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# 14737 - Spencer Model 1860 Carbine
1/28/2014
Robert Alpena Mi

Spencer Repeating - 1860 - 52 - Blue - 17750 -

M stamped on left side behind receiver plate How do I find out if this Rifle was used in the Civil War?

Answer:
Robert- Your carbine is one of the large number of Spencer repeating carbines used during the Civil War by Union cavalry units. Unfortunately there are no surviving records to indicate where yours was used. Many nearby numbers are listed, and were used by various units as of 1864, and many likely remained in use during the Indian Wars as well. The “M” is an inspector marking with no real importance. John Spangler


# 14848 - RG Value
1/28/2014
Lonnie Salyersville

Rg - Rg 38s - 38 Special - 4'' - Blue - 395257 -

Dc -A- How much is it worth and when was it made

Answer:
Lonnie, Your revolver was probably made in the 1960s if memory serves me correctly, Value on these is very modest, one price guide suggest $35 to $125 which varies depending on exact model and condition. Frankly, I consider them only marginally safe to shoot, and would never own one under any circumstances, let alone try to shoot it. Marc


# 14838 - H&R Double Action Value
1/25/2014
Gerald, Puyallup, Washington

H&R Double Action - 04.32.6shot - 32 - 2inch - Stainless Steel - 6144 -

Does this handgun have any Real value?

Answer:
Gerald, there is not much collector interest in revolvers of this type, I would expect to see one for sale at a gunshow in the $150 or less range. Marc


# 14735 - 1873 Trapdoor .45-70 Springfield
1/25/2014
Cecil, Jacksonville, Florida

Springfield - 1873 - 45-70 - 22'' - Don't Know - 79140 -

Has VP on chamber area on top of Barrel What's the value and the time period it was made

Answer:
Cecil- Your rifle was made about 1878, and was almost certainly made as a rifle with 32 5/8” barrel and full stock. There is only one carbine listed within a thousand numbers either side of your number with the rest being rifles. Without being sure if it is a cut down rifle or perhaps a genuine carbine we cannot make an accurate guess on value. John Spangler


# 14729 - Krag .30-40 Rifle
1/22/2014
Jeff Santa Rosa, CA

Springfield Armory - 1894 - 30-40 - 24'' If Measured Properly - Don`t Know - 12934 -

Someone hand engraved `Z373LO'' under the loading mechanism. My mother believes it belonged to my great grandfather, and that he may have used it during the Spanish/American war. Does anyone recognize Z373LO ?

Answer:
Jeff- Your rifle started off as a Model 1892 rifle made in 1894 with a 30 inch barrel. I do not know the exact meaning of the Z373LO markings, but suspect it is an old ID or driver license number applied to help with recovery if it got stolen. There is no documented history on this rifle, so we cannot tell you more. John Spangler


# 14836 - Bad News, Remington A3 With Weaver Mount Hole
1/22/2014
USA

US Remington - 03-A? - 30-06? - Blue - 3430452 -

On the end of barrel is RA 2-43. Opposite side is a stamped ''P''. On the 03-A? stamp, can not read after the A because of the weaver mount hole. Any information on this gun, date, value etc. Thank You.

Answer:
Your rifle's receiver was manufactured in 1942, the barrel was manufactured in February of 1943. If the receiver has been drilled and tapped for a scope, most if not all, collectors will not be interested in it. Value will be as a shooter, probably in the $200 to $250 range. Marc


# 14834 - NRA Centennial
1/18/2014
A bomb

Winchester - 94 - 30-30 - 22'' - Blue - NRA13757 -

NRA centennial Value of gun

Answer:
bomb, They made about 44,400 NRA commemorative rifles and carbines, so they are not rare items. One price guide shows them at about $750 if absolutely unfired, no scratches at all anywhere, with the box and papers and the cover for the box in excellent shape. Commemoratives that do not have the original box and papers or ones that have been fired are worth considerably less. If a commemorative has been fired it is just a fancy shooter, worth about the same or less as a model that is not a commemorative. Marc


# 14723 - Colt Single Action Army Value
1/18/2014
Allen, St Martinville, LA,

Colt - Single Action - 45 - Other - 180777 -

All serial numbers match What is an estimated value for this revolver with no finish and some pitting? All 4 clicks, smooth action

Answer:
Allen- Your revolver was made around 1898, so it certainly has some collector value and appeal. However, I cannot help much with value. Colt SAAs are a very arcane field with many subtle nuances affecting value, including barrel length which you did not provide. Condition will be a turnoff to some buyers, but actual price will still be respectable. Your best bet is to do a search on the completed sales on GunBroker.com advanced search and see what some in comparable condition and configuration and vintage actually sold for. John Spangler


# 14831 - Nickel M1 Carbine
1/14/2014
Chad, Valdosta Georgia

M1 Carbine - .30 Cal - Nickel - 25175 -

the trigger guard pin is a roll pin not easily removed. There are no manufacturer marks and the only marks are the serial number in front of the rear site and stamped US Carbine Cal .30 M1 in front of the receiver. How old is this rifle, what is the manufacturer and is what is the price range?

Answer:
Chad, it is hard to say what you have. My guess is that it is one of the many after-market M1 carbine copies, but it could also be a Bubba special that had some of the markings removed and was nickel plated in a home grown customization. Either way value will be modest at best. Marc


# 14842 - Mle 1866 Bolt Action Made In Belgium
1/14/2014
Theo Queensland, Australia

Bolt Action - 30 Inches -

We have an old gun, there are various markings on the stock as well as on the barrel. It has an oval with the letters ELG and a crown above that. Made in Belgium on top of the barrel. Also Manufature D'armes and beside that MLE 1866. The barrel is 30" long. On the stock it has a round mark with MA in the centre and I believe a date of L.T. Septembre 1873. We do not know what it is. It has a bolt action. Also various other marks, a lion over the letters PV, 1 kg 173, oval with inside the numbers 12-70,big letters and numbers on the stock TS 54239, on the butt 4T.

We would like to know what it is, we believe it was issued to the constabulary in Papua. Maybe you can help us. Thank you very much for your help.

Answer:
Theo- The ELG in an oval confirms the "MADE IN BELGIUM" marking. The latter markings would be needed to comply with arms exported to the United States after the mid 1890s, and possibly done on all export production, or perhaps done to comply with laws of other English speaking countries, presumably around the same time.

The Manufacture D'armes and MLE 1866 and circle with MA on the stock are distinctly French military markings which were used on the Model 1866 Chassepot rifle. These were originally a needle fire single shot rifle, but many were later converted to use conventional cartridges. They were obsolete by the 1890s and likely sold as surplus about that time.

I suspect the gun was a French Model 1866 rifle that was converted in some way for sale on the commercial market in Belgium circa 1890-1910. At that time the Belgians were busy supplying converted arms of various types for sale in various colonies throughout Africa and probably around the Pacific as well.

Collector value is probably very modest, although local historical interest may make it very desirable in certain regions. John Spangler


# 14829 - Colt 1917 Army With Replacement Grips.
1/11/2014
Ron Warren, Powder Springs, GA

Colt - 1917 Army - 45 - 5.5 - Blue - 19690 -

This pistol has Pearl Handles. I was told that means it could be an officers issued pistol. I was trying to understand wood grips verses Pearl grips. The grips have the Colt logo stamped on them. Does Pearl handles represent anything special? Thanks.

Answer:
Ron, it seems like people are always looking for a way to claim that their firearms is an "Officers Gun". Over the years, I must have heard hundreds of way out stories from people who are grasping at straws, trying to find some reason to be able to identify that their firearm was used by or issued to an officer. I am not sure of the logic behind pearl handles equals officers gun, pearl handles could just as easily equal pimps gun. In my opinion the pearl handles reduce the value of your revolver by $200 or more. If the revolver were mine, I would be looking for a nice set of original grips and I would sell the pearl handles separately. You may even come out ahead that way if you can sell the pearl handles for more than the original grips cost. You are lucky that whoever added the pearl handles did not have the revolver nickel plated. Marc


# 14840 - Hopkins & Allen XL No. 3 Revolver
1/11/2014
Coy, Mesquite, TX, U.S.

Hopkins & Allen - XL No. 3 N.Y. - K2XX -

I would like to get some information about this firearm, particularly approximate date and place manufactured, caliber, etc. This belonged to my grandfather and I inherited it from my father.

Answer:
Coy- Hopkins and Allen made inexpensive handguns under a variety of names (both their own, and "trade names" for various retailers) in Norwich, Conn. beginning about 1867. The XL series (numbers 1 through 8) were most common in the 1870s and 1880s. The model number was related to the caliber, but I could not find precise identification of the "No. 3" but suspect it was probably .32 or .38 rimfire. Good vest pocket guns or to keep by the bed for shooting burglars, wild animals or wild people. Certainly not expensive guns, but comparable the inexpensive guns many people buy for protection now. Little collector interest, but a wonderful family heirloom. I hope you can pass it on to your grandchildren. Sarah Brady hopes she can get it away from you before your grandchildren get it. Support NRA!... John Spangler


# 14825 - Ted Williams Model 53
1/7/2014
William Woonsocket SD

Ted Williams - Model 53 - 30-06 - 22'' - Blue - U155129 -

none Who made it and what year?

Answer:
William, references indicate that the Sears Model 53 was a Winchester Model 70A, some time in the 1970s, the "Ted Williams" is said to have been added. The 70A was an economy version of the Model 70 that did not have a hinged floorplate. Marc


# 14730 - Dutch Beaumont Rifle Bayonet
1/7/2014
Fausto

Beaumont - 1871/88 - .43 - NA - Other - NA -

FYI your item 23129 Beaumont bayonet is the second type. The single screw version was more difficult to manufacture and the ''storm ring'' ( not sure why it translates that way ..) with the 2 screws was adopted in 1875. Also the 2 screw models are supposedly all steel vs the single screw model which has a steel blade welded on an iron shaft. I guess some early models could have had the ring replaced.

Answer:
Fausto- I appreciate your comment that the Beaumont bayonet with the two piece locking ring is the “second type” and that the simpler one piece locking ring with one screw was the “first type.” However, I am using the terminology used by Jerry Janzen in his “Bayonets From Janzen’s Notebook” which also cites Keisling’s books as a source for model designations. I disagree that the single screw rings are hard to manufacture, as they are actually pretty simple, made as a flat piece with a lump on either end, one getting drilled for the screw to pass through, and the other drilled and tapped, then the ring is bent to shape, and was the norm on virtually every other socket style bayonet locking ring I have seen. So, in the interest of being consistent with Janzen and Keisling I am going to stick with use of “first model” to describe the two piece rings. However, If you buy this item, you are free to call it whatever you like! John Spangler


# 14819 - Remington Model 33 Info
1/4/2014
David: Shinnston, WV

Remington - Model 33 - 22 - 23'' - Don't Know - 140071 -

Recently bought gun and would like to know when it was manufactured. I was told this was the first bolt action .22 that Remington made. Any information you might have would be appreciated.

Answer:
David, the Remington Model 33 was a Bolt-Action, Single-Shot .22 Caliber Rifle introduced in July of 1931. It was a simply made, inexpensive to produce, affordable, easy to shoot, good "first gun" for a youngster. The bolt assembly was simple and well constructed. Opening the bolt would extract and eject a spent .22 rimfire shell, new cartridges were loaded signally by hand. The bolt plunger had to be cocked by hand each time the rifle was fired , this was intended to be a safety feature.

Standard rifles had a twenty four inch round barrel, one-piece American walnut stock, weighed four pounds, eight ounces and when first introduced in 1931 cost $5.00 brand new. There was also a Model 33 smoothbore intended for use with .22-caliber shot cartridges. The barrel of this gun was marked "SMOOTH BORE" on the left side.

In 1932 and 1933, Remington redesigned several Model 33 features, to improve the rifle and reduce production cost. The stock was lengthened, and grooves were added to the forend. The bolt was simplified, and the angle and finish of the bolt handle was changed. The trigger was slimmed in profile, and the edges of the trigger guard were rounded.

In February 1933, Remington introduced the Model 33 N.R.A. Junior Target Grade Rifle which sold for $12. The target model was equipped with a Lyman No. 55R adjustable rear peep sight and Partridge-type front sight, wide adjustable leather sling strap and swivel hooks.

In early 1934 Remington brought out the Model 33A with a Lyman No. 55R adjustable rear peep sight, selling for $7.70 ($2.20 more than the standard grade Model 33A). In 1935 Remington began calling this rifle the Model 33P, for the peep sight.

The Model 33 was in production through 1935, a total of 263,547 rifles were sold in that six-year period. In 1936 the Model 33 was replaced by the Model 41 A. Blue book values for standard Model 33 rifles are in the $200 or less range depending on condition. Marc


# 14718 - Colt Single Action Army Revolver Value
1/4/2014
Allen, St Martinville, LA,

Colt - Single Action - 45 - Other - 180777 -

All serial numbers match What is an estimated value for this revolver with no finish and some pitting? All 4 clicks, smooth action

Answer:
Allen- Your pistol was made in 1898, which helps the value since that would make it an antique. Of course, the lack of any finish and having some pitting hurts a bit. Caliber .45 is a plus, but the barrel length is important too, as collectors seem to like the longer barrels (5.5 or 7.5 inches) more than the shorter ones with the 4 ¾ inch barrels. Without seeing the gun it is hard to put any sort of accurate value on it, and if it has a vintage holster or some history that would add to the value. My guess is somewhere in the range of $1,000-1,500 retail, but that may be too high or too low. You really need to have someone who specializes in Colt Single Actions take a look at it. John Spangler


# 14818 - Arminius Parts
1/1/2014
Jerry, Selma, AL.

Arminius - HW 7 - 22 Magnum/ 22 LR - 6 Inch - Blue -

Where can I buy a replacement 22 mag. cylinder?

Answer:
Jerry, the Arminius name was taken from a German hero of the first century AD, all Arminius firearms had a warrior's head embossed in the grips. Arminius manufactured many types of inexpensive firearms, in great quantities. The basic Arminius pattern of revolver was a gate-loaded solid-frame design with rod ejector mounted beneath the barrel. Some revolvers had removable cylinders and folding triggers. Revolvers were double- action or self-cocking hammerless with a concealed hammer that struck a floating firing pin. Safety catches were standard on the hammerless models. Some revolvers had a trap in the bottom of the butt which had space for five or six spare cartridges.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Arminius revolvers were marketed through many retail outfits, under many trade names. Some of the names that I can remember for Arminius were Dickson, Herter, Kessler, Omega and Gecado.

Collector interest in Arminius firearms in general is low to nonexistent and values tend to top out at around $150. I do not know of a source for parts, I suggest that you try looking for another revolver just like yours complete with magnum cylinder at gunshows. You may be able to find one for not much more than a cylinder alone would cost from a parts dealer. As an added benefit, you will have spare parts that you can use when your revolver brakes. Marc


# 14720 - 1894 Krag Marked Z373LO
1/1/2014
Jeff Santa Rosa, CA

Springfield Armory - 1894 - 30-40 - 24'' If Measured Properly - Don't Know - 12934 -

Someone hand engraved `Z373LO'' under the loading mechanism. My mother believes it belonged to my great grandfather, and that he may have used it during the Spanish/American war. Does anyone recognize Z373LO ?

Answer:
Jeff- Your Krag started life as a rifle with a 30 inch barrel, so it definitely has been altered somewhere along the line. The marking Z373LO does not match any military style markings. However, if the marks are 2 373 10 that would be closer, but still not quite what would be expected. My guess is that it may be some sort of “operation identification” type defacement with a driver license number or the like. It is very likely that your rifle was indeed used in the Spanish American War, but certainly not in its present configuration. Since troops were not allowed to take their rifles home (legally), it is very unlikely that your ancestor carried that exact rifle, although he may have had one like it. Sentimental value is probably more than the collector value which is a few hundred dollars at most. John Spangler


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