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# 2360 - Bayonet- British Pattern 1907- MOLE
10/30/1999
Charles, Avon, CT, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown N/A N/A Unknown Unknown

1907MOLE I have a bayonet with a 17" blade. It has markings "1907" and "MOLE" under the "1907". Can you tell me anything about it and what it may be worth? It is in very good condition.

Answer:
Charles- The British Pattern 1907 bayonets for the No. 1 Mark III rifles were made by a number of makers and value is generally rather modest- $40-75. However, several makers are very rare, and Mole is one of the most sought after makers. I do not have my reference book handy to get exact production numbers, but think this would probably retail in the $150-300 range. If you want us to help find it a good home, we can help.


# 2364 - Winchester 94
10/30/1999
BOB, Alberta, Canada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 Rifle 32-40 24'' Refinished Blue 183000

This gun has a bore like a stovepipe but will outshoot my modern94 30-30. Was factory ammo circa 1900 smokeless? What would this gun be worth U.S. dollars?

Answer:
Bob- The Winchester 1894 was the first offered as specially made for smokeless powders, but I am not certain when the .32-40 smokeless loading became the preferred loading. With a stovepipe bore, in a relatively unpopular .32-40 caliber, and refinished to boot this probably would wait a long time for a buyer at $150-250. Keep it as long as you can. Canada seems to be incrementally outlawing all types of firearms anyway. John Spangler


# 2422 - Hopkins & Allen Question
10/30/1999
Mark, Quincy, IL.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hopkins & Allen Unknown 32 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Double action, Center fire. made in Norwich, Conn. I cannot find any information, prices, value, etc. Would anyone know about this pistol?

Answer:
Mark, you gave me little to go by, a model might have been helpful, but in this case I am still able to answer your question. Hopkins & Allen was a manufacturer of cheap Saturday night special type firearms. Collector interest in firearms manufactured by Hopkins & Allen is low to nonexistent, value will not be much over $50.00. Marc


# 2335 - Availability Of Parts
10/26/1999
Anonymous

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Inland M2 30 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am interested in finding part for my M2 Carbine and am looking for the following replacement parts (preferably manufactured by Inland, but will consider parts by other manufacturers): Trigger Housing M2 (complete assembly if available) Disconnector Block Slide M2 and original WW2 Manufactured Bayonet to complement my rifle. Thank you for your assistance.

Answer:
Anonymous- The only M2 parts we have are listed on our accessories and parts page. I trust you are familiar with the laws regarding possession of a carbine with either M2 parts, or marked M2. If not, the bottom line is you can be in big trouble if it is not registered with the BATF. Cannot register it now. If it was not done basically by 1968 it is now illegal contraband. Gotta follow the rules. John Spangler


# 2334 - Bolt Action 16 GA
10/26/1999
Tony

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J.C. Higgins 58314 16 GA Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a J.C. Higgins 16 gauge bolt action , holds 6 rounds. Model 58314. Just want to know how old this is, & how much it is worth. THANKS....... Tony

Answer:
Tony- Hate to give you bad news, but (a) very few people want a 16 gage shotgun at any price. (b) Very few people want a bolt action shotgun at any price. While it may be a well made and reliable old gun, the market value is whatever you can get for it. $25-50 is probably about all, and that may take a while. Good luck. John Spangler


# 2329 - Springfield " Trapdoor " Rifle
10/26/1999
Dana, Freer, TX, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Model 1878 US Springfield 45/70 26" Wood Stock W/Cleaning Rod Unknown

1878 Model Stamped on Gun US Springfield Engraved w/Eagle holding arrows The letter "U" stamped on the barrel A stamp with 1884 and written initials that look like S/VP or WVP Breech Loader with Cleaning Rod Can you give me an idea of when this gun was used and if any wars. How old might the gun be? I am unable to see any kind of serial number. Any information on the gun that you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Dana- You may have a treasure, or most likely not. The markings are pretty much standard for all the Springfield "trapdoor" rifles and carbines.

I do not know how you measured the barrel length, but the correct way to measure on all cartridge rifles is from the face of the closed bolt or breech to the end of the barrel. However, the usual barrel length choices are 32.6" for the standard infantry rifle, 29.5" for the cadet rifle, and 22" for the carbine. Some experimental carbines were made with 24" barrels and experimental rifles with 28" barrels. Some shotguns were made with 26" barrels, but were marked 1881 on the breechblock. All of these had serial numbers on the back of the receiver. One last possibility is a very scarce "Officer's model" made with 26 inch barrel but no serial numbers visible. These were extensively engraved and had checkered stocks and a wooden cleaning rod. I my opinion they are the most beautiful rifles ever made at Springfield. Others agree and values for these are in the "big bucks" category, many times that of the other types. Of course, you may have a rifle that was cut down at some point and not a treasure at all, but perhaps a fun gun to shoot (if approved by a competent gunsmith). Send us some photos and we can help tell for sure. I have been looking for an Officer's model for my collection, so PLEASE let me know if it is for sale. John Spangler


# 2322 - Old .22 Rifle
10/26/1999
Scott

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Continental Arms Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have an older .22 rifle and I would like some information if possible. On the barrel it reads, Continental Arms Company-1933, at the beginning of the barrel it also reads S-LR-L which I know means Short, Long rifle, and Long cartridges, and it works with these shells. It is a single shot rifle, the buttplate is blued, it loads from the top of the barrel. It is in good condition. If you could tell what its value is that would be great and any other information that you can find. Scott

Answer:
Scott- I can find two listings for Continental Arms Co. The earlier is for a Norwich Conn. outfit that made cheap revolvers around 1860. The later is for a Belgian outfit that made very high quality double barrel rifles for African Safaris, probably in the post WW2 period. I cannot tell you anything specific on your rifle, but it sounds like it might have been one made in Europe, probably Belgium and imported and sold through Sears Roebuck or other outfit. I suspect the value is rather modest, like well under $100. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2330 - Commercial? Walther PPK
10/23/1999
Scott, Mesa, AZ, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther PPK .32 Unknown blue 378984 k

Eagle over n, on slide and on ejector. Waffenfabrik Walther, Zella-Mehlis(fhur). Walthers Patent Cal 7.65 mm. mod.ppk is written on left side, I just got the pistol and know little about it, and was wondering how old the gun is and maybe what it is worth. Some of the blue is worn from going in and out of a holster. Any info. would be appreciated.

Answer:
Scott, due to the absence of any military markings in your description, I think that you have a commercial Walther PPK that was manufactured between 1939 and 1945. Walther model PPK was introduced in 1930, as a smaller more easily concealed version of the Walther Model PP. The initials 'PPK' stand for 'Polizei Pistole, Kriminal', referring to its intended use by the Kripo, or Kriminal Polizei which was the detective branch of the German police force. Commercial PPK pistols were manufactured in Germany from 1930 to 1945 and PPK's were procured by the German military form 1940 to early 1945. The eagle over N markings that you describe are found on both commercial and military PPK pistols, they are a German commercial test proof whose design was set forth in the National Proof Law of June 7, 1939. If your PPK was procured by the military there should be a military acceptance stamp (eagle over 359 or eagle over WaA359) located on the left hand side of the frame to the rear of the trigger and also one on the left side of the slide just forward of the slide grip. Police PPK's have a police acceptance stamp (eagle over an x in a circle with a "C" or an "F" to the right) located on the left side of the frame to the rear of the trigger. It is usually difficult to sell a commercial .32 caliber PPK for much more than $350. Marc


# 2320 - Thames Arms Co.
10/23/1999
Heather

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Thames Arms Company Unknown 32 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello, My husband owns a 1902, 32 Caliber 5 shot pistol, manufactured by Thames Arms Company Norwich CT. U.S. Patent Sept 2 & 30 1902. I looked up the company while surfing and nothing came up, would you be able to assist in how much this particular pistol is worth? Thank you so much for you time.

Answer:
Heather- The only info I could find on Thames Arms Co. is that they made cheap revolvers circa 1900. Harrington and Richardson used Thames as a brand name on some of their products later, so I suspect that Thames got absorbed by H&R. The "cheap revolvers" made in 1898 or earlier have some interest as decorator items and a few collectors like them because they can get a huge collection without spending very much money. Values run from about $25 up to maybe $100-150 for really nice ones with oddball features. However, if made after 1898 they are considered "modern guns" by the BATF and subject to all the record keeping and probably local licensing foolishness as if they were a brand new Smith & Wesson semi-automatic. I am sure you and your children are much safer as a result so we should all be grateful that the legislators and other politicians have protected us. With all the bureaucratic foolishness, there is no demand for these at any price when made after 1898. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2319 - Little Scout
10/23/1999
Cthomas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Little Scout 22 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Can give us some idea what a Little Scout 22-long rifle with a 14 1/2 " barrel might be worth? It was patented July-2-07 in Chicopee Falls Mass. by the Stevens Arms Co. If you don't have that info, Can you please suggest a site or link that can help us? Thank You for your time!

Answer:
I am very familiar with these, as my first gun was one of them. Value runs anywhere from about $50 to $175 depending on condition but probably most sell in the $100-125 range. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2318 - Cavalry Manuals
10/19/1999
Jamie

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Looking for cavalry manuals on how they would pack supplies ammo and weapons in on mules and horses in W.W.II I think the last cavalry post was somewhere in so. Calif. East of San Diego just wonder if there are any manuals around thank you.

Answer:
Jamie- Sorry, we do not have any manuals on that. I suspect that essentially the same info was used for about 50 years, with just format changes to comply with latest fashion dictates in manual preparation. Your best bet will be FM 25-7 Pack Transportation dated August 1944. Other related titles include FM25-5 Animal Transport June 1939; FM25-6 Dog Team Transportation Jan 1941; FM 25-6 Dog transportation Aug 1944; FM25-7 (draft only) Pack transportation May 1963 (draft). Some of the WW1-WW2 era quasi official manuals used for ROTC, or as general study guides for soldiers or NCOs may have info as well. John Spangler


# 2317 - US Pistol- H. Aston
10/19/1999
Kyle

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H. Aston Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have acquired an 1848 cap & ball pistol, in excellent condition. I hope you can help me find out what it is worth. The markings on it are as follows: 1848 MIDDtn Conn. and in another place on it: U.S. H. ASTON I inherited this from my father, and would greatly appreciate any help you could give me. Thank you, Kyle

Answer:
Kyle- Your pistol is a Model 1842 smoothbore .54 caliber single shot percussion pistol. These were issued to cavalry troop in pairs, and carried in holders attached to the saddle. Since they were carried on the horse, these are often referred to as "horse pistols." Many were used in the early days of the Civil War until enough revolvers became available. About 24,000 of these were made by Henry Aston of Middletown Connecticut 1846-1850. Value in NRA antique very good condition is about $625 and in NRA antique excellent about $2,000. (See our links page for definitions) Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2316 - Bayonets- Japanese
10/19/1999
Dale

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Japan Bayonet Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am e-mailing to see if you know anything about Japanese bayonets. I recently acquired a couple of Type 30 bayonets, one with a hooked quillion and the other straight. They both are in unissued condition and have blued blades. Is it possible to tell approximately when they were made by the serial numbers? I know some of them were blued and some were bright metal. Any significance to that? Are there any reference works on the subject that are available? I appreciate any help you can give. Sincerely, Dale

Answer:
Dale- There are literally dozens of variations of the Jap type 30 bayonets. Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook has some basic info. Lary Johnson's Japanese Bayonets book has all the minute details. They were made in about a dozen places, with steadily degrading /simplified quality shortcuts. I cannot go into details. John Spangler


# 2325 - Deutsche Werke AG Pistol
10/16/1999
mark, Concord, Calif. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Deutsche Werke ?? 6.35mm 5 1/2"? black w/wooden handle 61883

This was inherited from my grandfather who passed away. It has been in the family at least 70 years. My grandfather came to America from Romania in 1916. It is not known whether he got the gun in Germany or in the States. It has various things stamped on it. Deutsche Werke, Werk Erfurt, Ortgies, Germany 61883. It has a slide in magazine. Cartridges with it, some have brass casings and some have aluminum. Can anyone tell me it's origin, history, age, and value, or where I might find information on this kind of gun? Thank you very much.

Answer:
Mark, In 1921 Deutsche Werke AG of Erfurt, Germany purchased the patents and machinery of Heinrich Ortgies. Manufacture of 7.65mm Ortgies pistols at Deutsche Werke AG started in 1921, 6.35mm pistol production started in 1922. Original Orgies made pistols are marked on the slide 'Ortgies & Co Erfurt Ortgies Patent', the grips came with a bronze medallion with the intertwined initials 'HO'. Markings on Deutsche Werke manufactured Ortgies pistols vary, early models have slides that are marked 'Deutsche Werke Aktiengesellschaft: Werke Erfurt', later slides are marked 'Deutsche Werke (monogram) Werke Erfurt' with the monogram in the center of this inscription. Early Deutsche Werke grips have the monogram 'HO', while later grips have an ornate 'D' formed by a stylized animal. Unfortunately there is not much collector interest these pistols, values fall in the $125.00 range. Marc


# 2315 - Knife- PAL RH36
10/16/1999
J.D.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
PAL Knife Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Trying to find info on knife with markings as follows: RH (then an oval with PAL inside it) with 36 to the right. Also says Made in America. Vietnam Circa? bowie type survival knife. Is this an original issue U.S. Army Special Forces knife? Possible value? Thanks! J.D.

Answer:
JD- M.H. Cole's book "US Military Knives, Bayonets and Machetes, Book 3" is an excellent reference on this type item. The PAL RH36 is one of several commercial style hunting knives procured by the U.S. military during WW2 for issue to servicemen. These were for all around utility use- opening boxes, cutting rope for tents or latrines, clearing brush, camp chores, etc as well as for potential use in combat. They are collectible, and values are not very high- probably in the $25-65 range depending on condition. A really crisp unsharpened example with excellent leather scabbard may be worth more. As I recall, the RH numbers were those used by Remington when they were in the knife business, but retained by PAL when they bought all the knife business from Remington in the WW2 period. I may be incorrect on this point, but our free information comes with a money back guarantee. John Spangler


# 2314 - Pistol- Hodgson
10/16/1999
Simon Manchester, England

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hodgson Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Have you ever heard of a Hodgson gun? I've just found one in my basement in Manchester, England, Is it worth anything?

Answer:
Simon- I found listings for three Hodgson gun makers. One dates between 1800 and 1832 and two others operated circa 1800-1810. The longest was located in Ipswich, Suffolk; while the other two were in London or Birmingham. I suspect this is a reasonably good old pistol. Your idiot Prime Minister's behavior frequently echoes our idiot President's. including their mutual hatred of guns and difficulty recognizing or remembering the truth. However, your pistol is still probably legal to own for a little while longer. Eventually it will undoubtedly be confiscated and destroyed "to protect the children" while armed criminals will be further emboldened to prey on the disarmed, and obviously untrustworthy subjects. Perhaps we will learn from your lead, and reject such foolishness, but that is highly questionable. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2313 - 45-70, Carbine
10/16/1999
Kiimberly Lisbon, ND, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1873 Carbine 45-70 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I own an old gun and would like to know more about it. It is a Springfield Model 1873 carbine. It belonged to my father who was a Civil War enthusiast. He used it during his years performing with the local Cavalry, Memorial Regiment. I do not know where he obtained this particular gun. I don't know very much about guns, but I will describe it to you the best that I can. Overall, it looks old, but in good condition. Everything on it looks like it's original to me. I know that it works well, because my father used to fire it. From end to end, it measures 41 inches. The metal was blue once, but you can see the gray metal in "prominent" places where the bluing was rubbed away by use. It has a beautiful deep reddish-brown wood stock that measures 28 1/2 inches (ending 12 1/2 inches from the end of the barrel). The wood is in great shape with only a few old marks. There is a metal plate at the end of the stock with the number "39" stamped into it. There is also a small "c" or "o" stamped into it, but not next to the number. On top of the gun, right in front of the trapdoor is a number "362484" (the 6 may actually be an 8, and the 8 may actually be an S. Both are difficult to tell for certain). On the trapdoor itself is stamped "US Model 1873". On the right side of the gun, there is an eagle stamp and "US Springfield". The eagle is holding 4 arrows and has a shield on its breast. On the barrel behind the rear site is a stamp that reads "VP" and something undecipherable. There is also an "A" stamp, but not next to the VP stamp. There is a "U" stamp which looks like a horse-shoe on the ring that attaches the wood near the front of the barrel. The rear site flips up and has a distance gauge stamped on the left side that reads "R" Then "5, 4, 3" then "B" then "2,1". There are gauge stamps on the flip-up part as well. It is a 45-70 Caliber. There is no cleaning rod attachment under the barrel. There is a saddle bar and ring attached to the left-hand side. I am interested in any history you may have about this gun and a value if possible. Thank you

Answer:
Kiimberly- You did an excellent job with your description, and it made it a lot easier for us to figure out what you have. Thanks for taking the time to put in the details. We get some questions that basically say "I have an old gun, It is rusty. Is it safe to shoot and how much is it worth?" Unfortunately, we are pretty sure you have a rifle that has been cut down to carbine length. The serial number is not specifically listed among those in government sources, but all the guns within a thousand numbers or so from any possible interpretation of your serial number variations are all rifles, not carbines. The "R" on the side of the sight indicates it was made for a rifle, while the ones for carbines were marked with a "C". Thousands of rifles have been cut down to carbine size (I have done dozens myself) and they are very popular. Usually a close inspection of the details will show if it is a cut down rifle or a real carbine. Easy for us to spot, but hard to describe so you can tell by looking at yours. At worst, both the barrel and the stock have been cut down. If the buttplate is solid (no door that twists to the side), it is probably cut down from a rifle. You may want to take the buttplate off (remove the two screws and tap it lightly and it should come right off) and see if there are any holes in the back of the stock under the buttplate. Carbines had three holes stacked on top of each other, about 1/2" diameter for a little ways, then about 1/4" diameter by about 8 inches deep. Most rifles had no holes in the butt. A few very late ones had two holes about 5/8" diameter with a slot on one side connecting the two holes. Another way to check the stock is to remove the two screws that hold the lockplate and saddle ring bar in place. After removing the saddle ring bar look at the two oval areas where it fits in the stock. Carbine stocks will have the bottom of the wood absolutely smooth, machine cut. Altered rifle stocks will generally show uneven hand cutting, and will show a dent on either side of the screw hole, almost like someone took a big screwdriver and pressed it into the wood. These marks come from the ribs on the back of the metal washers installed in the stock on the rifles. They were round instead of oval, and one side was thinner than the rest to match the rounding of the stock, and the rib kept it in the proper position, but left an important clue that it was a rifle stock, if you know what to look for. Value for a real carbine in probably in the $800-1500 range depending on condition. (much higher for an extremely nice one). For a cut down rifle value will be $350-750 depending on condition. Based on our description, we would probably try to sell it in the $450-550 range. Italian made copies of mediocre quality are selling for about $650-750 new. John Spangler


# 2312 - Ruger No.1 Value
10/12/1999
Paul

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ruger No. 1 338 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am the owner of the 1996 NRA Gun of the year. It is 14 out of 550. It is a Ruger No. 1 , 338 win. mag. It has never been shot, it is one of a kind, and it has the gold trim all over. I would like to know how much this is worth now. It was valued at 2,500.00 in 1996. Thank you, Paul

Answer:
Paul- We really do not have a good feel for the value on these, so cannot put a dollar figure on it for you. In our opinion, very few, if any, of the fancy "limited edition" guns sold as commemoratives or the like have proven to be good investments. Many are beautiful examples of the gunmakers, engravers, and stockmakers artistic skills. Many helped generate revenue for worthy causes, and some merely enriched the outfits producing a new item for a different market segment on a near monthly basis. Many of the original purchasers were motivated by a desire to support an organization or to have a souvenir that had some personal significance. In our opinion most of the people motivated to get any of these arms did so when they first came out. The resale market seems to be very limited for all of these types of guns, and although some of the price guides show some increase in values, it is very difficult to find people who want one at any price. The best place to market one of these might be in Gun List, or through the newsletter of one of the specialized collector groups (Ruger Collectors Association in your case). Hope this helps. Hope you have enjoyed owning it, even if it does not turn out to be a great investment. John Spangler


# 2311 - 1911 Pistol
10/12/1999
Bruce

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1911 45 Unknown Unknown 356242

I have a Springfield armory 1911 .45 auto . I was wondering when it was made ? I tried to use the info data base on your site , and it said my pistol was a colt. Mine's ser. # is 356242 . If you would help me , it would be greatly appreciated. I have some friends that collect older firearms , I will be directing them to your site. The site looks great!

Answer:
Bruce- We have bad news for you. The frame of your M1911 pistol was made by Colt in 1918. Springfield Armory frames were made in two lots one starting at 72751 and the other ending at 133186. You probably have initials JMG, WGP or GHS in a circular logo on the left side by the magazine release. The Springfields used a flaming bomb inspector mark there. Nearly every part made at Springfield had a small "S" stamped on it, while the Colt parts did not have this mark. In the military ordnance system, parts are parts, and no effort was made after a gun was issued to keep all the original parts together. Therefore you will now find pistols with a mix of M1911 and M1911A1 parts from almost any combination of manufacturers. Some M1911 pistols were sold or carried home by troops after WW1, and have minimal parts mixing, with the choices limited to the over 500,000 made by Colt, 25,767 from Springfield and 21,676 made by Remington-UMC prior to the end of 1918. It is very common for the maker of .45 automatics to be misidentified, based on markings on the slide. We recently sold a M1911A1 with government papers identifying it as a Colt, even though the serial number clearly identified it as being made by Remington Rand. Thanks for telling your friends about our site. Hope we can help them with their collections. John Spangler


# 2229 - Modele 1935S
10/12/1999
Floyd

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
M.A.C Modele 1935S M1 7.65L 3" Blue Steel MAC-B 15XXX

Trying to find out more about this gun. I believe it is the same caliber as a 30 Luger, and is a military issue but know little about the gun and want to find out more.

Answer:
Floyd, After the first world war, the French decided that they wanted to equip their armed forces with a new semi-automatic pistol. Various manufacturers were contacted and designers at the government Saint Etienne arsenal began work on a semi-auto design. Numerous designs were tested, and eventually, a model developed by the Societe Alsacienne de Constructions Mecanique (SCAM) was selected to enter service as the Me 1935. The Me 1935 was a modification of the Browning swinging-link system, the principal difference was that the firing lock was in a separate, removable, unit. The Me 1935 pistol had a well-shaped butt, a reliable action, and it was exceedingly well made. The safety catch was a simple half-round shaft on the end of the slide which, when rotated, prevented the hammer from striking the firing pin. Unfortunately the Me 1935 was designed for the anemic 7.65mm Longue cartridge (not the .30 Luger) which propelled an 87-gr bullet at 1100ft/sec to give only 233ft/lb of muzzle energy, this was very poor performance for a military cartridge of the day. With war looming in 1938, Saint Etienne re-designed the Me 1935 to make it easier to mass-produce. The basic mechanical features remained the same, but the lines became more angular, and the finish was of lower quality. The locking of barrel and slide was changed from the original Browning type ribs, to a simple lug on the barrel locking into a single recess in the slide. Various modifications were also made to the lockwork to make it easier to produce. In order to distinguish between the older and newer models, the original SACM-made version became the Me 1935A, and the war production model, became the Me 1935S. Before many 1935S pistols had been produced, WWII began and France was occupied by the Nazis. It is reported that 1935S production continued under the German occupation, but only Me 1935A pistols have been noted with German acceptance markings. Marc


# 2341 - Marlin Mark II 12 Gauge Pump Shotgun
10/9/1999
Jeff, Shawnee, Oklahoma

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin Mark II 12 GA Unknown Blued Unknown

When was this gun made? Is it a collector gun? How much did it sell for new? I would appreciate any information you have. Thanks Jeff

Answer:
Jeff, The Marlin Mark series shotguns (models Mark I, Mark II and Mark IV) were takedown models with aluminum receivers that were manufactured in France from 1960 to 1963 for Marlin. The Mark I had a plain receiver and wood, the Mark II had engraving on the receiver and checkered wood, and the Mark IV was the deluxe version with better checkering, higher grade wood and more engraving. Sorry to have to tell you, but there is no collector interest in these shotguns. When looking for a shotgun to shoot and hunt with, I have found that most people seem to want one chambered for 3" mag that has a vent rib barrel and interchangeable choke tubes. Values for your shotgun which is chambered for 2 & 3/4 inch, has no vent rib and no interchangeable choke tubes are in the $100 to $125 range, and it will probably be a slow seller at that. I have no information on what these sold for new. Marc


# 2310 - 1873 Trapdoor
10/9/1999
Krista

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Trapdoor 1873 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have an original trapdoor 1873 with all its markings but no serial numbers. Can you give me any info why. Thanks

Answer:
Krista, M1873 -1888 .45-70 trapdoor Springfields all had serial numbers on the back of the receiver between the breechblock and the tang.. Earlier Model 1868 or 1870 .50-70 did not have any numbers there, but some had serial numbers on the side of the receiver and/or barrel. If a M1873-88 is not numbered it may be that the number was removed when refinished by some unknown party at some point, or it is possibly a scrap or surplus receiver that was never numbered, and then later assembled into a complete gun. Anyway that is my opinion. We have a link to www.trapdoorcollector.com where experts on this subject congregate, speculate and pontificate. You may want to post your query there and see what others think. You may have some exotic rarity that I am unaware of. Good luck. John Spangler


# 2302 - Bulgarian Armament
10/9/1999
Tim Ashtabula Ohio

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bulgarian WW2 Rifles Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown UNKNOWN

I'm asking for my father, who is a collector of WW2 rifles and accessories. He's been trying to find out what kind of rifles the Bulgarian Army used, whether they had there own makes or used others from other countries. thank you Tim Massena

Answer:
Tim- (Sorry you didn't give an address, I could have stopped for a free meal when I passed through Ashtabula after the Ohio Gun Collectors show). However, I confess I am not sure what the Bulgarians may have used during WW2. I suspect they just used standard Soviet style Model 91/30 Mosin Nagant rifles. However, they may have had some other older arms pressed into service, or maybe the ubiquitous 98 Mauser might have been used. There is a neat bunch of collectors of foreign military rifles who have a newsletter and I am sure some of them would know. The outfit's newsletter is the International Military Rifle Journal. And I will be glad to provide subscription info to anyone who sends us an email request for the info. You might also ask over on The Militaria Collectors' Exchange (www.TMCX.com) where a lot of foreign military collectors hang out. They have a good Q&A section that may get an answer from someone who knows for sure. John Spangler


# 2301 - Springfield M1903 Rebuild
10/9/1999
Bob, Wayne, NJ, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1903 30-06 Unknown Unknown 877006

F aint Partial Cartouche - SA Overstamp Cartouche - BAWL Receiver original serial number has been removed and overstamped with 877006.Barrel is SA 5-42 with Ordinance Mark but no proof mark punch in bomb. Why was this original serial number removed and overstamped? When might the rebuild at the Benecia Arsenal been done?

Answer:
There is a word that describes this rifle- inexplicable. Remember that parts is parts, and the miracle of interchangeable parts allows all sorts of atrocities to occur at unknown dates, by unknown perpetrators. Although BAWL is recognized as a Benecia Arsenal rework mark, it only shows that the stock was marked there at some point. It may or may not have had the other parts associated with it at the time. Your speculation is as good as ours. John Spangler


# 2401 -
10/8/1999
Scott, Neosho, Mo. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger 1913 9mm 4 inch blue 5721

Has Crown near Erfurt Logo, Has small unit markings all over it (they look like an eagle or phoenix with its wings spread) I understand that some of the 1913 Lugers went to specific German units (i.e.. artillery, infantry etc..). Can you tell me which imperial unit was associated with the eagle or phoenix insignia.

Answer:
Scott, the "phoenix" markings that you describe are probabley military crown over eagle proof marks. Military Erfurt Lugers should have crown over eagle proof marks located on the right side of the receiver and on the barrel. Imperial German unit markings consist of a line of large and small numbers and letters. Imperial German printed instructions no. 185 "Small Arms Marking Instruction" states that unit markings for the Pistol 08 (Luger) will be applied in the center of the front grip strap. An example of an Imperial German unit marking would be "16.R.3.120" which stands for Infantry Regiment No. 16, 3rd Company, 120th weapon. Marc


# 2296 - Mauser Model 1871/84 Rifle Value
10/5/1999
Tim, Humble, TX

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Spandau Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 3128

T. G. MOD. 71/84.1887Breech mark: F.W. This rifle is bolt action with internal magazine. rear sight is flip-up with a calibrated slide. Please tell me as much as you can about its origin and manufacturing and value.

Answer:
Tim- I don't know what your is worth, but checking our collectible firearms catalog page will let you see what we think our stuff is worth. We try to put lost of exciting information about the design, manufacture, and history of various guns in our descriptions. We sincerely hope that you will discover some historical, technical or artistic feature that will make you suddenly realize the many benefits of owning this item and inspire you to immediately order the item. Frequently it works, but some of you are still not reading carefully enough, or are somehow remain oblivious to the benefits and fail to take advantage of these wonderful opportunities we offer you. Act quickly, most items are one of a kind, and we don't want you to miss these great deals. John Spangler


# 2295 - Winchester 1897 Riot Gun?
10/5/1999
Dennis, ID

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1897 12 Ga. 20" Blue C100749

I'm trying to determine if I have an early riot model '97 Winchester. It's description is: It has approx. 50% of the blue finish remaining. The receiver is a solid frame and no markings are found except the serial number. The magazine tube is approx. 15.25" and capped with a magazine plug w/centering stud that is held in place with one plug screw. The wooden slide action handle (three handle screws)has seventeen grooves and the action slide bar is marked "Winchester Model 1897". The barrel is approx. 20" with a .15" dia. brass bead sight mounted .50" from the muzzle. The barrel is marked on the top "MANUFACTURED BY THE WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO NEW HAVEN. CONN. U.S.A. PAT. NOV.25.90.DEC.6.92.JULY 21.96.FEB.22.98.JUNE 14.98". Also on the top of the barrel in front of the receiver is "12" and under this to the left side of the barrel is "FULL CYL". The wooden stock is a high comb type and no markings are found on it. Any history and/or an approx. value on this firearm would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Answer:
Dennis- Everything you describe sounds correct for an early Winchester 97. You can look up the date on manufacture using one of the links on the left side of our screen or the bottom of the main page. However, I would expect to only find "full" or "cyl" on the barrel. If "Full" is present that is a big warning to me that a gun started off with a long barrel as a sporting gun. A "factory letter" from the Cody Firearms Museum's original Winchester shipping records may confirm this is a rare variation of some sort, if you want to make the investment for a letter. I suspect it was cut down in recent years as hunters lost interest in the old 97s as field guns. Cowboy action shooters love them and re that main market these days. John Spangler


# 2280 - Starter Pistol
10/5/1999
Rick, Boonville, Mo., USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Starter Pistol/Palm Pistol 22 1 1/2" Nickel None

Small palm size pistol, has only letter B stamped on side. Made off regular gun frame, has set-up for blanks, factory done. 6 shot, 4 1/2" overall length, folding trigger, Year made, who by, value if possible.

Answer:
Rick- We admit total ignorance on starter guns or other guns that fire blanks, which may be intended for theatrical use.. A folding trigger is a clue that it may be fairly early (maybe 1900-1930, and probably European. Value depends on the needs of the buyer. I wouldn't give you a dollar for a box full of them. A track and field referee who forgot one may be willing to pay a lot for one. My guess is that you are probably looking at $25 or less for this item. John Spangler


# 2277 - $10,000 Junker
10/5/1999
Paul

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Eibar Unknown 44xl Shot Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for some info on a gun a friend picked up at a gun show. We can't find it in any books an no one at any shops has any ideas . It is a double barrelled pistol that resembels a minature double barrelled shot gun it has single hammers on each barrell with dual triggers it is nikel plated . It has a coat of arms on each side of the frame on the top of the barrells it says jl galef it also says 44xl shot crtge . It also says elbar 192 6 on the bottom of the barrells it has the numbers 3247

Answer:
Paul- Eibar is the location of many Spanish gun makers. Galef was an importer of guns (mainly from Spain) who ceased operation about 1968 or so. The .44 XL shot cartridge is like an oversize .44-40 or a very short .410 shotshell. If your "pistol" has rifled barrels, it is probably legal to own. However, if the barrels are smooth, then the BATF would consider it a "sawed off shotgun" even though made as a pistol size weapons. Yes, sort of dumb, but that is the way they interpret the law on such things. If smoothbore, and illegal, you would be subject to a $10,000 fine and or some serious federal prison time. Your choices are to call the nearest BATF office and tell them what you have and ask how to turn it in for destruction. Some people would recommend you just destroy it yourself and throw the pieces away. I do not think there is any collector interest in this in either smoothbore or rifled configuration. There were several models of inexpensive shotshell firing handguns made prior to 1934 when they were outlawed (along with machine guns). These were sold mainly to trappers. Hope this helps. Sorry it was bad news. Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. John Spangler


# 2300 - Universal Sporting Goods, Inc. M1 Carbine
10/2/1999
Bud, Booneville Ar.,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Universal M1 Carbine .30 18 in. ? black? 14561

I would just like to know more about this gun and how much it is worth. It looks good and does not appear to have been modified. The rear sight is missing but there is an adjustable rear sight in the front of the bolt. I have shot it and it handles nice but the 30 rd clip seems weak. It will not reload after two or three rounds. The clip is stamped with a M2. I would appreciate anything you could tell me about this gun. I have ordered a book on the carbine but doubt this particular gun will be addressed. I have read some of the Q/A and like what is being done. Thanks...

Answer:
Bud, sorry to have to tell you, your carbine is not of U.S. government issue. Universal Sporting Goods, Inc. (circa the early 1960s) made M1 Carbine copies for commercial sales, The quality of these copies for the most part was not bad, but was defiantly not up to the standards of the U.S. government issue carbines. Universal was purchased by Iver Johnson in January 1983 and the facilities were moved to Arkansas in the summer of 1984. Iver Johnson continued to sell Universal-branded Carbines as late as 1988. Values for Universal carbines are in the $100 to $150 range. Marc


# 2276 - Old Gun
10/2/1999
Jennifer, Boise ID

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Spencer Shotgun Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

We found an old shot gun at my mother's house this weekend and would like to learn more about it. It says "Spencer Arms Co. Windsor CT USA Pat. Apr.1882." Where would we find more information on it? The men who looked at it said they had never seen anything like it before.

Answer:
Jennifer- These were invented by Christopher M. Spencer, who also invented one of the best Civil War Carbines, the seven shot Spencer Carbine. The Spencer shotguns were one of the first successful pump action shotguns made, although they rapidly became obsolete when John M. Browning came out with the Model 1893 and its improved cousin the Model 1897. The Spencer shotgun certainly looks strange to us today, but it was a pretty slick piece of machinery in 1882 when most men (and women) were only a few years away from using muzzle loading shotguns. A few Spencers were purchased by the U.S. Army for guarding prisoners, but most were sold for hunting use. About 1890 Sencer's company had financial problems and they sold everything to Francis Bannerman Sons, of New York. Bannerman continued to make them until about 1903 but with their name on the side of the receiver. The Bannerman guns are worth less than the ones made by Spencer. In good to very good condition the will bring about $300-400. I have owned about 4 of these, and the last one we sold was a very nice one with lots of finish. Usually they have broken stocks, or the front of the magazine tube is loose, or they have mechanical problems. There is usually someone at the Boise gun shows who can tell you about these. I get up there once or twice a year, and Vic Jusakuskas, Glen Mattox, and some other guys also know these old guns. Hope this helps. Let us know if you decide to sell it, John Spangler


# 2275 - Colt Lord And Lady Derringers
10/2/1999
Ken

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Lord And Lady Derringers Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for information on Colt Lord and Lady derringers , any information you have , if any on these would be very helpful. I need their value and manufacture dates anything you have on these would be great. Thanks very much.

Answer:
Ken- Colt made these cute (or gaudy- take your choice) little .22 single shot derringers 1959-1963. They were available as single pieces or cased sets (two of the same or one of each). I think these run about $125-175 per gun, but value and demand will be far lower if they are in anything less than 99% condition. I think I have seen some of these still being sold by some of the wholesalers in recent years for pretty low prices. I do not think they were all that popular. John Spangler


# 2274 - Free Bayonet Answer
10/2/1999
Rod

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have acquired a supposed 1909 Bayonet. Without Charging me (I only want to know what it is)Can I give you some information on it?

Answer:
Rod- Based on your information we can only confirm that it is probably a bayonet, and probably made in 1909 or is a 1909 pattern. "Thrifty" people usually get about what they pay for. It gets worse when they are stingy with information. If you had provided us with information like we ask for on our Q&A submission form we might have been able to tell you more. Little stuff like length, type of finish, and all markings are important. With a few good clues we can often help out. When reduced to mind reading we often do not get much to work with and cannot do much but guess. Our one free guess is that you have one of the bayonets made in Germany under contract for Argentina as Model 1909. For information on bayonets, I encourage everyone to invest about $30-35 in a superb book "Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook" by the late Jerry Janzen. It has superb drawings of most bayonet type arranged by country and within country by date. John Spangler


# 2273 - Mauser- Israeli 7.62
10/2/1999
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser- Israeli K98 7.62 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a K98 that is marked 7.62. The proof mark has been removed, the receiver has what looks like a star of David on it. The gun is dated 1939. On the right side of the receiver it has three small eagles with numbers that are to small to see. The left side is marked model 98. not much bluing remains. What is this gun? Is it .308 WIN? Is this a safe conversion. The barrel is bright with good grooves. There are other marks in the receiver that look like Arabic. Thanks

Answer:
James- Israel successfully fought for and won its indigence in 1947, largely with rifles and pistols in the hands of its soon-to-be citizens. The K98k Mauser then available in large quantities at low prices from WW2 surplus stocks was adopted as the Israeli service rifle. These were in 8mm Mauser caliber, and often remarked as they were overhauled. Following the adoption of the 7.62 NATO cartridge by NATO, the Israelis adopted that as well, probably around 1960 or so. By then semi auto rifles and selective fire assault rifles were the standard arms for front line Israeli units. The old Mausers were rebarreled to 7.62, and the stocks branded near the butt and the receivers prominently marked. These were apparently intended for use by reservists and home guard units. By the late 1970s enough more modern arms were available and the old Mausers were sold as surplus. Generally these are found in excellent condition. A well used example with Arabic markings may indicate one which saw action in one of the incessant outbreaks in which the Muslims and Jews assist the others in reaching their heavenly rewards on an accelerated schedule. Only a competent gunsmith who can physically examine your particular rifle can tell you if it is safe to shoot. in general, the K98k actions were well made of good materials, and the barrel replacements well done and carefully inspected. Unlike the early Spanish Mausers converted to .308 which I would NEVER FIRE, I would not be too worried about one of the Israeli conversions. There are some subtle differences between the 7.62 NATO and .308 Winchester chambers and ammunition but most people treat them as being interchangeable for all practical purposes. Please point out to all your friends (especially any anti-gun types) that in Israel nearly every house has guns in it, including huge numbers of full automatic assault rifles and UZI submachine guns, but their violent crime rates are far lower than in the United States, and many European countries. Switzerland also has very high levels of gun ownership and very low crime rates, on the level of Japan and England. Israel and Switzerland are usually not mentioned when people insist that if we only got rid of all the legal guns, all violent crime in the U.S. would stop. They fail to realize that the willingness to commit violent crimes is largely a cultural factor. Japanese Americans (with as much access to guns as everyone else) commit almost no violent crimes, just as in Japan. Most of the population segments that commit violent crimes come from a cultural background of perpetual violence and atrocity to others. American cultural guidelines flowing from Hollywood encourage and glorify violence, while those who produce that crap piously insist that guns be outlawed. John Spangler


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