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# 306 - Schmidt & Haeerman/Suhl Rifle
1/28/97
greg k e-mail kups5960@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
E. Schmidt & Haeermann \ Shul Mod 21 Unknown Approx 24" Blued Unknown

78 marked by cheek piece, 38873 stamped on butt plate

I've had this gun that my dad bought years ago. It has no bolt or trigger ( looks it could have a double set trigger)my question is when was it made, where can I get the parts to complete the gun, and how much is it worth? also the Springfield that you researched for me I would like to sell because I bought a complete marine sniper ser no.152xxxx if you know anybody that would be interested, please e-mail me thanks, Greg K

Answer:
Greg- Sorry we can't tell you much without seeing the gun. Most German bolt action rifles used the 98 Mauser action as the starting point, and those parts are readily available. Missing the bolt and trigger, in an unknown caliber, it looks like at most a $50-100 item, unless it has some really neat stuff that might justify expensive custom made parts to restore. Demand for most high grade European sporting rifles is real weak. Complete and original it might still be in the $300-500 range. All these are guesses without seeing the gun... John Spangler


# 310 - Merveilleux [palm?] Pistol Circa 1860
1/28/97
mike,mbk@pdt.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Merveilleux Repeating Pistol 6 Mm 3&3/8,inch Nickle, With Scroll Designs 9XXX

Some type of palm gun, overall length 5in,underside of barrel, has Belgian proof marks, three, one is R/with a crown over it; one is the letters AE together; and one is shaped like a diamond ring with the letters LG inside the ring.

I believe it may have been made in France around 1860's but I'm not sure what the value is or how many were made it is listed in a gun book under #1523 but I don't which book it was. it is listed on the same page as#1521 .320 cal. M.L. Lincoln B Hammerless, and #1522 Mangeot Comblain Revolver maker unknown. Would you be able to tell me anything about this pistol and the collector value?

Answer:
Mike- My psychic powers are weak today. You have some fascinating clues, but we really need a photo on this one (Maybe even just a quick photocopy of the item.) Please send one to us at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171) and then I thknk we will be able to help out. Maybe Claude Blair's European handguns, or Mathews Firearms Identification will be the key, but without an image, it will be impossible to find anything... John Spangler


# 308 - Shotguns- Simmons Hardware "Cannon Breech"
1/28/97
Ed eager@ac.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Cannon Breech ?? Unknown 12 GA 30 Inch Blue M5XXX, Q1XXX, L7XXX

CANNON BREECH on top of barrel and on left side of action/receiver(?).Serial number is located on left side of barrel lug and to the rear of the trigger guard on the stock tang. SIMMONS HARDWARE CO. on the pistol grip cap and the word SIMMONS is diagonal on the butt plate. I would appreciate any information on these shotguns. They are all single shot, break open types. They vary in condition: very good, good, crap. I would also appreciate any information on SIMMONS HARDWARE CO. if possible. I have accumulated these guns over several years. The first one I saw belonged to my granddad. It was chambered for 2 1/2 inch shells so he used a valve grinding stone on it so he could shoot 2 3/4 inch shells. (I didn't get his but that is a different story.) One of mine is chambered for 2 1/2 inch !shells as well. The other two appear to be chambered for 2 3/4's. (None of these three appear to have been worked over with a stone.)The breech of each of these guns is a full 2 inches across. I had an "old timer tell me that he believes that when smokeless powder came along many men didn't trust the new thinner steel guns and the heavier breech was probably a result. Also, I seem to recall several years ago seeing an add or something for a side by side CANNON BREECH shotgun. Any information on these would be appreciated as well. Thank You for you assistance in advance. Respectfully, Ed Ager

Answer:
Ed- Simmons Hardware Co. was located in St. Louis, MO and were retailers (not makers) of guns circa 1875-1930. Apparently most of their guns were imported from Belgium, although in later years they sold some Savage/Fox 540DL and 540BDEs as Simmons model 411/411E. I would agree that your guns date from the time when smokeless powder was being introduced (about 1895-1910) and "Cannon breech" certainly sounds pretty strong to me. Although not priceless collector treasures, these single shot top-break guns are interesting examples of the continuous improvement in arms technology, and the innovative ways people use to sell products. That's about all I can tell you on these. You might look through some really old outdoors magazines (maybe on microfilm at a large library?) and see if you can find some ads, or the 1902 Sears catalog reprint might even have them... John Spangler


# 307 - Winchester Commemoratives
1/28/97
Dean

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 94 commerative, Oliver F. Winchester 38-55 23'' Blue OFW XX

Mint cond still in box almost never handled.

I have this rifle and three other commemoratives (Legendary Lawmen, Legendary frontiers men, Antlered Game,) they all have a matching serial # of XX, i.e.. LL XX, LF XX, AG XX and OFW XX. Is this unusual and does it raise the value of the collection. I would like to keep collecting the commeratives but I don't know how well they are doing as far as increasing value, or which commemoratives are the most desired to look for. These particular rifles are all still in the box untouched, is it mandatory that I continue to look for guns in this type of condition and lastly, should I shine the silver facing on the guns or let them stay black in the box. Thanks for your help.

Answer:
Dean, I personally have never had much interest in commemoratives, but it sounds like you have a good start on a very nice collection. I don't know how you were able to get the same serial number for each of your rifles but the fact that the numbers are the same will increase the collection's value. In order for a commemorative to retain it's value it needs to be unfired and have the original box and papers. Firing a commemorative drastically reduces it's value as does not having the original box and papers. If you purchase commemoratives that do not have the origional box and papers or ones that have been fired, remember that you should be paying considerably less. Reduce your offer $100.00 to $200.00 for missing box and/or papers. If a commemorative has been fired it is just a fancy shooter, worth about the same as a model that is not a commemorative. I would not recommend that you shine your commemoratives, but make sure that they are always kept well oiled so they will not rust. Fjestad's Blue Book of Gun Values has a good section on Winchester commemoratives and for more information you should purchase a copy. There is a link to Fjestad's web site on our links page... Marc


# 309 - Savage 101
1/28/97
skip skippy@epix.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage Arms 101 .22 LR 4" Blue 48XXX

Indian head on both sides of wooden handle In excellent condition

What year was it made and what is the approximate value?

Answer:
Skip, The Savage Model 101 is a single shot, single action pistol with a swing out barrel and adjustable sights. The Model 101 was made from 1960 to 1968. A model 101 in excellent condition is worth from $75.00 to $100.00... Marc


# 290 - Stevens Favorite .25RF Rifle
1/28/97
edie ooobaby@ptialaska.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens Stevens Favorite 25 20 1/2 Inches Etc 1X

The number 1X is placed on the underside of the gun just behind the lever. On top of the gun is etched J. Stevens A & T CO. Chicope Falls, Mass.u.s.a.pat apr.1794.

Would like information as to what the current value is for this gun and where I could possibly go to find out more information. Also ...what about ammunition...I have about 30 rounds of original ammunition for this gun.

Answer:
Edie- Around a million of these were made between 1893 and 1939, mainly in .22 but also in .25 and .32 rimfire and a few in .22WRF. The standard model is shown in "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Arms and Their values" as worth $150 in good condition and $350 in excellent. There is a rare early variation that had a detachable plate on the right side of the receiver that is worth about three times as much. These were not serial numbered, but many had "assembly numbers" so it is very probable that yours is one of the late models despite having "1X" marked on it. If you have 30 rounds of ammo, that is 30 rounds more than most people have for their .25 rimfires. It is basically a collector cartridge now. There is an excellent book by Kimmel "Savage and Stevens Arms" that includes a lot of their old catalog materials and other information. Essential for Stevens collectors, just sort of interesting to look at once if you only have one. Hope this is helpful... John Spangler


# 286 - Spanish Military Pistol Circa 1762
1/28/97
Mike / rsig5@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Military Holster Pistols: El Madrid, Esqible Anno 1762 Unknown Unknown Silver And Wood Unknown

How can I find out more about these antique pistols?

Answer:
Mike- You probably have a very collectable piece there. We would need a photo to do much more. The best specialized reference on this subject is "Spanish Military Weapons in Colonial America 1700-1821" by Brinckerhoff & Chamberlain. There are probably some good ones in Spanish, but since I "no hable" so good, I better stick with this one. Send us a photo (Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171) and we will see what else we can tell you... John Spangler


# 288 - Parkhurst .410 Ladies Shotgun
1/28/97
Randall

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Wm.Parkhurst Ladies Side By Side Double Hammer Type .410 Unknown Blue 1XX

Checkered stock and forearm. Belgium laminated barrels. Stamped machined on receiver. Brass shield inlaid on the bottom of the buttstock.

I have been unable to find any information in regards to this shotgun. My father purchased the shotgun from an old family friend many years ago .Anything you can tell me about the gun would be greatly appreciated .Such as when was it made and were ? Does it have any collectors value ? Should I have it appraised ? Again ,I thank you for your attention.

Answer:
Randall- Sorry we cannot tell you much about your gun. The only William Parkhurst I find listed is a maker in Amherst, New Hampshire who made percussion guns. From your description, it sounds like one of the relatively common guns imported by Sears (and anyone else who ordered a bunch could get their trade name marked on them). They were inexpensive guns then and remain so now. Because of the .410 chambering, it is probably fairly late (say 1920-1940)compared to the peak of the foreign imports in the 1890 to 1920 period. Generally considered to be "wallhangers, most are of doubtful safety to use with modern ammo unless checked by a competent gunsmith. I'd guess you are in the $75-150 range, and would not bother with an appraisal. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 289 - Sharps Civil War Carbine
1/28/97
Greg gregham@philly.infi.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sharp's Carbine 1859 NM Unknown Unknown Unknown 34XXX

A friend has a Sharp's Carbine manufactured in 1859 with the serial number listed above. He is trying to find out who this gun was originally issued to during the civil war. Based upon a book he has with some Sharp's Serial Numbers matched with the names of men who they were issued to, he believes that this is older may have been a member of the 19th Pennsylvania Calvery, Company K. Any hints on how to find this info out?

Answer:
Greg- It is always difficult, and often completely impossible to link a specific weapon with a specific soldier from any war. The records were simply not thought to be worth preserving. However, some information is occasionally found. Most by Frank Mallory, of the Springfield Research Service. He spends huge amounts of time in the National Archives going over records looking for this sort of info. Sometimes it only goes as far as connecting a gun to a unit, but sometimes to an individual. He has published his findings in four volumes, and they range from Civil War era arms up to the M1 and M14, and include pistols as well as longarms. I have probably checked close to 2000 guns, but only found a handful listed. For a fee, Mr. Mallory will provide a summary of the information on a gun with serial numbers listed in his book and often a copy of the official document where it was listed. These are often arms that were issued, damaged, lost, or used in some experiment. Real nice info for the collector to know. Serious US Military Collectors should get all four volumes, plus subscribe to his quarterly "U.S. Martial Arms Collector and Springfield Research Newsletter." ($25 per year P.O. Box 4181, Silver Spring, MD 20904). But, your friend's Sharps is not listed in any of the four volumes. There are entries for carbines in the 34xxx range associated with four different units, the 19th PA being one of them. There may be additional sources to check which can add more information but I am not aware of them... John


# 294 - Mauser K98 Cleaning Rod Problem
1/28/97
George GUNSLINGER@worldnet.att.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser K98 8mm Mauser 23.25" Standard Military 8XXX

1937 on receiver ring. S/147 on Receiver ring.

I just bought a 1937 S/147 code K98 rifle that did not have the cleaning rod with it. I borrowed a friend's rod from his 1944 K98 that was 12.5" long. It did not fit the well in my stock. I measured the depth of the well and it was 6". There is no way that a 12.5" rod would work. In addition, my friend's rod was just barely to big in diameter to fit into the wooden well past the metal top band in my stock. Is there a different rod for my rifle?

Answer:
George- There are three ways to fix the problem of a cleaning rod too long for your rifle. Cut the rod, drill the hole deeper, or find the right rod. I'd recommend the latter. Up until late 1939 or early 1940 the standard cleaning rod for the K98k Mauser rifle was 10 inches long, and thereafter it was made 12.5 inches long. Lots of Mausers are missing rods, so you should have no problem selling yours, or maybe swapping for the shorter one... John Spangler


# 298 - Maastricht- Dutch Beaumont Rifle
1/28/97
Chris

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown, Maybe Mauser Unknown Muzzle Measures About 7/16" 32" Not Blued, Somewhat Bright Finish 4XXX

Stock has a stamping on side "MAASTRICHT" and "1877" with a big "W" on it. Near breach on barrel (or receiver?)it is stamped with what appears to be "B STEVENS" (take that with a grain of salt - it is only a guess!) with what must be MAASTRICHT below again. The stamping is very light and only the tops of the letters are visible. Virtually every part of the gun is also stamped "K425". There are many proof marks all over. I don't know if this is a Mauser but it sure looks like the pictures I see on the Web.

Can you help me identify this gun and determine its caliber, whether it is shootable and its value? Thanks in advance, you can use my question "publicly" but I would also appreciate an email response if possible. Thanks again, Chris Whitney

Answer:
Chris- Your rifle is a "Beaumont" bolt action rifle made as a single shot designated the Model 1871. Stevens was the maker, located in Maastricht. These were .433 caliber, using a rimmed, bottle-necked centerfire cartridge, similar to the 11mm Mauser or .43 Spanish, but I don't think interchangeable with either of them. Most of the Model 1871 rifles were later converted to Model 1871/88 by addition of a magazine developed by Vitali, and are usually called "Beaumont-Vitali" rifles. Very old and historic, they draw little collector interest unless in exceptionally fine condition. I was glad to sell a decent one a few years ago for about $80.00 but think they would go for more now. The unmodified single shot versions seem to be less common and probably would bring more. From a distance they look a little like Mausers because both are bolt actions, but the design is totally different. A few people have found the primitive early bolt action rifles an interesting collecting field, with a decent variety of items at bargain prices compared to what many more modern pieces are bringing. Hang it on the wall and enjoy it... John Spangler


# 311 -
1/26/97
Bob

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 94 Wrangler I-A 32 spl 16" top eject blue Unknown

Western scene of teams and covered wagons engraved on both sides of the receiver.Both sides are different. The rifle has a small lever and is top eject.

Where can I find more manufactures information and approximate value forthis rifle. In addition I have a Winchester Wrangler II, 38/55 Cal. with a16" bbl. and side eject. It has a John Wayne style loop lever and is engravedon both sides. Engraving is different on both sides, one side shows a buckinghorse and rider, the other side has a corral fence and spectators with a mountainbackround. I would like the same information for this rifle.

Answer:
Bob


# 301 - Marlin Scope Clearance Problems
1/25/97
michael, michm00v@ciao,trail.bc.ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin Model 882 .22 Winchester Magnum 22 Inches Blue Unknown

I would like to know how to mount a scope on the "factory grooved" receiver. it appears that operation of the bolt handle would interfere with the scope and mounts. is this true, or can I mount a scope in the regular fashion?

Answer:
Michael, The fact that your receiver has scope mounting grooves means that the rifle was designed to be used with a scope and should have proper clearance if the correct mounts and scope are used. The two main factors that can affect bolt handle clearance when mounting a scope are the height of your mounts and the shape of your scope. For instance if your Marlin was designed for a .22 type scope that has a 3/4 inch tube and you tried to mount a regular 1 inch rifle scope you might run into some clearance problems. When I encounter clearance problems I try a different style or height scope mount, or maybe even a different scope. I would advise you to take your rifle and scope to a local gunsmith and buy a set of rings that are the proper height to give you the clearance that you need. Good Luck.. Marc


# 284 - Danzig 1836 Musket
1/22/97
zobo@netcom.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Danzig 1836 4060 Do Not Know 36 Blue Unknown

Crown emblem over Danzig

What is it? so far I can find no info on this gun! What might the value be? Any info some one might have would be appreciated!

Answer:
Zobo- You have a Prussian musket made at the Danzig arsenal in 1836. It was a flintlock design of about 1824, and most were converted to percussion, and many imported for use by US and CS forces in the Civil War. Very little is written on these (Best sources are Bill Edwards' superb "Civil War Guns" and the Company of Military Historian [Todd et. al.] "American Military Equipage 1851-1872", volume I.) I see these at gun shows priced for $100 for ones with cut down stocks up to about $450-500 for really nice ones. Not much collector interest except in the real nice ones as an example of imported guns used in the Civil War. Hope this helps.. John Spangler and Marc Wade


# 287 -
1/22/97
Mike mikegh.sales@sympatico.ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
W.W. Greener Double Barrel 10ga 30" Plain 133XXX

Between barrels says "WW Greener St. Mary's Works Birmingham Macnab & Marsh Canadian Agents Under forearm says "Not For Ball" with the numbers 11B 12M and 3 indefinable stampings. All pieces are stamped with the same serial number. Steel butt and pistol plates. There is some engraving. Wood is in decent condition

I would just like some info on the maker and the age of the gun. Also is the gun of any collector value or is there even a following for this makers guns. Thanks

Answer:
Mike, I have to admit that I have never been very interested in W.W. Greener shotguns and so I don't know much about them. My books tell me that W.W. Greener has been a maker of only the best quality rifles and shotguns since 1829. Approx. 20-50 rifles and shotguns are made annually by W.W. Greener and prices for some of their more expensive models can be in excess of $30,000. "Double Barrel" is not a W.W. Greener model name so I will guess that your shotgun is a Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore, because the Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore is the only model that I can find that is offered in 10 Ga.. Farkiller Grade F35 Large Bore values for range from $1,000 to over $3500 depending on condition. If I have made some incorrect guesses about your shotgun maybe there is a Greener expert out there who will read this answer and send in some better information... Marc


# 299 - M-1 Garand With A Winchester Receiver
1/22/97
Jeff jjm@sweetwater.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester M1 Garand 30.06 24" Parkerized 131XXX

I purchased this M1 as a shooter. After doing a little reading, I discovered that the receiver may be somewhat rare. The rest of the gun is made up of SA parts but it looks like the receiver has never been refinished. I was considering having the gun refurbished, but wonder if a collector would like to have the receiver as is. I would hate to ruin something this old. Do you know of someone I am not experienced in this sort of thing, but I would call it NRA Good or better. If it is worth keeping as is, I would like to trade or sell it as I am more interested in shooting them than looking at them. This gun occasionally releases the clip when partially full. Operating rod catch?

Answer:
Jeff, thanks for the question. My records indicate that your receiver was manufactured in 1941. Due to the fact that so many M-1 Garands were re-barreled during the 1950's and 1960's, and to the use of corrosive ammunition, original WW-II M-1 Garand barrels (both Winchester and Springfield) are much harder to find than the receivers are. If your barrel is an original Winchester it will be marked on top (under the handguard) with the initials W.R.A. and the drawing number D35448. If your M-1 Garand has both a Winchester barrel and receiver you will probably have no problem trading it for a mis-matched M-1 shooter in excellent condition. If only your receiver is Winchester it is doubtful that there will be much collector interest in it... Marc


# 295 - M-1 Garand Books
1/22/97
Jim treadwellj@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Garand M1 .30 Unknown Unknown 135XXXX

Receiver is marked Winchester barrel is marked SA 3 44 bolt also has SA marking

When was the rifle originally manufactured? It is a DCM rifle. Any way to tell if the barrel and bolt are matching components? Is there a standard reference to look up serial numbers for the M!?

Answer:
Jim, I have no way of telling if your M-1 Garand is a DCM rifle or not but I may be able to answer some of your other questions. Your Winchester receiver was manufactured in June of 1943. Your bolt and barrel were both manufactured by Springfield Armory. Your barrel was manufactured in March of 1944, and should have a drawing number D35448-28 the date stamping should be 1-S-A-3-44. Your Bolt and barrel are not original to your receiver but collectors would be interested in your barrel because of it's WW-II manufacture date. There are two great M-1 Garand collector books by Scott A. Duff that I would Highly recommend, The M-1 Garand of World War II and The M-1 Garand Post World War II.. Marc


# 304 - FN Browning Pistol
1/22/97
Osman , OSENTURK@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning, Belgium Around late 1800s (inherited from my 7.65 Pistol (I don't know) Blue Unknown

It's in Turkey now and nearly-mint condition and working. How much do you think I can it sell for? Would you be interested in buying it?

Answer:
Osman, you didn't give me much to go on, but from your statement that your pistol was manufactured in the late 1800's I will guess that it is an FN Model 1900. Aprox. 724,500 Model 1900's were manufactured from 1899 to 1910. Book values for Model 1900's in excellent condition are in the $300.00 range but collector interest in them is not high. You may have a difficult time selling your pistol for over $175.00.. Marc


# 297 -
1/22/97
Jerry ljkemp@3-cities.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester And Marlin Winchester 94 And Marlin 93 Winchester 30-30 And Marlin 32 Special Winchester 20 Inch And Marlin 26 Inch Octagon Both Are Blued 183XXXX & 284XXXX

None

These sporting arms came into my possession a number of years ago. Can you please tell by the serial numbers what their approximate ages are and their approximate value. I do not intend to sell them at this time but would like to know their approximate value. In my opinion, the Winchester is in excellent to good condition and the Marlin is in good condition. Thank you.

Answer:
Jerry, The model 1894 Winchester is one of the most popular firearms ever to be manufactured. To date over 6 million 1894's have been manufactured and they are still going strong. My records indicate that your Winchester was manufactured in 1952. Model 1894 Winchester's manufactured before 1964, bring a premium but condition plays a big part in determining their values. There is a big difference between NRA Excellent and NRA Good condition (see our NRA Condition Grading Definitions For Antique Firearms section). Values for your Model 1894 could range from $150.00 to over $350 depending on condition and finding the right buyer. The Marlin Model 1893 was manufactured from 1893 to 1936. Later production Marlin 1893's were marked "Model 93" and have less value. Depending upon condition and markings values for Marlin 1893's range from $300.00 to over $1700.00.. Marc


# 296 -
1/20/97
Joe........bangbang@wcc.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Colt Super .38 Junior Colt .25 Super .38 Auto .25 5" 2" Blue Blue 155XXX XXXXXX

Can't see any markings on the .38 super, but it has plastic grips which are brown and look like wood. The .25 has on the right hand side of the frame, just behind the trigger (made in Spain for colt's). on the left hand side, there is an (s) inside a circle. has wooden grips.

I just inherited these two pistols and would like to know when they were made and the approximate value of each. Also anything else that a normal person would like to know about pistols. I'm not a collector and don't know much about weapons. The .38 super may not have ever been fired. I have the original box that it came in as well as the paperwork. it has $82.50 written on the box. There is a .22 conversion kit with it which has all it's seven parts as well as two clips. It also has the original box and paperwork with it. there is no price written on this box. I also have a box (50) of western super x centerfire cartridges which are .38 super automatic (high velocity) 130 gr. full metal case with an Ottoman's price sticker on the box for $5.35. Thanks in advance for your input on this matter.

Answer:
Joe, your Colt Junior was made in Spain by Astra for Colt. Colt marketed the Junior form 1958 to 1968 in two calibers, .22 and .25 . According to my records your Junior was made in 1958. The Colt Junior is a good compact pocket pistol but pistols chambered in .25 caliber are not as popular as ones that are chambered in .22 caliber. I would estimate the value of your Junior to be in the $150.00 to $225.00 range. Colt manufactured .38 Supers from 1928 to 1970, your .38 Super was manufactured in 1960. Finding a buyer for your .38 Super will probably be more difficult than if it were chambered in .45 ACP, because .38 Supers are more expensive and because .38 Super is not as popular a caliber as .45ACP. To get top dollar for your .38 Super, you will have to find a collector who wants it because it has never been fired. I would estimate the value of your .38 Super to range from $700 for someone who just wants it to shoot, to over $1000.00, if you can find a collector who wants it badly enough, the conversion unit will add another $300.00 to the value. If you want to make a fast sale I would be more than happy to give you the $82.50 price that is written on the box!... Marc


# 300 - Stevens Visible Loader .22
1/20/97
Dan ddott@terranet.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens Visible Loader Unknown "22 Short - Long Long Rifle" 22 Inches Unknown Unknown

STEVENS ARMS COMPANYChicopeefalls Mass USA*STEVENS VISIBLE LOADER - PAT. APR 30.70*TRADE MARK STEVENSG U.S. PAT & FGN22 SHORT - LONGOR LONG RIFLE

This rifle has been in my family for a number of years. I would appreciate any information you might be able to provide. Thank you

Answer:
Dan- Generations of kids grew up learning about guns with the "Miserable Loader". These included models 70, 70 1/2, 71, 71 1/2, 72, and 72 1/2. These were made from about 1907 until the early 1930s. Despite the abuse of all the kids who have used them many continue to function. Specimens in very good or better condition have some collector interest and bring about $125 or more. A nice item to keep in the family to teach your kids/grandkids about gun safety... John Spangler


# 291 - Cartridge Collecting
1/17/97
Mike Rosbach

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was wondering if you now of a Web site where I could go to find information on collecting old cartridges. Any help will be appreciated.

Answer:
Mike- I don't know of any web sites devoted to cartridge collecting. Century Arms site (see links) has an ammunition page, but not much for collectors there. Some of the better gun shows have cartridge collectors and collectible cartridges. (Colorado Gun Collectors in Denver 4-5 May is one.) The International Ammunition Association (formerly International Cartridge Collectors Assn) is well worth joining as it covers everything from .22 rimfires through artillery, from earliest to the most recent. (Will provide application if desired). Depending on what area you are most interested in, there are a number of good books you should get. Let us know the topic and we can make recommendations. I recently bought entire cartridge collection and will be glad to quote prices if there are any specific items you need. Too many to make a list. I'm just marking them and taking them to shows. Hope to meet you sometime... John Spangler


# 276 - Parts Luger ?
1/16/97
frank loopie@epix.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger P-08 30 Luger 6 Inch Blue none found

Number one stamped under lanyard ring, DWM toggle, black widow stocks, Germany stamped on right side of frame.

What is it? German police, Frankinstine, no date on gun.

Answer:
Frank, your description is a little sketchy, but from the information that I have, I would guess that your Luger is a parts gun and/or has been re-blued. The 6 inch barrel, DWM toggle and caliber, would be most common on one of the pre WW-II model Lugers. Black bakelite grips are a trade mark of the "Black Widow" Luger which was manufactured by Mauser in 1941 and 1942, and marked with Mauser's byf maker code The "Germany" stamping would indicate manufacture for commercial import into the U.S. The absence of serial numbers may indicate vigorous buffing prior to re-bluing. Take a close look at your Luger's stampings and edges. Shallow stampings, and/or rounded edges are good indicators that a firearm has been re-blued... Marc


# 265 - Shotgun, "W. Richards" Hammer Type
1/14/97
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
W.Richards 10 Gauge, Exposed Hammers, Fine Engraving Unknown Dbl Barrel, 30" Unknown 69xx

There appears to be something like crossed hammers, dots between the crosses, 2ea on each barrel with "11" in between

What can you tell me about this shotgun, when made etc.

Answer:
David- Westley Richards founded a prestigious gun making firm at 23 Conduit Street London sometime around 1812, and later received a Royal Appointment to provide guns to the royal family, and contracts for military arms as well, and for the India trade. He received several patents relating to breech-loading systems, and is widely recognized as one of the best makers of his period. The quality of his work is further documented by the numerous unscrupulous attempts to sell unsuspecting (or greedy) people inferior guns with names similar to "W. Richards" marked on them. However, you pretty well described English proofmarks of the period, and it is highly likely that you have a "real" one instead of a copy. (However, some foreign makers did fake English proof marks as well, so this is not definite confirmation that yours is "real".) I don't have any Richards serial number/date references, so the best we can do is make an educated guess of about 1880-1910, the peak of the exposed hammer era... John Spangler and Marc Wade.


# 266 - Shotgun, English Beckwith Percussion
1/14/97
Theresa e-mail = treesea9@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Beckwith (England) Shotgun - Muzzle Loader 12 Gauge Aprox 29 1/4" Brownish not found

1) Has platinum rivets in each barrel at nipple end.2) Has extensive metalwork on stock. All metal work is engraved, including rib on barrels and the firing pin.

This shotgun belongs to an elderly friend of mine. He would like to know a little of the history of it, if possible. I could not find Beckwith on the Web so I assume they are out of business. Can you help?

Answer:
Theresa- Henry Beckwith worked at 58 Skinner Street, Snow Hill, Brimingham and in London from 1846-1868, as did Willliam A. Beckwith from 1848-1860. Henry exhibited at the 1851 London International exhibition, so was considered to be among the better makers of the time. The platinum plugs are seldom found except on the finer pieces, so this certainly sounds like a fine gun. I suspect that many of Beckwith's better guns were almost custom made pieces, of the sort that landed gentry would purchase. Very useful in the field, as well as for impressing one's friends with your good taste. I have heard that there is some interest in blackpowder shooting in the UK, and many of the finer pieces are still suitable for shooting (provided a competent gunsmith checks them and approves). Hope this is of interest. Enjoy your gun while you can. Having outlawed most cartridge guns, I suspect that some pretext will soon be found to justify making old muzzle loaders illegal as well... John Spangler


# 281 - Shotgun- .44XL or .410?
1/14/97
Kelly Nelson knelson@mail.ala.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J REYNOLDS Unknown 44XL or .410? Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a double barrel rabbit eared shotgun which is a Belgium made. It was my great-great grandfathers. When my father go it shot 44xl shot shells. He later had it reamed out to shoot 2 1/2" 410 shells. I have found a ad in the 1902 SEARS catalog for a 44 cal. shotgun like this. The shotgun is 42" long. It weights 4 pounds. The barrel is 26" long. The gun has "J REYNOLDS" on one side plate. The marks on the receiver are "CC","2990",a star, "FD", a straight line with a diamond on top. The marks on the barrel are "EL"or"EG"in fancy lettering,"10.4","W", a star with "FD" under star, a oval with crown on top with "E" and "LG" in oval. The barrel has "TWIST BELGIUM" on it. I would love to find out some history on it. After sending this information to Mr. Gunther with "SHOOTERS" he told me I was wrong and this was a 410 from the start because of the 10.4. I gave this reply to my father and he say it was a 44xl shotgun from the start. Please help if you can.

Answer:
Kelly- An interesting question indeed. I cannot confirm when the .410 shotgun cartridge was introduced, but Marlin and Winchester did not introduce guns in that caliber until the late 1920s. Where there is a specific statement that the gun was altered to take the .410 shell, I would be inclined to believe it as the sort of thing that owners would remember. I checked the 1902 Sears catalog in my outhouse and it certainly does offer Belgian hammer double guns chambered for the .44XL (.44 centerfire Extra Long shotshell) for $11.14. Of course if Great-great granddad had read another 18 pages and spent $13.20 he could have had a Colt Single Action Army revolver in any caliber. (Would have been a much better investment!) Anyway, the .44XL shot cartridge seems to have been the standard small shotshell in the early 20th century. The Marble Game-Getter advertised in 1908 used the .44XL shotshell, not the .410. The "10.4" marking on your gun is the metric measurement of your gun's bore. (For example, the .41 Swiss rimfire metric cartridge designation is 10.4x38mm) Switching the numbers around to get .410 out of 10.4 doesn't work for me. I would agree that your gun started out as a .44XL and was rechambered for the .410. Is that a safe conversion? Possibly, but I certainly would not fire it, especially with today's 3 inch shells if it was altered for the early 2 1/2 inch length shells. Hope this helps. (Hey, if you have a bet going, send half your winnings to the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, to help keep some dumb congressperson from making a law taking your gun away from you.)... John Spangler


# 269 - Ted WIlliams Model 100 (Winchester 94) Rifle
1/13/97
Brent tcaldon@pe.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sears Ted Williams Model 100 30-30 19 3/8 InchesV Blue v125xxx

On the left side of the barrel: Ted Williams (this looks like a signature) Model 100*CAL.*30-30 WIN.SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. * NO. 273.532140 * MADE IN U.S.A. on the top of the barrel: GT and SP inside a circle The gun resembles a Winchester Model 94.

How old is this gun and did I pay too much ($60)? Thanks!

Answer:
Brent- You are right, it looks like a Winchester 94 because it is basically just that. It is the "new model 94" made after 1964, but I don't know how much later than that. The big long number is the Sear Roebuck CO catalog number for this gun. $60 could be a bargain if it was well taken care of and you need a shooter. If you got it as a collector item you might be awfully lonely looking for anyone else who collects "house brand" guns. (Hey, that's an idea- how many different names did the Winchester 94 get sold under? A great display sometime.)... John SPagnler and Marc Wade


# 267 - Springfield M1903A1 USMC Sniper
1/13/97
greg k

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1903 A1 30.06 24" Approx Blue 150xxxx

Has star gauged bbl dated 6/37 has holes drilled and tappet for scope 2 on bridge of receiver and 2 approx. 7.2 inches from bridge. I have been collecting snipers for about 10 years. I bought this rifle from a friend who told me it was a marine sniper. he bought it from some guy who bought it from the navy(supposidly0 do you have any information on these rifles.

Answer:
Greg- It is quite possible you do have one of the rare and desirable USMC "Model 1941" sniper rifles. However, there are a lot of rifles that kinda-sorta look like them but are not. First, everything should be correct as on a M1903A1 National Match rifle- approx. 1.45 million or higher with barrel dates about 1937-39; star gauged barrel (also look for the star gauge number on the barrel, usually under the handguard- letter and 2-4 numbers, less than 1/16" high) Polished N.S. bolt (distinctive Springfield polishing pattern if you have seen others, you will recognize it), numbered to the rifle, (some get mismatched, like the USMC sniper in my collection, but that worries me less than one not numbered at all). Bolt possibly refinished blue/black instead of bright, but number/polishing should be evident. Bolt ways (square recesses inside receiver where bolt lugs run back and forth) should be nicely polished, not just bright worn spots). Milled buttplate with deep coarse checking and butt trap. "C" type full pistol grip stock without inletting for M1903A3 handguard ring, and probably "S" but not "K" marking in cutoff half moon. Serial number of rifle may or may not be present on butt stock near sling swivel. D-1836 drawing number usually present. Drilling and tapping on receiver and barrel for scope mounts should be centered, and professionally done, 6x48 thread size. Handguard clearance cut should be clean and machine done, not clumsy file work. (See pictures in Senich's various Sniper books for good examples). Serial numbers should [probably] not check out as DCM sales in Springfield Research Service data base, but might fall in same range as those listed as NMA1 rifles. USMC Quantico museum has ser no 1526610; ex-Quantico is ser no 1526161, and I believe two other rifles to be authentic 1496224 (ER collection) and 1526925 in my collection (with bolt numbered 1496565). I have numbers somewhere of 3 or 4 more authentic rifles in collection of prominent New York dealer/collector, but cannot locate them right now. Those are all good signs. Now the things to keep you awake at night- lots of competitive shooters put scopes on their NM rifles, with the standard 7.2 inch spacing. Some fakers have made outright fakes and passed off as real. Some people have made reproductions, plainly marked, and sold them as such. (I have made 5, stamped on barrel by front scope block "REPRO/JHS/7.94[date]" Handguards are marked the same inside, and "R" in the windage knob cut. I reported numbers of all these rifles to Dave McClain, the M1 sniper rifle authority, and LtCOl Norm Chandler, USMC (ret) the Marine Corps sniper authority, so they should be easy to document as "not real"). If you have sales papers from the Navy, that is great, if not, trust your instincts if they tell you something is "not right". When buying, "If you don't know your diamonds, know your jeweler" and insist on a written bill of sale, and full return privileges within a reasonable period for further inspection by someone who knows these guns. Greg, I hope you got a good one! There is allot of good stuff out there in closets, but you have to keep looking all the time... John Spangler


# 268 - Brazilian Contract Model 1917 S&W Revolver
1/13/97
Nathan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Smith & Wesson Unknown Revolver 45 ACP Five And A Half Inches Blue Unknown

" S&W D.A. 45" stamped on barrel, on the right frame side, stamped, is an ornate star encircled with leaves, pierced by a sword, a banner below that with the words " ESTADOS UNICOS DOBRAZIL 15 de NOVEMBRA de 1889" and the date 1937 below that.

Info wanted identifying S&W D.A. 45 cal. I've come into possession of a Smith & Wesson 45 caliber revolver and I'm interested in learning more about this firearm. I will be grateful for any information.

Answer:
Nathan, it sounds like you have a Brazilian contract model 1917 S&W revolver. Handguns chambered for 45 ACP were desperately needed once the USA had entered the First World War. To meet wartime demands, both S&W and Colt modified their standard large caliber revolvers to chamber 45 ACP. The S&W Mod. 1917 was just a Second Model .44 Hand Ejector chambered in .45ACP, with the cylinder shortened to accept the special half-moon clips required for speedy ejection of spent .45 ACP casings. In 1937 S&W accepted an order from the Brazilian government for 25,000 Model 1917's. The Brazilian contract S&W Model 1917 revolvers which were stamped with the Brazilian seal on the side plate, were delivered in October of 1938. I have seen Brazilian contract model 1917 S&W revolvers offered for sale by many of the big gun wholesales for prices in the $150.00 range... Marc


# 273 - Shotgun- J.P. Lovell, English Made
1/13/97
Tammy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
10ga Shotgun ???? 10ga 28" Unknown Unknown

10ga Side by Side shotgun Markings England John P. Lovell Arms Co. Boston MA. Eurema Gun Fine Damascus all three of these markings are in the ribbing between the barrels Hammers need to be cocked before firing All metal parts are highly scrolled. There is a projection off the top of the barrels that fits into the stock like a puzzle piece. Underside of the barrels have the folowing markings 11 then what looks like two crossed swords with a crown and diamonds. the swords and diamonds appear twice on each barrel. Next a large diamond shape with a 1o and a cin it on 1 side. and a large diamond with a 1o with a' on top of the o and a c. with the word choke next to the diamond. There are 2 indentations (symbol) next to the word choke on each ! barrel The right barrel has 3 notches on the inside evenly spaced at the backend of the barrel. The left side is smooth. There are also the letters JPD stamped on the stock and barrel butt suspect these maybe my great great grandfathers initials. What is the meaning of the choke markings and the notched in the barrel. Also any history and or information of this type of gun.

Answer:
Tammy- all the markings you describe on the bottom of the barrels are normal English proofmarks. The choke markings indicate that the barrels are slightly smaller diameter at the muzzle than normal. "Choked" barrels keep the shot pellets from spreading quite as much as they otherwise would, theoretically making it possible to get kills at slightly longer ranges. (Just the opposite of pirate blunderbusses where the wide part at the end of the barrel is intended to spread the shot to get more kills at close range.) I cannot explain the notches on the inside of the right barrel. Since the right barrel is usually the first one fired, it may be that the extractor that pulls the fired shell out got worn and these were put there to make it easier to pry the shell out with a knife or something. Just a guess... John P. Lovell Arms Co. operated in Boston from 1890 to 1897, the last of several companies involving Lovell which had started business around 1840. Unlike the Belgian shotguns frequently mentioned on these question and answer pages, your English made gun was a higher grade piece, and much better made. Your great-grandfather had good taste, and invested a little more money for his gun. However, due to their "laminated or Damascus" barrels, they are considered to be unsafe to fire. Therefore the value is not great, and it is an interesting family heirloom. Enjoy it and take care of it... John Spangler and Marc Wade


# 275 - Swedish Model 96 Mauser Sights
1/13/97
Jim: madar@fyi.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Carl Gustafs M-96 Sweedish Mauser 6.5X55 28.5 In. Blue 509xxx

Typical, all serial numbers match, but the barrel was stamped by the importer.

I've acquired this rifle to shoot in antique military rifle matches my club holds 2 or 3 times a year. The gun is quite a shooter, but has a serious problem in that the sights are not adjustable for windage at all and the crude ramp elevation adjustment is for ranges 300 meters and up. I'd really like to install a receiver sight, but the gun would need to be drilled, and I don't want to devalue it because its in pretty good shape(even though it was really inexpensive). What do you think?

Answer:
Jim- I have admired the beautiful quality and amazingly low prices of Swedish Mausers for years. As a dedicated collector I like your reluctance to drill holes for a new sight, but I don't think it would be a capital offense or venal sin. However, you might see if you can track down one of the rifles with the Swedish target rear sight that has a disc on it instead of just the normal elevation slide. I think they are intended to solve the problem you describe. You might ask this question on the Century Arms page (see links). They have a lot more shooters there, including Doug Bowser, who has written a book on the Swedish Mausers, and promotes match shooting with older military rifles. Good Luck... John Spangler and Marc Wade


# 274 - Savage Model 24P Combination Gun
1/13/97
Bob bpotts@sockets.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage 24 Series P 22LR/410 24" Blue/case Hardened Unknown

I have a Savage model 24 series P in .22/410. It has blue barrels with a case hardened receiver. The stock is walnut with checkering under the fore arm and on the both sides of the grip. The rifle/shotgun has a top lever release and the barrel selector is on the hammer.

I have been unable to locate any info on the "P" series. What differentiates the "P" series from the other models? What are the approximate manufacture dates for this series?

Answer:
Bob- I plead ignorance about the Savage .22 rimfire/.410 combination guns. (Well, not complete ignorance, my brother-in-law has one, so I have at least seen one....) I do know they made several combinations of calibers, and would guess that may be related to the "P" designation. We would welcome correction if anyone knows for sure... John Spangler and Marc Wade.


# 264 - Gun Collection
1/11/97
Ed

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Perazzi Mx3L UnKnown It Comes W/ 3 Barrels Unknown Unknown

Several Scroll designs on part near stock

My Girlfriends farther just passed away and I was told to get the guns out of her house I was wondering if you had any info on this gun, I have never seen this kind of gun before Do you have an approx.. value? Or where it was made, Any info would be nice, He also has a couple of colt hand guns that are in cases that I haven't taken a good look at yet, But each one has a badge with it, Looks very old. Thanks in advance, Ed

Answer:
Ed- Thanks for contacting us. Please take your time with the items you mention. There may be some very valuable items. For example, Perazzi makes several models with the MX3 designation. The cheapest version, without the extra barrels would probably sell at retail between $1,500 and $3,500 depending on condition. Perazzis are made in Italy, and are among the finest shotguns available anywhere today. List price on new ones run from about $5,000 up, way up! We will need more information to help you- (markings, serial number, single barrel or over under, and probably more stuff later.) However, if you do your homework carefully, it may mean a difference of hundreds, or even thousands of dollars for the heirs. The pistols may be relatively inexpensive commemoratives (worth a couple hundred to maybe one thousand dollars)or if old pieces, perhaps much more. Again, we will need a lot more information, but don't be in a hurry to sell them to the first person who comes along. We would be glad to assist you in determining fair market value of these items, and would appreciate a chance to assist you in marketing them. What is your general geographic area? If it is somewhere we get to frequently, we may be able to arrange a personal examination, or we may be able to recommend a reputable dealer in your area... John Spangler and Marc Wade


# 261 - Musket- Belgian
1/9/97
Mark captpica@shianet.org

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Musket Unknown (A Dime Will Almost Fit Inside) 36 Inches Brown none

I am trying to identify the manufacturer of an old musket. The only markings visible when fully assembled is a small oval stamped into the top of the barrel just behind the rear sight. Inside this oval are the letters ELG with a five pointed star below. They are arranged like this: E L G * The only other markings on the gun are on the bottom of the barrel, visible only when disassembled, the letters "GH" and the numbers 15.9

Any idea who the manufacturer of this old musket may have been? I'd appreciate your help in identifying this flea market find. Thank You.

Answer:
Mark- Your good description of the typical 19th century Belgian proof mark tells us this was made in Belgium in the 19th century. A dime is about the right size for .69-.72 caliber smoothbore muskets, which were common up until about 1860. The 36 inch barrel was probably cut down at some point, as these usually ran 42-44 inches. However there were some models which had shorter barrels. This is one of those guns where a photo would really help... John Spangler


# 260 - 96 Mauser Carbine
1/9/97
Ray fryr@ohsu.edu

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Broomhandle 1920 Carbine, Large Ring 7.63 Mauser 11 3/4 Inch Blue, 80% 20,5xx on frame

I recently saw a 1920s type Broomhandle pistol carbine (w/o stock) at a gun show. This gun didn't look like the pictures of carbines that I have seen in System Mauser, because it had the regular grip. Can you tell me more about this pistol. I call it a 1920 because so many strange German pistols were imported into the US then. This gun had a forearm, but I didn't notice how it was attached to the gun.

Answer:
Ray, I must admit that I am no expert on 96 Mauser carbines. My records indicate that 96 Mausers with serial numbers in the 205XX range were manufactured in 1899 and should be of the "slab side" type with no panel milling on either side of the frame. The 11.75 inch barrel and "large ring" type hammer that you describe would be consistent with the description of the "Large Ring Hammer Transitional" model that is in Fjestad's gun value book. James N Belford's book The Mauser Self Loading Pistol shows a picture of a Mauser carbine SN 69114 on page 178 that has the regular style grip which can not be removed from the frame. The Mauser in the picture differs from the one you describe because it has a small ring hammer and a 13.5 inch barrel. In the past few years some US companies have converted recent Chinese import 96 Mausers to carbine configuration. Could the Mauser that you saw be one of these? Perhaps someone with more expertise in Broomhandle carbines will read this answer and be able to provide us with better information... Marc


# 242 - Russian Tokarev SVT40G Sniper Rifle
1/7/97
jon jebuscho@ix.netcom.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Tokarev SVT40G (Sniper) 7.62x54R 24" Blue hb3549

1941 Manufacture date.the Hb in the serial number are russian characters.all proof marks and serial numbers match.

Where do I find more technical and historical information? It is very scarce. there seems to be none on the internet save two people that have or had one in the past. Any sources of accessories or spare parts? Value?

Answer:
Jon- Ed Ezell's "AK-47 Story" shows a production of 1,326,000 SVT4os and 51,000 SVT40 sniper rifles between 1940 and 1942. Production figures for 1943-45 are unknown but estimated at less than 2 million SVT38 and SVT40s, and I would assume that some more snipers are included. Smith's "Book of Rifles" has an extensive description of development and functioning of the Tokarev. it describes the sniper version as "the same as the semiautomatic rifle M1940 except that the barrel has been selected and the receiver has been drilled and tapped for a telescope mount." Other sources to check might include US military intelligence pubs (declassified) on Vietnam era stuff which might have some interesting tidbits. "Small Arms of the World" could have something in one of the various editions. Other than the bayonet, scope and mount I am not aware of other accessories that you would find. I'd try Springfield Sporters or SARCO for spare parts. Value- I don't know, but saw some of these recently advertised, and don't think they were too expensive. In my opinion, anything related to sniping is a good investment. (However, when some law breaking moron shoots somebody with any rifle with a scope on it, watch for attempts to ban all evil "sniper" rifles, in which case your investment value drops like a rock.) That's about all I can add... John Spangler


# 246 - Winchester 1884(?) Rifle
1/7/97
Sye foxdavid@execpc.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1884 32 Unknown Blue Unknown

32 W.C.S.

I have been told that this is a 32-20. What I need to know if this is the right caliber and where I can obtain ammo. I would also like to know some history of the gun ex.. when it was made and the promident use of the gun. This was given to me by my grandfather years ago and I am reluctant to use it because it might be valuable or today's ammo might damage the barrel. Your advice on these issues would be appreciated.

Answer:
Sye- I am not familiar with a model 1884 Winchester, nor a ".32 WCS". cartridge. so we cannot help much. Please double check the Model of the gun (probably on the barrel or the tang) and the caliber marking. Give us full markings and the serial number and we can tell you a lot. Without them, we would be guessing... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 240 - Shotgun by G.H. Fox circa 1878 (American Arm Co.)
1/7/97
Nancy@mcn.org

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
GH Fox Unknown 12 Guage Unknown Unknown Unknown

Stamped on the gun: G H Fox (note that it does not say A H Fox)Patent Jan. 4, 1870 Nov. 6, 1877 Jan. 8, 18782137 is stamped after the patent dates. This gun breaks from side to side to be loaded; not loaded from the ordinary downward position. I would be grateful for any information you may have on this gun, especially as to its value. I am not a collector, and if this gun has value, would definitely be interested in selling it.

Answer:
Nancy- George Henry Fox (1819-1901) had numerous patents on gun related designs, and ran a succession of gun producing companies under various names in the Boston Mass area from 1853 through 1901. From 1870 until the end, he operated as "American Arms Co." After his death much of the machinery was sold to Marlin, but the name and designs went to someone in Michigan and soon fizzled out entirely. I cannot find any information on the various models made under Fox patents, but am pretty sure that there is no horde of collectors laying awake dreaming of someday acquiring one. Black powder breech loaders circa 1860-1890 (except high grade target rifles) seem to be neglected by collectors, and values seem to be low compared to older and newer guns. What interest does exist is concentrated on complete original examples in good to excellent condition. Even minor flaws will kill interest entirely. I suspect your gun would bring $50-150 if you can find someone interested in the design, or less than $75 if someone only wants a wallhanger. Good luck... John Spangler


# 245 - Webley & Scott M1911 7.65 Pistol Disassembly
1/7/97
Johan email:css119@igubu.saix.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley & Scott 1911 Automatic Pistol 7.65mm (.32) Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have recently inherited this pistol. I want to remove the pistol's slide for cleaning purposes, but can't get it off. Can someone help? Where can I get more information on the stripping down of this pistol(preferably on the web)?

Answer:
Johan- You came to the right place! We can fix anything but the crack of dawn or a broken heart. If you have not already tried a big hammer or a cutting torch, then try this: Grab the back of the trigger guard (where it fits into the grip) and pull it forward and down. It will pivot down, and the slide and barrel will come off the front. I guess it goes back together in the opposite sequence, but I never tried to take one apart or put it back together. If this doesn't work, write a nasty letter to the folks who printed W.H.B. Smith's "Book of Pistols and Revolvers" and tell them that the info on page 317 is wrong... John Spangler


# 247 - Mauser DSM 34 .22 Trainer
1/7/97
Cliff clifcole@erols.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser DSM34 .22 Unknown Blue 38,XXX

N.S.D.M.B. stamped on left side of buttstock ring. No other similar marks on rest of the gun. Stock is numbered (matching) to rest of the gun.

Is the buttstock ring marking of any significance? Do you know if DSM34'swere routinely marked in this way? What do the initials stand for? If this is an original marking, what does it make the gun worth? It is in excellent condition, about 95% overall. Any info you could provide would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Cliff (clifcole@erols.com)

Answer:
Cliff- Sorry I don't know enough about German WW2 vintage markings to explain what they mean. Could be something really neat, or something mundane like "East Berlin Junior High School Rifle Team". Probably some German fanatic can tell us, but until then I wouldn't add a premium for the marks. I think these run in the $350-450 range, but don't follow them very closely. Sorry I cannot help more. You might try asking on the Century Arms site (see our links) they seem to have lots of folks interested in Mausers there... John Spangler


# 249 - Rifle, T. Davidson, Ohio
1/7/97
Eddie e-mail add is janet@beaulib.dtx.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
T Davidson & Company Black Powder ? 36 In. ? none

On side plate has T. Davidson & company, and is made in Ohio

Would like to know about history of gun and how old it is.

Answer:
Eddie- I cannot tell you anything about who made your rifle, but it was not Tyler Davidson & Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio. Why? They only made locks, which they sold to gunsmiths who made or assembled the rest of the rifle. Davidson was active around 1834-1866. Someone familiar with black powder rifles can probably tell more from some photos. Mail some to us (Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171) and we will see if we can add anything... John Spangler


# 252 - Springfield Rifles (2) Model 1884 .45-70
1/7/97
GORDIE

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
U.S. SPRINGFIELD 1873 45-70 Don't Know Exactly/ It's An Infantry Rifle Unknown 2 guns: 1st:364XXXX 2nd: 26XXXX

I need complete information/ history on these guns. When they were manufactured, specs, etc. Thanks.

Answer:
Gordie- Would you believe 10:47 AM June 25, 1887, and 3:30 PM July 3, 1884? I didn't think so, but the years are about right, even if I had to make up the times and dates. (Hey, I might have fooled somebody.) There was originally an inspector stamp ("cartouche") on the left side of the stock, opposite the lock, with script initials (SWP) and the date, but these may have been sanded off, or the stocks switched at some point in their history. I cannot find any specific reference to when or where these two rifles may have been used, but they are typical of those used in the latter stages of the Indian Wars, and by volunteers troops in the Spanish-American War in 1898 and the subsequent Philippine Insurrection. They used .45 caliber ammunition with 70 grains of black powder (that's by weight, not counting the grains) and a 500 grain lead bullet. Ammo guys call that ".45-70-500" ammo and the sights were calibrated to about 1800 yards. You probably wouldn't be hit at that range, but you don't want to get hit by a 500 grain bullet at any range. The black powder produced big clouds of smoke, so troops could not see the enemy after a few rounds. The clever Spanish were using smokeless powder, which didn't block their view, but allowed them to aim nicely at the big clouds of smoke marking position of US troops. They used a triangular socket bayonet with 18 inch blades, which were actually surplus Civil War musket bayonets with the sockets "squeezed down" to fit the smaller .45 caliber barrels. Okay- any more details, check Frasca & Hill "The .45-70 Springfield" or Ernst & Waite "Trapdoor Springfield". Or, for a research fee of $50 per hour, I could tell you lots more myself.............. They are very collectable, and average specimens start about $350 and like new examples can bring over $1 Grand... John Spangler


# 253 - Springfield Rifle (M1884 .45-70)
1/7/97
Ed. erohwer@sky.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
U.S. Springfield 1878 ? 60 Blue 38XXXX

VP

Any idea what the age of this rifle is ?Do you know of anyone in the phoenix area that can work on this, it needs a firing pin ?I am interested in restoring this to working condition. Any idea where I can get ammunition for this ?

Answer:
Ed- Bring your rifle to the Crossroads of the West Gun Show in Phoenix on 22-23 February. I will have firing pins and some other parts there with me, and be able to figure out exactly what you need. I can also do most of the work involved on these rifles. No charge to take a look and tell you what is required. Your rifle was made around 1888, but is known as the Model 1884. It uses .45-70 ammunition, preferably black powder loads, although there are some smokeless loads that are safe for "trapdoor" rifles. There may be ammo dealers at that show who have appropriate ammo. I am too much of a collector at heart to recommend firing old guns. Besides, too many unemployed lawyers are trying to pay for their kids' college education, so I will never recommend firing old guns. Instead, I chicken out and advise people to have it examined by a competent gunsmith, so they lawyers will sue them instead if the thing blows up... John Spangler


# 259 - Japanes Rifles
1/7/97
Bill wyoungmn@maf.mobile.al.us

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Japanese Unknown Unknown 25" Blue 95XXX

Circle with capital "I" to left of SN. Circle with three semi-circles touching at 12, 4, and 8 O'clock to right of SN. Circle with "hyphens" inside at 3 and 9 O'clock to right of previous circle. Multi-petal "flower" on top of chamber.

Wood stock is rather crude with a shellac like finish; not smoothly finished. Butt plate is wood. Sling brackets on left side. Front sight is blade with rear peep sight. Wood stock extend forward to within 4" of muzzle and has a short piece on top of barrel. A second gun is similar except has a 30" barrel and a dark oiled stock. SN is 443786 with only the circle and three semi-circle marking and the "flower" on top of the barrel. Sights are blade front and "V" rear. Also has rear vertically adjustable rear sight. Both guns have bayonet mounts. I'm thinking of selling. Please give me "ball-park" !values. Both guns are excellent condition. The small one looks like its never been fired.

Answer:
Bill- Thanks for the excellent description of the markings, it really helped! The rifle with the 25 inch barrel is the "7.7mm Type 99 Short rifle" It is very late production (probably late 1944 or early 1945 often called a "last ditch" model because of the crude features. However, they are pretty common. Yours is at the very end of the "34th series" of rifles made at the Toyo Kogyo arsenal in Hiroshima. They are fairly hard to find without the imperial Chrysanthemum emblem on the receiver defaced by grinding or chisel marks. The other rifle may be an earlier "7.7mm Type 99 Long Rifle" made at Kokura arsenal. The long rifles were made in much smaller numbers. Or, it could be a similar looking "6.5mm Type 38 rifle" which also had a barrel about 30 inches long. While most ordinary Japanese rifles run in the $50-125 range, these two could run as high as $150-250, depending on a close examination of them, and further research on the long type. Some of my customers are collectors of Japanese arms who might be interested if they are rare ones, and a dealer friend who looks for ordinary ones (but at wholesale prices). Let us know if you want us to help find a buyer... John Spangler.


# 262 -
1/7/97
Eugene ESLAG@AOL.COM

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
??? ??? 20 Gauge ? Not sure 24" to 28" I think Blue, but reciever is engraved, but dirty Mabey 16XXX It is stamped on the barrels

This is a double barrel side by side shotgun and I'm pulling my hair out trying to figure out what it is. It has a Definitive marking and a provisional marking on it from Belgium with three other marking that I haven'tbeen able to figure out A star over a M and a Star over an AE also 12-65 in an Oval. Down each barrel ACILR COCKERILL (Steel from the largest steelmill in Belgium), and down the center on the rib is stamped R.GLINIECKII SKA KRAKOW, Which I think is something in Swedish, but I loose a lot in the translation. On the gun stamped in three out of sight areas is stamped 1378 and CHOKE 182. Any Information on this gun would be greatly appreciated.

The question is who made this and what type of gun might this be?

Answer:
Unidentified Shotgun Eugene- Hey, you already figured out nearly everything. Makes us look bad when we can't add much. About the only thing we can even guess at is the additional markings, which are probably choke markings or chamber length markings. Rather than Swedish, I think the markings might indicate a Polish connection, as Krakow (also spelled Crakow) is one of the larger cities in Poland. I suspect the Belgians were happy to sell guns to Polish firms as well as American firms to be marked/marketed under different house brands. Okay, we're out of ideas now... John & Marc


# 251 - Gewher Mod 1918 "T-Gew" Anti Tank Rifle
1/4/97
ROBERT S TUCKER

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Unknown 13mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a Mauser, 13mm, bolt-action, single shot WW1 anti-tank rifle with a wood stock and pistol grip and a bi-pod. Could you give me some history on this weapon and information concerning the availability of ammunition and parts. Thanks.

Answer:
Robert, it sounds like you are describing a Mauser Tank- Gewher Mod 1918 "T-Gew". The T-Gew was the first anti-tank rifle ever developed and it set the pattern for a number similar weapons. The T-Gew had a Muzzle velocity of 3000 fps and could penetrate almost an inch of armor at over 200 yards / 0 degrees. Overall length was 66.13 inches , weight was about 40 pounds, the barrel was 38.69 inches long, had 4 grooves, with a right hand twist. The T-Gew was really just an enlarged Mauser action fitted to a long barrel with a heavy pistol grip stock, and a bipod, but it proved to be quite effective against the allied tanks of it's day. For parts and ammunition take a look at our links page. Good Luck... Marc


# 244 - Kreigsmarine Model 1934 Mauser
1/2/97
Joe jim.bellah@lmco.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Model 1934 7.65mm 4" Blue 62xxxx

Eagle with swastika on right side of lower receiver with capital letter M under the swastika. Eagle and "M" proof stamp behind rear sights. Wood grip, curved at the back strap with center screw.

This pistol was brought back by my father from WWII, he was in the 88th div. fighting in Italy. I can't seem to find any authoritative Mauser literature that decodes the mysterious "M" stamp under the swastika. I have seen L,N,& F for various navy and police issues, but no "M". This piece is in NRA excellent condition with original holster and 2 Mauser factory stamped magazines. less than a dozen rounds through it since 1945. Is this a commercial model with custom grips or an oddball ?

Answer:
Joe, the Eagle over the M stamp on your 1934 Mauser is a Kreigsmarine marking. Kreigsmarine markings on 1934 Mauser pistols are not consistent. From 1936 to 1941 the Kreigsmarine procured approx.. 23,000 Mauser 1934 pistols, and there are over 200 distinct reported variations. Among other variations Kreigsmarine Eagle over M markings were both stamped and engraved on both the left and right hand sides of frames. Property numbers, beginning with an O or an N may or may not be stamped on the front grip strap. Grips came in both checkered walnut and synthetic (the examples of synthetic grips that I have seen have Mauser banner on them). My records show that your serial number falls into a late production range (probably 1939 or later) that had no property number stamping... Marc


# 243 - Luger 1939 Dated
1/1/97
Ray rrgrany@ibm.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger 1939 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My father-in-law brought a 1939 Luger back with him after the War, it is in pretty much the same condition now as fifty years ago. What is a good source to research the markings and authenticity along with getting an approximate value? What do we need to look for to determine the "condition". In asking me to find something out, he also handed me a article from GUN - July 1982 (the sheet is in excellent condition, barely yellowed, just to show how he keeps his things) written by Ralph Shattuck - Part Three of "The World of Lugers" stating that Ralph had never seen a 1939 dated. Is it possible to get the entire article or is there another source. I haven't done a lot of searching other than to find your web site. Thanks for any help you can give. Ray Granberry email: rrgrany@ibm.net

Answer:
Ray, 1939 dated Lugers are very rare, according to my records all 1939 Lugers are of the Mauser Banner type and very few Mauser Banner's were manufactured. Your Luger should have the word MAUSER inside a fancy border with curved edges stamped on the forward toggle link. The book Luger variations by Harry E Jones contains two pictures of 1939 dated Lugers on pages 212 and 216. We would be happy to research your Luger and give an appraisal. Instructions for getting an appraisal and determining condition are on our APPRASIALS page. Without more information it is impossible to give an accurate estimate but values for Mauser Banner's in excellent condition can be over $2500.00... Marc


# 241 - Incorrect Ammunition = Serious Injury Or Death!!
1/1/97
EFF WOLVIE 01

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 5MM Unknown Unknown Unknown

Can 5.56mm ammunition be used in a 5mm gun?

Answer:
-Jeff- ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!!! If you can't get the right ammunition, do not attempt to fire a gun. Sometimes people manage to force incorrect ammunition into a gun, and attempts to fire it result in death or serious injury. Take your gun to a competent gunsmith and have them verify the caliber and advise you on the correct ammunition. Sure glad you asked before you tried this!... John Spangler


# 234 - Webley Bentley
1/1/97
Martin onsite@training-ltd.demon.co.uk

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley Bentley Not Known Just Over .38 5" Looks Like A Recent Rebluing Job none

Only marks are proof marks on barrel and cylinder. this is a 5 shot percussion pistol, in fine condition, though it looks like it has been restored and reblued. it is double action only, no hammer spur, and has a rammer mounted on teh left hand side of the octaganle barrel. it also has a push in spring arrangement on the left of the gun which holds the hammer back sufficiently so that the cylinder can be turned. it also has a large spur sticking out on top of the grip . I just wondered if you had heard of such a thing john, and also if you had any idea of age and value.

Answer:
Martin- An interesting firearm you have there, but one which poses some problems for us. There are several possible reasons for names being marked on arms. The maker usually marked them, if a patented design, the patentee might have their name marked on the arm, and retailers sometimes marked them. Owners/donors sometimes added names. James and Phillip Webley were gun makers. James died in 1856, shortly after beginning revolver production, and his widow continued sales under his name until 1863. His brother, Phillip, continued in the trade for many years, both as a maker and as a retailer. In 1860 Phil Webley, along with two or three others, entered into an agreement with Joseph Bentley to sell some of Bentley's double action revolvers. Bentley was a prolific inventor, with numerous patents to his credit between 1839 and 1860. By 1865 the trade name being used was "P. Webley & Son," and percussion revolvers were being replaced by various pinfire and rimfire designs. I have not seen any revolvers with the combination of features you mention, but have seen them individually. Quite often the pistols of this period were very well finished, and could lead some to believe they are refinished. (Of course, some have been refinished, and an experienced person can tell the difference). Okay, checking the exact markings on your gun should help pin things down. However, even from here we can say it falls in the range of 1856-65, and probably more like 1860-61. There is little collector interest in the United States for things like this, but I would think there would be a lot in the UK. In fact, these may be the only guns you can legally own (at least for a couple of years until they ban these too) so interest and values might increase. On the US market, I would guess these would sell like the Tranters and Deane Adams & Dean revolvers we see. These run US$200-450 for nice examples. Here, we think of them as secondary arms of the American Civil War. Of course I already knew all this, but if you wanted to check up on me, "The Revolver 1818-1865" by Taylerson, Andrews & Firth would be good, also "The Webley Story" by Dowell. Both these were originally published in the UK and you may be able to find them in a library there. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 239 - Gardner Shotgun
1/1/97
Debbie e-mail: dandpkaelin@fuse.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Gardner Shotgun 10 Guage 30 Or 32 Inches Damascus Steel Barrel, Walnut Stock Unknown

The walnut stock is checkered and there is tortoise shell inlay on the forestock.

Approximately when was this shotgun manufactured? I know that Gardner shotguns were manufactured in Cleveland, Ohio, USA during the late 19thcentury. How many of these shotguns were manufactured and what was the original selling price. What is a ballpark estimate of the value of this shotgun on the current market? Any information you can provide on the history of the firearm and/or the manufacturer will be greatly appreciated. It is difficult to find information on this manufacturer much less to find information on this particular firearm. Thank you in advance for your assistance in this matter. Deborah

Answer:
Debbie- You didn't mention if your gun is percussion, so I am assuming it is made for cartridges. If the marking is "Gardner Gun Co." that firm was active in snowy Cleveland circa 1887-1895, although Frank Sellers "American Gunsmiths" indicates this was a sales organization for Gardner machine guns, made by Pratt & Whitney. Robert Gardner (no relation, I don't think)in "American Gunmakers" lists them as shotgun manufacturers, 80 Bank St, Cleveland, 1887, closed in 1895. William Gardner of Toledo and Cleveland had patents for magazine firearms, feed clips, and machine guns between 1869 and 1887. City directories and newspapers might have more information if you wanted to pursue it further. Other "Gardners" with various first names are listed as gun makers in Columbus, Cincinnati, Ada, Lima, and Chillicothe, all in Ohio, circa 1850-1880. Probably several are related to each other, and if your gun is only marked "Gardner" could be the maker. In the 1880-1900 period double barrel shotguns often sold in the $5.00-15.00 range depending on quality. Unfortunately, they are not particularly valuable today with damascus barrels. Probably in the $50-75 range as "wallhangers" mostly. The tortoise shell inlay may not be original, but a later addition. These guns put a lot of food on tables during their lifetime, but have little documentation or history that can tell us much more about them. Family traditions are probably the only source. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 238 - Winchester Model 1894 1/2 Magazine Carbine
1/1/97
Bruce Stealth02@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 .32 Winchester Special Carbine with 1/2 magazine (lightweight blue 75XXXX

The half magazine seems to be rare for this model....Value of this rifle and any pertinent information you can give me about the manufacture of half magazine Winchesters

Answer:
Bruce- You think your Model 94 is neat? Last week I went to the Browning museum in Ogden, Utah. They have many of John M. Browning's original, hand made prototypes of guns that have been made by the millions and are still among the best ever designed, although invented 60-120 years ago. For instance- prototypes of the Model 1886, 1894, 1895 Winchester Rifles, Winchester Model 93/97 shotguns, the Browning autoloader shotgun which went under FN, Remington and Savage names, the .32, .380 and .45 automatic pistols, and M1895 "potato digger, the 1917 water cooled machine guns, etc. Anyone interested in guns should make the pilgrimage there. Seven days a week, $2.00 a head, and they have trains, cars, fossils and other stuff in case some family members don't worship J.M. Browning as much as others. Oh yes, your gun- made in 1915. Factory records through 1932 show that one of every 725 guns had a non-standard magazine length, according to George Madis' "Winchester Book.". However, the half magazine was popular enough that it was a standard feature on the later model 55 and 64 rifles which are considered to be part of the over 5 million Model 94s made in the first 102 years of production. Neither of the two most popular pricing guides show a premium for half magazine model 94 rifles, but I am sure Winchester collectors would pay a little more. Winchester offered many special order features, and while most are interesting and "nice to have" only odd combinations or some of the really rare ones get collectors "WOW!!! Megabucks!!" excited. The "lightweight" version is something a little special, but takes an expert to recognize. If you think you have one, it may be worth getting a "factory letter" to document that it is original. Condition is the biggest factor in value. Rare junk is still junk. Assuming yours has about 60% original finish, I would guess the value at about $500-600, or if lightweight model somewhat higher. Tough to tell without seeing the gun... John Spangler


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This page was last updated 2/1/97 6:28:58 AM