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# 96 - Colt Model 1905 USMC .38 Pistol
11/28/96
- CARLAT@worldnet.att.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1905 usmc 38 6" Blued USMC 205 COLT 10205

This revolver is as described in Flayderman's Guide To Antique American Firearms on page 96

Other than Flayderman, I can find little else regarding this model, are you aware of any sources that go into any detail about this model? Would writing Colt produce any information other than date shipped to USMC, finish, barrel length, and number of guns in shipment? I would like to contact anyone else who has one of these models and exchange information. Thank you for your service. Jack

Answer:
Jack- You have a very scarce item. Flayderman gives the basic description, and you are right that a "Factory letter" would not add much light. The better Colt books (Sutherland & Wilson- "Book of Colt Firearms") might add a little. When you get away from the hardware end and into the historical usage are, the best source is Fank Mallory's "U.S. Martial Arms Collector and Springfield Research Newsletter" ($25 per year Box 4181 Silver Spring MD 20904. Email- frank.mallory@srs.blkcat.com) This is largely the results of his diligent research in official records at the National Archives, and is a fantastic source of accurate information available nowhere else. He has assembled much of his serial number data showing specific guns documents to a specific unit/person/event into four volumes. They cover trapdoors, Krags, M1903s M1917s, M1 Garands, M1 Carbines, Civil War era arms, Colt SAA and .38 double actions, M1917 Colt and S&W, M1911 .45s and some miltary shotguns. I use mine just about every day. (I checked the first three volumes and didn't find your USMC listed there). Unfortuately the records do not include very gun ever procured by the US military, so you will not always find things. However, it is very interesting when you do. For a small fee, he will send a "factory" type letter socumenting the information for you. Every U.S. military arms collector should subscribe to this great periodical... John Spangler


# 104 - Providence Tool Co (Peabody)
11/28/96
"michael J. Erickson"

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Providence tool co. Unknown .45-.50 34" Blue Unknown

I work at a Museum, in our collection we have several weapons that I can not seem to find much information on. One in particular is a Peabody patent 186?, made by the Providence tool co. Providence RI. The Barrel is aprox 34 inches, and has a blued finish and I believe it's caliber is .45-.50. It has just behind the receiver on the top of the Butt stock a Military issue number of 16, and on the Bottom of the stock a metal plate "Mass.204". Any information on this weapon and some good research sources would be appreciated.

Answer:
Mike- Your "Peabody" rifle was patented in 1862, but not made until about 1870. These were adopted for National Guard (Militia) use by Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York circa 1870, to augment issues of "Trapdoor" Springfield's from the federal government under the terms of the 1808 Act for Arming and Equipping the Militia. They were made in caliber .433 (sometimes considered to be same as .43 Spanish) Two works with further information are George Moller's "Massachusetts Military Shoulder Arms" and Ed Hull's "Arms of the Providence Tool Company". I can do further research in these if desired. If your museum has a number of longarms (military or civilian types) I would be glad to provide a sample copy of a "Collection Inventory Data Sheet" to use with your accession records. (Send request on museum letterhead to Box 711282 Salt Lake City, UT 84171) Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 105 - Kawaguchiya Japan Shotgun
11/28/96
FRONTSTEER@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
The Kawaguchiya Fire Arms Company Japan Unknown Double barrel shotgun Unknown Blue Unknown

Made especially to the order of Bayard

Can you tell me anything about this gun that I bought at a yard sale. It is very old! Thanks

Answer:
Frontsteer- Ah so- you got us this time. Bayard is a "house brand" used on imported firearms. I have no more information on when or where, but would have to depend on the design of the gun. Pre WW2 Japanese gun makers seldom exported, so I would guess that it was in the late 1940s or 1950s, but being born in 1944, I don't think of that as old... John, the old guy.


# 107 - Harpers Ferry Civil War Rifle or Musket
11/28/96
- tg@cris.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Harpers Ferry 1852 long gun made at US arsenal @ Harpers Unknown Unknown rusted Unknown

It has the US arsenal seal on the receiver

I am not a gun buff, however I am a Civil war buff. I recently bought this weapon and would like to know more about it, including any books that would help me ascertain if the weapon is all original. I have serious doubts about the ramrod and foreend assembly. Where can I find this info? TG

Answer:
TG - Harpers Ferry was only making two models in 1852, so see if your gun fits either of these. First- the Model 1841 "Mississippi" Rifle, which had a heavy barrel 33" long. The bands, trigger guard, buttplate and patchbox in the stock are all brass. The stock goes up to about 4 inches from the muzzle and has a big brass band there. Ramrod steel with brass section at tip. Originally .54 caliber, many were bored out to .58 caliber during the Civil War and fitted with a lug of some sort so bayonets could be attached. Your other choice is the Model 1842 .69 caliber smoothbore percussion musket. The barrel should be 42 inches long, and the stock should come to within about 4 inches of muzzle, again with a big band there. All the bands, trigger guard, etc were iron or steel on these. Ramrod was steel with a tapered swelling at the last 2 or 3 inches. The best general reference for a beginning Civil War collector is Jack Coggins "Arms and Equipment of the Civil War" It does a great job blending info on arms and equipment and their uses into an understanding of the tactics of the period. Your library may have a copy. (I also have them for sale at $12.95 (softbound) plus $3.00 shipping-Send to John Spangler Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171) (I sell them because they are good books, and don't recommend them just to sell books.) Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 110 - Colt Modle ???
11/28/96
Michael Gillis - mikeg@atcon.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1903 ? .380 (hammerless) 6" ? blue 88XXX

The gun has three matching numbers on it, 640. Written on the gun is "Colt's PT.F. Hartford. CT.USA Patented April 20, 1897, Dec 22, 1903". Also written on the gun is "Shanghai Municipal Police". The gun is in very good condition. It has plastic, checked grips.

I am wondering if you know any background on this gun. Such as when was it in use with the Shanghai Police force. I am also wondering if the gun has any value to collectors. I purchased it about five years ago for $125(Can).

Answer:
Mike- Sorry, we cannot match your description to anything specific. My guess is that it is the Model 1908 "Pocket" model, but the barrel length was only 3.75 inches. They were made from 1908 until about 1940 Many of these were purchased for issue to US military officers. I vaguely recall seeing some serial number research relating to arms used by some Chinese quasi-military forces in the early WW2 period, but don't remember where. I suspect a fanatical Colt collector can tell you more. Say, with the Australians and England basically outlawing all guns, and recent Canadian moves in that direction, I suspect Canadians won't be paying much for any guns soon. Good luck, and start fighting stupid "feel good" legislation before it is too late... John Spangler


# 113 - Remington Sportsman 48
11/28/96
mrpatty - mrpatty@geocities.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Sportsman 48 12 gauge full Unknown 306XXXX

Shotgun has an external choke, "Power Pac" pat. 2447205 Shotgun was made in the USA by Rem Arms Ilion, New York Pat. 2,278,589.Wood stock,

Another gun given to me, which was my grandfathers, it too was his. He used to bird hunt with. My question is when was it Manufactured, and about how much is it worth? Shotgun is in good condition.

Answer:
Mr. Patty- The Remington model 48 was made between 1949 and 1959. Values run in the $200-$300 range. A good reliable hunting gun, but not one with great collector value... John Spangler


# 114 - Winchester Model 1873
11/28/96
Bob Guion - momentum@rof.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester rifle Model 1873 repeater w/ lever action 44/40 24 in Blue that's turned brown 50XXX

Wood seems to be burled or special quality. I'd guess it's in NRA fine condition.

What is the age of this gun and does it have any value as a collector piece? What is its approximate value?

Answer:
Bob- Your Model 1873 Winchester, made in 1880, is a good item. Assuming it is just an ordinary rifle with no special features, it is probably in the $800-$1400 range. The wood definitely sounds like it might be special order, but a factory letter would be needed to confirm that. However, high grade wood that shows excessive wear or abuse doesn't add much. This is the sort of gun that has to be seen to give a good value. These are very popular with collectors in this area. Let us know if you want help selling it or an appraisal... John Spangler


# 112 - WWII P-38
11/28/96
mrpatty - mrpatty@geocities.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Government Issue P38 P-38 Unknown Unknown Unknown XX84c

Grip is not a solid color, sort of like a tiger pattern. Was given gun, which was my Grandfathers, who was in WWII, in the Air Force, he was a pilot. It came in a black leather holster which was old, and said P38 on the back of it. What year was the gun made, and could it in fact be his service pistol from WWII. I should be able to tell if I can get a date. Also how much would the pistol be worth, it is in good condition!

Answer:
Sorry Adam, but you have not supplied me with enough information to be able to determine the year or even the company that manufactured your P-38, although form the description of the grips I would guess that it is a Walther. Wartime issue P-38's should have a WW-II German ordnance code stamped on them (the ordnance code was used to hide the identity of the manufacturer). The most common codes are byf for Mauser, ac for Walther, and cyq for Spreewerke followed by 2 digits. The two digits that follow the ordnance code are the year of manufacture. I have talked with some WWII German pilots at gun shows who have told me that they were issued P-38's. If your grandfather was in the German Luftwaffe then there is a good possibility that he was issued this pistol. Your P-38 could be worth anywhere from $100.00 up to $3,500.00 for some of the rare versions. To be able to determine the value I would need a better description (check out our appraisals page)... Marc


# 108 - H&R Sahara
11/27/96
Dan Royce - dakar@ctol.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H & R Sahara Special 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

My father is giving my son this rifle for Christmas. My husband and I were wondering how much we should insure this gun for. I was told that it is a semi-automatic, single shot rifle and that H & R only made this model for two years. Any information about this gun and it's value would be very helpful. Thank you for your assistance.

Answer:
Karen- Sorry we cannot help you on this. I find no mention of a "Sahara" made by H&R, they tended to use model numbers instead of names. Also, I am not familiar with a semi auto that is a single shot. There are several single shot bolt action or top break models that have values of less than $150. The top value for any H&R .22 rifle is about $450 for a like new target rifle. I suspect the gun has priceless sentimental value. (I still have the single shot .22 that my dad got from his dad.) However, it may not be worth bothering with much insurance. If you find a model number, let us know. John Spangler


# 100 - Arimus HW7 (Herman Weihrauch) .22 Mag. Revolver.
11/23/96
Bob Walker walker@mkol2.dseg.ti.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
ARMINIUS Unknown 22 Mag. Unknown Unknown 321XXX

I have a question about the history of a firearm. The gun was given to me upon my uncle's passing. It is a war trophy brought back by him from WWII. I believe that he may have picked it from the assembly line when his unit captured the factory. My question is where and when was this gun made? Also, what purpose did 22 cal revolvers serve in WWII Germany? The details of the gun are: 22 magnum, 8 shot revolver, 6" vent rib barrel, ramp front sight, slot rear sight, brown plastic grips. Serial number 321XXX. Markings on right side of frame: Made in Germany. Markings on right side of barrel: FLE Miami, FLA.On the left side of frame is a black 1/2" circular metal disk with gold word ARMINIUS and left profile of figure with beard, long hair, and wings on head. The same figure is stamped on the frame. Also on left side of frame are the letters HW7 and 2 shields, one with 69inside the other with crosshatching inside. Markings on right side of barrel: Kal.22 Magnum. A small eagle like figure with the letter N below it is stamped on the frame, barrel and cylinder. Thank you very much for any information that you can give me on the history of this gun. Bob Walker walker@mkol2.dseg.ti.com

Answer:
Bob, I am afraid that I am going to have to refute your uncles claim that your revolver was captured during WWII. Arminius was originally the name of a German hero from the first century AD. The Arminius trade name was used by two different German firearms manufactures. The first company to use the Arminius name was Friederich Pickert of ZellaMehlis, Germany. Pickert manufactured inexpensive but well made pocket revolvers form 1922 to 1945. The second company to use the Arminius name was Herman Weihrauch Sportwaffenfabrik of MeIIrichstadt/Bayern, West Germany. Weihrauch started manufacturing revolvers under the Arminius name in the mid 1950's. My records indicate that your model HW7 revolver was manufactured by the Herman Weihrauch company of West Germany, some time during or after the mid 1950's... Marc


# 99 - Non-Matching Erfurt Luger
11/21/96

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger Looks like a standard military model 9mm 4" Blue XX54

Most of the parts seem to have the number 54 on them, though there is a slab of metal on the left side of the gun with 84 on it. the gun is dated 1913 on the top, and marked ERFURT with a crown symbol on top of the toggle assembly.

Any idea of the value of this gun, and if it is possible to trace where it was issued/made. The gun is in good condition with slight holster wear, and a few small marks, but internally the gun is very clean.

Answer:
Martin, your Luger was made at the Erfurt state arsenal located in Erfurt, Germany in 1913. The crown that you describe is the symbol that was stamped on Lugers manufactured at the Erfurt arsenal. Aprox. 500,000 Lugers were produced by Erfurt between 1910 and 1918, 25,000 Lugers were manufactured by Erfurt in 1913. Many firearms including Lugers have parts that are stamped with the last few digits of the weapon's serial number. When a firearm is described as "matching" it means that all of the parts that are stamped with a number match the weapon's serial number. When all of the parts of a Luger that are stamped with a number do not match, the value of the Luger is greatly reduced. A non-matching Erfurt Luger in the condition that you describe is worth in the $250.00 dollar range... Marc


# 97 - Refinish 1896 Mauser?
11/20/96
Dean Smith - unipur@id.co.zw

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Broomhandle Mauser 1896 ? 7.63mm Six inches ? Blue TBA

How do I obtain history on this particular weapon? I am told by different sources that it is best to leave the weapon in original condition rather than restoring. Is this true? If not, please advise what should be done. Can you tell me from the information supplied how much this could be worth, and I would be grateful for any other interesting facts etc that you may have. If you can't, please let me have other contacts. If necessary I can send you details of serial numbers and markings if this is of any use. ps Callingfrom Zimbabwe - get your atlas out to see where we are!

Answer:
Dean, Thanks for your question, it is good to hear form Callingfrom Zimbabwe. The 1896 or "Broomhandle" Mauser was manufactured in Obendorf, Germany from 1897 to 1938. Over the years Mauser produced many variations of the Broomhandle, but the most common one was the 1930 commercial. If I had the serial number I could tell you the year of manufacture for your Mauser. Values for different Broomhandle variations range from $150 dollars for a common 1930 commercial in rough condition to over $30,000 dollars for an all original and matching cone hammer in excellent condition. I would advise you not to restore your Broomhandle until you find out more about it, because if it is a rare model restoration would ruin it's value. A good book to get for information about the 1896 Mauser is The Mauser Self-Loading Pistol by James N. Belford and Jack Dunlap, published by Borden Publishing Co. of Alhambra California... Marc


# 94 - E L Cunder boys rifle
11/19/96
Norman Johns - njohns@iavbbs.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 22 short I believe 20 inch hex with 5/16 flats blue I believe Unknown

Left side of barrel chamber: a right pointing arrow followed by the letter P on it's back, a larger left pointing arrow followed by FL.6.mc, following the above an oval on it's side with a crown, embedded in the oval the letters E L Cunder side of barrel: the word BELGIUM the numbers 2253 under side of barrel underneath stock: the letter N surrounded with a circle the number 5A the number 1901the right pointing arrow with the on the back letter P occurs in numerous places throughout. This is a single shot, thumb operated hammer must be pulled back through the half cock and full cock position. The shell extractor is also thumb operated by being machined to the breach of the chamber to catch the shell's rim and hinged to the trigger/hammer assembly. The hammer (firing pin now days) looks like a flat circle with two half circle indentations leaving a ridge running from top to bottom to strike the shell's rim. Can you supply me with any information regarding manufacturer, caliber, age and approx value (fair to good condition).Thank You Norman Johns

Answer:
Norman- During the period from the 1890s through about 1920 "Boy's rifles" were very popular items for youngsters. (Why could you give 10 year olds guns then and they wouldn't shoot anyone, while now guns are banned from anyone under 18 but kids are killing lots of folks?) Anyway, Belgium was a major source of inexpensive guns, and many thousands were imported, often sold by big mail order companies like Sears, Montgomery Wards, etc. The "Belgium" marking and LG in oval proof mark confirm the source of your gun. The most common action used was a "Flobert" design, similar to what Americans often call a "rolling block" design. Most were .22 rimfire (sometimes short, or long, or long rifle) but sometimes of the caliber's are seen, perhaps .25 or .32 rimfire, or even 9mm rimfire, but ammo is basically not available for any of these. Even in excellent condition there is little interest in the foreign made boy's rifles, although the American made versions are popular with many collectors. People don't seem to have much luck selling Floberts at any price. If your gun has some family history, it is probably a nice souvenir, if not, it is good decoration, but not something that is very valuable. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 92 - E. Monseur Tege .65 Cal
11/18/96
John Helquist twist1@mail.idt.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
?? ?? I belive 65 caliber 40" Unknown Unknown

The words E. Monseur Tege stamped near the hammer (Lock). I have had someone tell me that they thought this rifle was manufactured in about 1860 and was used at the time of the Civil War. It is not a flint lock, but looks like one. It does however use percussion caps, with about a 60-65 caliber ball. The gun is in excellent condition. I am thinking a out selling the gun, but since do not have a good record of what it is, I don't have any idea what to ask for it. Just wondering if you may know from the words E. Monseur Tege stamped on it. Thanks for your help John-

Answer:
(Gotta be a good guy with a name like that!) Sorry we can't help a whole lot. Some photos or sketches would really help. However, I suspect (kinda feel like a fortune teller gazing in a crystal ball now) that you have a Belgian made musket of Civil War vintage. The "Tege" marking is probably "Leige" a famous gun making town in Belgium (home of FN where most Brownings were made). They made many variations of French and other military arms, and while "E. Monseur" is not listed in my reference books, it seems to fit in. Most commonly these arms were about .69 or .70 caliber, and had "back action" locks. Barrels are about 40-42 inches long held with three bands and a stock going to within 4 inches of the muzzle, and a ramrod underneath. I have seen rusty examples offered for $200 and have a really excellent one in my new catalog at $795. Again, we can't be sure these are the same as your gun. Good close up photos sent to Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171 would enable us to confirm this identification or make us admit we were wrong!... John Spangler


# 91 - Colt .38 Auto ???
11/17/96
Greg Bito - gsbito@mii.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Automatic 38 6 1/2" Unknown Unknown

On the right side, AUTOMATIC COLT (and) CALIBRE 38 RIMLESS SMOKELESSOn the left side, PATENTED APR.20.1897.SEPT.9.1902 (and) COLT'S PT.F.A.MFG CO HARTFORD, CT. USA with a five digit serial number.

When was this firearm manufactured, what is it's value? What other facts or interesting information do you have on this?

Answer:
Greg- Your pistol was made by Colt, sometime after 1902. It is probably one of two 1902 models but there are several other models that were manufactured in .38 caliber. Without a model name or a serial number (automatic is not a model name) we can't tell when it was made and just have to guess what model it might be. The 1902 models were made between 1902 and 1929. Value for one of the common 1902's in rusty junk condition is very low. One of the rare variations with exotic military markings in NRA antique excellent condition is in excess of $8,000. Wish we could be more specific, but the quality of our answers depends greatly on how much information we have to work with... John Spangler and Marc Wade


# 90 - Winchester Model 1897
11/15/96
DANWLID@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1897 12 gauge Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was just curious if you knew why Winchester developed and marketed a small number of Model '97 solid frame type shotguns versus the brake-down model, of which they made many thousands? Was it because it was priced cheaper than the original, a consumer demand for it, or just a different marketing ploy? With the cowboy action shooters buying up all the '97s they can find,(cutting off the barrels and shorting the stocks), it seems lately that good model '97s have been getting scarce. What is the current value of the solid frame and breakdown models in good condition? Thanks, Dan

Answer:
Dan- You have a suspicious mind or have been the victim of erroneous information. The first really successful pump shotgun, the Winchester Model 1893, had a solid frame. It had some mechanical flaws, and after about 35,000 were made, the Model 1897 was introduced, also with a solid frame. Solid frames continued until about serial number 208,000, in 1904 when the takedown model was introduced, and both types were in production for many years. Eventually slightly over 1 million Model 1897s were made. (Still the best ever made, in my opinion.) So, it was not economics driving production of a cheaper solid frame model, it was the development of a reliable take-down design that allowed a different design. Remember, 30 inch barrels were popular (ever some 32, 34 and 36 were sold) and if you have ever tried to lug one of those around in a vehicle (think train or buggy in the earlier days) you will appreciate how nice the take down feature is. I'm too lazy to check the old Winchester catalogs to see what the price difference then was. Right now, I haven't seen much difference in prices between the solid and take down models. I frequently see Model 97s (pretty rough) in the $150-200 range, with nice ones in the 250-350 range and later really nice ones $450 and up. Regional difference seem to be a factor too. Out in the west here the Cowboy shooters like them, but few shotgun hunters are competing with them. so prices may be lower than parts of the country where hunters want them. For military marked trench guns, solid or take down, the prices are high to astronomical, so keep that in mind, and watch for fakes... John Spangler


# 89 - Mismatch Colt 1860 Army
11/15/96
Brosh - brosh@matnet.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Mostly 1860 Army .44 8" Blue 85XXX

Address Col Saml Colt New York US a (gets a little fuzzy past here)proof marks "CC" on barrel

Hi again-another weird question for you guys. I have this Colt 1860 Army, with the same s/n on barrel and frame, but the grip frame is from an unknown Colt revolver. The s/n on the grip is 148XXX, and the frame retains traces of nickel finish. There are pins on the frame for locating the grips. My question has two parts-what model of Colt donated it's grip frame so my old Colt could ride again, and should I "correct" the Colt's configuration, or leave it as is and accept it as the guns history? It's not in great shape, but I take it out occasionally and run a few balls through it-one advantage of having a collectors piece that's not of collector quality! Thanks and CUL

Answer:
Chris- We are not Colt experts, but we'll answer anyway! Your gun was made in 1863. I suspect your M1860 Army's grip frame is from a later Colt Single Action Army made in 1893, based on "nickel" finish and pins for two piece grips. The grip frames are basically interchangeable on all the 1851-1873 models (or so I have been told). If "not in great shape" I would recommend leaving it as is, since it has a valid history of its own. We would welcome comments/correction by any Colt experts out there... John Spangler


# 82 - Marlin 93 .32-40 Rifle
11/14/96
Joe Peters - cenelec@evansville.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin 93 32-40 25 1/2 (hex) nickle none shown

Patent dates. October 11, 1887; April 12, 1889; August 1, 1889.The stock has several different animals hand carved on it. What do these dates mean? What was the production years of this rifle? What is the selling price of such a rifle? Is the hand carving original to the rifle?

Answer:
Joe, the Model 1893 Marlin began production in 1893 (what a surprise!) and in 1905 they changed the name marked on it to "Model 93" and it stayed in production until 1936. The patent dates on the barrel refer to various design features of the action, patented by L.L. Hepburn. The last date should read August 1, 1893. The 26 inch octagonal barrel and .32-40 caliber were pretty standard for this model. William S. Brophy's "Marlin Firearms" book is the definitive reference on these, and he does not mention nickel plating in connection with the Model 1893, nor any carving of animals on the stock. Many highly finished and special order guns are shown, and while there are a few with gold or silver plating, most just had lots of engraving and superb checkering. I suspect that the nickel finish and animal carvings are later non-factory work. Model 93s sold for about $30.00 new in the 1930s. For one with non-factory finish and carving, there would be little collector interest and it would be valued mainly as a shooter, but competing with the well made Model 336s in calibers that are easier to get ammo for. I would guess that you are probably in the $100-200 range. There should be a serial number, probably on the lower tang, underneath the lever. That would help identify the year it was made. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 87 - 44 Rimfire Cartridge Casings
11/14/96
ohaworkstation - oha@Alaska.NET

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm trying to date some .44 rimfire cartridge casings from an archaeological site. Can you tell me when brass began to replace copper in the manufacture of casings. The casings in question are of copper. Length = .925, rim width = .533,exterior diameter below the rim = .476The casings exhibit duel firing pin impressions -- Win. Model 66?Any advice you could offer would be appreciated. Thanks, Dave

Answer:
Dave- We will be glad to help on this question, but would like a little more info. A quick check shows that all rimfire cartridges made in North America prior to 1927 used copper cases, and the shift to brass varied with the maker after that. Are there any "headstamp" markings on the case? (Many were unmarked, but if marked it can really pin down a date). Are the sides of the case straight, or is there a "bottleneck" taper? If not deformed, can you provide a diameter of the case at the open end? Any other clues from the context of the site, or other artifacts from the same layer- military, hunters, settled area. etc.? Once sure of the caliber (there were a number of different .44 RF cartridges) we can look into the double firing pin marks. Are the marks exactly opposite each other? If not, it could be one that misfired and was then rotated for another try. (P.S.- the most interesting course I ever took was one on Historical Archaeology when I was working on a Masters in History at the University of Florida.)... John Spangler.


# 88 - Walther G43
11/14/96
DEREK SELTZER - derekseltzer@worldnet.att.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther G-43 rifle 8mm Unknown Unknown 97XX

waf.and ord marks,ac-44

Can you tell me a brief history of rifle, who and where they were used. mine has a winter trigger guard and zf-41 mounted scope.. thanks are there any books on this rifle..?

Answer:
Derek- Your G43 was made by Walther in 1944. There were used by a wide variety of units in all theaters. I do not know of any way to track German arms use by serial number records. If you have a zf-41 scope, it is incorrect, as that is for the K98k rifle with the scope rail on the rear sight base. The zf-4 scope (round ends but square center portion) was used on the G43. Smith & Smith "Small Arms of the World" and Senich "German Sniper 1914-1945" cover this gun pretty well... John Spangler


# 86 - Simmons Royal Shotgun
11/14/96
"Michael E. Cook" - omega@net66.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Simmons Royal Side by side 12 gauge Unknown Unknown Unknown

Don't have gun with me therefore don't have all data at this time. Know manufacturer?

Answer:
Mike, Simmons was a "house brand" name used by some retailer (sorry I don't know exactly who) for several shotguns. The ones I have listed are Simmons model 411 and 411E. These were made by Savage under their own name as the Savage 540DL and 540BDE respectively, and also as the Fox BDE 20 ga. That's all I know. Hope it helps... John Spangler


# 85 - Bridge Gun Co. Shotgun
11/14/96
THAWK@webtv.net (Mark Hudson)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bridge gun company Double barrel 12ga 30in Blue 8XXX

belgium laminated steel on top of barrel 8485 botton of barrel

Could you please help me find some infromation on this gun and what it might be worth its in good shape thanks for your help

Answer:
Hudson, your shotgun was made in Belgium and imported for sale by the Shapleigh Hardware Company. Bridge Gun Co was one of the trade names they used, sort of like Sears using the "Kenmore" nmae for appliances made by various firms. There is little collector interest in these old guns with "laminated" or damascus barrels. They are considered to be unsafe to shoot, and valued mainly as decorators. The seem to run in the $50-100 range, usually closer to the $50 end... John Spangler


# 84 - 1889 Belgian Short Rifle in 7x57
11/14/96
Brosh - brosh@matnet.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser FN 1889 Belgian short rifle 7 x 57 (That's the weird part) 22" blue Unknown

ON barrel, R5976, on reciever, R9767 Fabrique Nationale. across reciever

How did a otherwise unremarkable 89 Mauser end up barreled and chambered for 7x57?It has a steel barrel jacket, so I doubt that it was rebarreled after leaving the factory. I bought it from a gentleman who took it off the back of a truck at Springfield Sporters, where he worked at the time, in the early to mid '60's.It was in a shipment from South America. No source that I've seen lists this rifle in any other caliber than 7.65 Mauser. Would appreciate any ideas on this guns origin!

Answer:
Chris- Another fine mess you got us into! Once again, I am forced to confess my ignorance in front of everyone. Oh well, people were going to find out sooner or later anyway. I couldn't find anything in my reference materials (although there might be something in the new "Mauser Military Rifles" book). Let me suggest a possible explanation- After WWI FN was in business, but Mauser was not too active anymore. Perhaps your rifle was made as a sample in hopes of getting a contract from a South American country. I would guess perhaps Bolivia, Paraguay, Venezuela, or maybe even Colombia (or the chunk of Colombia we "liberated" which later became Panama.) Coming from a Springfield Sporters South American shipment sounds legitimate, and 7mm certainly supports South American sale. Well, that's the best story I can make up early in the morning. Hope it is enlightening. Let us know if you find a better explanation... John Spangler


# 80 - H.& D. Folsom Shotgun Identification
11/12/96
kristeen steeves - kristeen_steeves@bc.sympatico.ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown double barrel 12 guage 30 inches blued Unknown

Marked St.Louis Armstrong

I have been unable to find out anything about this firearm other than the obvious Serial numbers on the barrel and receiver match. I would like to know who, what, when, where and why thanks for your time Kristeen

Answer:
Kristeen- Your shotgun was foreign made (probably in Belgium) and imported by the H.& D. Folsom Company for either Shapleigh Hardware Company or Sears Roebuck & Co., probably in the 1890-1910 time frame. This was common practice, and even American makers would mark their products with a variety of different names or "house brands" for retailers, much like Sears would sell Whirlpool or GE appliances under the "Kenmore" label today. These old shotguns were mostly intended for use with black powder loads and are considered unsafe to shoot with modern ammunition. Great decorator items, but not much value or collector interest in them... John Spangler


# 79 - Marble Game Getter
11/12/96
Unknown

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co. Gladstone, Michigan "Marble's Game Getter Gun" 22 Rifle & 410 Shotgun - Over & Under 12 inches Not sure Not listed as far as I can tell

The stock is a metal folding one and came with a leather holster and carrying strap. The gun is around 75-80 years old. I would appreciate any information about the actual age of the weapon, how many were manufactured, how many are still in existence, etc. Thanks very much.

Answer:
Thanks for asking about "Game Getters." Marble made axes, compasses and a nifty little over-under combination gun called the "Game Getter." These were made from about 1907 to the 1920s, and with enough changes that there are a number of people who collect them. These were made in 12, 15 and 18 inch barrel lengths. The 18 inch versions are legal to buy and sell like any other cartridge rifle or shotgun. However those with 12 or 15 inch barrels are considered "sawed off shotguns" and illegal under federal law unless they were registered during the amnesty period after passage of the Gun Control Act of 1968. If registered there should be some BATF paperwork for them. If this is found, then they can be transferred with BATF approval, and payment of a transfer tax (I think it is $5.00 for these, compared to $200.00 for full auto guns). If the paperwork cannot be found, then these would be illegal to own , possess, sell, etc., and no responsible collector would touch one under any circumstances... John Spangler


# 74 - Webley .455 MK1
11/12/96
sibb54@ix.netcom.com (Jean Scibila)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley MK1 455 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I just picked up a Webley Mark I pistol. It has a HUGE broad arrow engraved on the back strap as well as many smaller arrows elsewhere. The cylinder has many markings of a crown over the letters VR over crossed pennants over the number 22.The barrel is marked 45AC.The frame carries the legend "Webley Mark I Patents". The butt is rounded and has a lanyard ring, the grips are black bakalite. The piece is not dated. Can you give me some info on this pistol? Thanks, Len

Answer:
Len- I can't help much on your Webley Mark I. The most common .455 Webley is the No. 1 Mark VI made mainly during WWI, and clearly dated and marked with maker's names. As far as I know these all had square butts. There were "Mark I" Webleys made earlier by Webley mainly for commercial sales. The "Broad Arrow" is an English Government property marking which has been used for centuries. (Didn't Robin Hood get in trouble messing with stuff marked with a broad arrow?) Often a second arrow was marked point-to-point indicated official sale or cancellation of govt. ownership. The crown/VR/pennants markings are normal proof markings. The "45AC" marking is a red flag to me. Although it could be a regimental marking, I suspect that it indicates the gun has been converted to fire .45 ACP ammo instead of .455 Webley ammo. This conversion was quite popular in the 1960s when lots of British surplus was being imported. You have proven I don't know much about Webleys, but you might have better luck checking with the Enfield Collectors (see the link on our link page.) Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 78 - Winchester Model 1910
11/11/96
Glen Frederick - glenfred@MNSi.Net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester repeating fireaarms 1901 10 ga. 10 ga. 28 inches Blue 71XXX

Old style WRS scrolled together on the left side of the action, steel but plate and very good walnut stock

What is the approx. date of manufacture and is this gun (very good shape) worth anything. I was also wondering if I could use a 3.5 inch shell cut down to either 2.50, or 2.875 with the standard grade of powder . what loads for each size would you recommend? what type of powder would you feel sufficient? for this gun what recommendations would you advise

Answer:
Glen, thanks for your question. The Winchester Model 1901 was manufactured from 1901 to 1920. Model 1901 serial numbers started at 64,856 and aprox. 13,000 were produced. My records indicate that your Model 1901 was manufactured in 1906. The value of your Model 1901 depends on it's condition. Fjestad's blue book of gun values lists the value of a 1901 in 90% new condition at $1000, 80% new condition lists at $875. Sorry but we do not give out reloading advise... Marc


# 77 - Winchester Model 1866 Saddle Ring Carbine
11/10/96
"Steve L. Parnell" - auntdoe@worldnet.att.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1866 Saddle Ring Carbine Unknown Unknown blue original 153XXX

Top of barrel between sight and forearm has the following numbers 5.0C.03.AC.A Please note the numbers and letters after the period are very small and are above the periods. This gun was purchased in the fifties and I am trying to establish the value and history including the markings. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Steve- Sorry that we don't have all the answers. Also, we are so lazy we don't even make things up if we don't know. I can say that your barrel markings are not U.S. military. They used a pattern of number/letter/number which indicated the regiment, the company(or troop, or battery depending on if the unit was infantry, cavalry or artillery, respectively), and then the number of the soldier in that company/troop/battery. Also, they strictly prohibited marking arms themselves, although most other gear was marked. They could be foreign military markings, as a lot of 1866 Winchesters were sold to foreign governments. Known sales include: 5,000 carbines to Turkey in 1870-71; 3,000 to France about the same time; and thousands more to Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Mexico. Most of the big foreign sales were over by the time your gun was made in 1880. However, smaller orders continued for many years, and George Madis' "Winchester Book" lists a carbine in the 153000 range as used by a Mexican state, but is marked (differently) on the receiver, not the barrel. The markings could indicate a commercial firm, perhaps hunting arms to supply food for construction workers in the wilderness; or to resist attacks by hostile Indians, ranchers, or union members; or to protect valuable products or equipment. Probably the best bet would be to send for a "factory letter" from the Winchester Records at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming. I believe the cost is about $45.00 but may be off on that figure. If the records are available, that will at least indicate actual shipping date, and perhaps where it was shipped. There is also a high-dollar dealer in California with a data base on Colts and Winchesters reflecting most of those which have been noted in published articles or sales catalogs. They charge a fee for their services, but they are probably worth checking. Unfortunately, I don't have their address handy, but if you want it, I will look it up for you. Hope you find out they are exciting markings!... John Spangler


# 76 - Winchester Model 1911 Shotgun
11/9/96
John Winkelman - wink@fish-net.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1911.s.l 12 gauge Full Nickel 27XXX

Marc, can you help us with some information on a shotgun? It is made by Winchester; Model 1911.S.L; Serial number is 27XXX with the numeral 3 inside a diamond in front of the serial number. The barrel is pulled in to load a shell. Wonder about age and value of this gun. Thanks for any info you can provide. E-mail address is wink@fish-net.com

Answer:
John, the Model 1911 is the first semi-automatic shotgun that was ever offered by Winchester. The Model 1911 originally came with either a 26 or 28 inch barrel in various chokes, and a laminated birch pistol grip stock. Winchester manufactured 82774 Model 1911's between 1911 and 1925. My records indicate that your 1911 was manufactured in 1912. I can find no mention of the Model 1911 ever being offered by Winchester with nickel plating. Collector demand for the Model 1911 Winchester is not very high, and I would estimate that a model 1911 that is nickel plated would be worth at most $150 or less... Marc


# 75 - Lefever Arms Co Shotgun
11/9/96
tompope@fia.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lefever Arms Co, ???? 12 guage double barrel 30" blue 24XXX

Patented 1872 73.80.85.86.87.

I would like more information as to the age and some indications to the possible value of this firearm. Thanks very much...Tom Pope

Answer:
Tom- Lefever Arms Company was the name used by that firm circa 1879-1902. About 1915 they were bought out by Ithaca. We know your gun was made after 1882 (due to the patent dates). You didn't say if it was a hammer gun or hammerless, and if the barrels were damascus or steel. Production seems to have overlapped on those features. All Lefever guns were well made and highly regarded then and now. While they made some high grade guns, most were just good reliable guns for average or upper-middle class markets. Hammerless guns with steel barrels are still in demand as shooters, and the Cowboy Action shooters like the hammer guns, but not particularly with damascus barrels. I think I have seen Lefevers without any special features priced in the $250-350 range. Hope that helps. John Spangler


# 73 - S/42 G Date Luger
11/2/96
MauserVic@prodigy.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Luger 9 4" Blue 47XX

Marc: My question is about another Luger: The barrel is 4in long, the finish is blue, it has walnut grips, the finish condition is 100%, all the numbers match except the magazine (no number) the Pistol's ser# is 47xx. Markings: On the chamber it has a "G", on the toggle there's a "S/42", On the right side of the receiver it has an eagle with the number "63" under it, next to that it has what looks like a square missing one side, and the number"92" inside of it "[92", and next to that it has what looks like an eagle made out of "sticks", This eagle doesn't look anything like the regular Nazi eagles I have seen. The magazine has an eagle with the number "63" under it. This pistol is Importer Marked, and was advertised as "captured and reconditioned" by the Russians. My questions are: Can you give me any information about this pistol?, is it rare?, what's its value? Thanks____Victor

Answer:
Victor, Thanks for your question. The markings that you have told me about, are all correct for a ''G'' date Luger. S/42 is a WW-II German ordnance code assigned to Mauser-Werke AG, Oberndorff am Neckar, Germany. G is the code stamped on the many thousands of Lugers made by Mauser in 1935. The eagle with the 63 is the German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark on arms produced at Mauser, and the 92 in the brackets is the German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspectors mark for Mauser P-08 - K and G code Lugers. Over the years I have seen very few Soviet firearms (captured or domestic) that have not been reconditioned, it was common practice for the Soviets to recondition most of their firearms. I am afraid that the fact that your luger is reconditioned will lower its value, I would estimate the value of a Soviet arsenal refinished G date Luger to be in the $250 to $300 dollar range... Marc


# 72 - Model 1873 Winchester
11/2/96
tarek@www.inetbjx.net.mx (Lic. Tarek Mazlum)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester's 1873 38-40 24 inches-octagon barrel Maybe blue 414XXX

Open rear sighted brass front sight solid brass loading gate tubular magazine winchester's repeating arms new Haven Conn King's improvement patents Mar 29-1866 Oct. 1869good in safe working condition I would like to know all about my father%60s rifle. Since I was a young boy, he used to speak me about the special editions of the Winchester 73 called one of one thousand. Would you be so kind to give me more information about. Thanks you. I hope to hear from you very soon. Tarek Mazlum

Answer:
Tarek, My references indicate your rifle, serial number 414XXX was made in 1892. Winchester made 136 Model 1873 rifles with fancy engraving, extra fancy wood, lots of special features. They sold for $100 at a time when the regular 1873 rifle was selling for about $20. The special rifles had "One of One Thousand" engraved on the top of the barrel just in front of the receiver. An original in NRA antique "good" condition is worth about $25,000, and up to $100,000 in NRA Antique "excellent" condition. I would be very happy for you if you have one! However, many fake one of one thousand rifles have been made over the years. People are very careful when buying them to check all the details. It is possible to get a letter from the Winchester Factory records (now at the Cody Firearms Museum, Cody Wyoming) documenting most Winchester rifles and when they were shipped. For ordinary guns they are not too exciting, and probably not worth the $30 it costs for the letter. To authenticate a 1 of 1000 rifle, it would be crazy not to get one. I don't know if I have anything with serial numbers of known 1 of 1000 rifles listed. Collectors believe that there may be several dozen still not found by collectors yet. If your rifle does have a lot of engraving on it, we can try to do some more research for you. Let us know. Hollywood made a movie (I think it was called "Winchester '73") which included a lot about the 1 of 1000 rifles. I have not seen the movie... John Spangler


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