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# 1004 - Dump It!
12/30/97
Keven, Nixa, Missouri, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Fratelli Tanfoglio E 15 22 Magnum 4 in. brassy looking TC05xxx

On this revolver, below the loading chamber it has "F.I.E. MIAMI FLA."On the barrel it says "F.I.E. MOD. E15 CAL..22 L.R. FRATELLI TANFOGLIO-MADE IN ITALY" My wife dug this old revolver out a box of things belonging to her grandfather, who is deceased. It appear to be single firing, as it won't cock again after you pull the trigger. I am interested in when it was made, and any other info you may have. It has something wedged into the barrel itself it seems to prevent it from actually being shot. Shouldn't the barrel just unscrew?

Answer:
Kevin, your revolver is one of the many cheap revolvers imported by FIE over the last several years. I would advise you to not waste your time or money trying to fix it. Even in perfect condition it values for this type of revolver are less than $50.00... Marc


# 999 - Shotgun- Enders Royal Service
12/30/97
Troy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Enders Royal Service ??? 12 Ga. 30" (Dbl. Barrel) blue Unknown

This shotgun has been in our family for several generations. I have tried tofind information about it in books and on the internet and have come up emptyevery time. I am looking for any information at all about this gun, especiallywhen and where it was made and if it is worth anything. Any help would begreatly appreciated.

Answer:
Troy- Several variations of this name were used by Crescent Firearms Company on guns made for the Shapleigh Hardware Company of St. Louis, MO in the early 1900s. Hunter Arms Co. of Fulton, NY, used the Enders Royal Service name on some of their Fulton models. All were inexpensive mass produced shotguns circa 1890-1910... John


# 996 - Hopkins & Allen Rifle With Detachable Stock
12/30/97
Mark Hopkins"

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hopkins & Allen Unknown 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Have inherited a Hopkins & Allen rifle with a long barrel and a screw-on metal stock. Fires .22 cal bullets one shot at a time. Has black Bakelite grips and a soft leather case. Any additional info? Please let me know. Mark Hopkins

Answer:
Mark- Sorry. We don't know a thing about this one.


# 1007 - Young American
12/30/97
John Bris. Aust.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H&R Arms Co Young American .22 2.5' Blue Unknown

I have been given this revolver, and from what I can find out it was manufactured in about 1910. I need a trigger assembly and trigger guard to make it work as these were damaged. Can anyone help me.

Answer:
John, values for the H&R Young American fall in the $50 or less range. My advise advice, don't waste your time... Marc


# 1003 - Mauser 98 Drawings
12/30/97
Eugene,Ekaterinburg, Russia,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Mauser 1898 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

HELP!!! I making model of this gun and I need drafts and sizes.

Answer:
Eugene- Wish we could help, but we do not have these. Some Russians are making beautiful miniature guns. A Mauser rifle would be about 3-4 inches (75-100mm) long. We do not have any names for you to contact. You might find a Mauser to examine in a local museum, or Army base. Good luck... John Spangler


# 983 - Winchester 1873 Musket
12/27/97
Clark, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1873 44/40 29" Blue 459XXXB

I would like all information you may have on this gun. The bluing is about 75%.Can you please tell me if this gun is a Carbine, some people that have looked at it says it is other's say it is a Musket. The stock goes to about three inches of the end of the barrel and there are three metal rings that hold the barrel and stock together. Also can you explain the letter B at the end of the serial number no one can so far.

Answer:
Clark- You probably don't realize that I get really unhappy when folks use "X"s instead of numbers in serial numbers then want to know about their gun. However, this being Christmas time and all that, I won't call you any names or anything. Just don't ever do it again, okay? Winchester M1873 muskets have 30 inch barrels, 27 inch magazines, and usually three bands, so it sounds like you are right about the identification. For a fee, the Cody Firearms Museum can provide a "Factory letter" telling when your gun was shipped, and where. The letter B at the end of the serial number reflects the Winchester practice of adding a letter at the end of serial numbers to identify minor changes in internal parts. Model 97 shotguns got up to the letter E... John Spangler


# 976 - Sharps Linen Cartridges
12/27/97
Jim Strang, Avon, OH., (NRA life)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Shiloh Sharps Carbine New Model 1863 .54 Unknown Unknown Unknown

How does one make linen cartridges? Having just spent roughly the equivalent of the Ohio State budget for this excellent Shiloh reproduction, I feel driven to complete the spirit of the piece by making up linen cartridges for use in North-South Skirmish Association skirmishes. My guess is, one obtains the right grade of linen, stitches it first into a lengthy tube, cross-stitches it every inch-and-a-half or so, soaks the creation in potassium nitrate solution, cuts it just below the cross stitches, turns each inside-out so the stitching is inside, fills each little baggy with the correct powder charge, then ties or glues the baglet to the step-down base of the Sharps bullet. (I don't have much else going on this winter, anyway...)Is that the recipe? Do you know the proper linen to use? Is there a good book that covers linen cartridge-making? You folks did a dandy job in answering my question about "Quaker" muskets some months ago. I hope you can come up with a good one here. Thanks.

Answer:
Jim- Darn good question from another wonderful NRA member. Wish I know for sure. I am sure some of the North-South Skirmish Association(NSSA) folks do this regularly and know all the secrets. They have a web site somewhere, but I forget the URL. Maybe a visitor can provide it. This is a very serious question because "combustible" cartridges used in the percussion sharps need to burn up completely and instantly when fired. That slow smoldering stuff can create a real bad accident. Of course, being easy to make is a consideration too. You know, of course, that during the Civil War, most ammunition was made by women and youngsters (evil child labor exploitation?). For a historically correct ammunition project you need to grab your powder, bullets, string, cloth, etc and holler for the wife and kids.... John Spangler


# 974 - Stocking & Co. Worester Cap And Ball Pistol
12/27/97
Harvey

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stocking & Co. Worester Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for information on a cap and ball (I think) pistol manufactured by Stocking & Co. Worester. There are only two other markings on the pistol D13and the number 28. The pistol is approximately 12 inches long and the portion of the hammer that strikes the cap is broken. Any assistance inidentifying and estimating value appreciated. Hnixon@aol.com

Answer:
Harvey- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. You had enough information for us to help. (Better than some which are along the lines of "I have this old gun, it is rusty, who made it and what is it worth?") Alexander Stocking was the founder of Stocking & Co. They operated in Worcester, Mass circa 1849-1852. They are known to have made percussion single-shot pistols and pepperboxes (with six barrels clustered together around the central axis). These sorts of guns were usually carried for personal protection or protection of one's home. Values on the pepperboxes are in the $400-800 range in NRA antique good and fine condition (see links for definitions), but yours would be less due to the broken hammer, probably by about 50%. The single shot pistols run about $150-400 in the same conditions, again reduce by about50%. That is about all we can tell you about the firm. Hope it helps... John


# 973 - Spencer Rifle/Carbine
12/27/97
Lars

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Spencer Carbine .56 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Thanks for a great site. I have learned a great deal from your Q & A section. My father has had a .56 caliber (I think) Spencer Carbine for many, many years. It has the following markings on the top of the receiver " Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston, Mass. Pat'd March 6,1860", and no other markings. The rifle is in good shape so I can tell that no other markings ever existed. My questions are what year was it made, were all US Government owned carbines marked with military inspectors marks, and what is the price range for these rifles. Thanks, Lars

Answer:
Lars- We need to know more about your Spencer, especially the barrel length and serial number (usually on the top of the receiver between the breechblock and the buttstock. Send us that, and preferably some good close up pictures and we can probably help. You may have $100 worth of junk parts, or a multi-thousand dollar prototype... John Spangler


# 971 - Model 1864 Joslyn Cavalry Carbine
12/27/97
Fredric, Black Hills

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Joslyn Firearms Co Unknown 45-70 Or 55-60 Short Unknown Unknown

THANK YOU FOR YOUR WEB SITE. I need to find out more about how to obtain any information to describe my old family heirloom, which is a caliber about roughly a 45-70 or 55-60, cavalry rifle, single shot , short barrel,wooden stock with saddle ring , and adjustable metal sights, 1864 , fair condition overall, made by joslyn firearms co. of stonington, connecticut patents early 1860's.

Answer:
Fredric- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. You have a Model 1864 Joslyn cavalry carbine. It fired a .52 caliber rimfire cartridge nearly identical to that used in the famous Spencer repeating carbines. The Joslyn is a very sturdy and simple design, and the evolutionary descendent of two earlier carbines designed by Benjamin F. Joslyn. These were widely used by the Union Cavalry and proved to be reliable and popular. Cavalry regiments using them included the 4th and 8th Indiana; 19th New York; 13th Tennessee (Union); 9th Pennsylvania; 3rd West Virginia; 2nd Wisconsin; 1st Nebraska; 1st Nevada; and 11th Ohio. About 8,000 of these were purchased by the Federal government for issue to units, and about 4,500 more were purchased by private parties (states, units, or even individuals) for use by troops they were arming. Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their Values indicates a value of $700 in NRA antique good condition (see our links for definitions) or $1900 in Fine. It would be interesting to document what you can of the family history of the piece. If it was used during the Civil War by an ancestor, you may be able to get a copy of their service record and pension applications (if any) from the National Archives. Take care of your piece of history. Bill and Hillary are not actively working to take it away from you ---- yet... John


# 959 - Shotgun- J. Manton & Co.
12/27/97
Cam, Manotick, ON, Canada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J. Manton & Co. Unknown - Double Barreled Shot Gun 12 Bore 32 Inches Browned #20XX

3 stamps on the barrel - (a)Daminated Steel (b)Government Tested (c)Choke Bored. Beneath the barrels; the letters JC plus four marks which I cannot decipher. I hope I am not "rushing my fences" but this is my second query regarding this shotgun. Since my first question I have been able to determine some of the marks which I had been unable to send you previously. I am not particularly knowledgeable about firearms, but have over the years obtained a number of antique weapons at various auction sales, primarily Snider-Enfields. This shotgun cost me about $90 Canadian and appears to be in fine condition. I am curious about the manufacturer, but have been able to determine from a WWW search that J. Manton & Co. was a manufacturer of firearms for the British government in the 19t!h Century. That is the extent of the information I have been able to find; probably because I don't know where to look. In the 1992 edition of THE LYLE OFFICIAL ANTIQUES REVIEW, I found the following entry under Arms & Armor showing a picture of a shot gun with the following entry: "A good quality barreled 12 bore underlever hammer gun by John Manton, Son & Coe., Dover Street, London, 46-3/4 inches overall, damascus barrels 30 inches, finely scroll engraved locks, frame and hammers. Value $1,040." I think my gun is less finely figured than the model in Lyles, though there is significant decoration. Mine also differs slightly in dimension being 48-1/2 inches overall with 32 inch barrels. I am deeply interested in finding more information about Manton & Co., the year of manufacture (if possible) and whether it is safe to use modern loads with this gun. Thank you for your consideration of my request, I hope you can help.

Answer:
Cam- The Manton family of England made high quality shotguns, beginning with John (1810-1825, then his younger brother (or half brother) Joseph who operated circa 1825-35. J. Manton and Son operated circa 1832-1862, and possibly a continuation thereof in London, England and Calcutta, India circa 1874-77. J. Manton & Co is listed as operating in London and Calcutta circa 1869-74. Those are all part of the famous English Manton gunmakers. However, circa 1900, many low-quality export shotguns were made in Belgium marked J. Manton & Co. I would bet that the marks you cannot decipher are Belgian proofmarks. These usually include an oval with a star and the letters ELG, or a tower and the letters ELG. English made Mantons would have had English proof marks, usually looking like crossed swords with a crown above and a number underneath. I would not risk damaging the value of an English Manton by firing it with modern ammunition. I would not risk damaging my body by firing a Belgian imitation. You probably got what you paid for, although guns have been sold for many years bearing the names of famous makers to buyers who hoped they were getting more than they paid for. Even in the past few decades, gunsmiths in the remote regions of India / Pakistan / Afghanistan have made copies of British rifles and pistols (and more recently probably AK-47s and the like) entirely by hand, marked them with English markings and sold them to mujahadeen and assorted western suckers. (A crude "Khyber pass" copy of a No.1 Mark III Enfield is a prized part of a friend's collection) Caveat emptor... John Spangler


# 968 - Meridian Model 10
12/23/97
Bill Piquette

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Meridian Model 10 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

My brother recently found an old Meridian Model 10 single shot 22 while cleaning out a house for a friend. He is wondering what it is worth. Thanks,

Answer:
Bill- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. The Meridian Model 10 was introduced in 1910, and advertised that year in the Sears Roebuck catalog for $2.19, but by 1915 the price had crept up to $2.65. Production slowed in 1916 when the Meridian plant was sold to New England Westinghouse (who made 7.62 Mosin Nagant rifles for the Russians. Meridian rifle production abandoned sometime in 1917 by the folks who retained the design rights. New England Westinghouse made some arms for the US after we entered the war in 1917, and then sold the plant to Colt who used the facilities to produce the Model 1918 Browning Automatic Rifle in the closing days of WW1. Your rifle is not listed in my value guides but I would estimate it at $100 in NRA antique Good to about $250 in Fine. There is a lot of interest in these old "boysrifles" if they are in nice condition, but beat up examples are worth little and have very slight demand. John Spangler


# 967 - H&R Shotgun Pistol
12/23/97
Darrel

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Harrington & Rihardson 801 (?) 410 9" Blue Unknown

A friend in Kansas wrote me that he'd seen the above described "handgun" at a farm sale. He said he was told that it was not a sawed off shotgun, but rather an original unmodified 410 handgun, not unlike the type supposedly used by the James brothers. Can you shed any light on this? Did H & R make such guns? Any current value info? Thanks.

Answer:
Darrel- What your friend probably saw was one of about 54,000 "Handy Guns" made by Harrington and Richardson between 1921 and 1934. Most were .410 GA but they were also made in 28 GA. Barrel lengths were either 8 inches or 12 1/4 inches. Most of the .410s were made with the old short 2 1/2 inch chambers. The "801" model number does not match up with anything we found. We confess ignorance, but only about what the James brothers carried, so we cannot help with that either. Value for a Handy Gun is about $10,000 and/or 10 years (of your money and time) if you have one without it being registered with the BATF. These are considered sawed off shotguns (or technically "any other weapon") and need registration and transfer paperwork similar to that for fully automatic weapons. If there is one of these loose in the farming heartland of Kansas, I guess we are in for a real crime wave there. Better get the Waco crew ready to move in and take them suckers out before they hurt someone!... John


# 966 - G41 German Semi-auto Rifle
12/23/97
James,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
DUV 43 G41 8MM Unknown Blue 16XXX

Three circles in a row under the handguard, the first circle has a PAG, the second circle has 2270, and the third one has a 45 and some symbols. I have a G41 rifle, with DUV code 43 and all matching numbers. Any information on the markings and proofs for this rifle would be helpful or books regarding this subject. I also would like to know of any defects, quantity produced, special markings and possible value of this weapon.

Answer:
James- You have a very desirable collectors piece there, but then again that's why you bought it! I am not sure if you have the Gewehr 41(M) (roughly translates to Rifle 1941, Mauser) or the Gewehr 41 (W) which was another one developed by Walther, as the Germans struggled to come up with a good semi-auto rifle design. Neither one was adopted, but the breech mechanism of the Walther was mated with the gas system of the Russian Tokarev to become the very successful Gewehr 43 which was produced in large numbers. Your "duv" manufacturer's code is for Berliner-Lbecker Maschinenfabrik, Lubeck plant, but I still can't tell you if that was for Walther or Mauser types. Smith's "Book of Rifles" and "Small Arms of the World" should have a fair amount on these. However anyone able to plunk down the big bucks for one of the guns should also invest $49.95 in Peter Senich's "German Assault Rifle" book. He superbly covers the evolutionary progress through semi-auto full caliber rifle into the "assault rifles" developed as the MP43 and MP44 (Machine pistols) sometimes called STG43 or STG44 (Sturgeschutz or assault rifles) Value of a G41 is fairly high. I saw one at the excellent Reno show that was missing the handguard and part of the forend priced at $1800, and a very nice complete one at $2500. I don't think either one sold, and I admit didn't care enough to see if they were the Walther or Mauser models... John Spangler


# 965 - Remington Model 141 Rifle
12/23/97
Jack, Modesto, CA .

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Model 141, The Gamemaster .35 Rem 24" Blue 76XXX

Remington Arms Co.INC, Ilion, NY, made in USAPatents1,043,354-1,044,,568-1,071,173-1,072,982L W W This rifle was given to me by my mother in law after the death of her husband. It is a pump, loads from the bottom, tube feed. The pump front grip is ribbed and the tube has a twisted type look to the tube. Can you still get ammo for this? Do you have any idea about the value? Do you anticipate it becoming more valuable as time goes on. Any idea what this was used for? I would appreciate any help that you could give me with this. Thanks!

Answer:
Jack- The Model 141 was made from 1936 to 1950 as a rifle for hunting medium to large game. Pump shotguns were popular, and Remington thought there would be a big demand for pump rifles as well. Cartridges can be found, but you may have to search a bit. (Try the "Old Western Scrounger" on our links page for your oddball shooting ammo needs.) After being out of production for nearly 50 years these seldom even approach $300 in value. Maybe they will be valuable some day, but I would bet that California will confiscate them all first... John Spangler


# 963 - Shotgun- Hopkins & Allen
12/23/97
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hopkins & Allen G 12 Gage 30" Unknown 236XXX

Thank you for any information you can give me about my grandfathers old shotgun. I have found no info on Hopkins@ Allen shotguns..

Answer:
Mike- Flayderman has the answer to this, and a heck of a lot of other questions too. Hopkins and Allen of Norwich, Connecticut operated from 1868 to 1917. They mostly made inexpensive; no- actually really cheap handguns. Most were marked with names like Acme, Bluejacket, Chichester, Defender, Dictator, Imperial Arms Co., Monarch, Mountain Eagle, Universal, or XL. You'd be embarrassed to have your family's name on most of those too. Well, they also made single barrel shotguns, generally inexpensive models. Good enough to leave in the barn for shooting rats, but nothing very fancy or valuable. Now they are best used as wall hangers or for their sentimental value... John Spangler


# 964 - Flintlock
12/20/97
Johanna

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Flintlock Unknown Unknown Unknown NONE

None Hello! I need some help on identifying an old Flintlock rifle. It was stored for years in the basement. I can't find any markings. It has many engravings and it is 63 inches long. I have some photos of it. Please let me know if you can help.

Answer:
Johanna- Sounds like a neat gun! Send the photos to Militaria HQ, Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171 and then we will be able to help... John Spangler


# 962 - Winchester Model 1903 .22 WRF Ammo
12/20/97
Robert

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for ammo for my .22 CAL. AUTOMATIC WINCHESTER RIFLE. It is a MOD.1903 with a 19 1/2 inch barrel. Today's shells are too small and do not seat well enough to use for this rifle. The one try I did split the shell down one side when fired. This rifle is also a rim fire. Any help appreciated.

Answer:
Robert- As you have discovered, it is unsafe to shoot this rifle (or any other for that matter) with ammunition other than what it was designed for. The Winchester Model 1903 uses only .22 WRF (Winchester Rim Fire) ammunition. Older boxes are seen on the collector market at $20 per box (and up!). In recent years, Winchester produced some more, with that made circa 1986 selling for about $10 per box, but the latest a little cheaper, perhaps $6 per box. I saw a bunch of this at the gunshow I attended last weekend. Your local gun shop probably doesn't carry it, so you may have to have them special order it, or order it from someone who specializes in older ammo. Try "The Olde Western Scrounger" on our links page. He probably can help... John


# 961 - M1903A4 Sniper Rifle Telescopes
12/20/97
andy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a 03A4 with a weaver model 29S scope, could this be correct? Ifso, would it be correct for a early A4, when scope production wasn't upto rifle production? In 'Collecting the '03 Springfield', J. Harrisonstates 'the 330C and M81 were generally used'.

Answer:
Andy- First, let me state that I think Mr. Harrison has put out a very attractive series of books with lots of information in them. Unfortunately, much of it is absolutely incorrect, and I very reluctantly advise folks not to waste their time or money on them. The M1903A4 was only issued with one of the following scopes: The M73B1(Weaver 330C, with a couple of marking variations), the M81 or M82 (Essentially Lyman Alaskans with military markings and usually with addition of sunshield in the front), or the M84. It is remotely possible that a few may have had the Telescope M73 (early commercial marked Lyman Alaskan) installed, but this is doubtful. The Weaver 29S was not procured for military use. It does have a 3/4 inch tube, and looks similar to the Weaver 330 (S or C model). They look "good" on the 03A4 rifle and sometimes are installed instead of a 330C to sell a rifle nowadays. Perhaps the owner couldn't find one, or just wanted to put a $15 scope on instead of a $150+ scope. Better check and make sure the markings on your rifle are "split" so that you can read all of the "U.S./ REMINGTON/MODEL 03-A3 and serial number without removing the scope base that is screwed onto the rifle. If part of it is hidden, you have been snookered by an 03A3 someone slapped a mount on... John Spangler


# 958 - SVW P.38
12/20/97
John

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown P.38 9MM 5" Blue 85XX

On the left side of the slide is P.38 followed by SVW. underneath the SVW is the number 45. On the right side of the slide there is a small star. The grips are metal. I would like to know what countries other than Germany manufactured the P.38 and this firearm in particular. Thank You

Answer:
John, SVW is a WW-II German ordnance code that was assigned to Mauser-Werke, Oberndorf on the Neckar, Germany in January of 1945. The 45 beneath the SVW is the year of manufacture. Your P.38 should be stamped with two military acceptance stamps (eagle over WaA135) on the left side of the slide with a military test proof (eagle over swastika) in between. The right side of the slide should also be stamped with one military acceptance stamp. I am not sure what the star stamping is, but it was probably added after the war (maybe one of our readers can help with this). P.38 pistols were mainly manufactured in Germany, and after the war in France by Manurhin as the P-1... Marc


# 957 - Old Sword
12/20/97
Evan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My grandmother has given me the task of getting rid of an old sword. It may technically be called a bayonet, dagger, knife, etc.. whatever, I am not sure. It is dated 1907 and it appears to have the name "sanderson" engraved on it. It is about 18 inches long and 1 inch wide. It has a holster. It has a wooden handle with metal and leather on the holster and other parts. It appears to be in fair condition.

Answer:
Evan- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. You have a British Pattern 1907 bayonet (officially termed a sword bayonet, so you get extra credit for that!) These were made in huge numbers (several million) from 1907 through 1940s throughout the British Empire. Sanderson is one of the most common makers. There is usually a date of manufacture (e.g.- 5 16 or similar) marked on the blade as well as various inspectors marks. On almost all of these, the cross guard is flat with the hole for the barrel. A very few of the earliest ones had a large hook on the bottom of the crossguard curling toward the point. The "hooked quillion" version is scarce and pretty valuable, but the rest of them run about $30-45 (with scabbard) depending on condition and any special markings that a collector might find exciting. Sorry it isn't a valuable treasure. We normally pay about $25 for these, with the seller paying postage. That hardly makes it worth your while to sell it to us, but we will gladly provide a shipping address if you want to go that route. From your area code, you appear to be in the Tidewater area. There is a very big gun show at the Hampton Coliseum this weekend, and you could probably find a buyer there for it. ( I moved from VA Beach 2 years ago). If you go, ask people where Robert House's table is, and I am sure he would buy it. If he isn't there, lots of other people would probably be interested as well. Just make sure you tell them that John Spangler sent you! Good luck... John Spangler


# 956 - 1903 Springfield Sporter
12/20/97
Beconner@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1903 Sporter 30-06 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Several years ago, I picked up a 1903 Springfield Sporter. It has the flaming bomb and NRA stamping on the lower plate, which indicates that it was sporterized at Springfield Armory. The English walnut stock is in pretty good shape and the 1913 Lyman peep sight is original. Problem is this--the serial number is less than 250,000. Park Rangers at the Armory museum are telling me not to shoot it because the old receiver is case hardened steel with pressure testing done by a copper crusher. So I guess I need a new receiver. I'd like to have a really good job done. Who do I call on? Thanks in advance for your help.

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. I am very familiar with the M1903s marked with the NRA and flaming bomb. This only indicates that the rifle was sold to an NRA member, and legally owned (as opposed to one without the marking and probably stolen property. The rifles were sold in standard service rifle configurations with full length stocks, etc, and not "sporterized" in any way. They had service sights, not the Lyman peeps, although these were quite often added later by the owners. They were frequently restocked with sporting style stocks, but again, this was done by gunsmiths at the owners request, and not done at Springfield. There were later "NRA Sporters" with short stocks like the .22 M1922 and .22 M2 Springfields sold from the late 1920s through the 1940s, but they were not marked with the "NRA/flaming bomb." (The late LtCol Bill Brophy's book on Springfield 1903 Rifles thoroughly documents these facts). The Park Service gave good advice as far as not recommending shooting the rifle due to the "low number" heat treatment. However, I would not advise replacing the receiver and destroying the historical value of the gun as is. If you insist on doing it, a "high number" receiver will probably cost at least $100-200 and a gunsmith will probably charge another $50-100 to switch barrels, set the headspace (not always possible when installing a previously used barrel) and drilling and tapping for the Lyman sight, plus additional charges for rebluing if necessary. My advice would be to invest in a good Ruger Model 77 in the caliber of your choice, either new or used, or any one of the other good sporting rifles on the market. Another option, if you are into reloading, would be to work up some lighter loads. Check reloading books for further information, and even then the decision to fire a low number receiver rests with your tolerance for risk. On the other hand, the U.S. Marine Corps never pulled the low number receivers from service and shot lots of service ammo through them. I saw one of these "NRA/flaming bomb" marked rifles for sale last week, with long slide Lyman 48 sight, original stock etc but rough bore for sale at $400 (it didn't sell at that, so the owner took it home again.) Good luck with your decision... John Spangler


# 955 - Pedersen Device
12/16/97
Matthew Day

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
??????Springfield Armory ?????? Peterson Device ? ? ? ?

Hi John and Mark , I am interested in the Peterson Device for the 1903 Springfield Mark 1 .Did they make a Special belt for this Device ??? Like they have the 1917 dismounted belt or Etc. I know they made a pouch for the Peterson Device and for the magazines , what else did they have on the belt? How many of these pouches did they have on the belt ??? Can you provide me with a picture of the belt ??? Was there any special tools for the peterson device ??? Did they ever make manual for this device ??? Any info would be a BIG help !!!

Answer:
Matt- The Pedersen device (officially "U.S. Pistol, Model of 1918" to mislead the enemy) was an attachment for the M1903 Mark I Springfield rifle. By removing the bolt, and inserting the device, the rifle became a semi-automatic firing a cartridge equivalent to the .32 ACP from a 40 round magazine. Useless for long range work, but considered really handy for chasing the Huns out of trenches. The soldier was to be given two magazine pouches, a pouch for carrying the 1903 bolt, and a metal can to carry the device. These were to be attached to the standard M1917 dismounted cartridge belt. Bill Brophy's magnificent "Springfield 1903 Rifles" has excellent photos of all this, including the set of special wrenches to adjust the device. There was never a complete manual published (as far as I know) but I think I have a copy of the draft text for one. (I need to do an article on the device for the Remington Society of America, which provided the research documents.) I am working with an individual who is considering making copies of the Pedersen device (perhaps even a firing version, perhaps only dummies, maybe both). Anyone interested in further information, please send us an E-mail (jhspang@ix.netcom.com) and we will let you know what comes of this... John Spangler


# 953 - Herter's Hunting Products
12/16/97
Jack

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

No doubt you're familiar with the big Herter's Inc. hunting and fishing catalogs that were published 30 years ago. Do you know what happened to their firearms inventory when the company went out of business? Specifically, is there some place a person could buy the Herter's brand .22 revolvers and other firearms? Thanks.

Answer:
Jack- I don't think any retailers have any Herter's stuff left on the shelf anymore. An outfit called Krupp-American advertised some similar stuff for a few years in the mid to late 1970s, at least in the reloading line. Herters offered an incredible assortment of guns, reloading gear, gunsmith supplies, fishing tackle, etc. I think this would be a really fun collecting field, and still see some of their items at gun shows. I still use their reloading equipment, and people seem to think highly of their guns; not quite as much as Colt or Winchester, but on a level with Savage or High Standard. Your best bet would be to use our free "Wanted" page to tell what you are looking for. Hope you find some... John Spangler


# 952 - Rifle, Custom Single Shot
12/16/97
Robin, London, UK

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J NICKLAS RIGA Break Action Single Shot Rifle 7.6mm 26 Inches Blue Unknown

single shot, break action like a shot gun, under lever, double set triggers, flip up leaf sights, German/Austrian I want a new barrel for this rifle. It has been smoothbored to .410 and has no meat left on it for reboring. What happened to Denis BELM of SALT LAKE CITY or Ackley rifle barrels I cant find them. Where else could I have a barrel made to match my old one. but in its old calibre of 7.6mm or 30.30

Answer:
Robin- You have a fine custom gun there, deserving of top quality work. P.O. Ackley is long gone from Salt Lake, and we are not familiar with Denis Belm. I am sure there are few good gunmakers left in England who could do the work for you (assuming the rest of your guns are not confiscated first.) I would suggest you use our links and check with Thierry Duget, a world-class engraver, who should be able to recommend someone capable to do the quality of work you need. There are some excellent custom gunmakers and barrel makers in the US, but I don't know enough about any of them to make recommendations... John Spangler


# 951 - East German SSG Model 82 Sniper Rifle
12/16/97
jack, meridianville, al us

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
SSG East Germany 82 Sniper Rifle 5.45x39.5 Unknown Unknown Unknown

need info on ssg82 east German sniper riflecal.5.45x39.5mmzeiss 4x scopeneed anything you might know about same thanks!cwood57@aol.com

Answer:
Jack- These may have been advertised by one of the surplus dealers/importers in recent years. Other than that, you got the wrong guys to get anything on these. We don't know much about current issue assault rifle type stuff. You might try our links page for the Century Arms site's "Trader's Den" message board. They seem to attract folks interested in this sort of stuff who can help you... John & Marc


# 1006 - Steven's Jr.
12/16/97
Gaston Bilbao, Las Vegas,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Steven's Jr Model 11 22-long Rifle Unknown Unknown Unknown

The Rifle is a small (Child size) Steven's Jr Model 11-22-long RifleIt is a single shot with a two position trigger.It has a patent date of July 7, 1907The stock seems to have been replaced.I removed the firing pin for safety reasons.Question:Is it worth anything?Can you provide a replacement stock or picture of an original stock?Thank You.

Answer:
Gaston- This model was being offered in 1929, and was similar to the Model 14 1/2 "Little Scout" which had been a popular item in the Stevens line for many years. The big difference was that the Junior used a one piece wooden stock with the Little Scout action inserted into it. (The Little Scout used a separate wooden buttstock and forend.) I only have a catalog drawing of this gun, but the stock looks pretty crude. Collector interest in these is not high unless they are in excellent original condition. Chances of finding an original stock are about zero, as most kids were very hard on these old guns and many were broken. Unless you are handy with tools and wanted to make a stock yourself, the cost of having a gunsmith make one would be many times the value of the gun. Nice old wall hanger, but not a real valuable item. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 948 - Shotgun- Belgian "Zulu"
12/13/97
Ash - Bear, DE - USA -

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 12 Ga. 34 Years Of Wear - It Is Just Old Metal Now 7xx + logo

The logo is an egg shaped ellipse with an "E" over an "L G" over a five pointed star all inside the ellipse. The single shot shotgun is breech loaded with a percussion style hammer which strikes an external firing pin. There is a spring which pushes the hammer back from the firing pin and when the hammer is cocked the breech can be flipped up and over to the right side of the gun so the center fire shell can be inserted from the top of the stock into the rear of the barrel. There are also a few shields stamped into the metal of the trigger guard and other parts which have the five pointed star along with an "M" stamped inside the shield. Who is the maker and how old is the gun?

Answer:
Ash- The hinged breechblock pretty well identifies this as a "Zulu" shotgun. These started life as French Model 1857 muzzle loading percussion muskets. They were later converted to breechloaders using the hinged breechblock, but were basically obsolete even then. A few were used by the Frenchin the Franco Prussion War (1870-71) and most were sold around 1874 to Belgian surplus dealers. The stocks were cut down, the barrels bored out smooth and sold as cheap shotguns. Instead of just being called "Ugly old French muskets made into cheap shotguns" the dealers coined the name "Zulu" invoking images of fierce warriors hunting in the wilds of Africa. These were sold all over the world, Sears offered them for $3.40 to $4.50 in the 1880s and 90s. They are great wall hangers, and dealers rejoice when they can sell one for anything more than about $75.00 today. Guns are loaded with insights into evolving technology, the growth and decline of nations, and the ingenuity of men and women engaged in free enterprise. Wow! You get all this free with each and every Zulu! Just think how much you will know if you invest in one of the fascinating collectable guns we offer on the catalog pages... John Spangler


# 933 - 1891 Danzig Gew88
12/13/97
Len

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Gew88 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I've just purchased an 1891 Danzig Gew88.The gun is all matching and has never been converted from the original cartridge configuration. What is the correct designation for this round 8x57,J,JR,JRS?Do you know if ammo is still available for this piece? Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,

Answer:
Len, The 7.92x57mm cartridge was adopted in 1888 with a .318" diameter bullet. We all call this the 8mm Mauser or 8x57mm. There was also a rimmed version, known as the 8x57R. In 1905 a new cartridge was adopted as the German military standard, which used the same 7.92x57mm case as adopted in 1888. However, it used a .323" diameter bullet. This was named the Infanterie or perhaps Infanterie and Jaeger cartridge, and the letter J added since the I and J are sometimes both used as an J in German. This began the use of 8x57J. The rimmed counterpart had the "R" (rimmed) designation added for 8x57JR. About the same time they shifted to a pointer "Spitzer" bullet, and often added the letter S when talking about ammo to distinguish it from the earlier round nose bullets. Now we have 8x57JS, or the rimmed version 8x57JRS. Remember the US went from the .30 Model of 1903 cartridge to the .30 Model of 1906 cartridge when we adopted the pointed bullet in 1906 with a .1" shorter cartridge case, causing some confusion then between the old .30 Army or .30 US (we now call .30-40 Krag) and the .30 Government (or .30 Model of 1903) and the .30 Government Model of 1906 (.30-06). It is not safe to fire newer 8x57mm ammo with .323" bullets in the older rifles made for the .318" bullets. However, you could probably easily reload if you can find the proper size jacketed bullets, or use cast bullets... John Spangler


# 947 - Flobert-Warnant Rifle
12/13/97
Jeremy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown 21"-22" Blue Unknown

has a few different markings. 1.) Has an oval with a "B" inside it and a crown above it. 2.) Has an "R" with a different more detailed crown above it. 3.) has an oval with the letters "L" and "LG" inside it with the same crown as the "R". 4.) It also has these letters and numbers on it "FL.8M.1.L". 5.) It also has what appears to read "BLLGIUM" or maybe "BELGIUM" on the top of the barrel. I have just acquired this gun at an auction and know very little about it. It is a single shot, with the loading mechanism on top of the gun. it rotates upward when the hammer is pulled back, so that a cartridge may be loaded. Then mechanism swings down over the cartridge while moving the bullet forward into the barrel. This is a very unique weapon, and I would like to know more about. Any information about where it has been made, if cartridges can be made, or any other information, I would very grateful. thank you.

Answer:
Jeremy- The action you describe sounds like it might be the "Flobert-Warnant" type popular on inexpensive (well, actually, really cheap) rifles made in Belgium around 1880-1900. They were widely sold in the US through Sears and other retailers. Calibers included .22 long rifle, .32 short rimfire and sometimes the .30 rimfire. Collector interest is minimal and values are not high. The Warnant action has the upward-lifting breechblock, and was stronger than the earlier Flobert or Flobert-Remington type actions. All of these were pretty much put out of business around 1900 when Stevens and other American makers began producing much better rifles at equally low prices. Sometimes the Flobert-Warnant is called a "Springfield model" because of some alleged resemblance to the trapdoor Springfield. I sure cannot see any resemblance, but let me have another beer and I'll check again... John Spangler


# 946 - Swedish Ljungman AG42 Rifle
12/10/97
Hoyt; Trinity, AL; USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Carl Gustafs AG42B Ljungman 6.5 X 55 Mm 24 (?) Inches Blue 45XX

John & Marc, you guys are just super with your replies. I hope you can help me. I am looking for a source (Internet or printed) for exploded diagrams and disassembly/reassembly photos of my Carl Gustafs AG42B Ljungman 6.5x55 mm semi-auto rifle. I have found only one one-page text document for this rifle. I have been unable to locate anything with details of history & development, production, number produced by year, proofs & stampings, internal parts, mechanical functioning, exploded views, photographs, etc. Any help on *any* of these will be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Hoyt

Answer:
Hoyt- Thanks for the kind words. (Hey Marc, we fooled another one! He thinks we know what we are talking about.) You need to check the local library's copy of "The Book of Rifles" by W.H.B Smith and Joseph Smith, or "Small Arms of the World", also by Smith. They have exploded views and instructions and history. Because you are so nice, we will tell you the disassembly part. "The safety arm [on back of the receiver] is swung to midway or neutral position; then the safety is raised up and away from the receiver body. The cover, bolt carrier, and bolt are removed from the receiver by sliding them back and out of the receiver grooved. To assemble, reverse procedure." Same process should work on the Egyptian Hamik rifles which were based on the Ljungman. You can have your friends to say nice things about you, impress the ladies, or whatever, by being smart like us. We have a couple of nice used copies of Smith & Smith's "Book of Rifles" for only $20 each plus $3 postage in the US. Really handy book full of great information, mostly military rifles, but many of the important civilian models too. Shipped in plain wrapper so no one will know what you are reading... John Spangler


# 943 - Shotgun. 20 GA Double "National"
12/10/97
john

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
National (made In Belgium) Sxs Double W/exposed Hammers 20 GA 32" Blued (?) 117XXX

Top of rib "Fine laminated Steel "Side locks "NATIONAL" Marked "Belgium" inside where the barrels attach I'd like to know about when this shotgun was made, and it's approximate value or range of values. I got it at a gun show mostly because I really like it's looks (weakness for exposed hammer shotguns) and it appears to be well made. I'm assuming that I shouldn't shoot any modern shells in it, although I'd love to fire it. Any advise? I'll send along an extra $25 to the ILA the next time they send me something. Thanks for your site-glad I found it!!!!

Answer:
John- National is a "trade name" used on hammer type shotguns made by Henri Pieper in Belgium from 1860 up to 1905, and by the successor "Anciens Etablissments Pieper" up until 1956. Crescent Firearms Company of New York also used the National name on some of their hammerless shotguns. Since yours is in 20 gauge (instead of 10 or 12) and marked "Belgium" instead of just having Belgian proofs, I would guess that it is one of the more recent imports, perhaps 1920-56 vintage. Have it checked by a competent gunsmith to evaluate its safety for firing. It sounds like one that may be shootable, and not strictly a rusty damascus barrel wall hanger. A willing buyer and willing seller determine fair market value, so it must be worth about what you paid for it. I don't want one, but if I did, I would be looking in the $50-100 range for a nice wall hanger, and maybe up to $200 if I suddenly decided I needed a cheap 20 GA double to chase birds and bunnies. If I hit the lottery, I might splurge and spend a couple grand on a really fancy high grade piece with gold and engraving and beautiful wood. Heck, even get a new car to carry it around in, or maybe that awesome 10 ton truck on our military vehicle page.... If NRA-ILA or NRA-PVF don't ask soon, send us a check made out to them and we will forward it. (Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171). There are lots of nasty anti-gun politicians and legislation that need to be opposed, and this is one of the best ways to help. You may not like everything NRA does, but it is the best operation around to preserve our rights. England, Canada, and Australia have already given away most of their private gun ownership rights. They will be cited as "enlightened, civilized" examples as soon as some horrible gun related tragedy happens in the US. Semi-autos ("only built to kill lots of people quickly" will be first, then anything with scopes, plus "deadly shotguns" like yours, and then any other gun left to become "the weapon of choice of criminals." Watch out for innocent sounding "child safety legislation" that conceals impossible bureaucratic schemes that will result in confiscation of all of your guns. All of these are done with good intentions but will have major consequences (intended or unintended) on us law-abiding gun owners. Anyone who can't or won't support NRA-ILA or NRA-PVF should throw away their guns now... John Spangler


# 942 - Telescope Repairs (Weaver)
12/10/97

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

We have a Weaver Marksman M1"-4X scope. Moisture has collected inside this scope. Is there any way we can take the scope apart to dry out or is there any other way of drying it out. Is Weaver still in business. If so, do you have an address for them .Thanks. Randy

Answer:
Randy- Sure, try Weaver Scope Repair in El Paso, TX (915)593-1005. They still work on old Weavers... John Spangler


# 940 - Rifle, Precision Industries .22
12/10/97
Gary, Las Vegas, NV 89114

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Precision Ind., Arms Div., OZ. MO. USA ?? 22 17 Inches Blue C0026XX

On the barrel there is stamped -- Wildcat 22-s-l-lr USA Overall length is 34 inches. The rifle is a single shot, and to insert the bullet you twist the rifle apart in the middle. The bullet is ejected by pulling back on the front hand piece. Please tell me about the manufacturer. The value. And how to contact anyone who may be interested in buying a rifle like this. Thank You, Gary W.

Answer:
Gary- Obviously a very inexpensive rifle, and since it has a serial number, it was probably made after 1968. There is no information on this model rifle, or the maker, in either of the two most popular value guides, so numbers made are probably pretty small. However, I suspect there is little or no collector interest in this item... John Spangler


# 939 - Savage Model 19 In .22 Hornet
12/10/97
Charles, Binghamton, New York

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage Arms Model 19 .22 Hornet 24.5" Blue 206XXX

On top center of barrel/receiver, first line "Manufactured by Savage Arms Corporation". Second line "Utica, N.Y., U.S.A. Patented NOV.20,1917". These two lines are centered above one another. There are no significant spaces between commas, periods etc. On left side just ahead of locking lug/extractor(?)recess (which is machined clear through) "Model 19--Savage--.22 Hornet. ("Savage" in a larger, different "font" than all other lettering, dashes are solid). SVG in circle logo on bottom potion of steel, serrated buttplate. 5 round magazines marked in 3 centered lines "MOD.23-D...Savage....22Hornet". "Savage" is again larger. This was my Grandfather's rifle. He passed it on to my father, who used it to shoot rats at! the local dump in the 50's and in turn passed it on to me in the early 80's. I assume that it was purchased somewhere in the eastern Vermont or New Hampshire area. Both of them were "New Englanders". I have heard of Savage model 19 rifles in .22 rimfire but not in .22 hornet and am wondering if the one I have is a "rarity". The rifle is in "very good" condition, has a semi-varminter barrel with no iron sites except an old "dove tail" scope mount near the muzzle (for full length scope). Receiver and barrel are concentrically machined from one piece of steel and the bolt fits snugly with no slop-hence the excellent accuracy inherent in the design. The stock is semi pistol grip and is in good condition, but has been refinished, albeit in excellent fashion, type of wood unknown. The rifle has also had a more recent drilling and tapping for Weaver mounts. The original scope mounting holes, for receiver "dove tails" are obviously, still! visible. I have looked for 10 years but cannot find any information on this rifle and have never heard of anyone else having one. The rifle still shoots 1/2' groups at 100 yds and I want to learn more about its history. Is the serial no. consecutive with the rimfire versions or do I have a "whole different bird"? How much would it be worth originally and how much today (curiosity only!), and when was it manufactured? I would also like to know who the original designer of the Model 19 was. Any response would be appreciated. This is a fine shooting rifle and deserves notice. Thank you for the Q & A pages.

Answer:
Charles- Glad you find these pages useful and interesting. Sorry you have what must be an otherwise boring existence if these are fun. Your rifle is a little out of the ordinary. The Savage Model 19 is fairly common, and was made for .22 rimfire ammo (short, long, long rifle). Besides the basic Model 19, introduced in 1919, there was the NRA model with a full length military style stock. These were considered good target rifles until the much better Remington 37, Winchester 52 and Springfield M1922 series came out a few years later. The 19L had Lyman receiver sights, and the 19M had scope mounts installed, both these were introduced in 1933. Also introduced in 1933 was the 19H, chambered for the .22 Hornet. All these were dropped in 1942 when Savage completely converted to military work, making No.4 Mk.1 Lee Enfields for lend lease delivery to the British, Thomspson submachine guns, and model 620 and 720 shotguns for US military use. The magazine is for the Model 23D, another of Savages rifles in .22 Hornet, but they probably fit both models. With the refinished stock and extra scope mounts, collector interest would be minimal. An unaltered 19H in excellent condition may bring around $500 while yours is probably worth about half that. However, if it shoots that good, hang on to it, especially since it has a nice family history... John Spangler


# 938 - Shotgun, Universal Import From USSR
12/5/97
Dan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Not Sure...Stamped Universal Sptng Goods, MFG IN Willa, U.S.S.R. 12 Gauge Dbl Barrel 12 Gauge 20 Inches Blue Unknown

this shotgun is probably 40-50 years old. Seems to be imported by Universal Sporting Goods in Hialeah, Florida and was manufactured in Willa, U.S.S.R. It has stampings of dogs birds, rabbits etc. on the sides, near the triggers. Thanks Any idea if this is a quality gun worth collecting???

Answer:
Dan- Universal Sporting Goods of Hialeah, Florida imported a lot of inexpensive foreign guns. I can only find mention that their shotguns in 1969 came from the Baikal, in East Germany. I suspect the Russian guns probably came somewhat later, perhaps even in the 1980s. In my opinion this is not "a quality gun worth collecting." Sorry, but remember, all our free opinions come with a full money back guarantee... John Spangler


# 937 - Rifles- Enfields made by Colt for Australia
12/5/97
Fred Reston, VA,USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Has anyone any knowledge of Enfield rifles manufactured for Australia in 1912-1913 by Colt?

Answer:
Fred- Someone may know of such critters, but it ain't me! Check our links and ask the folks at the Enfield Collectors page. I have heard of French Chassepot rifles made in England for sale to China; and British bayonets altered for German rifles sold to Uruguay and Japan, so almost anything is possible. Also, better make sure your friends are not slipping anything into your drinks... John Spangler


# 936 - Steyr Model 1905
12/5/97
Warren

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Steyr Md.1905 7.65mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

SYSTEM MANNLICHER Md.1905 WAFFENFABRIK STEYR The serial number is 3059, caliber is 7.65mm. Do you know any history regarding this model? More importantly, where can I obtain ammunition for this pistol? Thanks a lot. Warren Williams, Ambler PA

Answer:
Warren- The Steyr Mannlicher 1900/01 design which later became the 1905 is considered by many to be the most elegant automatic pistol ever made. Mannlicher did not choose to adopt the existing 7.63mm Mauser round because it was too powerful, but instead, designed a new cartridge using an 85 grain bullet developing 1025ft/sec. Some model 1905's were issued with a detachable stock, and there was even a model with a long barrel that was issued as a carbine which had a standard pistol-grip shoulder stock and a wooden fore-end extending from the receiver forward to the front sight band. The pistol was reasonably successful and was adopted privately by many officers of the Austro-Hungarian army, though after trials in 1904/5, its official adoption was rejected. Steyr built up a good export trade to South America with this pistol, and it remained common there for many years after its decline in Europe, being officially adopted by the Argentine Army in 1905. Finding a source of ammunition may be a problem. Ammunition originally issued in Germany for this weapon was called Mannlicher 1903 7.65mm. Mannlicher 1903 7.65mm. ammunition has not been manufactured in recent years and samples of the original are difficult to locate. This pistol will chamber the standard 7.63mm Mauser, but DO NOT use this cartridge. Tests with the 7.63mm. Mauser cartridge have resulted in bulged backplates and jammed breechblocks. The receiver itself is a very lightly machined piece. For ammunition try posting a want on our free Militaria And Gun Wanted List page, or contact the "Old Western Scrounger" who is listed on our links page... Marc


# 932 - 1884 Trapdoor operation
12/5/97
Art

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1884 Trapdoor 45-70 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Art, San Leandro, CAI bought an original 1884 Springfield in VG condition and some blackpowder45-70 ammo for it, but don't want to shoot it until I'm sure I know what I'm doing. I also bought (this is getting expensive) "Trapdoor Springfield" by Waite and Ernst which is a really good book, but doesn't explain how to shoot it. I don't fully understand the three clicks. Is there a manual anywhere that explains the procedure as to how this gun should be operated? Would be happy to buy from you. Please email or write. Thanks.

Answer:
Art- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. The trapdoor operation is pretty simple, and was intended to be used by troops with little or no education or training. First click is just a safety to keep the hammer from resting on the firing pin, so if you had a cartridge in the chamber, it wouldn't go off if you accidentally hit the hammer. Second click is "half cock" for opening and loading. In earlier trapdoors and muzzle loaders this was used as a safety position. However on the trapdoor you could accidentally push up the thumb piece and open the breech and have the cartridge fall out, so they added that notch for what you and I would call the first click. Third click is "full cock" or ready to fire when the trigger is pulled. Note that hammer should not fall if the trigger is pulled while engaged in first or second click. If it does, there is a problem with one or two parts inside the lock. When done firing clean the rifle with hot soapy water to get rid of the black powder residue. Recommend a real cleaning rod rather than the rod that comes with the rifle. Push it all the way through before reversing direction so you don't get a patch stuck. ENJOY! No good books on operation or shooting of these. Hope this helps. I have fun with mine. Reloading is easy and fun, so you might want to try that too. Check to see if there are some "Cowboy action shooters" in your area. They like these and old/repro six-guns... John Spangler


# 927 - Colt 1903 .32 ACP Used By OSS?
12/5/97
Jeffrey

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1903 .32 Acp 3.25" Blue 555XXX

British Proof marks (BNP under a crown) on right side frame and slide. The barrel also contains this mark. There is also a crossed sword mark on the right side of the frame. This gun is also marked US Property. This gun was purportedly issued to the OSS. How can I tell if it was?

Answer:
Jeffrey- First, I really get ticked off by people who won't provide a full serial number, yet want to know something about their specific gun. Whatcha trying to hide anyway? If you stole it from the OSS (office of Strategic Services) or its successor the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) they will track you down and.... oh, that's a secret, never mind. Anway, Charles Pates' brand new book "U.S. Handguns of World War II" has lots of info on these and all the other secondary martial pistols of the period. A great book that I most highly recommend, and at only $40 a bargain to boot! About 17,337 Colt .32ACP Model 1903 pocket pistols were purchased by the U.S. government in WW2. About 7,500 of these went to England under lend-lease, and yours was probably among them, perhaps in the shipment of 1,000 on May 14, 1942, or the 5,000 shipped in November and December 1944. 2,828 were delivered to the OSS between April and September 1944, and another 100 to the OSS in England in December 1944. Some of the British pistols were for issue to the SOE (Special Operations Executive) which was their counterpart of the OSS. Of course many sat in storage and others were issued to various officers, couriers and less exciting folks who needed a pistol. Frank Mallory's "Springfield Research Service" has also turned up some serial numbers on various Colt pocket models, but not knowing the number of yours, we will never know if it is listed or not. I suggest you purchase as set of the books (about $100 for the 4 volumes) and check yourself, so other people won't know the serial number of your gun... John Spangler (who really gets ticked by partial serial numbers!)


# 926 - Rifle- Winchester Or Numrich?
12/1/97
Jeff Walker, Warwick, NY

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester/Numrich Arms ??? - Rolling Block 45-70 Buffalo 27" Blue G341XX

Stamped 45-70 Buffalo, Numrich Arms, West Hurley NY on top rear of barrel. The barrel is octagonal. The rest of the metal on the gun, the trigger housing and the butt plate are nickel. My uncle told me he believes the "action" (nickel) part of the rifle is an old Winchester, and someone changed the barrel. He thought it was an original 45-70 Government Buffalo rifle. The gun is in very nice shape. The barrel is real nice, the nickel could use a professional buffing, and the stock is like new....it's so nice it can't be original. I was wondering if you can tell by the serial number if it is a Winchester, and what an approximate value would be. I know it's hard without actually seeing the piece, but a range would be appreciated. !Thank You..Jeff

Answer:
Jeff- Your uncle may be right, but everything you say indicates that this is just one of the guns that Numrich made from all new parts. What you describe as nickel is probably a color case hardened finish, which has a shiny look to it. Winchester did not usually use any letter prefixes on the single shot models, (although they did on pump shotguns, to help identify minor internal design changes). Even if the action is an old Winchester, right now its value is just as a shooter. I'd guess about $250-500 depending on condition, sights, etc, and how bad someone wants a .45-70 to shoot. These seem to be pretty popular in some areas, so you might want to try it out, after having a competent gunsmith check it out for you... John Spangler


# 925 - Shotgun- Lefever
12/1/97
Ernie

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lefever Arms Co. Double Barrel Shot Gun 12 G 30" Blue 560XX

patented 187280.85.86.87 Could you tell me the year of manufacture, estimated valuation, and reputable gun dealer that I could negotiate a sale with. The stock has been broken and repaired over 50 years ago. Thank you

Answer:
Ernie- Lefever made lots of shotguns from 1885-1916, and Ithaca made many more under the Lefever name from 1916 to 1948. These were in many different grades, with optional special features, which require a careful examination by a specialist to identify and evaluate. The later more common examples run from $200 up, and the earlier examples in better grades in excellent condition can bring several thousand dollars. A previously broken stock will probably seriously reduce both value and interest in the gun. Without knowing where you live, it is hard to recommend a reputable dealer. (We could recommend ourselves, but that would be tacky, and we don't want to deal in most old double shotguns.) Try taking it to a gun show in your area and talking with various dealers there. Good luck... John Spangler


# 920 - Mis-Matching Luger
12/1/97
Hoyt, Trinity, Alabama;USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
DWM, 1937 Luger - P.08 9 mm 3 & 1/8 Inches To Front Of Frame Blue In Poor Condition. Little Blue Remains receiver: "45xx"; frame: "92xx d"

Top of receiver is marked: "1937" ; On right side of slide there are three stampings:Eagle/63; Eagle/63; and a plain Eagle - all without Nazi Swastika marks. In upper 1/3 of right grip there is: a Black Nazi Swastika outlined in gold (?) in a red enameled (?) field with a black outer circle. The emblem is 7/8 inch in overall diameter and is inlaid in the grip. There are no import marks on the pistol. Front grip strap is marked: "1./J.R.12.31." The checkered walnut grips are worn and appear to be original. The bottom of the barrel is marked: "8,81" and "45XX" Considering that the pistol has mismatched serial numbers and that little remains of the blue finish BUT it does have the inlaid Nazi Swastika emblem AND the unit marking on the front grip strap, what is a reasonable range of gun-show asking prices for this pistol? Also, what would be the code, markings, and color of the most appropriate holster for this pistol? In other words, I know of several good sources for original P.08 holsters, but I do not know which one to buy for this pistol. The pistol will never be sold as long as I own it. Thank you for any information you can provide. Hoyt

Answer:
Hoyt, Thanks for your question. Sorry to say that I am not to enthusiastic about your Luger. The eagle/63 stamps are German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark on arms produced at Mauser Werke AG, Oberndorf am Neckar, Germany, and 8.81 is the bore size in millimeters. A fair price for a mismatched Luger with almost no finish remaining would be in the $150 to $200 range. Any WW2 P-08 holster would probably be ok (if the holster wasn't correct for the top half of the pistol, it probably would be right for the bottom half)... Marc


# 914 - Eley Company Shotshells
12/1/97
Joe

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

During an archaeological dig this summer at Dundurn Castle, Hamilton, ON, Canada, our team uncovered 15 shotgun shells which were manufactured by the Eley Brothers Co. We were wondering if you could direct us to an e-mail address for the Eley Co. as I believe they are still around to-day. Thanks for your time, Joe Parish Vice-President McMaster University Anthropology Society

Answer:
Joe- We do not have email address for them. However, you can reach them at Eley, P.O. Box 705, Wilton, Birmingham, B6 7UT, England. If you need help identifying the artifacts, you might want to contact the gentleman who edits the shotshell section for the International Ammunition Association- Mr. Dick Iverson, 3215 14th Avenue, Rock Island, IL 60201, USA Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 909 - Mannlicher-Schoenauer And BRNO Rifles
12/1/97
Gordon, Wellington, New Zealand.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
(A) Brno (B) Mannlicher-Schoenauer (A) 21H (1954) (B) 1903 (A) 7x57 (B) 6.5x54 M-S (A) 20.5" (B) 22" ?? (A) Blue (B) Blue (a) 383xx (b) 59xx

I have been offered the following rifles by a collector friend who is selling his collection, and I wish to research information before I make a decision on either.(A) BRNO MODEL 21H: Rifle has a double adjustable set trigger, and has been fitted with a Nickel Supra 2 1/2 x 22 scope and quick-release mounts since new. Condition is excellent. I would like to find out: (1) How many of this model were made in total, (all calibres)? How many were made in 7x57 in total, and the split between 'carbine' and 'standard' length numbers. (2) General comments on collectability? (3) Where can I find more detailed information on both the rifle and scope?(B) MANNLICHER-SCHOENAUER MODEL 1903: Rifle is understood to be an original factory single-trigger take-down sporter, with standard stock style (not fully wooded as per the Mannlicher double set trigger 1903 carbines). I have seen a photo of a identical rifle described as a 'British-custom Takedown Sporter'. Rifle has metal buttplate with trapdoor. Condition is excellent. I would like to find out: (1) Where these were actually made? (2) How many were made and over what period? (3) When was this particular rifle made? (4) General comments on collectability? (4) Where can I find more detailed information?

Answer:
Gordon- Those are two extremely nice rifles. Absolutely top quality pieces with very desirable features. Unfortunately your questions go far beyond our limited expertise in this subject. We can only say that the values are probably around US$1000 for the BRNO and perhaps up to US$2000 or US$3000 for the Mannlicher-Schoenauer. There used to be a Mannlicher-Schoenauer Collectors Association in the U.S, but we do not have a current address for them. Maybe one of our visitors can help. Despite your country's refusal to let US Navy ships visit, it appears you have resisted the epidemic of gun-banning sweeping the other English speaking nations. Hope you enjoy those fine rifles for many years to come... John Spangler


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