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# 2694 - Marlin Model 19 Shotgun
3/28/00
Constantine, Athens, Greece

Marlin Fire-Arms Co. New Haven. CT USA - Model 19 - 12 Ga. - aprox.64cms - nickel - 77456 -

No special markings that I know of. Dear Sir, I own a Marlin Pump action shotgun. Date written on the rifle. Pat'd Nov 1894,May 12 1896 and June 2 1896.Model 19 is written on the screw behind the hammer. Did this rifle have a metal buttplate? because mine has a leather piece screwed on. Can you help me find any information about this rifle, history, or where can I find out how to dismantle it without doing any damage? I wrote some time back to the Marlin Company and no response. Any info will be helpful. Thanks, C.

Answer:
Constantine, the Marlin Model 19 Takedown Shotgun was manufactured in 1906 and 1907, it was an improved and lightened version of the earlier Model 1898. The Model 19 had a 5 shot tube magazine and could be had with a choice of 26 inch through 32 inch barrels with various chokes. The Model 19 was an exposed hammer design with a pistol grip stock that a hard rubber buttplate. Grades A to D were available with the higher grades having specially grained walnut stocks with extra nice checkering and fancy engraving on the metal surfaces. Sorry but I have been unable to locate any takedown instructions for the Model 19. Marc


# 2664 - India Pattern Carbine
3/28/00
Bob

I have an Indian army (about 1861) cavalry carbine. It is of .577" bore with a 20 inch barrel and a captive ramrod and is in full working order. I wonder if you could give me some idea of its worth. Many thanks Bob

Answer:
Bob- There does not appear to be much interest in true India Pattern arms, at least in the U.S. The similar models of English pattern or made for export elsewhere are very popular as being representative of the many fine Enfields imported and used by both sides in our Civil War. Compounding the matter is the fact that in recent years the Indian pattern arms have been reproduced in large numbers, usually in inferior quality levels. These have pretty well saturated the market for anyone with interest in them, or gullible enough to think they found a Civil War piece at a cheap price. If a recent repro, I think it would sell here at about US$150-250. If an original, then probably more like $250-500 but with very weak demand. Only way to know for sure is to try to sell it. You should do better with it in the UK than we could here. John Spangler


# 2663 - M4 Hornet Survival Rifle
3/28/00
Aaron

Hi! I'm a native Nebraskan who's father has a M4 Hornet, its the kind of wire-stocked Take-down gun mentioned by Wayne from Canada on 10/?/98. It has the 14-inch barrel, bolt action, Lyman Peep site, and is a wonderful gun to shoot, HOWEVER, since it has a 14 inch barrel its legality comes into question. Can I order a barrel that could replace it? Isn't the AR-7 survival gun essentially the same? I would appreciate any info on my dads gun.

Answer:
Aaron- I am familiar with these, and another customer reported last week he had found one, and I had only seen one other in the last 5-10 years, and both those had longer barrels installed. These are illegal with the original 14" barrel, and considered by the BATF to be the same as a sawed off shotgun. Since they are not prosecuting the hundreds of thousands of felons and other prohibited persons trying to buy guns from dealers, they probably have time to worry about stuff like this instead. Crazy. I understand there is some sort of set screw on the side of the receiver and after that is backed off the barrel can be unscrewed. You can probably get a gunsmith to thread a new barrel to fit and turn it to the same contours but at LEAST 16 inches long to be legal. I think you could also get away with welding (brazing/silver soldering?) some sort of extension piece on the muzzle- just be darn sure the hole in it is lined up with the bore, even if it is oversize. Since I am not an expert in such matters you should check with a class 3 (machine gun) dealer who would probably be able to confirm or correct this information, or you could ask the BATF if you feel lucky. I am not familiar with the AR-7 survival rifle, but think that is the plastic stocked .22 rimfire that has been made by a series of different makers since Armalite introduced it in the 1960s. It is entirely different, and if I recall correctly the .22 Hornet may require a slightly larger bore diameter than the .22 rimfire. Again, check with a gunsmith who knows about such things. It is possible to use a .22 rimfire barrel- I have seen one of the first .22 Hornet rifles ever made, once owned by George A. Woody one of the inventors, which was made from a .22 M1922 Springfield. However since this involves the safety of containing an explosion with a force of tens of thousands of pounds per square inch right next to your face, you must be sure you get accurate information, and we cannot provide that. John Spangler


# 2698 - Mauser Model 1914?
3/25/00
Mark St Louis, MO

Mauser - 32 - Blue - 95876 -

A "U" with what appears to be a crown over it. The crown is worn however and may not be this A relative who fought in Europe during WWII and brought several pistols home with him. He also owned a small country store in which he allowed people to pawn or trade weapons. I have one weapon which has wooden grips and was blue, however most of the bluing has worn off. There are no military markings (i.e., nazi eagles stamps). The company logo "Mauser" is stamped on the frame above the grips. On the slide is stamped "WAFFENFABRIK MAUSER A:G OBERNDORF A.N. MAUSERS'S PATANT". When the weapon is charged the firing pin can be seen protruding from the rear. I have not been able to identify this weapon and would like to know if it is indeed a German military weapon or manufactured for the United States. It's an odd looking weapon but appears to be a well built one. If you could please help me identify the weapon or give me a website where I can look at pictures of Mauser handguns I would greatly appreciate it. I know I have not given much help but I thank you in advance for your time.

Answer:
Mark, your description and the slide markings sound like you have a Mauser Model 1914. These pistols were used by the German army in WWI but they were also exported and sold on the domestic civilian market. If your pistol is of military issue, it should have military proofs which are usually located near the rear sight and on the front of the trigger guard. Pistols exported for sale in the Untied States should be stamped "GERMANY". Here is a small picture of a Mauser Model 1914, hope that it helps. Marc


# 2662 - Winchester 1897 Shotgun
3/25/00
Vic

I have a 12 gage Winchester Model 1897, serial number C147616. Can you tell me the approximate manufacture date and answer one other question. The pump grip appears to have been broken at one time. It now has three screws extending from under the wood and metal of the grip. One on each side and one on the bottom. I have looked at other Model 1897s and have never seen one that is constructed this way. But, when I remove the slide mechanism, I can't see any other way for the wood piece to be retained on the metal. Any ideas?

Answer:
Vic- The early Model 97s had a different "action bar" and forend design that used three screws to hold the wood forend in place. This was later changed to a design that had a large nut on the ends of the forend to hold the wood in place. Perfectly correct for early guns. On the left hand side of our page, way down at the bottom we have a link that will let you look up dates of manufacture for most collectible Winchesters. You can check that to find out when your gun was made. John Spangler


# 2661 - Harrington And Richardson - Handy Gun
3/25/00

I have a Harrington and Richards Handy Gun that was my grandfathers. It is a 410 Pistol. I'm not sure of it's Manufacture date. It is early 1900's. Would you happen to know it's value?

Answer:
Dear Anonymous- The Handy gun is a single shot pistol firing a .410 shotgun shell. It was almost always made with a smooth bore barrel. Federal law says anything with a smooth barrel is a shotgun, and any shotgun with a barrel less than 18 inches long (measured from the closed breech to the muzzle) is illegal unless registered with the BATF. This was supposed to have been done back in 1934 or so when the National Firearms Act was passed which basically banned private ownership of machine guns and sawed off shotguns. It could also have been registered in 1968 during a brief "amnesty period." If it was not registered then, it is illegal to own, and a big time federal felony violation. If you cannot find the registration papers, the BATF may have copies somewhere in their files If you are SURE that it was registered you could request a copy, but your chances of having them find a copy to show that you can legally own the gun are not good. (A cynical view illegal gun, thus "taking a bite out of crime" than it would be to dig in their records to prove that your gun is legal.) I recently talked with someone who has been trying to get BATF to transfer ownership registration of a handy gun for over three years, and even after sending them copies of the registration they are basically ignoring him. If you do not have registration papers, you should call the nearest BATF office (listed in phone book blue pages under US Govt Treasury Dept) and inform them that you found this and suspect that it is not legal and want to turn it in to them. I am sure you will feel better knowing that crime will drop significantly in your area with this evil gun out of circulation. Of course, any criminal willing to violate a whole bunch of laws can go to K-Mart and buy a single shot shotgun and a hacksaw and make a somewhat ugly copy of the handy gun in less than five minutes. Better play by the rules, and if you don't like them, get busy helping elect politicians who will throw crooks in jail instead of passing more gun laws. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2660 - Antique Gun Powder Flask
3/21/00
Mike

I hope you can help me identify, and place a value on the gunpowder flask identified below: < It is shaped just like the Remington flask shown on traditions@traditionsmuzzle.com. They could not identify it and referred me to you. < It has the spring loaded clip near the top (at the base of the fill tube) to allow the gun powder to flow and still works. < About 1 1/2 inches below the clip are 2 eyelets, one on each seam, with a 14 to 15 inch linked chain attached. < The raised markings (identical on both sides) are as follows: < Near the top of the flask is an eagle, wings spread, looking to the left with arrows and I believe an olive branch in its claws. < At the bottom where the flask is widest is a shield with US inside. Behind the shield, extending in a fan-like fashion beyond it, is an array of arrows and other objects I can't quite identify except for a trumpet. < Between the eagle and the shield is a circle about 2 inches in diameter comprised of stars. In the middle are two hands in a hand shake. It appears to be in good shape except for a small dent on one face. I found it in a flea market years ago in Italy, albeit obviously a US issue. I am curious about its origins and whether it has value as an antique, and if so, what's it worth? Can you help, even if it means you need to refer me elsewhere. I anxiously await your reply. Thanks, Mike

Answer:
Mike- Thanks for contacting us. You have done a nice job describing what collectors call a "Peace Flask". These were made under US contract and issued with the M1841 Mississippi rifles, and probably with other .54 caliber rifles remaining in service (the muzzle loading "common rifle" and the breechloading Hall's patent rifle.) The bad news is that these handsome flasks have been widely reproduced over the last 30 years or so, mainly in Italy. Many have been artificially aged and sold to unwary or uninformed collectors in the U.S. I am willing to bet that the Italians have taken advantage of a few tourists too. If you were one of them, it may be of interest to know that the reproductions usually sell for about $25-40. If you got real lucky and found an original, you will be much happier to know that they sell in the $250-600 range depending on condition and which minor variation they might be. I am not a language scholar, but those folks say that "Caveat Emptor" means "buyer beware." I think it might actually mean "there is a sucker born every minute, and people are trying to catch them all at least once." John Spangler


# 2628 - What's It Worth
3/21/00
Frank Loy, Ca USA

Remington Firearms - Pump 22 Long Rifle - 22 - 23 Inches - Blue - RW 41646 -

Following text is located on the top of barrel: Remington Arms Company, Ilion, NY USA Pedersen's Patents Jan'y 5 1909 Other Patents Pending Would like to have an idea of what this gun is worth and if there is anything special about it. The condition of the gun is nothing less than perfect. It has been well taken care of.

Answer:
Frank, nice to hear that your Remington is in such good condition. Unfortunately over the last 100 years Remington has manufactured at least 35 different models and types of .22 caliber pump action rifles. These different models have a wide range of collector interest and values. Due to the many different possibilities of what your rifle may be, it is imperative that I have a model number to be able to provide a realistic estimate of value. Without knowing the model number the best that I can tell you is that any Remington pump 22 in the condition that you describe should be worth at least $125.00. Values for some of the rarer models can go as high as $500.00. Marc


# 2564 - What Is It?
3/21/00
Garry, Moorhead, KY USA

8mm - ? Octagon, Rifled -

Crown over R, sort of a pineapple with letters E, L, G breech load single shot, fancy hammer and trigger guard What is it?

Answer:
Garry- It is a gun made in Belgium, which we can tell from the ELG proof marking. Beyond that we cannot tell much. I wonder if doctors have this problem. A patient shows up and says- "I don't feel good- heal me." It sometimes helps to have clues to work with. Is the pain in your head, your toes or your butt? When did you notice this? Maybe if we charged as much as doctors or auto mechanics people would give us more information to work with. We keep trying this mind reading stuff, but either we are not very good at it, or maybe we are real good at it and there is not much to read. John Spangler


# 2625 - Remington Model 511 Scoremaster Informaiton
3/18/00
Tom, Los Alamitos, CA US

Remington - 511 - .22 - About 27" - Blue - NONE -

Scoremaster Model 511, Remington Arms Ilion NY, pat 1908035, 1913840, 2356257. Under breech are letters PSS and what looks like an arrowhead, possibly a Q. .22 Long rifle, long, or short. I've had it for over 50 years and bought it used. So I guess its about 60 - 70 years old. I'm curious about its history; approx. year of mfr., value, etc.

Answer:
Tom, the Remington 511 line was first available to the public in April 1939. When first introduced there were three different 511 types, the 511A, the 511P and the 511SB.

The Model 511A had a detachable box-magazine which held six rounds of .22 Short, Long, or Long Rifle ammunition, a ten-shot magazine was an optional accessory. Sights were a ramp white metal bead blade-type front, and a sporting type step-adjustable rear. 511A weight was five pounds, twelve ounces. 511A barrels were marked: MODEL 511. When first introduced the 511A sold for $11.50.

The Model 511P is the same as the 511A except that it had a Partridge-type front sight mounted on a non-glare ramp and a Remington Point Crometer rear peep sight, adjustable for windage and elevation, with two interchangeable discs. 511P barrels were initially marked MODEL 511-P, later rifles were marked MODEL 511P. When first introduced the 511P sold for $11.95.

The Model 511SB - was the same as the Model 511A except it was a smoothbore chambered for .22 Long Rifle shot cartridges only. The 511SB had a white metal bead shotgun-style front sight and no rear sight. 511SB barrels were marked MODEL 511 and 22 CAL. SMOOTH BORE. When first introduced the 511SB sold for $11.50.

Model 511 production was interrupted during World War II but resumed for the models 511A and 511P after the end of the war in 1945. The Model 511P was discontinued in December 1960, and the Model 511A was discontinued in 1963. Total Model 511 A, P and SB production was 381,267.

As for the year of manufacture, the "PSS" markings that you describe tell me that your 511 was manufactured in June of 47. Remingtons made between 1921 and 1972 have a code located usually on the left side of the barrel near the frame that identifies the year and month of manufacture. The following letters correspond to the months of the year, for example B=January, L= February and so on [ B - L - A - C - K - P - O - W - D - E - R - X ]. The following letters correspond to the year of manufacture starting in 1921 and ending in 1972. [ M - N - P - R - S - T - U - W - X - Y - Z - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K - L - MM - NN - PP - RR - SS - TT - UU - WW - XX - YY - ZZ - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K -L - M - N - P - R - S - T - U - W ]. As you can see there are some problems with this dating system. Marc


# 2561 - Can You Tell Me Date Of Manufacture?
3/18/00
Jim

Winchester - 1873 - 38-40 - Blue - 106685A -

Improvement also stamped on it is 1866 What went in the trap door in the buttstock. The rifle is complete and in working order except for these items. Can you tell me date of manufacture. What is the A designation? Thanks

Answer:
Jim- We would have hoped that you would have used the link on the left side of our main page to go to the sections on dates of manufacture to look up when your rifle was made. We have nearly every Winchester model and also U.S. military models. Another one of the really neat services we offer FREE to our visitors. In any case, your rifle was made in 1882. The trap in the buttstock was for a cleaning rod with three or four sections that screwed together. Remember, in the old days ammunition used black powder and corrosive primers with mercury in them. If not cleaned out pretty quickly after shooting, all this nasty stuff would rot out the bore very quickly, and make collectors unhappy about 50-100 years later. Therefore we should refrain from criticizing the Winchester Repeating Firearms Company about their ratty old guns. It is not their fault. They included all the features needed to keep the guns in good condition if the owners used them properly. On the other hand, some greedy lawyer may decide that it IS Winchester's fault and sue them for this at the same time they are suing them for criminals going out and killing people with their guns. Most of the Winchester line made in the late 19th and early 20th century have letters associated with the serial number. These indicate some internal parts variation so that the factory or gunsmith could provide the right parts for repair. On the Model 1897 shotgun, they got up through "E", but I do not know how high they got on the 1873 rifles. John Spangler


# 2551 - French Model 1892 "Ordnance Revolver".
3/18/00
Mark West Olive, Mi.

Mre,,d'armes St,,Elienne - Unknown - Unknown - 4.5" - Blue - F22039 -

Mle 1892 is stamped on top of barrel, then on the side of the barrel there is a P in a circle and an L in a circle. On the other side of barrel is S 1893 This gun is in very good condition except it looks like someone tried to drill the barrel out to accommodate a different size bullet. I would like to replace the bullet chamber. it is a six shot revolver. It looks like all the chambers have been drilled and it was a bad job. Could you please help?

Answer:
Mark- You have a French Model 1892 "ordnance revolver". These are neat old guns, and still fairly common at reasonable prices. In my opinion it would be a waste of money to try to salvage the one you have, so go find another that has not been altered. These take some oddball 8mm Lebel pistol round that is not available anywhere, and probably the reason someone tried to convert it to shoot something else. Steve Frey's "Imported Military Firearms 1866-1899" is a wonderful reference on oddball guns of this period, and loaded with tips on their care and repair, and his personal recipes for improvising ammunition for obsolete calibers, even pinfires. We do not recommend or endorse his methods as safe or effective, but point them out as interesting information, such as his indication that .32-20 cases can be the basis to make 8mm Lebel pistol cartridges. John Spangler


# 2616 - Stevens Favorite
3/14/00
Paul

J.Stevens A&T CO. - Stevens Favorite - .22 Long Rifle - Blue -

has I 10 on trigger guard pat. Apr. 17. 94, J. Stevens A&t Co. Chicopee Falls Mass. This is my uncles rifle it is a single shot 22 long rifle, with an octagon at the breech the barrel is round. Is there a site on the web where I can find more info on this rifle?

Answer:
Sorry Paul, there is little collector interest in the old Stevens firearms and I know of no sites on the internet that are devoted to them, I will try to give you what information that I can. The Stevens Favorite was manufactured from 1894 to 1935, and it was among the most popular of the Stevens target rifles. The Stevens Favorite design was aimed at junior or cost-conscious marksmen. Most common chambering included .22 Long Rifle, .25 Rim Fire and .32 Rim Fire. Most common configuration was a straight grip stock with a small tapered forearm, a Rocky Mountain front sight and a 24 inch barrel, although other barrel lengths were available. Blue book values are in the $100.00 range with specimens that have octagonal barrels commanding a 33% premium. Marc


# 2528 - Deutsche Werke Werk Erfurt 22
3/14/00
Dave, St. Albans, VT USA

22 - 23" including chamber - Blue -

German rifle with the words "Deutsche Werke Werk Erfurt" stamped on the top of the barrel, 5/8" from the chamber. Left side of barrel is stamped "CAL 22 Long Rifle". Under the barrel, same location are two proof marks, followed by "5.4 mm". Right side of chamber is stamped "DRP Germany" (Germany positioned under DRP). 2 proof marks on the left side of the receiver. Top of receiver is a 5/8" circle with an insignia that looks like an S with a figure that perhaps is a 1. Under the circle is stamped "Mod 1" (1 positioned under Mod). To load a single cartridge, the bolt is pulled back and the top of the receiver is lifted up, giving access to the chamber. It has a back bolt. Could you tell me something about this rifle and it value (NRA-VG Condition).

Answer:
Dave- Sorry, I am ont familiar with this one. I think that Collector Grade publications has a book out on German .22 rifles, and their publications are usually very nicely done with excellent information based on solid research by respected authors. You might check in this direction. John Walter's paperback "Rifles of the World" is loaded with info on all sorts of common and scarce rifles, and you may be able to find it in there. I do not have access to my copy right now, so I cannot check for you. John Spangler


# 2519 - Springfield '03
3/14/00

Springfield - 1903 - 30.06 - Military - 1000880 -

10 18 on end of barrel Can you tell me when was made, if it is rare? Where was made, etc. any info and as much as you can find would be appreciated. Is in great shape looks and mechanical.

Answer:
Sir- Modern U.S. military rifles are marked onthe receiver with the place of manufacture. They usually have the date the barrel was made marked on the barrel. Newly manufuactured rifles usually used barrels that had been made within a month or two prior to the time of assembly, but there are exceptions. If there was a big batch of barrels, the ones on the bottom of the pile could have had more dumped on top as new shipments came in over many months before they finally got all the way to the bottom of the pile again. Sometimes one manufacturer would run out and others would send barrels to keep production going, so you can find a barrel that does not match the maker of the receiver and still be perfectly "correct." Of course, any barrel available, either from supply stocks, or salvaged from other guns can be found in rifles that were overhauled, and the dates on those do little more than indicate the earliest possible date a rifle could have been overhauled. In the case of your rifle, it was probably made at Springfield Armory around the end of 1918 or sometime in 1919, based on observed dates on barrels in other receivers in that serial number range that appear to be original. If you rifle has the original finger groove stock and original finish, it is probably a pretty good collector item. Most people would consider it to be a WW1 rifle, even if it possibly got assembles slightly later, and these always sell well. John Spangler


# 2612 - VIS MOD. 35 Radom Information And Holsters
3/11/00
Ed, Wichita,Ks USA

Radom - Vis35 - 9mm - Approx. 5" - Blued - L5856 -

Nazi production markings, but still has take down catch and Bakelite grips. Were holsters produced specifically for the Radom and what do they look like? Also, how can I track down what year mine was produced?

Answer:
Ed, the Polish military adopted the VIS MOD. 35 (Radom) pistol in 1935 by as their standard military sidearm. On September 1, 1939, Radom production was taken over by the invading Germans, at the time of the takeover all Polish markings were discontinued and a German numbering system was instituted. All Radom pistols manufactured after September of 1939 have German markings.

Because the decline in the quality of Radom pistols is much more evident than any other of the other German WWII procured pistols. Collectors have categorized them into 3 different types. Type I pistols were manufactured in the first part of the war, Type II towards the middle and Type III at the end.

Type I:

All parts except the recoil spring and recoil spring guide are blued with high quality commercial type blue finish. Barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide are polished white. Grips are checkered hard rubber. A shoulder stock slot and a lanyard ring may or may not be present.

Slide Legend:

F.B. RADOM VIS MOD. 35 PAT NR. 15567 P.35(p)

Type II:

All parts except the barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide are blued over an improperly polished surface. Barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide are polished white. Grips are checkered black plastic, checkered brown plastic, fine checkered hardwood, or coarse checkered hardwood. Lanyard ring and disassembly lever are present, shoulder stock slot omitted.

Slide Legend:

F.B. RADOM VIS MOD. 35 PAT NR. 15567 P.35(p)

The " P.35(p)" was eliminated from the slide legend of late grade II pistols.

Type III:

The frame, slide, and magazine are parkerized. Rear sight, hammer, hammer release, magazine release catch, slide stop, and grip screws are blued over a roughly or poorly polished surface. Barrel, recoil spring, and recoil spring guide are polished white. Lanyard ring is present, shoulder stock slot and disassembly lever are absent. Grips are checkered black plastic, checkered brown plastic, fine checkered hardwood, coarse checkered hardwood, or grooved hardwood.

Slide Legend:

F.B. RADOM VIS MOD. 35 PAT NR. 15567 P.35(p)

As for your holster, it is hard to describe without a picture what a Radom holster should look like, I suggest that you purchase a copy of Lt. Col. Rebert D. Whittington III 's book "German Pistols and Holsters 1934/1945" (copyright 1969, 224 pages). Whittington's book contains good pictures of most of the pistols and holsters that were used by the German armed forces during WWII and a lot of useful information. If you can't find a picture the things to look for will be the folded and stitched construction, large size to fit a Radom pistol (height about 8.5 inches, maximum width at the flap about 6.12 inches) and the scribed border line around the edge of the magazine pocket. German WWII Radom military holsters will be stamped on the inside of the of the flap with "P.35(p)", a maker code and a date. Marc


# 2487 - Winchester 50-105 Express
3/11/00
Lisa, Lillooet, BC, Canada

Winchester - 1886 - 50-105 Express - 25278 -

How many were made and what is the approximate value?

Answer:
Not many in .50 caliber, although Ihave seen an utterly magnificant display of about 20 of these, all with slight variations in shights, stocks, special features, etc. They are really beautiful guns, and much scarcer than the smaller calibers. Value is about double that of the smaller calibers, so figure basically US$1,500 up to maybe 3 or 4 times that depending on condition and features. Unfortunately, the stupid new Canadian gun laws makes if muchmore difficult to own any sort of gun. U.S. citizens better wake up and work their butts off to defeat Al Gore and his liberal friends or we will find ourselves in similar situations. John Spangler


# 2672 - Wesson Rifle
3/7/00
Ed

I recently came into possession of a blackpowder single shot ,double trigger, rifle. it has a 24 inch octagon barrel,16 inch stock about 40. caliber(not sure)i. it's made by F.WESSON'S & D.KITTEREIG. it's hard to make out all of lettering on kittereig. pattent dates ( oct 05 1859--nov 11 1862 ) serial #2649 could you tell me what this rifle is & or what it was made for (ie. military ? ) all I know about it is it's OLD . if you can't help me with this tell me where I can find info.

Answer:
Ed- Your rifle is based on a design patented by Frank Wesson in 1859-1862 and made in Worcester, Mass. These were made from about 1859 until about 1888 with numerous variations. Yours is probably the second model, made 1863-1876, Most were .44 rimfire, but some were .22, .32 or .38 rimfire, with the 24 inch barrel as standard. Flayderman's guide lists the value in NRA antique Good condition and fine condition as $250 and $450. The B. Kittredge &Co. Cincinnati, O. markings indicate sale through that famous old dealer/distributor. Some of these are considered to have been possible militia purchases during the Civil War and value will run $450-1250 on those. Neat of guns. but fairly common and not too much collector interest in them. If you decide to sell it, let us know, we can help you find a good home for it. John Spangler


# 2673 - P.O. Ackley
3/7/00
Frank

Gentlemen, I have a rifle that hopefully you can give me some info about. It is an Interarms, mark X. in 30.06. it has a gloss finish and a 24 inch barrel. On the top of the barrel about halfway down is: P.O. ACKLEY SLC UTAH. Now I have heard of him as a cartridge developer but never new him to make rifles. Do I have anything here? Thanks Frank

Answer:
Frank- Parker O. Ackley was indeed first and foremost an accomplished gunsmith. I believe he was one of the founders of the gunsmithing school at Trinidad, Colorado following WW2, and later moved to Salt Lake City. In the 1950s and 60s he did a lot of custom work making hunting rifles from assorted actions, as well as experimenting with various wildcat cartridges. We occasionally see some of his rifles around here, and they are uniformly nice quality work. I am not sure if he did work on your rifle, or merely sold it and marked it with his name. Browning did the same thing with Winchester rifles, so maybe it is just an old tradition among local retailers to generate a little advertising, or keep from having people try to return guns they got from another source. We have some PO Ackley catalog type items on our book catalog page that may be of interest. John Spangler


# 2614 - Savage Mod 1904 Boys Rifle
3/7/00
Ray Moses Lake, WA US

Savage Arms - 1904 Boy's Rifle - .22 - 22" - Brown - NONE -

I was presented with this rifle shortly after my birth in 1951.What is the value range for this gun in NRA fair condition?

Answer:
Ray, an unknown quantity of Savage Model 1904 Boys Rifles were manufactured from 1904 to 1917. Model 1904 rifles were a bolt action design with an 18 inch barrel and a straight stock, chambered for .22 Short, .22 Long , or .22 Long Rifle cartridges. Blue book values for examples in NRA fair condition are in the $65.00 or less range. Marc


# 2674 - Colt 22 Rifle
3/4/00
Linda

I am looking for any information on a colts ptf. a.mfg.co. hartford Ct U.S.A. Patented May 29 Sept 1883 May 26 1885 June 15 1886 Feb 22 1887 Colt 22 Caliber pump action 23 inch octagon barrel SN34073 appr. value

Answer:
Linda- Your rifle is a Colt "Lightning" small frame model rifle. Slightly larger versions were made in .32- 30 through .44- 40 calibers and an even larger model was available in .38- 56 through .50- 90 calibers. The .22 version was made from 1887 to 1904, and yours was probably made in mid 1898, and would be considered an antique under US laws. Of course, Canadian laws seem to be aimed at disarming the population entirely (unless you are a criminal) so if not already requiring registration for eventual confiscation, this will undoubtedly be added to the list soon. Value depends on condition, and "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their Values" lists these at US$275 in NRA antique very good condition and $875 in NRA antique excellent. You have a nice site- love the wolves!. How about donating some of your time and talent to those fighting the new Canadian gun laws? Gun owners everywhere need all the media- savvy help they can get. Happy new year to all! John Spangler


# 2675 - Brazilian Made FIE Shotgun
3/4/00
Josh

I read through your web page and wondered if you could help me. I have been given my first shotgun, which had been handed down. I don't think it is of any great value but I would just like to know some history about it. I have not been able to find anything about it. On it reads: MADE IN BRAZIL FOR F.I.E. MIAMI FIA USA. It also has a circle on it with ERA in the circle. It is a 20 gauge single shot gun. Could you inform me with any information about it...its history, a date of when it might have been made. I'd appreciate any help. thanks Josh.

Answer:
Josh- Congratulations. Owning a gun is a big responsibility but I am sure your parents feel you have earned this. My first gun was also a hand me down, and old single shot .22 rifle made by Stevens. Not worth much money, but it is special to me, and I still have it, and lots of other guns that I have added to my collection in the 40 years since I got that one. FIE stands for Firearms Import Export company, and they operated out of Hialeah, Florida (part of Miami) from about 1980 until 1990 when they declared bankruptcy. SO your gun was probably made between those dates. Brazilian gun makers are very good and although they copy many of their designs from popular US models, they are generally well made and sell for a lot less than their U.S. made cousins. Brazil is a HUGE country and has thousands of square miles of jungle in the Amazon river basin and vast mountain ranges. A lot of people in the remote areas live very primitive lives, and some Indians have never heard of electricity or modern medicine or anything. However, a lot of these people depend on hunting to get food, and there is a strong market for shotguns there. If someone wanted to collect guns made in or for Brazil, there is a long list, dating back as far as our Civil War when Yankees and Confederate agents in Europe bought up a lot of rifles that had been scheduled to go to Emperor Dom Pedro in Brazil. Brazil bought a bunch of Mauser rifles from German in 1908, and started making them in Brazil in 1934. Taurus, one of the biggest pistol makers in the world, is located in Brazil today. I was lucky enough to visit Brazil twice with the U.S. Navy, and it is a beautiful country with very friendly people. Since most of the country is south or the equator, their seasons are opposite ours, and while winter is ending here, summer is ending there. John Spangler


# 2723 -
3/4/00
Denise Hurricane, WV USA

Browning? - ? - 9 mm - 7 in - Nickel - 92983a -

Has Fabrique Nationale D'armes De Guerre Herstal-Belgique on the side of the barrel. Also Browning's Patent Depose. Serial number is on all parts except the clip. Has German Swastika on both top and bottom parts of gun with WaA140 beside of it I was told gun was taken off of an German officer in WWII. Was wondering if this could be true? Also about how much it is worth. It is in working order and will fire.

Answer:
Denise, you just happen to have hit on one of my pet peeves. I always take the old "taken off a dead German officer in WWII" story with a grain of salt. I have been in the gun business for many years and I have heard the "dead officer" story many times. I have NEVER been told that a pistol was taken from a dead enlisted man. It makes me wonder what happened to all of those pistols that were issued to enlisted personnel, they seem to be very rare and should be highly sought after by collectors of military pistols.

The pistol that you have is a Browning High Power (Model 1935) . The WaA140 marking that you describe is a German Army acceptance stamp that was used towards the end of the war on High Power pistols with fixed 50-meter sights. The Browning High Power design is famous for its durability and accuracy, it is one of the few designs that was issued during WWII to both Allied and Axis troops. Values for Nazi marked High Power pistols in original condition can be quite high. Unfortunately your pistol is not in original condition, it has been nickel plated and this lowers it's value considerably. Values for Nazi Proofed High Power pistols that have been nickel plated are in the $250.00 or less range. Marc


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