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# 1533 - Colt Army Special Revolver
11/28/98
Michael, Tulsa, OK, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Revolver Army Special PTF (??) 32/20 6 Inch Blue 467291

Mfg. Hartford Pat. aug. 5, 1884 june 5, 1900 july 4, 1905 I would like a little history and approx. value of the gun. It is in good condition, but don't know if it can be safely fired. thanks

Answer:
Michael- over 240,000 Colt Model 1908 Army Special's were manufactured from 1908 to 1927, my records indicate that your revolver was manufactured in 1922. The Army Special was the successor to the New Army and Navy, and incorporated a number of improvements including modernization of the shape of the frame, cylinder rotation was changed to clockwise and the cylinder was locked by a single peripheral recess for each chamber, engaging with a bolt at the rear of the cylinder, the cylinder latch was rounded off, and the hammer was given a pivoting firing pin. Colt dropped the 3 inch barrel length, and lengths were standardized at 4.5 and 6 inches. Calibers included .32, .38 Short and Long, .38 S & W Special, .38 Special and .41 Long. Blue book values for the Army Special range from $175 to about $500 depending on condition and markings. It has been my experience that these are slow movers unless they have special markings, and I usually consider myself lucky if I sell one for over $175. As with any firearm this old, I would advise you to have it checked by a competent gunsmith before you fire it. Marc


# 1647 - Alexander Hamilton Duel Pistols
11/28/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I would like to know if there is any information to the whereabouts of the pistols used in the duel between Aarron Burr and Alexander Hamilton. Wich we all know Hamilton lost. May have seen them and would like any info if possible. Thank you if you could answer me as soon as possible, just in case the are the real thing and may hit the road before I know for sure.

Answer:
Sir- I don't know the answer to your questions without doing a lot of research, but I think I can help---a lot.

I am certain that the original pistols are in a museum or major collection somewhere, and were pictured on a cover of the American Rifleman sometime in the last30 years.

Now, what you really need to know. I am pretty certain that the American Historical Foundation of Richmond, VA, offered a copy of these about 10-20 years ago. Maybe it was another outfit, but since these folks have offered commemorative firearms for nearly every historical event (except National JELLO Week) I am pretty sure it was them. Certainly nice quality pieces, but not quite the same thing as THE originals. In my opinion their commemoratives, as well as most other commemoratives, are very poor investments although they may be fun to collect or have sentimental value for the purchaser.

If you think you have some pistols that may be the originals, first check carefully to be sure they are handmade, then be sure they are old. If they look like new, they probably are. If they look like they MIGHT be old, they MIGHT be, but MIGHT NOT be. Fakers are clever, and often skilled craftsmen.

If you are convinced they are real, be sure you get a written receipt specifying exactly what the seller purports them to be, and includes written promise of full refund if examination by an expert to be selected by the purchaser fails to support the seller's claims. I would them have them examined and appraised by Eric Vaule, Norm Flayderman, or a few other true experts. It may cost a fair chunk of change for this service but failure to be very cautious may just validate P.T. Barnum's claim that there is a sucker born every minute. Good luck. John Spangler


# 1646 - Original Hanel Larenz Rifle
11/28/98
Richard

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a single shot, bolt action rifle with the inscription ORIGINAL "HANEL LARENZ". I'll assume that it's German but I don't know why the word "ORIGINAL" would be on it unless it was a remanufactured original and the company doing the work wanted to highlight the fact. It also has a bayonet with matching serial numbers with the gun. Ever hear of the name?

Answer:
Richard- I don't know the answer to your question but will make a barely educated guess anyway.

Matching serial number bayonet is an interesting feature, and helpful note since you didn't tell us the model. With a bayonet it is probably one of the German service rifles Model 1871 (which was a single shot), the 1871/84 (a tubular magazine repeater) the 1888 or 1898 but both the latter were box magazine repeaters in the service model. However, target shooters have often used slightly modified version of military service rifles when allowed under the competition rules in effect at the time. (A current U.S. example is use of the commercial M1A and AR-15 rifles which are semi-automatic only, not the military issue M14 or M16 rifles which are full automatic "assault rifles.") In the pre-WW2 era German target shooters often used rifles similar to the Gewehr 98 Mauser but chambered for a 8.15x46mm cartridge. I think some of these were single shot instead of magazine fed, just as a very few M1903 Springfield rifles were made with solid bottom receivers for single shot target rifle use.

The "Original Hanel" markings are probably intended to assure the buyer that this is a real one made by the Hanel folks. Similar to the rampant colt marking on the AR-15s to identify them as the real Colt product instead of a clone by Bubba's aluminum screen door, frying pan, and rifle company.

I am sure a lot of other guys know a lot more about these, but think this is pretty close to the truth. Hope it helps John Spangler


# 1634 - W. Ketland & Co. flintlock
11/24/98
Sprague

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
W. Ketland & Co. Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a client who is having an estate sale. He has asked me to find information regarding a flintlock rifle left to him by his father. From what I can appreciate, it is:

W.Ketland & Co. manufactured flintlock rifle with a sailboat and thistle pod indentation stamped into the receiver group. I understand that it was made in Scotland and may be one of only 30 made. Your guidance and expertise would be appreciated.

Answer:
Sprague- William Ketland & Co operated in Birmingham, England from 1808 to 1829. In addition to making complete guns, they also make large numbers of locks for the export trade to the U.S..

I do not recognize either the "sailboat" or "thistle pod" markings as either U.S. or English proofmarks. Nor can I validate the "only 30 made" comment. Most guns of the period were virtually handmade to the customer's requirements (for better guns) or the maker's whims (or materials on hand at the time) for lesser quality guns.

We would need full description with dimensions, and some good photos of the lock, the markings, and other details, plus overall view in order to tell you much of anything.

In general, a plain smoothbore flintlock English fowler of the period 1808-1828 would probably run in the $300-500 range in average condition. Figure about half that if converted to percussion. Fine quality pieces or rifles would run higher, but without knowing more about the gun we could not even guess on values. John Spangler


# 1633 - Swedish Mauser
11/24/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Is there an advantage to the 38 vs 96 model? Thanks.

Answer:
Sir- Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Some gentlemen prefer slender blondes, others (perhaps not even qualifying as gentlemen) prefer plump brunettes (with a cigar and wearing a beret?). Some think a leafy walnut tree is beautiful while others admire the fine furniture and gunstocks made of figured walnut. Both the model 1896 and 1938 use the same action and 6.5x55mm ammunition. The earlier was made when long barrels were popular for full burning of the powder charge, maximum muzzle velocity, and a long sight radius for long range shooting. The later models had a shorter barrel length to be handier in a time when troops often climbed in and out of vehicles, and the bent bolt handle was less likely to poke your comrade. There was little practical loss of velocity or accuracy from the shorter barrel and sight radius. Apparently more people prefer the shorter M1938 rifles, as the surplus dealers seem to sell them at higher prices than the longer M1896 rifles. In my opinion the Swedish Mausers are the biggest bargain in the surplus market in recent years. Superb quality materials and workmanship and with 6.5x55 ammo readily available at good prices make all of these exceptional values. Unlike the ubiquitous cheap semi-automatic SKS, these are bolt action and do not fall into the "ugly" category. It will take the politicians a little longer to find excuses to ban and confiscate these. John Spangler


# 1628 - Winchester Model 52 Value.
11/24/98
James, Port Clinton, Ohio

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 52 .22 Long Rifle 26"? Blue I Think 43917

I am looking for information and an approximate value for this gun. It has been in a closet for about 30 years and was made in 1938 as far as I know. It is in great shape. Thank you.

Answer:
James- Many consider the Winchester Model 52 to be Winchester's finest .22 caliber bolt action rifle. The Model 52 was introduced in 1919 and about 125,233 were manufactured by 1979 when production ceased. The Model 52 was available in many different barrel types and configurations including the standard target model, heavy barrel target, extra heavy barrel (bullgun target rifle), international match and sporter. There are sub-varieties identified by the letter following the serial number, which indicated a major design change. The early "pre-A" version had a slow firing pin, while the "A" model had a "speed lock". The "B" model was very popular before and after WW2 among target shooters and introduced the "marksman stock" on the target guns. The circa 1950s "C" model had a much better trigger and bedding system and is still prized by some shooters. The "D model introduced in the 1960s was single shot with solid receiver bottom (earlier models all used detachable box magazines) and had a factory installed accessory channel for hand stops, palm rests, etc. Unfortunately the triggers on most of the later "D" models were junk. I think the final model was an "E" model but do not have details on it. The 52B and 52C sporters are beautiful guns, and highly accurate, plus pretty pricey. The recent Browning made copies are about as good and often available under $500 making them a real bargain for someone looking for a high class shooter. Model 52 values range from $250.00 to over $2500.00 depending upon configuration and condition, but $500 is a pretty good guess for most. Let us know if you want to sell yours. Marc


# 1627 - Rifle Identification
11/21/98
Heather

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi I am wondering if you could tell me what type of gun this is, It's stamped 1943 with a crown between the 19-43,it has a disk on the butt that is circular with two rows of numbers inner row (1) outer (25) the rows are Torped & Overslag the numbers are in a triangle. the really strange part is the breech section there are only two bumps to grab hold of and to load a round you push it forward then back, then it throws a round in the chamber, also it has a clip I think ten rounds. if you know what type this is could you please e-mail me and tell me.

Answer:
Heather- You have a Swedish M42B "Ljungman" semi auto rifle. These were made in 6.5x55mm Swedish caliber (an excellent cartridge). These were sold as surplus in the late 1960s or early 1970s, often in near new condition. The Egyptians made a variation of this in 8mm Mauser caliber known as the "Hakim." Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1626 - Herman Goering Rifle
11/21/98
Dan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a hunting rifle that belonged to Herman Goering (Adolf Hitler's General). I am interested in authenticating this rifle and finding a buyer. The rifle is in excellent condition and is obviously a very special piece. Can you help.

Answer:
I regret we cannot help much on authenticating this item. As the old soldiers of WW2 slowly pass away, families have many relics with interesting stories based on some facts and some guesses. Private Ryan may have picked up a hunting rifle in Germany in a village near Goering's hunting lodge. Over the years the story may have been shortened somewhat to become "Goering's hunting rifle." Nearly impossible to prove or disprove these stories unless the gun has a clearly authentic inscription to identify the owner. With the rampant fakery in Nazi stuff, one needs to be very leery of inscriptions too.

On the other hand, an inscribed firearm, with supporting documentation (photos of the owner holding it, newspaper account of presentation, "capture papers" records of being displayed as Goering's hunting rifle in museum, prominent gun shows, etc) and complete written chain of custody from time of capture to present might be authentic.

Buyers for top Nazi stuff are a special group (often weirdoes, in my opinion) and prices may reach astronomical levels for items that strike their fancy and area accepted as authentic.

We would be interested in marketing this for you if authenticating documentation is available. Otherwise, we probably cannot do much for you on this item. John Spangler


# 1621 - HSC Identification
11/21/98
Anders Welin Sweden

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser-Werke A:G Oberndorf A.N HS C 7.65 Unknown Blue 758.255

On the right side of the trigger guard an eagle over the letter N. Very good condition. Date of manufacture? What branch of the German armed forces used this? Value?

Answer:
Anders, Nazi HSC pistols were made from 1941 until the end of the war, serial numbers began at 700,000 and ended at 951,000. Pistols used by the German armed forces will have an Eagle over "WaA135" markings on the left side of the trigger guard where it meets the frame. This marking is the German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark on arms produced at Mauser Werke AG, Oberndorf am Neckar, Germany. The Eagle over the letter N marking that you describe is a commercial test proof and it should be located in 3 places. 1- on the right side of the chamber (barrel), 2 - on the right side of the trigger guard, and 3 - on the right side of the slide near the muzzle. HSC's issued to the police have an eagle over an x inside a circle with the letter L to the right stamped on the left side of the trigger guard. If your HSC does not have Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks, it is doubtful that it is of military issue. Normal HSC values are in the $175 to $300 range depending on condition and markings. Values for special variations like Political Leader or Kreigsmarine pistols can be over $1000. Jan Still wrote an excellent book "Axis Pistols" full of good information on the amazing variety of handguns used by German forces, both German made and from over-run countries. Marc


# 1616 - LeFrancis Le Gendarme
11/17/98
Oklahoma, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown (MF On Hand Grip) Brevete 6.35 4.5" (total Gun Length) Blue NO. 1 58385

MF encircle on hand grip by wreath of leaves w/a bow at the bottom. Has writing on barrel, mostly unreadable. Look's like Manjfac...Francaise D'... Saint Etienne. Just want some information about the gun.

Answer:
Sir, from your description it sounds like you have a Manufrance LeFrancis Le Gendarme (Policeman) Model. Le Francais automatic pistols were made of excellent materials with good quality workmanship by French standards, they differ from most automatic pistols because the back travel of the slide does not cock the weapon. In this unique design, the force of the explosion merely blows the slide back to permit the gases to eject the empty case (there is no extractor) and to compress the recoil spring. The recoil spring drives the slide ahead to strip the top cartridge from the magazine and chamber it. The first Le Francais automatic pistol was designed in 1913 and was marketed in 1914 as the Modele de Poche. The 6.35mm Le Gendarme, which was essentially the same pistol with a longer barrel was introduce shortly afterwards. Le Francais pistols had a hinged drop-down barrel. The hinged barrel could be released by a lever to allow the breech to rise clear of the slide which gave access for cleaning or loading. The barrel catch is linked to the magazine so that the barrel opens as soon as the magazine is withdrawn. Baseplates of Le Francais magazines often have a spring clip for an extra cartridge, the spare round can be loaded into the chamber before the barrel is closed. Consequently, there was no need to retract the slide to cock or chamber a round, and the earliest examples of Le Francais pistols were made without finger grips on the slide. Le Francais pistol production ceased in the early 1970s. Marc


# 1611 - Seeking Info About An Old Bayonet
11/17/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am seeking info about an old bayonet. It looks like the pictures of your U.S. 1905 SME4 except it has US on one side of the blade and 1805 on the other side. It is in a leather sheath which I was told was handmade.

Answer:
Sir- Sure sounds like a Krag bayonet to me, if the blade is about 10-12 inches long. These were marked US on one side and dated on the other (1894-1903 usually). The only leather scabbards associated with these are actually made for picket pins, but fit nicely.. They had a metal ring at the top somewhere. M1905 bayonets were made starting in 1906. These had 16 inch blades. The earliest scabbards were leather with a metal throat piece about 1.5 to 2 inches long. and a pivoting metal hook arrangement. These were later modified to eliminate the pivoting hook and a small wire belt hook as installed. There was an experimental bayonet made in 1905 with a 16 inch blade which could have been marked US and 1905. The grips were held by rivets. Not sure what the scabbards were like on these. These are rare, and I would like to add one to my collection. John


# 1608 - German .22 Training Rifles
11/17/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently purchased 1- 22 and 1-22 carbine as a birthday gift for a friend. The only info I could get was they were made between 1938 and 1941 for the German Youth Movement during W.W.II. Any other information as to manufacturer, value, or history would be appreciated. Thank-you for your time.

Answer:
Sir- These sound like Deutsche Sporttmodell (DSM) or German Sport Model rifle or the similar Klein Kaliber Wehr (KKW) or Small Caliber Service rifle. These were made by about 5 or 6 makers with several minor variations. They were used for training young people to shoot in the equivalent of Boy Scouts, or the more military and politically oriented youth groups, and even for some recruits in preliminary phases of military training.

Value depends on condition, condition, condition, the exact variation, and any unusual markings. Figure $250 to $500 for most examples. Hope this helps. My birthday is not until July, so you have plenty of time to shop. John


# 1615 - Stevens 124B
11/14/98
Terry Farmersburg, IA . USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens Savage Arms Corp. 124B 12Ga. 28 In. Blue NONE

I would like to know the year or at least the era this gun was made. Also if there is anywhere on this planet I could buy a stock for it.

Answer:
Terry, the Stevens Model 124B was manufactured circa 1950. The 124B was offered in 12 Ga. only, it had a straight pull action, 28 in. barrel, 3 shot magazine and a Tenite (plastic) butt stock and forearm. For parts try the link to Gun Parts Corporation on our links page. Marc


# 1607 - Remington Shotgun, R.B. Action
11/14/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Iv got a Remington shotgun, r.b. action , Top of stock is stamped, E. Remington & Sons. Ilion NY. U.S.A. PAT. MAY 3d 1864 etc all the way to March 18 1874 . Was this shotgun ever made or was it a rifle before? Any history or facts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Answer:
Sir- Remington made several thousand shotguns based on the rolling block action circa 1870s to 1890s with 30 or 32 inch barrels of either damascus or plain steel. The first model used a shotgun style buttplate and the second type (circa 1893) used a military style buttplate. Bot these were unusual in that they were chambered to use either 16 gage brass shells or 20 gage paper shells. Flayderman's Guide shows values around $275-300 in NRA antique very good to $700-800 in NRA antique excellent condition. Neat old guns. However, we must caution that it would be very easy to confuse a rifle with the three broad shallow grooves pretty well shot out or rusted over with a shotgun. In this case it would be worth very little. Hope this helps. Let us know if you want us to help you sell it to an appreciative collector. John Spangler


# 1606 - Stock Cartouche Stampers
11/14/98
Terry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown M-1 Garand Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I understand that there is a someone in UT that has the appropriate cartouche stamps for the M-1 Garand. His name is Terry Smith. Do you have his number? Also, got my CMP Collector Grade M-1 the other day. Bit of a disappointment. The wood was dinged and gouged. The metal was very nice (1955 manufacture) but I don't think they are any great bargain at $750. I decided to keep it as I have a virtually new M-1 GI Springfields walnut Garand Stock with no cartouches (hence the interest in contacting Terry Smith). CMP will send a replacement stock when they find the appropriate one. Terry

Answer:
Terry, Sorry you didn't get as nice a rifle as other folks I had heard about. I consider stock cartouche stampers (and I reluctantly guess their clients) to be very low forms of life and heartily condemn the practice. While I realize that neither you nor the party with the fake cartouche stamps intends to defraud, the difference between original and fake is usually forgotten when a third party gets their hands on a gun and the fourth guy in line gets screwed. I respectfully decline to assist in this effort and would hope that you would reconsider. John Spangler


# 1600 - Erma EGM1 Information
11/10/98
Heinz Frechen Germany

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Erma EGM 1, Mod.70 22 LR Unknown Unknown Unknown

Are their any tests or descriptions about this gun?

Answer:
Heniz - The Erma EGM1 is a .22 LR, carbine which was styled after the US M1. The EGM1 was introduced in 1970 and discontinued in about 1985. The EGM1 weighed 5.6 LBS, had an 18 inch barrel, adjustable aperture rear sights and came with a 10 or 15 round magazine. I could find no results from tests that were done on the EMG1, but Fjestad must like them, his blue book places EMG1 values for examples in 95% condition at $250.00. Marc


# 1603 - Calgary Stampede 1981 Commemorative Rifles
11/10/98
Wayne

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

A friend of mine has two Canadian Calgary Stampede 1981 Commemorative rifles he wishes to sell. These rifles are in the original boxes not opened. He would like to know if you have any idea what the current value of these would be, and if there is a market for them. There were 1000 of them made according to the info he has. The cases are made of oak or mahogany, not sure of which. You have been of great help to me in the past, I hope you can be again. Thank you for all your help!!

Answer:
Wayne- These sound like very nice rifles, but I think you will have a hard time selling them. The U.S. market for commemoratives is very weak, and there is little interest on this side of the border for the Canadian models. You have allowed your stupid politicians to essentially ban private ownership of guns in Canada. (Well, not ALL guns yet, but just wait a while and they will insist on getting any that remain, so that the crime problem will surely be stopped with "just one more reasonable compromise- if it saves one life- for the children...") The customs and other paperwork associated with importing modern guns from Canada make it more trouble than it is worth for us to consider doing anything with these. We suggest you contact John Denner on our links page, a fine Canadian Dealer and see if he can help you. Good luck. John


# 1602 - Inherited Collection
11/10/98
Thomas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently inherited a sizable collection of antique percussion/flintlock rifles and long guns, Civil War Colt sidearms, and percussion/flintlock pistols from my dad. You may know him, his name is Al -----. He was a school teacher from New Jersey who did most of his collecting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He is still very much with us, but he wanted me to get a head start enjoying them, so I have them. My uncle is Dr. David ------, a Civil War historian and Great War buff. I did a search and your page came up. Your name is very familiar to me, and I think we might have met when I was very young. I am writing to inquire as to how to gain more information in my area about these beautiful artifacts. I do not shoot black powder, but am a tactical and defense shooter. There are people at the tac range that I overhear discussing long rifles, but I do not know who to trust. Are there reputable dealers, appraisers in my area? I want to get a feel for what I've got, and also meet other collectors with whom I might enjoy collecting and ownership with as a hobby. Let me know what you come up with. The firesticks are in safe storage at a remote location, and are difficult to transport. There are 24 rifles, 12 Colt sidearms, 14 assorted pistols, two matching dirks, two matching twigs, and about 15 powder horns. I am restricted from selling any of these items through a family trust agreement, but would like to learn more. Most of the people my dad dealt with are long gone -- like Hacker Martin - the bearded mountain man from Virginia who had no windows in his house and steadily filled up an old barrel full of bees which he'd grab out of the air and rip in two! Saw him get stung only once, and he actually shed a tear. Thank you for any help you can provide.

Answer:
Thomas- I am very bad on names, so it is possible we have met. If not, it must have been some other handsome, intelligent, and friendly person. Likewise your Dad and Uncle. I have done enough shows at various time in eastern Pennsylvania, and central and northern Florida that our paths may have crossed.

Sounds like a wonderful collection, and I am delighted to see someone familiar with modern guns have the opportunity to get a better understanding of the older stuff.

The only specific recommendation I have for a south Florida contact would be Norm Flayderman, one of the best and longest established dealers still in the business. Fine gentleman, but mainly into buying and selling. There may be a collector's group in your area. Ask around at any of the gun shows when you see a table with old stuff on it. The owner will probably know. Also ask if there is a club around affiliated with the National Muzzle-Loading Rifle Association. That is where the long-rifle shooters hang out, but be careful, they are mainly into modern copies and less well informed about the originals than perhaps 30 years ago when there were few "modern" copies so they all shot originals.

To learn more, get a copy of Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their Values. Any bookstore should have it or can get a copy for you ($32.95). Read the general material in the front, then the opening comments in the chapters dealing with items in your new collection. Decide which area interests you most right now, and then look at Flayderman's listing of recommended books in that chapter. Buy the books, or get them from your local library on inter-library loan and read some more.

Look for a GOOD gun show to attend. CADA (Collector Arms Dealers Assn) puts on one a year in Orlando, I think, and that will be an excellent chance to see some other nice old guns and people that are interested in them. You will also see one or two camouflaged SKS lovers who didn't realize this was a "real" gun show and not a surplus/flea market event that most shows have become. It is worth the time and travel to attend a good show.

Here are two more books- Ned Roberts' The Muzzle Loading Cap-Lock Rifle, and Bill Edwards' Civil War Guns. Both are very readable, with a good mix of info on the history surrounding the guns, as well as nuts and bolts details on the hardware.

If you ever decide to sell some of the pieces, we would be glad to have the opportunity to help find good homes for them. We would rather see you enjoy them for a while, but eventually every collector will have to pass them on to another generation. We just pay for the privilege of owning them for a few years. Enjoy your turn. John


# 1601 - Old Henry Leman Gun
11/7/98
Larry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Henry Leman Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello! Glad to find help. I have an old mussel loading long rifle that has been in the family for generations. The only markings on it are LEMAN and below that LANCSTR,PA Can you tell me when the gun was made, and how it was used. Thank you so much. Larry

Answer:
Larry- Henry Leman operated in Lancaster, PA in the early to mid 1800s. He mainly made inexpensive guns in large quantities for sale to settlers moving west. We would need to see your rifle or have some good photos to tell much more about the date as the details evolved over the years. If the barrel is rifled, it would have been used with round balls for hunting (necessary for food then, not just an excuse for a walk in the woods) and for defense against predatory humans of any ethnic origin. If smoothbore, it would have been used for the same purposes with round balls, although with a much shorter ranges. However, smoothbores could also be used with shot for hunting birds or small game. Glad to see you preserving some family history. John


# 1595 - Sporterized Springfield 03 Mark I
11/7/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 30-06 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Dear Sirs, I am the proud owner of a Springfield 03 Mark I that has been handed down from my great great uncle, to my father to me. I understand that this rifle is designed to be compatible with the Petersen device. I was wondering, how can I get my hands on one? How expensive could I expect it to be. Secondly, I am very much ashamed to say that the barrel of my 03 is in poor condition. The rifle is scope mounted and will only hold about a 6" group at 100yds. Where could I find a quality replacement barrel and how much could I expect to pay for barrel and installation? The rifle is very important to me sentimentally, but the hunter in me can't stand the poor accuracy. What do you recommend.

Answer:
Sir- If you can find a Pedersen device for sale, plan on paying some where around $20-25,000 for a nice one.

You can get a M1903A3 two groove barrel new in the grease for about $40-50. These need to be installed by a gunsmith and have the final headspace adjusted by reaming the chamber. Plan on about $25-50 for the gunsmith. Two groove barrels have a bad rap on accuracy and shot just as well as the four groove. Since you already have a scope on the rifle, there is not collector value to it, only sentimental value, and usefulness as a shooter. If you only used the iron sights you would have to have a M1903 barrel with the rear sight base, but with a scope you don't need that and the 03A3 barrel will work fine. Good luck. John Spangler


# 1594 - 22 Cal Single Shot Rifle Identification
11/7/98
Joe A

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 22 Long Rifle 28 7/16 Unknown 62XX

I have a Single Shot rifle that was brought back to the US by a WW II soldier that I have never been able to identify (nor anyone at NRA). The following is what I Do know:

Action: Falling block similar to a Sharps, true hot water blued, some engraving not high quality, base for detachable adjustable aperture sight is integral on tang, trigger is adjustable for let-off on top of tang. Stock is two piece Schutezen style. It has a four digit serial number 62XX.

Barrel: Length 28 7/16, octagonal, .730" across flats, top flat is matted full length and 10" of rear of top flat is undercut to form a rail for some type of open (Anshultz style?) sight. Front sight is dovetailed fore and aft and quick removable.

Markings: Left side of falling block is marked with a circle divided into 3 sections with a single letter in each section (letters F L and Z ). The divided circle is circled by the words EINGETR MARKE

Receiver is marked with German Nitro proof marks.

Bottom of barrel is marked just ahead of the forarm:

FR LANGENHAN, ZELLA-MEHLIS.

Rifle is in excellent shape all original, with all sights and a trigger/sight adjusting tool. There is no sight for rail. Can you any provide history about it? I thought Langenhan was mostly noted for making pistols. Could he have also produced rifles? I have had it since the early 50's and occasionally shoot it being very careful. Any info or history would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Joe- Sorry we cannot help much on this one. German single shot target rifles of the pre-WW2 period were usually very high quality, and highly individualized. Today everyone in the world goes out and gets an Anschutz except for a handful of folks who choose another brand for mystical reasons or superstitions. The German rifles were largely handmade or made in very small numbers by talented gunsmiths. The falling block "system Ayedt" action was quite popular, but I do not know much about them. Like many other high quality German arms, most of these were brought to the US by returning troops after WW2, often without sights or accessories. There is no written information on these that I know of except possibly some brief mention in old catalogs (Stoegers, ALFA, etc). Nor is there much information readily available on the gunsmiths. You already know as much as we do on this one. John Spangler


# 1597 - Another Happy Mod 1200 Owner
11/3/98
drew tucson az. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1200 12 Guage 27" Blue 377804

Smooth diamond pattern bolt carrier, "p" over "w" stamp on left side ,barrel and receiver. Empty cartridge remains loosely inside barrel and will not eject by the extractor unless pump is held, keeping action fully shut. I have the same model in a 20 gauge and have not seen this before, they both operate identical, have you seen this before? If so how may it be corrected?

Answer:
Drew - We are not shotgun experts at Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters, in fact we try to stay away from shotguns (other than collectable military riot and trench guns)as much as possible. I can tell you that I have run into this particular problem with Winchester model 1200s before. Several years ago a friend wrote to Winchester complaining that the action of his Model 1200 would come open on it's own when he was firing magnum loads. Winchester's response was that the action opening on it's own is a good thing which would help facilitate faster cycling. My advice, provided as usual with a full money back guarantee is, sell the 1200 and get a Remington or a Mossberg. Marc


# 1586 - Original 71/84 Mauser
11/3/98
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Spandau Mauser 71/84 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was referred to you by a buddy. I recently purchased an original condition 71/84 Mauser. Made by Spandau in 1888. All numbers match including the buttplate screw numbers. I would put overall condition at 95% + . I have no knowledge of these old girls and thought maybe someone here could help with- value, bit of history, ammo sources, etc. I see these at gun shows on occasion and this one is by far the best I've ever seen.

Answer:
Mike- The Model 1871 Mauser was a single shot, and the 1884 version converted it to a magazine fed arm, just as the era of large caliber lead bullet black powder cartridge was ending and the small bore smokeless powder jacketed bullet was beginning. Thus many M1871/84s are found in excellent condition. I remember ads for them in excellent almost unfired condition at under $20.00, but that was in the "good old days" before 1968 when anyone could order guns through the mail. As a starving college student I ordered some for $9.95 (which included 100 rounds of ammo.) You probably paid a bit more for yours, and if you and the seller are happy, I guess that is about what they are worth.

As far as ammo- you can get a few loose rounds now and then, or even a on original box if you get real lucky, but not enough to shoot. You might check our links page for "The Olde Western Scrounger" who specializes in obsolete ammo to see what he can provide. While we appreciate the match armorer's expertise, please refrain from tuning up the trigger, glass bedding the action and adding a scope on this one. Your job is to pass it on to the next generation of collectors in about 10-15 years in the same condition it is in now. John


# 1584 - 35 Rem Mod 8 Information
11/3/98
Hunter

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 8 35 Rem Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm looking for any information on a 35 rem model 8 such as a price list or anything . Thanks

Answer:
Hunter- These are an interesting design by good old John M. Browning. Very heavy, pretty reliable, sorta gawky looking but for may years about the only semi-auto available to the sportsman. The bolt handle was copied on the Johnson M1941 rifle and the latch on the side was copied on the Kalishnikovs. The Model 8 later evolved into the Model 81. I have helped sell three of these in the last couple of years, all were in really nice shape and after lugging them around for months, we almost gave them away. Old and neat does not always equal valuable. It gets worse when hard to get ammo is involved. For more info, there is a book called "The Models Eight and Eighty-One" or something pretty close to that. Your library can get it on interlibrary loan and you can find out everything you ever wanted to know about those critters. John Spangler


# 1583 - Italian 6.5mm Carcano Carbine
11/3/98
Michael

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am wondering if you can help me identify a rifle that I saw at an auction preview last night. It is a military weapon of approximately carbine length. Small bore (slightly larger than .22) with an integrated bayonet. The bayonet folds under the barrel and fits a few inches into the wooden stock. The bayonet is an unbladed triangular type. The rifle is clip fed, bolt action. The only markings that I can find is the word "MIDA" on the underside of the bolt with a 5 pointed star inside a circle under that word. So my questions are.... What kind of a rifle is it? There are no clips included. Will it be possible to get clips/ammo anywhere? And, I guess most important, Is it worth bidding on and how much would be a reasonable market price?

Answer:
Mike- This certainly sounds like one of the Italian 6.5mm Carcano carbines. I am not familiar with all the markings, but this does not match any Italian marks I am familiar with. Besides the 6.5mm carbines intended for combat use, very similar versions just slightly reduced in size were made as training rifles. The trainers are scarce, and value pretty good (maybe $300-500. The 6.5 service models are common and seldom sell for more than $100.00 Hope this helps. John Spangler


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