a leather covered spring steel blade with a blunt tip to avoid injury. By the outbreak of World War One, the Army had adopted a much cheaper and expendable wooden rifle for bayonet training. It was made of a thick, dense wood (similar to mahogany) roughly shaped to the outline of the M1903 rifle with fixed 16 inch bladed bayonet. Several heavy rivets reinforced the butt in two places and the crossguard area of the bayonet to prolong service life. The tip of the bayonet was covered with a padded leather ball, nearly always missing from these. Brophy shows an example marked RIA 1914 but all of the 5 or 6 I have ever seen have only had a tiny ordnance wheel inspector mark. Overall length about 60 inches. This example is about average condition with the padded leather tip missing, and assorted dings and scars. The wood has been drying out for 90 years and the buttstock has numerous age checks or cracks, but it is solid, thanks to the reinforcing rivets. Overall a mellow medium brown patina. Ordnance wheel inspector mark is present. This is a rare M1903 Springfield accessory, or a rare addition to a U.S. bayonet collection. As noted, we have only seen a handful of these, so survival rate is pretty low. $250.00 (View Picture)

19383 WW1 5 ROUND BRASS STRIPPER CLIPS FOR M1903, M1917 AND BAR (LOT OF 12) - .30-06 ammunition for the M1903, and M1917 rifles and the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) was issued in five round stripper clips, packed 12 to a bandoleer (total of 60 rounds). During WW1 the clips ere made from brass, but during WW2 they used steel for the clips (with either steel or brass spring). These were intended as one time use items to be thrown away after stripping their five rounds into the rifle. These are used VG-fine condition, but most will have one of the tiny metal tabs at the end of the spring broken off (and a few may have them broken at both ends). It is easy to make the clips function well again by slightly pinching the ends of the clip with a pair of pliers to provide enough tension to keep the rounds from slipping out accidentally. This is a lot of 12 WW1 brass five round stripper clips, enough to refill one bandoleer. $24.00 (View Picture)

19360 WW1 "T-HANDLE" ENTRENCHING TOOL - The “T-Handle Entrenching tool” was adopted in 1910 and remained in service until replaced by the folding type adopted in 1943. These were made during both WW1 and WW2, and this one is probably WW1 production (based on the serifs on the U and S stampings) but would fill a spot as a representative WW2 model as well since old material was issued as long as it was serviceable. The handle shaft has dried out and split from age. It could still be used (gently) and is fine for display, but not for aggressive digging in under fire. The original paint is long gone and the metal covered with a rusty patina. This could easily be given a coat of OD paint if you wanted to make it look better, and you could even fill up the crack before doing that for even nicer appearance. Fine for living history use, or a collector looking for a bargain. $60.00 (View Picture)

19079 U.S. WW1 MODEL 1910 CONDIMENT CAN - Tin plated container with two large sections having screw caps. One for sugar, the other for coffee, plus a smaller pry-top compartment in one of the caps for salt. This was to carry three days worth of coffee, sugar and salt in a soldier’s backpack. These were used up until the pre-WW2 period when canned or dry rations replaced the previous practice of issuing raw foodstuffs to be prepared by individuals. Although over 6 million of these were made for use in WW1, only a few turn up on the market today. $35.00 (View Picture)

18640 U.S. WW1 DATED CANTEEN, CUP AND COVER - Good representative set, all dated 1918. Well used and about average condition for WW1 gear we find any more. The canteen and cup are both LF&C 1918 marked (Lander, Frary & Clark) with condition as shown in the photo. Cup is absolutely filthy with the remains of Timmy’s last campfire cookout (ptomaine treats of some sort), but will clean up fine. Assorted dents and dings. The cover is marked Brauer Bros. Mfg. Co. 10-18 with legible US on the front. Faint red letters and a rust stain on the back and one small hole in the seam on the back, but still displays nicely. The whole set for $79.00 (View Picture)

18564 U.S. Model 1907 leather sling - Used, fine, but stiff and somewhat dry with age and some cracking. Blackened brass hooks typical of all the WW1 slings and some of the WW2 slings. No markings that we could see, so it may be GI, or a commercial equivalent. Would look good on a more used rifle with 60-80% finish. $65.00 (View Picture)

18178 U.S. WW1 WEB GEAR LOT- HAVERSACK, GAS MASK BAG & PERSONAL GEAR BAG - Lot of three items that have been together for decades and presumably from a single doughboy. The M1910 haversack comes with the early meat can pouch with the button on the flap. Maker LONG 2-18 stenciled inside. The strap arrangement on the back has been modified by removing the center strap that hooks to the eyelet in the center of the adjusting section of the waist belt, and also the diagonal strap and snap from both of the shoulder strap ends. This will still display nicely but will not ride properly for reenactor use. The gas mask bag has a name than has been inked over, but looks like it might be L. SLATER [or BLAIR?], 301, T.A.T., AEF, FRANCE. This is the bag and strap only, minus the usually dry rotted, decayed and smelly gas mask itself. Also included is a non-regulation personal effects roll with an old shaving brush still in it. These were for carrying personal stuff conveniently. The whole lot for $95.00 (View Picture)

18168 WW1 GRENADE VEST/ Trench gun ammo vest - Mint unissued, with ten pockets with snap flaps on the front. Wide neck strap and two sets of ties to secure it around the body. (Straps and ties were rolled up and stuffed in the pockets, just as it left the factory, but removed for the photo.) These were used in WW1 for carrying hand or rifle grenades (the VB type) and there are photos showing these being worn in WW2 by troops with trench guns. This one has no maker markings. $50.00 (View Picture)

17856 U.S. Model 1910 Haversack (Backpack)- complete - This is a good complete outfit, with the very hard to find pack tail (“diaper”) and the leather connecting strap and also the meat can pouch. The upper parts are all similar shades of khaki and look “salty” from use, while the tail is nearly new in greenish khaki. Quartermasters made no effort to match colors during the war, they just issued whatever was on hand. Overall good condition with no obvious repairs or damage, and good clear markings, but there are some stains and rust stains, mainly on out of sight areas. Haversack made by Plant Brothers & Company in August 1918. Meat can pouch is unmarked but has the WW1 style button flap instead of s buckle. Tail was made by Standard in 1942 and may technically be the M1928, but I am not sure how to tell the difference. Will be great for a WW1 collection even though the tail is dated later, or for a WW2 collection as they reissued all the old gear again. This is the only COMPLETE M1910 haversack set we have had in several years. $195.00 (View Picture)

17540 U.S. MODEL 1910/1918 MESS KIT OR MEAT CAN - Officially this was first known as a “meat can” intended to hold part of the ration issued to each man, and carried in the “meat can pouch” attached to the back pack. However, it was mainly used as a frying pan for preparing meals, or as a serving piece when going through the chow line to load up with the good stuff “Cookie” had prepared for the unit. The 1918 pattern is a bit deeper than the M1910, but I have a hard time telling them apart. This one is marked on the tin plated handle US/LF&C (Landers Frary & Clark)/ and illegible date. I think it is the shallower M1910 design, but it may be the M1918. The aluminum pan and cover are in excellent condition on the outside, with an almost polished finish. The inside has a lot of scratches (from cutting up the food? or light pitting, but still at least VG condition. Inside of the cover is neatly stamped “133/ BASE HOSPITAL No. 1” and the back of the frying pan part has a lightly scratched cube design with initials D.A. (Pvt. Dumb A??) Despite huge numbers made, these have become relatively scarce in recent years. $45.00 (View Picture)

17518 SCARCE FIRST PATTERN M1903 CARTRIDGE BELT RIMLESS EAGLE SNAPS BY RUSSELL - (Dorsey Belts pp 4-7) This is the early cartridge belt issued with the M1903 Springfields. This style belt was made by both Mills and Russell, using the patented woven style construction. The first pattern belts had narrow tips on the ends with short brass tabs, marked with Mills patent info if made by them, or unmarked (as these are) when made by Russell. Some of the very earliest belts were flat at the bottom of the pocket, but after adoption of the .30-06 cartridge with the pointed bullets, the pocket design was modified to reinforce the bottoms of the pockets by “puckering” them to make them stronger. Eventually Mills reinforced the lower portion of the woven material with added threads in addition to the puckering. This is a near excellent example except for a small amount of fraying and period repairs between the first and second pockets on the left side (see photos). This one is unit marked to the 1st New York infantry and may have been in service during WW1. These early belts are scarce, and often in poor condition when found, so this one is a real find. $295.00 (View Picture)

17383 U.S. MODEL 1918 SADDLE SCABBARD FOR M1903 SPRINGFIELD - 1917 dated Semi-legible DUNCAN- 1917 maker and date markings. Old unit marks by the open end, but illegible. Leather is fairly flexible, but has lots of cracking along the folded edge and some scuffing and flaking. Unlike most of these, this one has both straps including the attaching hooks. Overall about good-very good condition, a good representative example to go with any WW1 era cavalry collection.v $165.00 (View Picture)

17248 U.S. Army Ammunition Crate circa 1920s-1940s - Nice box that has had the stenciled markings painted over so I cannot tell for sure exactly what it originally held. I believe these were more or less a standard size and used with various types of pistol and rifle ammunition. Inside dimensions about 14” x 11” x 6” and outer dimensions about 12 3/4” x 16 ¾” x 7 ¾”. Use of the handhold cuts in the ends instead of adding on wooden cleats seem to have taken place around WW1. Overall VG condition except for one corner of the lid which is worn quite a bit. Complete with the tin liner (with top removed so they could remove the contents). All six of the screw posts are present, but there are no wing nuts. Can easily be repainted for whatever type of contents you like in a display. $40.00 (View Picture)

16855 U.S. MODEL 1910/1918 MESS KIT OR MEAT CAN DATED 1918 w - Officially this was first known as a “meat can” intended to hold part of the ration issued to each man, and carried in the “meat can pouch” attached to the back pack. However, it was mainly used as a frying pan for preparing meals, or as a serving piece when going through the chow line to load up with the good stuff “Cookie” had prepared for the unit. The 1918 pattern is a bit deeper than the M1910, but I have a hard time telling them apart. This one is marked on the tin plated handle US/WSCo/1918 (I don’t know that maker’s name). The cover has unit marks 361 F 188 stamped on it. The aluminum pan and cover are in VG-fine condition. Despite huge numbers made, these have become relatively scarce in recent years. $40.00 (View Picture)

16854 U.S. MODEL 1910/1918 MESS KIT OR MEAT CAN DATED 1918 - Officially this was first known as a “meat can” intended to hold part of the ration issued to each man, and carried in the “meat can pouch” attached to the back pack. However, it was mainly used as a frying pan for preparing meals, or as a serving piece when going through the chow line to load up with the good stuff “Cookie” had prepared for the unit. The 1918 pattern is a bit deeper than the M1910, but I have a hard time telling them apart. This one is marked on the tin plated handle US/[maker illegible]/1918. The aluminum pan and cover are in VG condition. Despite huge numbers made, these have become relatively scarce in recent years. $40.00 (View Picture)

16602 U.S. Model 1918 saddle scabbard for M19093 Springfield - Legible L-F Co/ 10-18 maker and date markings. Leather is fairly flexible, but has lots of cracking along the folded edge and some scuffing and flaking. No straps, but the loops are intact so you could add straps if you like. (However, these display better without the straps and they store/ship a lot easier without the straps as well!) Overall say about good condition. $95.00 (View Picture)

16671 U.S. WW1 M1916 HOLSTER FOR M1911 .45 PISTOL MADE BY BOYT - This is a WW1 era holster, made by Boyt and so marked on the back along with the inspector initials used during WW1. It was made in russet leather color, but it has a coat of black polish or poorly done dye, probably applied after the 195 change in regulations specified that holsters should be black. I doubt if this could be returned to a brown color, but maybe someone who works with leather knows how to do that. Otherwise you might as well throw some more black polish on it and make it look good. Pretty nice shape except for the color problem. $75.00 (View Picture)

16602 U.S. Model 1918 saddle scabbard for M19093 Springfield - Legible L-F Co/ 10-18 maker and date markings. Leather is fairly flexible, but has lots of cracking along the folded edge and some scuffing and flaking. No straps, but the loops are intact so you could add straps if you like. (However, these display better without the straps and they store/ship a lot easier without the straps as well!) Overall say about good condition. $95.00 (View Picture)

16475 U.S. ARMY WW1 OD WOOL STANDING COLLAR COAT (BLOUSE/TUNIC) - I believe this is the Model 1911 with the very high standing collar, and four patch pockets. This does not have the grommets on the collar for the discs, but there was a lot of variation in these uniforms due to constantly changing specifications. No markings except for name “REDD” inked inside the coat on both sides (although only one shown in the photos). Probably about size 36 but no guarantee that is correct. Overall VG-fine except for some moth holes in the lower left pocket (see photo). Buttons are blackened bronze with rims on the small buttons and no rims on the edges of the large buttons. $95.00 (View Picture)

16128 WW1 era M1912 Pistol belt- - Khaki web, with no maker markings. Well used and there is a lot of fraying on the edges revealing the white cotton inner core of the webbing there. $25.00 (View Picture)

16120 U.S. Model 1912 Horse Brush for cavalry or horse artillery - (Steffen, Horse Soldier III, 248) Russet leather with US and Herbert Brush Mfg. Co. maker name marked on the flat part (earlier models had the US on the strap). Leather in near excellent condition with bristles in good shape as well. Nice for display with any cavalry display, although technically correct only for 1912 and later. Of course, this would also be a nice gift for your mother in law or soon to be ex-wife to improve their grooming and hygiene. $50.00 (View Picture)

15895 U.S. ARMY WOOL BLANKET WW1 (Nice!) - This is one made under the Quartermaster Department Specification No. 1255 of October 16, 1917, the first wartime specification issued. The blanket continued to be olive drab color as used since 1904, however, the olive brown border stripes at the ends and “US” brand in the center were dropped. The quality of the material used in the blanket dropped as the specification permitted the use of up to 35% wool substitute and shoddy in the blanket. This produces a noticeably coarser type weave and thicker feel than the higher quality blankets made during peacetime. The weight of the blanket was specified as 3 pounds to 3 pounds 4 ounces. Size was a nominal 7’ to 7’ 3” by 5’ to 5’ 3”. A cloth label was to be stitched in a corner, with the name of the contractor, contract date, the depot, and a blank for the inspector, but as is almost always the case, this has been removed years ago. Overall excellent condition except for a few small and widely scattered moth holes, so it almost displays as new. This is the best of the few WW1 blankets we have encountered. $125.00 (View Picture)

15828 U.S. WW1 MESS KIT - 1918 dated. Overall fine-exc condition. One of the nicer examples we have had, and starting to become hard to find. Looks like the markings are LF&C/1918 and that the Universal marks were added later, perhaps for marketing to the civilian market. $40.00 (View Picture)

15750 WW1 GRENADE VEST/ Trench gun ammo vest - Mint unissued, with ten pockets with snap flaps on the front. Wide neck strap and two sets of ties to secure it around the body. (Straps and ties are still rolled up and stuffed in the pockets, just as it left the factory, and thus not visible in the photo.) These were used in WW1 for carrying hand or rifle grenades (the VB type) and there are photos showing these being worn in WW2 by troops with trench guns. This one was made by N.H. Co in May 1918. $65.00 (View Picture)

15717 U.S. SADDLE SCABBARD MODEL 1904 FOR KRAG OR M1903 - Issued for use with either Krag carbines or with M1903 rifles. These were standard item used in the Mexican Border campaign, and in WW1 even after the M1918 scabbard was adopted. Probably the best of this model we have had in the last 10 years or so. Visible markings LAD/1918/C.H.[?] and final inspector initials H.W. Medium brown leather is nice and supple with some scuffing and staining. The loops for the suspension straps are intact and one strap (the upper?) is in place, lacking the snap hook. Overall used about fine with all stitching intact and no modifications. $225.00 (View Picture)

15110 MCKEEVER .30 CALIBER CARTRIDGE BOX – 30th Infantry marked - Nice brown leather overall fine-excellent condition. The McKeever boxes were mainly used for garrison or parade or guard duty, while the Mills loop or pocket belts were used for active campaigning in the field. End is marked in the regulation fashion 30/ D/ 44 and in addition there is a neat ink stamping “Co. D/ 30th Infantry/ No. 44” the only example of such a double marking we have seen. Since the box was made at Rock Island Arsenal in 1908 it probably was issued to the 30th Infantry in 1909 when they returned to The Presidio of San Francisco from several years service in the Philippines, where they remained until departing for France in 1917. Overall fine to excellent condition except the closing tab is cracked and weak. $125.00 (View Picture)

14917 RARE M1903 CARTRIDGE BELT BY MILLS- FIRST MODEL- RIMLESS EAGLE SNAPS - The classic woven design with puckered bottoms to the pockets, but without the extra heavy thread use at the bottom which was added after adoption of the pointed spitzer bullet in 1906. This has the narrow ends on the adjusting tabs on the back, and lacks the internal pocket divider found on some later belts. Overall Very good condition, with just a tiny bit of fraying starting on the fold of two or three pocket flaps, and some water staining and dirt around the buttons. Old Infantry unit marks have been painted over with khaki paint, readying it for re-issue at some point long ago. We find an eagle snap belt once every few years, and this is the only first model (correct for the M1903 while still in its Rod Bayonet configuration) we have had in at least 10 years, and it is in far better condition than we usually find any of the early M1903/1907 belts. I should probably keep this one for my own collection! $395.00 (View Picture)

13835 Pre-1910 "T-HANDLE" ENTRENCHING TOOL - Different from any other I have ever encountered, but clearly part of the M1910 family. The blade has sharply sloping surfaces on both sides of the extension for the handle, and that is much longer and stronger than the usual M1910. The extension is marked US (in an italic style). Has been repainted several times, but overall VG-excellent. For the advanced collector this a probably a real prize. $149.00 (View Picture)

13751 WW1 CANTEEN, CUP AND COVER - A very nice representative example for your doughboy outfit, or early WW2 period. Cover has clear 1917 date. Cup is 1918 dated. Canteen is unmarked, but definitely US GI item with the WW1 era aluminum cap. One small hole on the side of the cover that does not detract from overall appearance. Some Boy Scout wrote his name and Troop 4 on the front of the cover long, long ago, and it has faded nearly completely away, but is still visible on close inspection. Nice set, not minty, but typical well used gear as it appeared in the field. $65.00 (View Picture)

13433 WW1 STYLE U.S. MODEL 1907 SLING - Typical WW1 construction as used up to early WW2 with brass hardware. Leather is somewhat stiff with cracking and minor flaking expected of a used sling 50 years old. A good representative example, but probably not suitable for regular use. No markings visible, but definitely GI quality item. $125.00 (View Picture)

13193 SCARCE U.S. NAVY MILLS CARTRIDGE/PRIMER BELT WITH COVERED POCKETS CIRCA WW1 - Typical Mills woven construction with cartridge loops woven in place. This also has a cover flap woven in, with a blackened brass Navy eagle/anchor snap at both ends, and on a securing strap in the middle. Blackened (actually more a blue color) on the end tabs and closure hardware. Inside of the female snap for the button had 1907 patent date, so these post date 1907. Although usually described as cartridge belts for landing party use, I am convinced that they are actually primer belts for the gun captains to wear for use with the bag type guns that used a separate primer. These primers are essentially the same size as a .45-70 cartridge case and will fit in the belt perfectly, while the belt height would allow a longer cartridge to hang down below the bottom of the belt. (This is true for the .45-70 cartridge, but by 1907 the Krag had been reissued to the Navy and the M1903 rifles were soon forthcoming, both of which used cartridges longer than the .45-70 and used tapered loops, which this does not have. The only plausible explanation for a .45-70 size loop on a waist belt after 1907 would be for primers.) These would have been used by some Marines as traditionally the Marine Detachment also manned one or more gun mounts. Condition of this rare belt is excellent with the exception of three or four small spots of dirt/soiling from storage. $525.00 (View Picture)

11962 WW1 M1912 PISTOL BELT (EXCELLENT) - A really great example of the WW1 version of the M1912 pistol belt having the snap for the magazine pouch added in 1917. This has the curved shape and stitching on the female part of the buckle used during early production. Unmarked, but unmistakable. and the nicest one of these we have had in several years. $150.00 (View Picture)

11507 USMC WW1 M1910 HAVERSACK - Made by Rock Island Arsenal in 1918. Instantly recognizable as USMC issue due to the green color which was used to dye much USMC web gear during and shortly after WW1. [Note- One collector whose opinons I highly respect disagrees with this attribution of the green died items to USMC use, but I politely disagree. I just wanted to make sure you know differing opinions exist.] Classic WW1 doughboy infantry pack which has straps and snaps to connect it to the cartridge belt. The haversack is what most people call the "pack". Two other pieces made up the complete rig- (1) the meat can ("mess kit") pouch attached to the outside of the flap, over the entrenching tool and (2) the "pack carrier" sometimes called a "diaper" which attaches to the bottom of the haversack but was often thrown away. Two of the snap hooks that attach to the belt are slightly incorrect replacements (WW2 steel instead of WW1 bronze). Used VG-fine with some light stains and storage soiling. $135.00 (View Picture)

11373 WW1 TRENCH MIRROR - OD Painted tin case with a swivel barcket on the back. Mirror in the case. Theoretically these could be attached to the end of the bayoent and stuck up so one could observe events out in "no man's land" withot getting shot by a sniper. That is the sexy explanation. In reality, I suspect that theyw ere mostly used for shaving, picking lice, and unglamorous stuff like that. All that I have seen in the past had a cover that would close over the mirror, but his one has no provisions for that. A rare variation for the truly obsessed collector. $39.00 (View Picture)

10879 WOOD AMMO BOX FOR M1909 BENET MERCIE MACHINE GUN - Construction is similar to the later M1917 wood ammo box for the M1917 Browning, but instead of opening on the narrow top, the box lies flat and the largest side opens. Inside are slots for six feed strips and for some sort of pasteboard or thin wood partitions. About 75% of the OD paint remains on the outside of the box. The lid does not latch properly as it has warped slightly, but a bit of sanding could eliminate the problem if that bothers you. Only one of these we have ever encountered and only able to identify it from photos in Bruce Canfield's U.S. Infantry Weapons of WW1 page178. With only 670 of the guns originally made, only a few of the guns have survived and even fewer of the proper ammo boxes to accompany them. $350.00 (View Picture)

10784 U.S. MODEL 1911 SPURS FOR OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN (WITH ALL STRAPS) - (Steffen, Horse Soldier III, 248) No maker or inspection marks, but unit issue marks are on the spur of one. Has all four original leather straps are included, although weak and not suitable for actual use. These were used from 1911 until the end of the horse cavalry, and I believe that some armor and air assault cavalry units continue (without official sanction) to wear spurs on some occasions to honor their cavalry lineage. Overall VG-fine. $95.00 (View Picture)

10803 U.S. M1917 mounted canteen cover, & cup - A nice WW1 rig with good maker marking LONG 12-17 on inside of the right flap. Cup is LF&C 1918 marked but canteen is not marked, but absolutely WW1 GI issue. Leather strap with snap hook for attachment to saddle is in excellent condition. Cover is dirty but otherwise looks great, although it is dry and the canvas is a bit weak. One small rip on the back of the right flap. The female lift the dot snap on the left flap is starting to pull out. Displays nicely, but needs to be handles with care. $95.00 (View Picture)

10740 WW1 M1917 TRIPLE POUCH FOR M1917 REVOLVERS (REPRODUCTION) - Three pockets, each holding two half moon clips of .45 ACP ammo. This was unique to the M1917 revolvers, and while never common, they have about vanished. Originals are now selling at $125 and more, so we were glad to be able to get these superb quality reproductions which we can sell for less than half that. Exact reproduction with every detail correct, except not maker marked. (We have marked inside of the belt loop "REPRO" so people will be able to tell the difference. These are made by our friends at American Patrol Company who do superb work on all sorts of repro web gear, and provided much of the gear used by Band of Brothers, Windtalkers, Saints & Soldiers, etc.) Free shipping on these either ordered singly or with other items. Two or more $50 each, or buy one for $55.00 (View Picture)

10499 WW1 CANTEEN AND COVER (NO CUP) - Canteen is in fine condtition with sharp US 1918 ACA markings. Cover is okay, but needs to have a rip near one seam on the back sewed up. Several worn spots on the bottom. Khaki color, with maker markings, but cannot tell if it is WW1 or WW2 date. $39.00 (View Picture)

10687 LEATHER KEEPERS FOR MILITARY SLINGS - New made, good quality workmanship using tan leather with double row stitching, just like the originals, not cheap stapled or riveted junk. Two were used on the M1907 leather slings. (Will also work on the M1885 slings for Krags or Trapdoors). $2.00 each, or 3 for $5.00 or 20 for $25.00 postage included. $0.00 (View Picture)

10501 U.S. Model 1912 Horse Brush for cavalry or horse artillery - (Steffen, Horse Soldier III, 248) Russet leather with US and maker name marked on the flat part (earlier models had the US on the strap). Bristles in good shape and leather pretty nice as well. Nice for display with any cavalry display, although technically correct only for 1912 and later. Of course, this would also be a nice gift for your mother in law or soon to be ex wife. $49.00 (View Picture)

9658 U.S. WW1 ERA TRENCH ART/SOUVENIR 37X93MM CARTRIDGE CASE AND PROJECTILE - A fairly common round, this is French made, dated 9-18 on the headstamp. Markings have been added all over using the standard GI marking dies (intended for mess kits, dog tags, etc). Base is stamped PLAINVIEW, TEXAS which may be the soldier's hometown, or perhaps the location of the camp where this was made. Rotating band of the projectile is marked TROY E. COOPER R-3,061,558 U.S.A. The neck of the case is stamped T.E. COOPER HOWITZER CO., and just above the rim, 19th INF, CAMP SHERMAN, JULY 27, 1921. It would be nice to research and learn more about Mr. Cooper. This type cartridge was used in both a French gun, and also in an American Model 1916 37mm gun that could be man carried into the field, and shows up frequently in WW1 photos. INERT, no explosive components. $45.00 (View Picture)

8277 U.S. M1910 "T" HANDLE ENTRENCHING SHOVEL - US marked on the handle and the haft of the blade. About 20% OD paint left on the metal parts, but almost none on the wood except in the pores of the grain. Nice mellow smooth finish. Just a bit of rust near the tip. Repainting is your decision, but it displays nicely as is. $59.00

7867x WW1/WW2 U.S. ARMY WOODEN TENT PEGS - Set of five, enough for one shelter half as carried by the doughboy and GI. Old originals which range from used VG to unissued old stock. Once fairly common, these are now pretty hard to find. $25.00 (View Picture)

5878 U.S. WW1 WATERING BUCKET - Khaki canvas with rope handle (covered with canvas, and rope supports across the botton. Marked on bottom KEMPER-THOMAS COMPANY 5-1918. Excellent condition. Ready to haul water for your comrades in the trenches, or your cavalry mounts, or whatever. (actual use is not recommended due to age of the canvas). Believe this was adopted about 1910-1912 for use by both cavalry and artillery units.(Steffen, Horse Soldier vol 3, fig 372a) $40.00 (View Picture)

4414 US M1904 Leather Rifle Scabbard- This is type with the brass ring where the lower strap attaches.  These were used with both Krag carbines and M1903 rifles up thru WW1.  Used about good condition, with leather fairly flexible, but minor repairs made over the years (some neat restitching, one rivet replaced).  Two loops for upper strap are torn, and a small hole (about 1/8" dia) neatly drilled near the lower strap loops, and another small hole near the tip  Defects not really apparent unless you look fairly closely.  Inexpensive example of one of the harder to find scabbards.  As usual, the mounting straps are missing.  No markings that I could find.  Okay representative example.  $65.00

1707 U.S. M1916 WW1 .45 Holster - Marked on back "S.&R.Co./1917/L.N.O." Unit marks on frontwith stamping dies as used on cavalry scabbards "CT 2030". On back owner scratched "A.B./1th [sic] B./C.T.". Medium brown leather very supple., Stitches at tip cut and plug removed, but looks fine, Good item for reenactor. Meaning of markings unknown, but I suspect cavalry unit of some sort. $40.00

2233 U.S. Saddle Scabbard Model 1904 Issued for use with either Krag carbines or with M1903 rifles. These were standard item used in the Mexican Border campaign, and in WW1 until the M1918 scabbard was adopted. The M1904 has the brass ring by the lower strap location. This is a good example, brown leather with all stitching intact. Leather cracking in some places, but overall stiff with god shape, not squashed flat like so many. Missing both straps to attach to saddle. Markings not visible. One section (approx 3"x4") has shows depression from storage under heavy object and is darker than surrounding area. Not a big deal, but just ugly enough you want to know about it BEFORE you order and avoid surprises. I think this is the side that goes against the horse anyway. $89.00 (View Picture)

1267 U.S. M1907 Leather sling Dirty and stiff, well used, need cleaning and treatment with Lexol or Pecard.  Some had maker/inspector marks and dates, but only have unmarked ones left.  All came from same box of slings turned in for storage in 1945, just as they were taken off the rifles.  $65.00 each

1234DN8 U.S. M1912 MOUNTED Pistol Belt w/ Sabre Chape (that is the little loop that the sabre hooks on).Unmarked, khaki, discolored or stained in spots. One frayed spot (about 1/4" at top in back). Belt shown in Dorsey's Belt book p. 65, but has second style closure (outwards angled) as shown on p. 64. $45.00


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