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# 1859 - Shotgun- Belgian .44XL Delhoone?
2/27/99
Emilio, Milwaukee, WI

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Delhoone? ? .44XL Shot Shell 22 1/4" Case Hardened, Blue Barrel NONE

Blackpowder marking in right side receiver Underneath the barrel 1 0 4 Delhoone B T C Liege markings in barrel also I have an 1880 to 1890 Belgian made shotgun. .44 cal. The action is a Martini-Henry. Very good condition. I would like to know more about the history and collector value of this gun. I also have a box of shells for this gun made by Remington.

Answer:
Emilio- I cannot find any listing for Delhoone, but if there are Belgian proofmarks it was probably the type of gun imported and sold here by mail order places like Sears or possibly with a brand name requested by a local merchant. Unless a high quality piece that might appeal to a shotgun collector there probably is not much interest in the gun, and I would guess it falls in the $75-200 range depending on condition and quality. The ammo is probably worth about as much as the gun if the box is full and in good shape. John Spangler


# 1854 - M1 Carbine- Inland
2/27/99
Bill, Falls Church, VA.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
M-1 Carbine Inland .30 Unknown Unknown 19369

All original markings. I have an M-1 carbine manufactured by Inland in Sept 42. The serial number is 19XXX. All marking are original and match the gun. Condition is excellent. Is this gun collectable or can it be use as a regular shooter? If it is collectable any ideas as to its worth?

Answer:
Bill- Your carbine is a pretty early one, and probably has a lot of collector interest IF IT IS ALL MATCHING AND ORIGINAL. High wood stock, dog leg hammer, narrow band with no bayonet lug, flip sight, all parts with letter "I" as part of the markings, etc. If arsenal overhauled there would be less interest but it could be restored. If the barrel has import markings, then you can probably just shoot it and not worry about destroying priceless history. If excellent all correct early matching original I would estimate the value to run about $600-850. A rebuilt import just a little more than half that. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1768 - FN Model 1910 Or 1922?
2/27/99
Jim, Hopkinsville, KY

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning 1910 Or 1922 .380 3" Black ? (WEAPON NOT HERE AT OFFICE)

How does one differentiate between the Browning Model 1910 and the Model 1922? I am getting conflicting information.

Answer:
Jim, The FN Model 1910 had a 3.42 inch barrel and a 7 shot magazine, it was widely adopted by police forces all over the world, but it attained little military success. In 1922, FN redesigned of the model 1910, among other changes, the barrel was lengthened to 4.5 inches and the grip frame was lengthened to take a larger magazine. In order to lengthen the slide to fit the new longer barrel without upsetting their existing production facilities, FN made manufactured a slide extension piece which bayoneted into the recesses used for the original spring locking collar. This extension piece thus served as a spring retainer as well as a portion of the slide. The FN 1922 pistol was adopted by the Belgian Army in 1923, and by the Dutch in 1925. During WWII the FN 1922 remained in production and was adopted by the German military as the 'Pistole Modell 626(b)'. Modern production FN 1922 pistols are known as the 'Baby Browning .380'. Baby Brownings differ from the FN 1922 in that they have molded grips, the magazine floor plate is shaped as a finger rest, and the slide is a one piece unit with a small retaining cap at the muzzle. The best way to differentiate between the FN 1910 and the FN 1922 is by the looking for the longer barrel with the slide extension. Marc


# 1908 - Winchester Serial Numbers With A Letter
2/23/99
Don

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 88 Unknown Unknown Unknown 22XXXXA

An acquaintance has a m-88 Win Carbine (19" bbl) with a 6 digit # :22XXXXA. He feels the A makes the gun very rare and extremely so as to make it highly valuable. I tend to doubt that the letter A could add much value. What letters were used after the s/n and are letter A s/n's rarer than H's?? I only own 1 88 and its a 5 digit # with no letter so I know nothing about them other than they are accurate. Your detailed input would be greatly appreciated. Thank you,

Answer:
Don, Over the years, I have heard two rumors as to why Winchester serial numbers sometimes have an alphabetical suffix. The first explanation is that serial numbers with an alphabetical suffix were mistakenly used twice at the factory so the suffix was added to differentiate between the two. The second explanation is that these firearms were sold through chain stores a like Montgomery Wards or True Value. I called John to see if he would be able to verify ether of these explanations and he came up with a third. John said that alphabetical suffixes were used to designate slight modifications in design. As to alphabetical suffixes adding extra value, I know of no collectors who are willing to pay a premium for these numbers , if you find someone who is, send me his/her name and we can both make a little extra money. Marc


# 1851 - School Project: The First Machine Gun How It Works
2/23/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

If you have any information on who made the first machine gun how it works and etc. please e-mail me back this is for a school project.

Answer:
Hi- Glad to help with research projects, but you will have to do some more work on your own. See if your library has a copy of "Small Arms of the World" by Joseph E. Smith. It has a great section covering all sorts of machine gun designs and the fascinating story of the men behind them. For serious advanced study there is a five volume set "The Machine Gun" by Lt. Col George M. Chinn, USMC written nearly 50 years ago that is still one of the best works on the subject. You might also look in encyclopedias under the names of the three inventors below to see what they tell you. Dr. Richard Gatling, a Washington DC dentist invented the "Gatling gun" about 1862. This had six barrels that rotated when the gunner cranked a handle. As the barrels passed various points on the stationary breech mechanism cartridges were inserted, fired, and removed. A few of these guns were used at the very end of the Civil War, but the basic design is still in use in jet fighters and helicopter gunships today. Instead of being manually cranked, they use electric or hydraulic motors to turn the barrels and they can fire up to about 3,000 rounds a minute. A Gatling gun that was used at the Battle of San Juan Hill in Cuba in 1898 in support of Teddy Roosevelt's "Rough Riders" was on display at a gun show in Kansas City in July. A friend of mine got to go out and shoot it later. I am jealous! The Army had a hard time trying to figure out how to use machine guns before World War I, and that in itself is an interesting story. Hiram Maxim, born in Sangersville, Maine, had a scientific education and after working on inventions in the early days of electric motors and the like he turned to making guns. About 1884 he invented a machine gun that used the recoil or "kick" from the first cartridge to extract the empty, load a fresh cartridge and fire it and so on until the trigger was released. These recoil operated guns were adopted by British and German armies and caused most of the casualties during WWI.

John M. Browning worked in Ogden, Utah (about 50 miles from here) and in 1895 he invented a machine gun that used the pressure from the burning powder gas when a cartridge is fired to move a lever that would operate other parts to remove the empty case, load a new cartridge and fire again. This lever was located under the barrel and if too close to the ground would kick up a lot of dirt, earning it the nickname of "potato digger" gun. Browning later invented a recoil operated machine gun in 1917. When the Army tested it they were amazed that it passed all their tests the first time, firing 20,000 rounds. To prove it was not just luck, Browning fired another 20,000 rounds without any problems. Finally they hooked together all the belts they had and the gun fired 600 rounds a minute for 48 minutes and 12 second before they ran out of ammunition. (You do the math..) Browning also invented a .50 caliber machine gun in 1918 that is still used by armies around the world today. He also invented the most popular deer rifle in history the Winchester 94 .30-30; the Colt Model 1911 .45 automatic pistol; the Winchester Model 97 pump shotgun, and the FN or Browning semi-auto shotgun. Plus a few dozen other famous designs you will learn about if you study more. Hope this helps. I was a history major in college and learned enough to be able to help kids with their homework. I am sure you will help someone else when they need it. See if your parents will sign you up as a Junior member in the National Rifle Association (www.NRA.org) so you can learn more about old and new guns and their history and safe use. John Spangler


# 1850 - Sherman Tank Telescope
2/23/99
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was wondering if you had a telescope for an M32 Sherman tank. I have a picture of it if you're not sure what scope I'm talking about. I didn't see this item on your page, but I thought you might get these in from time to time. Do you have any idea what kind of price this would be going for? Also, I have a scope labeled "Telescope, M38A2". Would you know what this scope was used for? The only thing I can find on the net is that the M38A2 is a practice bomb. As I look through the scope, I don't see that anything is actually magnified...is this normal, or is an optic missing from the internals of the scope? The numbers seem awfully tiny. Thanks for any help you can provide.

Answer:
David- I am not familiar with a M32 Sherman. I thought they were all M4 series, but I know there are a lot of variants with different turret and gun systems. The telescopes are probably very similar for many, differing only in the reticule appropriate to the gun installed. TM9-2300 Standard Artillery & Fire Control Material- editions of 1944 and 1949 have a lot of info spread out over numerous pages that may identify the proper telescope. In this case we are talking telescopes associated with the main gun, not driver periscopes or the like. Your M38A2 telescope is for the M4 Sherman tank and Light tank T24. The following descriptions also apply to the M40A2 and M47A2 telescopes (and pretty much to the M38, M40, M47 and A1 modifications of these which differ only in minor details.) The latter scopes are used in the M5A1 light tank, Motor gun carriage T70, and Medium Tanks T23, T25, and T26. "These telescopes are for direct fire as well as for observation. They are mounted in Periscope M4A1 [the common flat box type with beveled ends].. The reticules reflect the high degree of accuracy with which direct fire can be controlled on weapons of 37mm and more....The telescopes have windows for the illumination of reticules for night firing....The instruments are compactly designed to be accommodated in the short Periscope M4A1 which the gunner uses for sighting from within the tank, his vision being about six inches below the line of sighting. The telescopes are mounted vertically in the periscopes and can be bore sighted by adjustment controls on the periscopes. That is about all I can tell you from reading the manual. I am sure there are some guys around who have restored these and you can probably find some of them on military vehicle oriented sites. John Spangler


# 1902 - SKS Information
2/20/99
Michael

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
China SKS 7.62 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Do you know where I might find serial number info on a Chinese SKS (Vietnam bring back)

Answer:
Michael, there is a book about SKS Carbines that you might find interesting it's title is "For Collector Only The SKS Carbine (CKC45g)" by Steve Kehaya and Joe Poyer. It has information about markings but I don't think that it has any serial number information. Marc


# 1849 - German Combination Gun
2/20/99
Russell

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
German Combination Gun 12 GA & 7.8MM Unknown Unknown Unknown

One of my associates has come across a combination rifle from one of the World Wars. The gentleman he bought it from said he got it off of a German Soldier. It is a side by side rifle. One side is a 12 gauge and the other one is labeled 7,8mm. The rifle barrel is rifled and the gun has two triggers. It has on the gun Emil Kerner and it also says Krupp, Stah. it also says gewehrmabrik. Can you tell me what the caliber of the rifle is and the possible worth of the gun? Thank you for your time and patience.

Answer:
Russell- Despite the story, this was much more likely to have been captured from a wealthy German landowner than a soldier, or perhaps picked out of a pile of confiscated weapons rounded up at the end of the war. After 50 years sometimes the details get a little fuzzy, but it is unlikely that any of these were in the hands of German military units (unless they took it from the wealthy landowner first!). Just about the only way to be sure of the caliber is to have a gunsmith make a "chamber cast" using low temperature alloy or sulfur and then measuring that and comparing it with European cartridge dimensions. These guns were all virtually handmade to the buyer's specifications and calibers ranged from a few that are easy to find ammo for to mostly obsolete calibers that are virtually unobtainable. Throw in a few wildcats and a couple of British or American calibers just to keep you guessing. The shotguns barrels are usually for the shorter length European shells. While an unfired US shell will fit nicely, the short chamber creates dangerous high pressure conditions when the crimped part of the shell cannot open fully out of the way of the emerging shot column and wads. A good gunsmith can usually run a chamber reamer in to fix this for a small fee, but be sure to have this checked before shooting any of these beautiful old guns. The names may be of the maker or the original owner with nearly no information available on any of the makers. Krupp refers to the famous Krupp steel makers, and stahl or flusstahl refers to steel or fluid steel as opposed to the weaker but very attractive older damascus or laminated steel barrel material. Value depends on the condition. caliber, overall design and how those match a prospective buyer's desires. Some enjoy the classic beauty of the old guns. Others rather have a modern looking US shotgun. Some buyers may only be willing to pay a few hundred dollars (if anything) while others may eagerly count out a couple thousand. Sort of like the difference between the plump nude women painted by the old masters compared to the skinny blonde bimbos on TV and in the movies today. Notions of beauty vary greatly over time and among different cultures. Of course, the anti-gun crowd thinks you are a pervert for having an interest in any type of gun and would like to (a) tax it, (b) ban it, (c) confiscate it or (d) all of the above. Better kick some money in to the NRA today to preserve your right to keep this historic old arm which demonstrates the skills of master woodworkers, metal workers, engravers and engineers. John Spangler


# 1848 - Mauser ' Half Breed ' Rifle
2/20/99
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Half- Breed Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Gentleman, have you information on an organization or person who is considered deeply intimate with Mauser rifles, both military and commercial? I have what appears to be a factory half-breed 'created' around 1939, so both specialties would be appreciated. I checked the Mauser-werke.de site and it for some reason is down (and out?) ANY information or leads would be greatly appreciated. I thank you for your time.

Answer:
James Our links page has a link to a site that is very much involved with Mauser military rifles. There is a great reference book on military K98k Mauser rifles-"Backbone of the Wehrmacht- The K98k Rifle" by Richard Law which is the definitive source for everything related to the military version and some oddballs. However, I suspect that you have a sporter made from a military rifle. Many talented German gunsmiths used surplus military actions to build sporters for American soldiers in the post-WW2 period. Except for possible remnants of factory markings, these would appear to be equal to the finest commercial production. On the other hand, the Mauser factory could have still been making "Sportmodell" rifles in 1939. There are also a number of .22 caliber rifles that look very much like the full size military K98k. Hope this helps. Good luck in your search. John Spangler


# 1842 - M1 Carbine- National Postal Meter
2/16/99
Steve Hazleton, PA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
National Postal Meter US M1 Carbine .30 Carbine 18" Parkerized 420XXXX

I recently purchased a National Postal Meter US M1 Carbine. The barrel is marked as follows: Buffalo Arms 11 43 Between the month and year of production is the Army Ordnance symbol. My question is: Is this barrel correct for this rifle? Everything is seems to be including the stock which is properly marked for a National Postal Meter carbine. Thank you.

Answer:
Steve- Larry Ruth's "War Baby" two volume set on the M1 carbine has nearly everything known about these nifty little guns and their accessories and civilian copies. He states on page 448 of volume 1- "National Postal Meter did not manufacture any barrels, but obtained them as government-free-issue from other contractors "all were in general use throughout production." The 11-43 date looks about right to me based on monthly production totals. I get really torqued when people ask questions about guns and use "XXX" in the serial number. It makes me suspect they are afraid it is stolen property or paranoid conspiracy wackos sure that space aliens or the BATF is going to make a note of their serial number and come take their gun away from them. I also think that the "XXX" stuff may block access by kids if their browser thinks it has found a porno site. We welcome kids learning more about gun safety and history, so tell your friends to use the full serial number or don't bother asking. I will take a deep breath and calm down and stop throwing things at the dog. Everything will be all right (unless Clinton's picture shows up on the TV screen). John Spangler


# 1841 - Rifle- Standard Arms Semi - Automatic
2/16/99
Glenn; Deptford, NJ; USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Standard Arms Model G 30 Caliber - "CAL 30" On Barrel 24" Barrel Blue 280

It has a brass fore end with a lion head and a spruce tree on one side and a moose with trees on the other. It also has a brass butt plate with the insignia SAC interwoven. The wood is not broken or cracked in any place. This gun has never been braised, welded, or worked on that I can tell. The way this gun works (I have been told) is that it originally came with a square key. On the end of the barrel is has M.F. SMITH'S PAT'S. PATENTED. MAR. 6, APR.10. APR.24.1906. OTHER PATENTS PENDING. Bore is excellent with no pitting. Weighs 7 BD lbs. You turn a button on the end of the forearm to a certain position and it is a pump, to the other position, and it is an semi-automatic. The first of its kind. I would say that 60% of the bluing is gone. It was sold as the FIRST semi-auto rifle ever produced in America. I would like to validate the claim that this is the very first semi-auto ever made in the USA, and would welcome ANY information about the manufacturer or the weapon. Thank you very much in advance for your reply. I can provide some pictures if needed. 8-)

Answer:
Glenn- I guess these were the first commercially made semi-auto rifles that had the option of being used as pump (or slide action) rifles if desired. About 12,000 were made about 1909-1911 in Wilmington, Delaware by the Standard Arms Company. However, good old John M. Browning's design made as the Remington Model 8 (later 81) was an earlier semi-auto rifle, with about 115,000 made between 1906 and 1950. The Standard Arms rifles are really attractive guns and a clever design. The value tends to be pretty low, running about $250 in NRA antique very good and $425 in excellent. Try to find a Colt or Winchester model they only made 12,000 of in those years for that kind of money. Flayderman's Guide is the only source of Information I have ever found on these, but I have never looked very hard. John Spangler


# 1836 - Mauser Rifle Question
2/16/99
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Rifle Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Gentleman, have you information on an organization or person who is considered deeply intimate with Mauser rifles, both military and commercial? I have what appears to be a factory half-breed 'created' around 1939, so both specialties would be appreciated. I checked the Mauser-werke.de site and it for some reason is down (and out?) ANY information or leads would be greatly appreciated. I thank you for your time.

Answer:
James- Our links page has a link to a site that is very much involved with Mauser military rifles. There is a great reference book on military K98k Mauser rifles-"Backbone of the Wehrmacht- The K98k Rifle" by Richard Law which is the definitive source for everything related to the military version and some oddballs. However, I suspect that you have a sporter made from a military rifle. Many talented German gunsmiths used surplus military actions to build sporters for American soldiers in the post-WW2 period. Except for possible remnants of factory markings, these would appear to be equal to the finest commercial production. On the other hand, the Mauser factory could have still been making "Sportmodell" rifles in 1939. There are also a number of .22 caliber rifles that look very much like the full size military K98k. Hope this helps. Good luck in your search. John Spangler


# 1876 - Repairing A Broken Nambu Firing Pin
2/13/99
John

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Nambu Type 14 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a Nambu type 14 pistol that is in fine condition with all parts matching, including the magazine. The problem is that the tip of the firing pin is broken. I have seen pins for sale but would like to retain the original numbers. It looks as if the firing pin is actually several small parts joined together. Is it possible to replace just the tip from the original firing pin??

Answer:
John - Nambu firing pins are notorious for breaking, pistols were originally issued with two firing pins. There is a small loop in type 14 military holsters that is provided to hold the extra firing pin. I have repaired broken Nambu type 14 firing pins by drilling out the broken tip on my lathe and inserting a piece of hardened steel music wire that is approximately the same size into the hole. I silver solder the music wire in place and taper the solder joint to match the original contour with a small file. It is hard to tell the difference from an original after this repair has been made. Marc


# 1844 - J. C. Higgins 22
2/13/99
Dan, Apple Valley, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J. C. Higgins Model 31{semi-auto} .22 {rimfire} S,L,LR 23 1/2 Inches Blue none

Retractable sling strap in buttstock. Where might I find a manual for this particular make/model???This is rather urgent due to the fact that my option to purchase this weapon expires in just a few days, as it is being included in an estate sale, and I'd like very much to include it in my collection.

Answer:
Dan, J. C. Higgins firearms are very common, I see them quite often at yard sales here in Utah. Values are in the $50 or less range. My advise would be to let your option to purchase this firearm pass. Marc


# 1803 - Spencer Carbine, M1860
2/13/99
Leo, Waterville, Maine,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Spencer ? 50?or 56? 20.25" ? 21749

Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston MA. 20Pat'd Mar6,1860 Is this a Collectable Civil War Rifle? or just an old gun? Does it have value? The condition is "Good" This gun was last fired 40 years ago.

Answer:
Leo- Please check the barrel length again, and measure from the face of the closed breech to the muzzle, not the outside of the barrel from the front of the receiver to the muzzle. The M1860 Civil war carbine in .56-56 caliber had a 22 inch barrel and was only made by Spencer. The Model 1865 had a 20 inch barrel and took a .56-50 caliber cartridge. These were marked at the breech "M1865" and made both by Spencer and by Burnside Rifle Works. Some of the Model 1860s were converted to take .56-50 ammunition after the war and these can be identified by a small "pointer" gizmo which is screwed to the bottom just ahead of the trigger. These are all very collectible guns./ Values for one in NRA antique "good" run about $875 to $1250, and a lot higher if better. (See our links for definitions of condition.) If you have any ammo left, that is selling for about $10 per round, so hold off on shooting any more of it. If you are considering selling it, let us know, or check out Oldguns.net/CnsgnSale.htm to review your options. I will be glad to stop by and pick it up when I get to Waterville sometime to visit my parents. If you found this at Marden's I will have to get on my parents for not checking more often! Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1802 - Colt M1911A1 ,45 Automatic
2/13/99
kushner

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911 45 ACP Standard I Guess Blue 1179051

M1911A1 U.S.ARMY UNITED STATES PROPERTY. PATENTED APR.20 1897, SEPT 9 1902, DEC 19,1905.FEB.14,1911.AUG.19,1913 COLTS PT F.A MFG CO. HARTFORD. CT.USA. (And has a lanyard loop} This weapon used to belong to my grandfather and I was wondering if you could possibly give me some information on this handgun and its possible worth

Answer:
Kushner- Your pistol was made by Colt in 1943, and would have originally had a gray parkerized finish. We have no information on its history. If it has a blue finish now, it has little interest for a collector and the value is probably around $300 as a shooter. John Spangler


# 1815 -
2/9/99
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
James Beattie Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Can you help me gather info on this firearm. Photo may speak louder than words. "J. Beattie" London. Perfect condition I think "no rust, no blue. Beautifully engraved. Thanks Jim

Answer:
Jim- Your photos show a double barrel (over under) pistol with back action percussion locks, flat bottom butt with checkered handle, and a swivel ramrod. From the photo it appears that the barrels are about 10 inches long and about .60-70 caliber and possibly rifled. Robert Gardner's "Small Arms Makers" lists James Beattie as working at 205 Regent Street, London, England from 1849 to 1879. He exhibited rifles, double guns, and dueling pistols at London [Exhibition] in 1851. A son was admitted to the firm in 1865 and the name was changed then to J. Beattie & Son. You pistol would be prior to 1865, and based on the style, could be just about any time back to 1849. Large bore double pistols were popular with British officers and civilians sent to the Colony of India. These are generally called "Howdah" pistols and presumably were intended to fend off attacks by tigers or natives while traveling through the jungle countryside where considerable stopping power was desired and a second shot was welcome if not essential. John


# 1799 - Possible Remington Rolling Block Military
2/9/99
Scott

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My family has had a rifle passed down that looks like a Remington No. 1 Military.My father unfortunatly cannot remember where it came from. It has on the side under the hammer the initials AR.O with the A and the R having a like side. Over the initials there is what looks like a crown and under 1881. It has been a belief that this gun was brought over from Europe. What I would like to know is if anyone can help with the initials, the maker and possibly what country it is from. Any help that can be given would be much appreciated.

Answer:
Scott- You are correct that it is based on Remington's design, and from Europe. These were made at the Spanish Arsenal in Oviedo during the reign of King Alfonso (Alfonso Rex) as indicated by the crown/AR and O markings, and a date of 1881 for your rifle. As to value, we have both a standard infantry rifle and one of the scarce artillery carbines listed on our collectible firearms catalog pages. You can compare conditions and descriptions and get a feel for what yours might be worth. John Spangler


# 1788 - Small Cannon
2/9/99
Walt

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a question that with your permission, I will elaborate on: Our family has had a small cannon for the last 200 years, which is now mine. It has a 1-inch bore, and is about 18 inches long. It is brass, and its shape is the same as old ship's cannons (that is, the barrel has a mushroomed bulbous end). When I was a kid, I was told it was a "midshipman's cannon". Do you have any idea as to what this thing's history might be, or what a midshipman's cannon is? There are no letters or numbers on it.

Answer:
Walt- I know nothing about "midshipman's cannon" theory. My best guess is that small muzzle loading cannon fall into one of the following categories: a. Toys made as one of a kind or in small numbers for kids to play with. b. Shop projects (with or without official endorsement) to develop or demonstrate skill in using tools. (I still have one a friend made in high school. He later retired from the Army as a Colonel.) c. "Yacht guns" for signal purposes in starting/ending races, or other signals- chow is ready, storm coming, etc. I suspect yours falls into this category. Winchester made a breech loading version starting in the 1890s and it was put back into production about 10-20 years ago due to popular demand. d. Instructional tools- precise scale models to use in classroom to study nomenclature, features, etc. Could be oriented toward operation of the piece or more technical engineering aspects. Much more convenient to move and store than a full size piece. Regardless of original purpose, small cannons always appeal to people. I have no feel for pricing on them. Hope this helps. Come back and visit again. John Spangler


# 1890 - Double Rifle- W& J Jeffery & Co.
2/9/99
Anil, Lucknow, U.P., India

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
W & J Jeffery & Co. Double Barrel (1910-20) 450/400 28 inches Blue with Gold Inlay Unknown

What would be its approximate value (in US Dollars)?

Answer:
Anil- I must confess I have never learned anything about these. One price guide indicates a value starting about US$1,500 in "poor condition in undesirable calibers" and more than $8,000 with elaborate engraving in .475 express or larger calibers. That is for box lock guns. Deduct about 40% for external hammers or damascus barrels. For examples with side locks values seem to run about 50% higher than for box locks. This is probably a very specialized market with only a few serious buyers, and I would expect them to have specific preferences about calibers and probably go for better condition pieces. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1787 - Rewelded M14s
2/6/99
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown M14 308 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently saw an ad in Gun List from a guy in SC who was selling semi auto M14's. I called him, and he said that he was using re-welded saw cut demilled receivers. The rewelded receiver is then re-heat treated and reparked, and assembled with M14 parts. Do you know anything about this type of rifle? I'm a little scared of the reweld. Please advise. David

Answer:
Dave- I have not seen the ad, but I would have a difficult time believing anything said about anything by one dealer who operates in S.C. is a town called Goose Loose or something. If someone else, I would be less cautious. I have heard about rewelded M14s on the market for several years, which apparently makes them no longer a class 3 item but a regular ordinary rifle. I have heard of no problems with them, and for many years the only M1 Garands available were rewelds, and those never had any serious problems that I knew of. If the cutting and welding is done about half way back or more, there is not much critical stuff back there. It only serves to cover the rear of the bolt when it is cycling back and forth and hold a rear sight. The locking shoulders are pretty far forward, and even if damaged by heat, would probably not result in a catastrophic failure where your widow would have to call me to sell your guns. This is a layman's opinion, and I disclaim any liability or responsibility for the safety or suitability for use of a firearm you choose to buy or shoot. Have it checked by a competent gunsmith first, and sue him if he says it is safe. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1786 - Robert Schuler Drilling Rifle
2/6/99
Cristal

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Robert Schuler Drilling Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Could you please tell me if you have any information regarding a Robert Schuler drilling rifle? I am told it was made in the 1930's in Germany. If you have any information please let me know. I recently bought one and am wondering of its value. Thanks

Answer:
Cristal - There is not good reference material on the old drilling rifles. Most were well made, almost custom quality pieces from the 1900-1935 period. They were brought home by US troops after WW2. Those with hammers are worth less than those without hammers. Values vary greatly depending on quality of work, calibers, and individual tastes. I have seen them go from $250 up to several thousand dollars. John Spangler


# 1832 - Sauer Model 1913
2/6/99
Ted

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J. P. Sauer And Sohn 1913 Pocket Automatic 32 Cal Unknown Blue Unknown

Has Black Plastic handle marked S&S. Serial number is well marked but I do not have the weapon available as I write this. How many of these weapons did JP Sauer and Sohn make. This weapon was found at the Battle of the Bulge by a WW2 Vet. How many of these weapons did Sauer and Sohn make.

Answer:
Ted, the Model 1913 was introduced in 1913, and was the first Sauer pistol to be sold under the Sauer Company name. The model 1913 is a 7.65mm blowback pistol that has a 7-shot detachable box magazine, fixed barrel, coaxial recoil spring and a tubular slide. The breech block is retained by a knurled screw cap at the rear end of the slide which is locked by a spring catch forming part of the rear sight mount. The safety catch is on the left side, it locks the sear and disengages the trigger when set. The Sauer company name is marked on the top rib of the slide, the word 'Patent' is stamped on the left side, and the calibre is stamped on the right. The word 'Sauer' is at the top, of the left grip and 'CAL 7.65' at the bottom, the right grip is marked 'S&S'. The Model 1913 was manufactured until about 1930, approximately 175,000 were produced. Marc


# 1886 - Rifle- Portuguese Mauser-Verguerio
2/6/99
Wayne, Centurion, Gauteng, South Africa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser M96 ? Not Sure 6.5 x 58 Apporx 29 Inches. 74 Cm Blue E6757

Espingarda portugueza 6.5 Mod 1904, Deutsche Waffen-und munitionsfariken Berlin When was this rifle made? It is a military rifle. Where was it used?

Answer:
Wayne- Your description matches the Model 1904 Mauser Verguerio rifle. This was a military rifle which was mainly Mauser but had an unusual two piece bolt design invented by a Portuguese officer. A standard Mauser design rifle was adopted in 1930, and most of the older Model 1904s were altered to take 7.92x57mm (8mm Mauser) caliber ammunition then. These could have been used by Portuguese troops in any of their former colonies, or sold as surplus to any of the less developed countries or insurgents or mercenaries. These are considered fairly scarce in the United States. John Spangler


# 1880 - Shotgun, Flintlock- Rawson-
2/6/99
Bill Hot Springs,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Rawson flintlock Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Any info you can give me about this maker would be appreciated.

Answer:
Bill- Frank Sellers' "American Gunsmiths" does not have any listings for Rawsons during the flintlock era. Dewitt Bailey and Douglas Nie "English Gunmakers" has a listing for John Rawson 1799-1803 at 65 Snowhill in Birmingham, noted as "fine gun and pistol maker" and another entry for John Rawson at Weaman street in 1817 with a note he died in 1821 and speculation that this is the same person as the other John Rawson listed. If this is the correct maker, your gun is probably quite nice. Flintlock double barrel shotguns are very awkward looking with all the lock parts hanging out on both sides, but have a unique beauty to them when well done. I have never seen more than two flintlock shotguns at any show I have ever attended until last month. A collector in Boise Idaho had eleven superb examples along with a wonderful powder flask collection for sale. You can sometimes find real treasures at small shows. We may be able to help you find a good home for your shotgun. John Spangler


# 1811 - Winchester Model 1906
2/2/99
Ann, Jacksonville, Florida, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1906 22 Unknown Blue 56066

WOODEN HANDLE AND PUMP. My father received this gun from his father when he was a child. He was born in 1901. While he was living he maintained the gun carefully. Unfortunately he did and left this to me and I know nothing about guns. The Winchester rifle has a wood handle and pump and uses 22 ammunition. The only markings are the serial numbers and an engraved statement on the barrel regarding it being made by the Winchester Repeating company. My son wants to keep this but my husband wants to sell it. Can you tell me something about it or tell me where to go for information.

Answer:
Ann, The Winchester Model 1906 was a simplified version of the earlier Winchester Model 1890, it usually came with a 20 inch round-flat crowned barrel, a straight-wristed buttstock, and a grooved cylindrical slide handle, average weight was 5.1 pounds. The M1906 was manufactured form 1906 to 1932, total production reached approximately 848,000 rifles, your rifle (sn 56066) was manufactured in 1907. The M1906 was initially offered only in 22 short, but after April 1908, the design was altered so rifles would chamber 22 Short, Long or Long Rifle. The M1906 was also offered in a deluxe 'Expert' version which was manufactured from 1917 to 1925. The Expert version had a pistol grip butt stock and a specially-shaped slide handle. Expert rifles could be ordered in blue, with a nickel-plated receiver and trigger guard, or with all the metal parts nickel-plated. Values for Winchester Model 1906 rifles range from $150 to $675 depending upon condition and configuration. Let us know if your husband wins out and you decide to sell. Marc


# 1785 - Civil War Dresden Rifle
2/2/99
Brian

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am attempting to research the muskets issued to my GGGrandfather's unit in the Civil War. He was in the 17th Wis. Infantry. Todd's "Military Equipage: 1851-1872" states that the 17th Wis. was issued Dresden Rifles in 1862 and these were replaced by Springfield Rifle Muskets in 1864. My questions are: What is the Dresden Rifle referred to in the cited reference? There seems to be some conflicting information regarding the specifications of this arm. I would also like to determine which model of Springfield Rifle Musket was issued to the 17th Wis. in 1864. And lastly, I would like to find the e-mail or web page address for the Springfield Research Service and the National Firearms Museum. Thank you sincerely for your assistance. Brian

Answer:
Brian- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. The other volume in Todd's work shows the Dresden muskets to be .70 or .71 caliber smoothbore muskets, roughly comparable to the U.S. M1816 conversion or M1842 percussion muskets. They are easily spotted due to a very large lockplate forward of the nipple/flash hole area which comes up to the top of the wood rather than tapering like most muskets. There were several variations, and it is probably not possible to match the exact model with what was recorded in regimental records. There was little attempt to distinguish between the model of Springfield .58 musket at the time, although it is listed in Todd's data for some regiments. Even then it is highly suspect as many people still are confused between the model and the date on the lockplate. My guess is that your regiment probably got M1861 muskets made by one of the 20 or so contractors and delivered in quantity in 1863-64. Perhaps M1863 type I Springfields, but it is impossible to tell. Springfield Research Service does not have a web page, but I am nearly certain that they will not be able to tell you anything additional on this subject, although they are a superb resource on other matters. They can be reached at frank@mbz.org The National Firearms Museum is part of the NRA. We have a link, or you can find the NRA site at NRA.org. The museum email is nfmstaff@NRA.org Once again, I doubt if they will be able to provide any additional help on this subject. John Spangler


# 1784 - Bayonet Question
2/2/99
Dave

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi, my grandfather was in WWI and my father has a bayonet which he said my grandfather carried in the war. It is marked A F H and U S. Can you tell me if this is the right period for this bayonet? I would like to make a plaque for my father, but prefer that the bayonet is indeed from his father. I have tried searching the Internet to no avail. The only AFH bayonet references that I could find were Italian, but this bayonet is clearly marked US. Thanks,

Answer:
David- Glad to help out. Hate to argue with family traditions, but AFH stands for American Fork & Hoe Co. They made bayonets from 1942 to 1943 and maybe some of 1944. They started off making the long version for the M1903 Springfield (16 inch blade), very similar to those carried in WW1 except workmanship was much lower quality. Only Springfield and Rock Island mad Springfield bayonets in WW1 (SA or RIA markings). and Remington and Winchester for the M1917 rifle used by many troops in WW1 (REMINGTON and W with or without a circle). AFH also made shorter versions of the Springfield bayonet (10 inch blade) during 1943 and possibly 1944, and various places shortened the early ones with 16 inch blades to 10 inches. Mystery solved, but not what you wanted to hear. Hope it helps. John Spangler


# 1782 - .303 British Headspace Gauges
2/2/99
Mark

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Enfield No 4 303 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello Gentlemen, I enjoy combing your site. I review all the sections whenever I see one section has been updated. I have taken an interest in Enfield No 4 rifles and would like to know if you guys have ever seen Headspace gauges specifically for these rifles ? Any ideas where to check besides oldguns.net ? The local gunshops/gunsmiths seem to agree that these gauges exist, but they do not have a set to measure the headspace on these rifles.

Answer:
Mark- Glad you like the site. Better find some better gunsmiths. You can get gauges from Brownell's in Montezuma, Iowa Phone 515-623-3896 or email them at brownelUSA@aol.com. They are the best known source of gunsmith supplies in the country and any alleged gunsmith who could not pick up their catalog and find gauges for you with less than 2 minutes work is sort of scary. Gages will run about $20 each for minimum, maximum or field size. As this is a rimmed cartridge, you could even make some if you have access to a lathe and the specifications. Many of the classic gunsmith manuals should have details, (Baker, Vickery, Howe, etc) or the NRA Gunsmithing Guide. All you are measuring is the space between the face of the closed bolt and the flat rear surface of the barrel. This is a heck of a lot easier than the rimless cartridges which measure from way up in the shoulder of the chamber to the face of the bolt. I am sure there were official British military gauges full of broad arrow stamps and the like, but I don't think you will find those around. If you like Enfields you MUST get a copy of Ian Skennerton's superb "Lee Enfield Story". At $60 it costs more than some smaller paperbacks, but you will never regret it and learn a heck of a lot more for your money. John Spangler


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