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# 1185 - Rifle Built on a German Karabiner 88 Action
3/30/98
Gaylord

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm looking for information on a: l890 V.C. Schilling- 38 calibur SUHL, KAR.88 & #8738 are on the barrel. L.G. 2070 on sling holder. Any information would be appreciated, I've not found any one who can identify this rifle. Thank you.

Answer:
Gaylord- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. We don't have enough information to accurately identify your rifle. It is built on a German Karabiner 88 military action, but beyond that we don't know much. Probably a custom piece made in the 1900-1930 period. We would need some good photos to do much more, and unfortunately there is not a whole lot that can be said about the thousands of fine German sporters except: Nice quality, ammo usually hard to find, and little collector interest in the US. Hope this helps... John


# 1177 - LeMat Percussion Revolvers
3/30/98
Justin Marietta, GA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
LeMat Revolver Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

As a dealer of antique firearms I was wondering if many LeMat percussion revolvers cross your path. I am an historian doing research on the gun and have scraped up a small pile of new information on this rare and odd gun but the volume of information to yet be obtained is large. Most LeMat information published is pre-issue. Little is known about what units or individual soldiers ended up with them. I've been able to locate a few new names, but many more are needed. If you know of any collectors that may be willing to share information with someone doing legitimate research on the gun I would be most appreciative in passing the word on. Sincerest Regards, Justin

Answer:
Justin- Thanks for contacting us. Wish we could offer some useful information to assist in your research, but unfortunately we cannot. I have only seen a few Lemats over the last 30 years, and as they were usually beyond my price range, and outside my collecting interests(longarms) I didn't pay much attention to the details. I have heard collectors voice concerns about fakery, and bogus inscriptions, so I urge you to be cautious in accepting everything presented at face value. The fact that most (if not all) were private purchase items rather than general issue complicates matters, along with the fact that many remained in Europe until after 1865, making their connection with CW usage rather suspect. Recommendations:

a. Publicize your interest and request for help by writing to Man at Arms and Gun Report, especially if you have some sort of survey form for folks to record data and return to you.

b. Check with Bill Edwards (author of Civil War Guns) and see what recommendations he can make for you to pursue. He knows an incredible amount. Sometimes a little squirrely if he get off on a conspiracy theory tangent, but usually very nice guy.

c. Make sure you check with major and minor museums to see if they have Lemats in their collection (include a photo which might be more recognizable to non-gun curators than just the name). Museum of Confederacy, Smithsonian, Cody, Springfield, Rock Island, Virginia Military Institute, USMA West Point, State museums/historical societies of former CS states, etc.

d. Thorough review of old catalogs from prominent dealers (Flayderman, etc) and major auction houses (Butterfield, Julia, Pete Harvey, etc)

e. Attend several of the major collector shows (both Gun and Civil War)wearing a big sign "Lemat Info Wanted" with picture. Gun shows would be MD Arms Collectors ("Baltimore" show in Timonium MD 21-22 March this year), Las Vegas Beinfeld show (January best), Texas Gun Collectors in Houston, and of the CADA sponsored shows, and maybe Ohio Gun Collectors(member sponsorship needed for admission) PA Antique Gun Collectors(Pottstown, PA), and there is a good show in Atlanta along with some not very good ones.

f. You probably already know that the National Archives can produce allot of service record info about individual soldiers, although seldom if ever will they mention anything about arms.

g. Maybe check with R.L. "Larry" Wilson, noted author on Colts, etc. He may be delighted to share suggestions with another researcher, or be hoarding them for future use himself. Don't know unless you ask. Likewise any other authors who may have touched on Lemats. Also ValForgett of Navy Arms, as the guy behind the repros, he probably knows allot about originals as well. Good luck!.. John


# 1166 - Winchester Model 94 Apache Carbine
3/30/98
Terry, Auckland NZ

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 94 Apache Carbine 30.30 510mm Gold Plated ? AC7401

Desert scene, cryptic markings, on right hand side of breach, left hand side Apache warrior on one knee and four stylized deer, Apache head on stock This was purchased from a second hand gun store in NZ. We wondered about it's origins?

Answer:
Terry, the Winchester Model 94 Apache carbine is one of Winchester's Canadian commemoratives. Eight thousand six hundred Apache carbines were manufactured in 1974 and their original issue price was $150.00. The blue book lists Apache carbine values presently at $795.00, if in the firearm is in 100% mint condition with the original box and papers. Subtract $150 if the box or papers are missing. If the carbine has been fired, the value would fall in the $250.00 range... Marc


# 1168 - Singer 1911A1
3/27/98
Michael

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Singer 1911A1 45 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking to buy a Singer 1911a1...If you know where one is or have one I have spent a life time looking! Michael

Answer:
Mike- You are chasing a very limited number of pistols, as only 500 were made on an "educational contract" and delivered in December 1941. Charles Clawson's "Colt .45 Service Pistols" covers their involvement pretty well and includes photos of one of the Singer pistols. They do exist and are easily recognized (serial number S800001 through S800500, JKC inspector initials and "S.Mfg Co/Elizabeth,N.J.,U.S.A" slide markings. Unfortunately these are fairly easy items to fake, so be careful. If you look hard enough and in a wide enough area, you will find things. Although my interest is Springfield long arms 1795-1955, I have been fortunate enough to find examples of at least four variations that had less than 500 made. However, I attend 20-30 shows a year all over the country and have been doing as many shows as possible for the last 10-15years. Some of the best stuff has come at small shows, brought in by the public, or sitting on a table for anyone to find. If you have the money to spend, I am sure that some of the big dealers could turn one up event eventually if provided a suitable financial incentive. Good luck!... John


# 1167 - Mauser 98 12 GA
3/27/98
Ken

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 98 Shotgun 12 GA Unknown Unknown Unknown

This week end I acquired a single shot shotgun. This was originally a model 98 Mauser rifle that had been re-barreled to 12 GA. Wood just cut down to fit and the butt plate removed and a wooden "recoil Pad" attached. Never seen or heard of this one. It is in 40 to 60 % condition. Can you tell me anything about it or it's worth? Oh yes I am a life member of the NRA and a Golden Eagle hope this counts for a reply! Thanks Ken

Answer:
Ken- Glad to help a NRA supporter, but wish it could be with more welcome news. Your shotgun is one of a large number made after WWI from surplus Mauser 98 rifles. While very safe and effective (I am told)they will certainly never win any beauty contests. I believe that Stoegers sold them in the US, and they are seen fairly often. Most originally kept the military buttplate, so that may have been altered. Collector interest seems to be pegged at zero on these, and prices tags seem to run $50 to $150, but I am not sure I have ever seen any actually sell. Hang it on the wall and if bad guys break in and steal" your valuable gun collection" they will be doing you a favor. Of course, if they do it while you are there, you may feel sufficiently threatened to justify filling the suckers full of lead from assorted other firearms. That helps lower the recidivism rate considerably... John


# 1159 - Winchester '66 Centennial
3/27/98
Bill

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester (2) Centennial 66 30-30 26" Octagonal Barrel & 20" Octagonal Barrel Blue & Gold Plated 81XXX & 88XXX

These guns have been in a sealed case for 25 years, have never been fired. Brand new condition. Can you tell me the value and history.

Answer:
Bill, I have never liked the idea of ready-made collectibles much, but I must say that the Winchester '66 Centennial is a beautiful rifle. With a total production of 102,309 pieces, the '66 Centennial is one of the most common of the Winchester commemoratives. The original issue price for the '66 Centennial was $125, now the blue book lists present day values for examples in unfired excellent condition at $450 (I think that $300 is more realistic). If you do not have the original box and pagers deduct $100 - 150 from the value... Marc


# 1163 - Invest In A Krag?
3/25/98
Ed

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Krag 30-40 Unknown Unknown Unknown

What is the range of value for a U.S. .30-40 Krag rifle that is in stock form? Plus, can you send me some information about the .30-40 Krag rifle. And are the .30-40 Krag rifles the vintage rifle to have?? Are they much an investment?? Ed.

Answer:
Ed- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Depending on model (1892, 1892/1896, 1896, 1898) and condition value can run from $200 to $5000. However typical common M1898 will run around $600-800 retail for a nice one. Interest in Krags has picked up and I think they are a good investment and lots of people like them as shooters. Invest in what you like, not because you expect to get rich. Flaydersman's guide has info on the Krag models. W.S Brophy's book "The Krag Rifle" is the best source of detailed info. We have a link to "U.S. Military Rifles of the 20th century" site which has some info and pictures on the Krag. Hope this helps... John


# 1158 - Bill Hickock S&W
3/25/98
Mel (BULL@xxx.xxx)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
S&W Model #1 2nd Edition Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

An old aunt gave me this piece she swears it was originally bill Hickocks. He was visiting here in Monroe MI with Custer and family and gave to the old aunts granddad. This piece is like the day it was made and I shoot it often. bull@xxx.xxx

Answer:
Bull- You need to get a new E-mail address before you try to sell that piece. There are too many folks out there who just flat don't believe stories about the famous people who previously owned some gun. Stories(usually verbal, but sometimes even written down) have a habit of omitting some facts, mixing others, and fabricating a few. Undoubtedly most (but not all) are related with sincerity and no intent to deceive, and usually believed by the owners. After listening politely to folks who proudly display guns made in 1884 as "the gun Grandpa carried in the Civil War" [which ended in 1865], I confess that I am skeptical about all such stories now. It would help if there was a lot of documentation to support a story like yours. Something showing that "Wild Bill" Hickock actually visited Monroe when the Custers were there, for starters. It would be nice to have a plausible explanation why Bill in a sudden fit of generosity sought out this individual and insisted he take a firearm. Maybe I am just jealous because no one has ever tried to give me a gun that cost about half a week's wages. I'd also bet that no one in the family ever bothered to write down anything about this gun, but just kept repeating the story, or at least as much as they recalled at the time. As far as shooting a 130 year old gun that "is like the day it was made" I guess you can do what you want with it. Heck, go find a mint '64 Mustang and go grocery shopping if you want to. One of the great things about this country is FREEDOM. Freedom to enjoy your firearms any way you want to, including shooting old ones that most would recommend against shooting. Freedom to preserve, alter or embellish traditions. Freedom to believe, or disbelieve. Freedom to write what you want. Freedom to disagree with what I write... John Spangler


# 1146 - CH Revolvers
3/25/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
CH Unknown .38 5" Originally Blued - All Worn Off. Unknown

CH revolver - claims to be made approximately 1908 or so. Base of barrel and where frame and barrel are cracked. Cylinder shows signs of being well worn and originally filed by hand. When trigger is pulled, Base of barrel and where frame and barrel are cracked. Cylinder shows signs of being well worn and originally filed by hand. When trigger is pulled, cylinder does not always rotate completely. - Fixed pin. Found by my grandfather around WWII. Curious as to real identification and value (almost certainly nil because of cracking)Called 'Colonel Hernandez' revolver by one dealer.

Answer:
Sir, my references indicate that CH revolvers were manufactured by Crucelegui Hermandos of Eibar Spain. Crucelegui Hermandos specialized in manufacturing hammerless 'Velo-Dog' style revolvers between 1900 and 1925. Large quantities of these revolvers were manufactured and they are quite common on the Iberian peninsula. There is no collector interest in CH revolvers and values for examples in mint condition are in the $50.00 range.


# 1155 - P-17 Sniper Rifles
3/23/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Eddystone P-17 30-06 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Thomas Alexander wrote: To whom it may concern: I own a P-17 Enfield made by Eddystone. I am curious if there was ever any modification to the P-17 making it a sniper rifle. I would appreciate any information you can give me on this type of application and the possibilities of converting my rifle to this. If this is not possible, I am also interested in any information on after market sights for this rifle enabling for adjustment of both elevation and windage, preferably without having to drill into the receiver. Thank you for your time and effort. Sincerely, Thomas L. Alexander

Answer:
Tom- No US sniper versions of this other than one or two prototypes using a specially made scope and mount that never went into production. Brits used Winchester P14s with elevation adjustable rear sights (Leaf similar to the good sights on the No4Mk1 rifles) as snipers. Only adjustable sights I know of require drilling and tapping. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1141 - Winchester History
3/23/98
Denis Winchester England

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester All N/A N/A Unknown Unknown

I'm a tourist guide working in Winchester, England and sometimes get asked if the Winchester Rifle was made in Winchester. The answer is no, but I'd like to be able to give more positive information. From various sources I've found that J.M. Browning (born in Ogden, Utah) was the inventor of the same and that he was working for the Winchester Repeating Rifle Company who seem to have been based in New Haven, Conn. Question 1: Where did the name "Winchester" come from? Question 2: Is there a published history of the Winchester company? Many thanks for your help

Answer:
Dennis, the name Winchester came from Oliver F. Winchester. Oliver Winchester started out as a carpenter in Baltimore Maryland and then a successful manufacturer of men's shirts in New Haven Connecticut. Oliver later went on to found the Winchester Repeating Arms company. We are selling a very good Winchester book in our books catalog - " Winchester: The Gun That Won the West" by Harold Williamson. This book is a study of the Winchester company. Not as much "nuts and bolts" as it is the way the company operated and the reasons it did things. Good coverage on relations with John Browning, their financial ups and downs. Good explanation of why they got into hardware and roller-skate business. This is "the rest of the story" that allows an understanding of Winchester history... Marc


# 1140 - Winchester Model 94 Long Barrel
3/23/98
Mike, Sunnyvale, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 30-30 25" Nickel 44XXX

What a great site! I didn't even know you were on the web until I had this gun passed down to me. It looks like a standard model 94, but has a long barrel. I've found that it was made in 1896 by the serial number. Can you give me a little history of the long-barrel version of this gun? Judging by some of the similar items listed on your web-site it probably isn't worth a whole lot, but would you make a guess on it's value? It's a great heirloom, and we still take it out to shoot once in a while. Thanks.

Answer:
Mike- Barrels are measured from the face of the closed breech to the muzzle. Looks like you may have just measured the exposed portion of the barrel. Although later standard length for rifles was 24 inches, in early production the standard was 26 inches. Longer barrels were a special order feature, and you could get them up to 36 inches long in calibers .32-40 and .38-55. Yours looks long because you are probably used to seeing the more popular "carbine" model which uses a standard barrel length of only 20 inches. While most ".30-30 deer rifle" model 94s are not very valuable, a long barrel early model like yours would probably be worth considerably more... John Spangler


# 1139 - G43 Sniper Scope Mount- Repro Or Original
3/20/98
Gary -Dayton-oh

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Berliner Lubecker G43 7.92x57JS 23" Blued 89XX

Typical WaA 214 and proofs QVE How does one tell the difference between an original ZF4 mount and the re pro offered by Sarco. I have an original (Possessed over twenty five years) and one recently acquired one supposed to be a Sarco. I can see no difference. Any help?? Gary

Answer:
Gary- Good question. The early SARCO repros were supposed to be very high quality, but their current ones are rumored to be lesser quality Chinese copies. After 25 years, a repro will look about half as old as an original, so age alone may not be real helpful. I would look very carefully at Peter Sencih's excellent book "The German Sniper" and see if you can find any small details there that would help. There is a very serious bunch of German arms collectors "The Karabiner Collectors Network" (KCN) who probably have figured out this mystery, but I am not sure how to contact them. You might check with the Karabiner Bayonet Network (KBN) folks on our links page. There is probably some overlapping of membership between the two organizations. If you find out, please let us know the answer so we can detect fakes and make darn sure we accurately describe any we offer in the future... John Spangler


# 1138 - US Carbine Cal..30 M1,. National Postal Meter
3/20/98
jeff.okmulgee.oklahoma

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Inland/Underwood US M1 30 Carbine .30 "18. Blue 2745508 "n" stamped below #

walnut stock, lots of character, fine condition. original theater of operations, service record, fair market value.

Answer:
Jeff- These were all produced during WW2, but there is very little info on where particular guns went after their initial delivery to the ordnance department. Most got shifted around among several units of the U.S. military, with some left in use by the Navy and Air Force until the late 1960s. Many were sold off through the DCM program in the 1960s for under $20 each. Huge numbers were given to various allies, friendly nations, and ungrateful semi-hostile nations as foreign aid from mid WW2 on. I understand that the Army Special Forces still have some for training purposes, but had a heck of a time getting parts for them..a problem solved by the ingenuity of the American GI that can be told another day. Many of these foreign aid guns have been imported in recent years, with prices as low as $139 each in the early 1990s. Anti-gun Congressmen are trying to prevent DCM from selling any more M1 carbines under the guise of "anti-crime or safety or some other BS reason, covering their true anti-gun agenda. A larger group of pro-gun Congressmen requested the Secretary of the Army to ignore such foolishness and proceed with sales. Right now decent M1 carbines seem to sell at the $300-400 level, with really nice matching original ones nearly double that. Okay- a story for yours- Maybe it was used by Army troops landing on Okinawa, then after overhaul reissued to Marines for use in Korean War, then overhauled again and given to the South Vietnamese. Captured by the Viet Cong and then liberated by an American soldier who smuggled it home in his duffel bag. (Was that worse than being a dope-smoking draft-dodger leading protests against their own country?) Heck, you can probably make up a better story yourself, so go for it... John Spangler


# 1135 - Winchester 97 Trap Or Pigeon Grade
3/20/98
Chad Georgetown, KY USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1897 16 Ga. Unknown Unknown 225XXX

I was wondering if this firearm is of the trap/pigeon/etc. grade and if there was any way to look at the physical characteristics of the gun to tell. Furthermore, will this grade difference have an impact on monetary value of the gun? Any additional general information on the Winchester Model 1897 line of guns would be greatly appreciated. Thank you and keep up the great work!!!

Answer:
Chad- I cannot say for sure, but you can find out real easy. The 97 shotguns in trap or pigeon grade are so marked on the exposed portion of the bolt. They usually have some nice engraving, and a black diamond inlay on both sides of the stock at the wrist. A friend of mine picked one of these up in a local pawn shop recently and was really thrilled. Trap guns sell for about double the price of a standard Model 97, and the Pigeon grade a little more than that. You may be able to get a factory letter from the Cody Firearms Museum to document your gun's original configuration... John Spangler


# 1204 - British Bull-Dog
3/18/98
Mike, Dunbar, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
British Bull-Dog Small DA W/ Ejector Rod .38 S&W ? 2" Nickel none

I have recently been gifted this pistol and am having trouble identifying it. It is a small DA revolver, nickel, top strap marked "BRITISH BULL-DOG", 6 SHOT, appears to be .38 cal, with ejector rod. identify? Mfg. any value?

Answer:
Mike, there are several manufacturers who have used the British Bull Dog name over the years. Forehand & Wadsworth of Worcester Massachusetts manufactured British Bulldog Revolvers in a seven shot .32 caliber model, a six shot .38 caliber model and a five shot .44 caliber model from 1875 to 1890. Johnson, Bye & Company of Worcester Massachusetts manufactured five shot British Bulldog revolvers in .32, .38 and .44 calibers in 1881 and 1882. British Bulldog was a popular name for the No.2 Webley revolver which was manufactured from 1879 to 1914 in .32, .38, .44 and .45 calibers. Various gun makers in Belgium from 1885 to about 1910 copied the Webley design. Unless your revolver is a Webley values will be in the $50 - $75 Dollar range... Marc


# 1132 - Tecumseh Rifle- Remington Copy?
3/18/98
Mitch, Calgary, AB, Canada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Possible Clone of Remington Number 1?? .32 Rimfire 22 Inches Blued Unknown

-"The Tecumseh Rifle Company" stamped on barrel-various proof markings on barrel and receiver-Octagonal barrel-Is a take down rifle Could you tell me if this rifle is a clone of the Remington Number 1 or 1 1/2, as well as who it was really made by.

Answer:
Mitch- We were unable to find anything on "Tecumseh" rifles. The basic rolling block action is pretty simple and could have been copied just about anywhere. The proof marks may help indicate the origin, or at least a stop along its travels. Maybe someone else can help on this. Sorry... John Spangler


# 1131 - Sedgley Rifle
3/18/98
RHERNAND2@mail.girsa.com.mx

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sedgley Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a SEDGLEY rifle. Can you tell me anything about these rifles? I want to replace the stock with a Synthetic replacement , can you make me a suggestion?

Answer:
Sir- R.F. Sedgley of Philadelphia was an interesting outfit, and most of their work revolved around the M1903 Springfield. I would guess that any stock for the M1903 would probably work for your rifle. They made very nice looking sporters based on M1903 actions. Many of these were low number types, with the markings removed, and sometimes claimed to be heat treated again to "fix" the original poor heat treatment. They also were a frequent supplier of items to the U.S. Marine Corps "Depot of Supplies" on S. Broad Street in Philadelphia, which later moved to Albany GA in the post-WW2 years. Sedgley provided barrels with a "S" within a circle marking and the letters USMC above. Many of these dated 1941 and earlier were used in overhaul programs and can be found on assembled rifles, often upgraded to M1903A1 configuration. Late 1943 dated barrels seem to have all been spare parts and are seldom found on rifles. Sedgley cut down Krags and sold those for many years, and also cobbled together odds and ends to make M1903s for movie studios and other low-budget buyers. These had some parts cast out of aluminum or pot metal, often with the circle-s Sedgley mark. They also made an experimental .22 conversion unit for the .45 M1911 pistol. Would be a neat collecting field to try to get one of everything plus literature, etc. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1128 - Belgian Rifle Maker Raick Freres
3/18/98
Les, Australia

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
SXS Rifle Boxlock 250-3000/250 Savage 28" Blued ? Unknown

Hi Guys, I am trying to find information/books on the Belgium Gun & rifle trade and in particular the Raick Freres Company. Despite searching high and wide I have been unable to locate a satisfactory book relating to the Belgium Trade. Lots of books and records on the British Gun makers but.... Could you give me some advice on this company or guide me to a decent reference book/books. Your help would be greatly appreciated. Les O'Rourke Melbourne, Australia

Answer:
Les- Sorry, we cannot find anything either. Maybe a visitor can help us out on this. You might also post this on our free "Wanted" page... John Spangler


# 1129 - Commercial .32 Caliber PPK
3/16/98
Steve, Woodburn, Iowa USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther PPK 7.65 ? Blue 421XXXK

left side: Walther mod PPK 7.65m/m Waffenfabrik Walther Zella-Mehlis (Thur)Right side on slide and barrel: eagle over the top of an "N" This belongs to a friend that purchased it at an auction. Is it possible to date it, find out who it was issued to and a possible value? Also any history about it's manufacturing company. I know this is a lot to ask so any information would be fine. Thank You Steve

Answer:
Steve, The Walther PPK was manufactured in Germany from 1930 to 1945 and PPK's were procured by the German army form 1940 to early 1945. The eagle over N markings that you describe are a German commercial test proof whose design was set forth in the National Proof Law of June 7, 1939. If your PPK was procured by the military there should be a military acceptance stamp (eagle over 359 or eagle over WaA359) located on the left hand side of the frame to the rear of the trigger and also one on the left side of the slide just forward of the slide grip. Police PPK's have a police acceptance stamp (eagle over an x in a circle with a "C" or an "F" to the right) located on the left side of the frame to the rear of the trigger. Your serial number falls in the late production range so I would estimate that it was manufactured in 1944 or 1945. Commercial .32 caliber PPK values fall in the $150 to $350 range depending upon condition... Marc


# 1127 - Mauser 8mm/.22 Conversion Kit
3/16/98
Larry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 98 22 Cal Insert 8 Mm/22 25 Inches Blue Unknown

I saw a 22 cal insert for a 8x57 Mauser. How common are these in the world? Thank you for your time.

Answer:
Larry- These are really neat items. The wooden case has a barrel insert, bolt assembly, two magazines, floorplate, and an installation tool. Lots of official looking waffenamt inspectors marks are on many, while others were made for civilian use. I have seen three or four in the last couple of years, priced between $400 and $800 (the latter complete with a rifle). A similar unit was made for 7mm Mausers sold to Chile, and I have seen two of those for sale also. Numrich Arms Corp made a unit for the M1903 Springfield in the 1950s that worked on the same principle. I have seen several of those as well (and sold two to my customers). People report that all of these work quite well, although I have never fired one... John Spangler


# 1126 - Rifle, Mauser Sport Model .22
3/16/98
Larry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Sportmodell 22 Kal 25 Inches Blue 27XXX

Engraved on the stock within a circle RFSS I talked with the Mauser company and they have no info on this gun, is there any more of these around. I have not seen any info on this type on the web either. Thank you for your time.

Answer:
Larry- There is no good reference that I know of that gets into German .22 rifles. Many were para-military pieces made under the Nazis for youth programs and military training. Others are pretty much straight sporting or target models. Without photos it is hard to tell anything else. Sorry... John Spangler


# 1117 - Mauser Model 1910?
3/14/98
Lance, Reading, PA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser ? .25 or equivalent mm. 4 or 5 inch Blue 587XXX

Inscribed is:WAFFENFABRIK MAUSER A.-G. OBERNDORF A.N. MAUSER'S PATENT This semi-auto pistol was my fathers. It's older than I am and I'm 45. I'd like some information on it such as model number (it's not inscribed), age, approximate value. I've even e-mailed the Mauser company, but received no reply.Thanks very much.

Answer:
Lance, I do not know of a .25 caliber Mauser pistol that came with a 4 or 5 inch barrel. From your description I would guess that you may have a Mauser model 1910 whose overall length is almost 5.5 inches. The Mauser 1910 was offered in both .25 and .32 calibers, it had a 3 inch barrel, blue finish, fixed sights and checkered walnut or hard rubber grips. It is said that the Mauser Model 1910 pistol is one of the best made and best finished pistols ever manufactured. Because of its design and longer barrel the 1910 is accurate and effective within the limits of its cartridge, at much greater ranges than any other pistol of this caliber. The Model 1910 was manufactured from 1910 to 1934. Model 1910 values are in the $175.00 to $225.00 range depending upon condition... Marc


# 1153 - Finnish 9mm Ammo
3/14/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I came across a 25rd box of 9mm ammo and curious about it's origin. The cases are stamped "VPT 58", and there's a red band at the "crimp" line. The box is marked Terasvaippa, silattu, and what must be the velocity rated at 2000 herm.

Answer:
Thomas- Your ammo was made in Finland. The VPT headstamp has been used for years, and was the most common found on 7.62x54R Russian ammo in the 1960s. The 58 indicates the year of manufacture. Finnish ammo has a reputation of being very high quality, and some of the Finnish powder is being used by high power rifle shooters interested in extreme accuracy. The red line at the crimp (where the bullet fits into the mouth of the case) is probably a sealer to protect the powder from moisture or lubricants. Such sealants are colored to make them visible, thus helping in quality control inspections. In U.S. practice the primer sealer color is usually irrelevant, however, color codes used by different countries may indicate something important, so be careful if you plan to fire this stuff... John


# 1149 - Movie "Titanic" Pistols
3/14/98
Ed Austin, Texas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

In the movie "Titanic" some of the characters are running around firing what looks like a chrome plated, engraved, .45 Caliber, semiautomatic military style weapon. The Titanic sunk in 1928. Is this an anachronism?? When was a weapon like this first built? Ed

Answer:
Ed- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. First a correction. I believe the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, not 1928. The familiar U.S. military .45 semi-automatic pistol was adopted in 1911. Very similar commercial models of 1905 and 1909 in .45 caliber were made, and tested in military trials. Similar looking but smaller versions in .32ACP or .380ACP were made as the model 1903 and 1908 respectively. Larger .38 ACP models of 1900 and 1902 were also made. Guess just about any of these could have been used, but the Model 1911 pretty doubtful. Hope you don't believe everything you see at the movies, and not too much of what they say on the TV news either... John


# 1144 - Early And Modern Effective Ranges
3/11/98
Tess Albuquerque

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

We would like to know how far a revolutionary musket/handgun and a modern handgun/rifle can shoot. Tess (9th grade student)

Answer:
Tess- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters.

Smoothbore muskets used during the American Revolution had an effective range of about 100 yards. Actual tests show that at 100 yards shooters are lucky to place five shots into a target about four feet in diameter. Pistols had an effective range of 25 yards to maybe 50yards. Some American troops used rifles (often called Pennsylvania or Kentucky rifles) that had an effective range of a little over 200yards.

Modern military rifles like the M16 have an effective range of about500 yards. Modern pistols have an effective range still about 25-50yards. Military rifles used during World War Two had an official effective range of about 500 yards, although especially good shooters("snipers") could use them effectively up to about 1,000 yards.

Notice the term "effective range" which is the distance that most soldiers will be able to hit what they are shooting at. Revolutionary War muskets did not have adjustable sights, and the guns themselves were very inaccurate. During WW2 sights were adjustable up to 2,800 yards,but few soldiers could shoot well enough to hit anything beyond about1,000 yards. Sights on the M16 only go to 500 yards because the small bullet is not very accurate beyond that.

The effective range of pistols has not changed much, mainly because most people cannot shoot pistols well enough to hit a person beyond about 50 yards. The pistols have become lighter and faster firing and easier to load, but that does not help if the soldier cannot hit anything.

The maximum range (how far the bullet will go) is a much different question. For Revolutionary muskets, it is probably about 800 yards. Modern M16 maximum range is about 3,000 yards and for WW2 rifles about3,500 yards (about 2 miles). Pistol maximum range was about 400 yards during the Revolution and is about 1,600 yards now.

The changes in range are a result of advances in the science of ballistics (studying how pressure, gravity, wind resistance, and shape and hardness of bullets affect accuracy and range.) Advances in chemistry resulted in better gunpowder, and made it smokeless. Advances in precision measurement and machine tools resulted in guns with interchangeable parts and closer tolerances to withstand greater pressures of modern ammunition. Soldier's shooting skills have changed as we have gone from a country where most people learned to shoot at an early age, to one where most people are not familiar with guns, and the Army does not have time to teach them as much.

Many people enjoy shooting old guns today. There are re-enactmentgroups who wear the uniforms and practice the tactics of the Revolutionary War era. Many families enjoy "Rendezvous" shooting ofmuzzle-loading guns. Thousands of Civil War enthusiasts fire muskets,pistols, and even cannons at targets. While in college, I took two history professors out to shoot old guns from the War of 1812 and Civil War periods. This helped them better understand what they studied and wrote about. It must have made me a lot smarter because my grades were better after that.

Several historians have studied how the changing design of weapons influenced military tactics, such as J.F.C. Fuller in England, and Jac Weller in the U.S. The U.S. Military Academy as West Point even did a series of video tapes with an officer firing guns from the revolutionary through the modern period and explaining how the tactics changed as the guns improved.

If you are interested in old guns, you and your family should go to the New Mexico Arms Collectors gun show in Albuquerque on March 7th and 8th,at the State Fairgrounds. You can probably see examples of these types of guns, and talk with people who have fired them. Ask first, and you will probably be allowed to handle them, but make sure they are not loaded, and keep them pointed in a safe direction... Enjoy! John Spangler


# 1143 - Gillespie Rifles
3/11/98
Betty Reliance, WY

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Gillespie Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for information on the Gillespie rifles which were made in the early 1800's by the Gillespie family in North Carolina in what is now Transylvania County. Do you know where I can find such information. I am looking as part of my genealogy research for the Gillespie family. Thanks for your help. Betty

Answer:
Betty- Frank Sellers "American Gunsmiths" lists the following Gillespies in NC:

a. Harvey (1821- ) Henderson Co. worked circa 1850, son of Matthew Gillespie.

b. John circa 1870 in Mills River, NC.

c. Matthew Henderson County circa 1815-1850 maker of flintlock Kentucky rifles.

d. Philip circa 1850 in Henderson. Worked with Phillip Sutton.

Sellers got his information from John Bivens "Long rifles of North Carolina" George Shumway, York, PA 1968. You can get this on interlibrary loan and see if it tells you more about their rifles.Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1116 - 1940 Manufactured 1911A1
3/11/98
Ross Hedin Mpls., MN.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911A1 .45 Standard Blue UNKNOWN

US ARMY model. A fellow has this pistol for sale and claims it was made in 1940, right before the war and is rare because it is blued and not parkerized. It has slight wear on the slide, otherwise it is mint. Any idea what it is worth?

Answer:
Ross, the Blue Book of Gun Values lists the following values for 1911A1 Government Colts:
80% condition- $385.00
90% condition- $485.00
95% condition- $625.00
98% condition- $895.00
For early 1911A1s with a bright blue finish in 98% or better condition the book says to add 150%. The book lists no add-on value for bright blue specimens in less than 98% condition. I have found that a bright blue 1911A1 in 80% - 95 % condition will usually bring $75.00 to $150.00 more than a parkerized one will. If the condition is under 80% the bright blue finish will not matter. My records indicate that 1911A1 serial numbers that were manufactured in 1940 will fall between 717282 and 721977... Marc


# 1203 - Spanish 6.35m Pistol
3/11/98
Mike, Dunbar, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Excelsior's Patent Automatic Pistol ? Small Auto 6.35m 2" Blue, Worn 249

No proof marks, Spain stamped behind Trigger guard on right side of frame. very small print. Can't find this listed in Blue Book or Antique and Modern Firearms? TripleK offered to buy for $100.00 sight unseen. They want me to send it to them to catalog and will make a new mag for me at no charge. Grips are marked ES within a circle. Says" Excelsior Trademark"

Answer:
Mike, I can find no mention of this pistol in any of my reference books. I can tell you that worn Spanish 6.35mm pistols are not easy to sell. My advise is to accept the $100 offer before they change their mind... Marc


# 1137 - Dagger Identification
3/9/98
Amber

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was wondering if you could help me. I am trying to find someone that could possibly tell me some information about a dagger a friend has acquired. So far all we know is that is from the 17th century. But none has been able to tell us it's origin or is able to appraise it. Maybe you know someone that is knowledgable about them??? I have a picture scanned if that helps. Let me know if you have any ideas. Would really appreciate it! Thank you! Amber

Answer:
Amber- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. I have looked at the picture of your dagger, and will offer my comments. Remember, all our free advice comes with a full money back guarantee. I am fairly certain your dagger is a fairly recent piece (say 1890 to1950) made using an old sword (or sword bayonet) blade with a new hilt and scabbard. It is most unlikely that anyone making a dagger from scratch would make a single edge blade with a fuller ("blood groove") and rounded top to the blade, and then put an edge on just the very tip. I suspect that the hilt is cast from pewter or similar low grade material. It is a neat "death" or "grim reaper" type motif but not similar to anything old that I am familiar with. (But I do not claim any real expertise in this area.) The fancy work on the scabbard is ornate, but not very artistic of tastefully done. I dimly recall something similar from a book read for an archaeology course in graduate school. The author, Ivor Noel Hume, is/was chief archaeologist for Colonial Williamsburg and an expert in Roman British as well as U.S. colonial period artifacts. A wonderful writer with great stories to tell, you should get a copy on interlibrary loan. It is probably his "All the Best Rubbish" or it may be another volume for which I do not recall the title. Anyway, in late Victorian or Edwardian times there was a big demand for Roman and other old artifacts. Two enterprising chaps (plumbers or something) began faking items and we requite successful, and then got more and more bizarre and fanciful in their creations. Old "Billy and Charlie" were finally found to be frauds and ceased their creations. However, people had taken such a liking to their creations that collectors began buying them, knowing they were fakes. Subsequently to profit from this interest, there have been fakes made of the "Billy and Charlie" fakes. I believe your dagger probably fits in this general category. If this is incorrect, my second guess would be some sort of theatrical prop, probably intended for use in Shakespearian production. Hope this helps. Get the book, its great!.. John


# 1130 - 1903 Springfield
3/9/98
Hank

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1903 30-06 Unknown Unknown 1040XXX

I have come across a 1903 Springfield that has me confused and thought you might enlighten me. It has a s/n of 1040XXX which puts it at 1918. The s/n has a huge "W" scratched over the original stamp.It appears hand done. The barrel is dated -42. then right under the date is U.S.M.C. Below that line is an s with a circle around it. Oh, and also, the receiver has the a slot on the left side that is too small for a belt feed or anything like that. The bore is good and the wood exc. What is this animal? I am a Navy corpsman with a Marine unit so it has caught my fancy. I just don't want to buy something that is a fake or a parts gun. The fellow wants $500.00 for it and thats a bit for me so I would appreciate the info. Thanks, Hank

Answer:
Hank- The M1903 started as a "M1903 Mark I" which was made in late1918-early 1919 to be used with the "Pedersen Device". This was a gizmo that replaced the regular bolt, and then had a 40 round magazine stuck in the right side to function as a semi-auto. These fired a small roundabout the size of .32 ACP, and the hole in the left side of the receiver was an ejection port for the empties. In the 1930s most of the Pedersen devices were destroyed and the rifles considered the same as other M1903rifles. I have no explanation for the "W" marking other than maybe Willie Watson got bored sometime. The circle-S marking is that of Sedgeley in Philadelphia who was a frequent contractor for the U.S. Marine Corps to fill orders for small arms parts. The 42 or 43 dated Sedgeley barrels are all acknowledged to be REPLACEMENT barrels made as spares, many of which have been sold as surplus not yet installed in a rifle. There is some debate as to if the USMC on these is U.S. Marine Corps, or if they are subcontractor markings of United Shoe Machinery Corporation of Lowell, Mass, who made small arms parts during WW2. I think that this has no better than a50-50 chance of having some Marine Corps association. $500 is not a bargain, but not out of line with what I see some people asking. If a"finger groove" stock, probably okay, if an ugly semi-pistol grip stock,I would pass on it... John


# 1205 -
3/9/98
Mike, Dunbar, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Baby Hammerless ? .22 short or CB? 1" nickel none

Worn on top strap Looks Like: April 31, Model 1940 ? can't be sure. Removable cylinder to load. Cock with a forward stroke of the trigger. Wood grips, smooth I have recently been gifted this pistol and am having trouble identifying it. It is a small nickel revolver, with forward cocking trigger, 6 shot , .22 short?, removable cyl. top marked Baby Hammerless FSS What is it, any value? Manufacturer? Thanks, Marc, I'm gonna play that tune again!

Answer:
Mike, my references indicate that Baby Hammerless was a name given in general to revolvers manufactured by Henry M. Kolb of Philadelphia form 1892 to about 1930. Most baby hammerless revolvers were 5 shot models chambered in .22 short caliber with a folding trigger and a concealed hammer. Several Baby Hammerless models were produced including the 1910, the 1918, the 1921 and the 1924. The model 1910 was offered in .32 as well as .22 short caliber, (could your revolver say Model 1910 instead of Model 1940)? Values for Baby Hammerless revolvers fall in the $75.00 range... Marc


# 1125 - Old US Sword
3/6/98
Mark

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have recently acquired an old sword that was the possession of my Grandfather who just passed away. Its in good shape with leather grip that is wrapped with some kind of twisted wire. Near the grip at base of blade it is stamped U.S. 18?? I cant make out the rest. One other unique feature is in the iron sheath it has two notches in it that appear to symbolize kills. How might I authenticate this weapon? Thank You Mark

Answer:
Mark- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Without a photo we cannot positively identify your sword. However, it sounds like the standard Model 1860 light cavalry sabre. These we reused in large numbers by US and Confederate troops. Many remained in use after the Civil War by the cavalry on the plains, and right up to1913. Unless there is some positive documentation, or at least an oral history tradition, to indicate the significance of the notches, I would be GREATLY skeptical of any attempt to make them represent "kills". The amount of actual sword fighting in the Civil War was minimal. Small notches may be from dropping it on rocks, or who knows what all. Filed notches could just be so the owner could quickly identify their sword incase it got lost, or was in a pile with others. There is now way to trace an individual sword from existing records. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1124 - History of Oliver Winchester
3/6/98
Adam

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm doing a project on the Winchester rifle, the history of Oliver Winchester, and the history of the Winchester Co. in general. Thanks Adam Bailey

Answer:
Adam- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. There is a great book which covers this in detail. "Winchester- The Gun that Won the West" by Harold F. Williamson. Your library may have it, or can get it on inter-library loan. Oliver Winchester was a shirtmaker who saw gun-making as a good business to get into, but relied on the inventions of others. He provided the money and marketing skills to get the items sold. For many years beginning about 1885, most of Winchester's guns were based on the designs of John M. Browning who lived in Ogden, Utah, about 40 miles from where I live. A museum there has his workshop, and many of the original guns he designed and made by hand in his shop. Fascinating place for any gun collector to visit. The best collection of Winchester guns is at the Cody Firearms Museum, part of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming. That is about 60 miles east of Yellowstone National Park, and also has a fantastic collection of American Indian items and the best display of Western art and sculpture in the country. Someday you should try to get there on a vacation. The Winchester Company is still in business, located in New Haven, CT. One of the guns they still make there is the Model 94 .30-30 deer rifle. Over 6 million of these have been made since this model was introduced in 1894, based on a Browning design. How many other inventions are still being made 104 years after they were introduced? In addition to sporting guns, and guns used by target shooters (including for the Olympics) Winchester made millions of rifles and carbines for use by U.S. soldiers and marines during World Wars One and Two. Perhaps someone in your family used one of these to defend our country and liberate others. There are at least two organizations devoted just to collecting Winchester items, and they have members from all over the world. Some don't collect guns at all, but like the catalogs or advertising displays made for use by stores that sold Winchester products. Others collect items Winchester made during the1920s and 1930s when the gun business was slow because of the great depression. These include flashlights, tools, hardware, and even roller skates! Sometimes criminals misuse guns for illegal purposes. However, most guns are used safely by law-abiding owners for hunting, self defense, or as collection items. We hope you and your family will enjoy learning more about Winchester guns and how their history helps explain the history of our country... John Spangler


# 1114 - Savage Model 25
3/6/98
Greg

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage 25 22 Unknown Unknown 24XX

Octagon barrel that has the stamping Manufactured by Savage Arms Corp. Utica, N.Y. U.S.A. Patented Dec.25,1906, June 1,1915, Mar. 28, 1916, Apr.11, 1916. It is also stamped Model-25 22 S.L.&L.R. I own a 22 that was my grandfather's. He has passed away and I don't know much about it. Could you please tell me as much as you can. (i.e. value, history, etc.) Thanks for you efforts.

Answer:
Greg, The Savage Model 25 was a .22 caliber takedown hammerless pump action rifle that would chamber .22 Short, Long or Long Rifle cartridges. The Model 25 originally came with a 24 inch octagon barrel, plain pistol grip stock and open sights. Savage manufactured the Model 25 from 1925 to 1929. Values for the Model 25 range form $65.00 to over $250.00 depending upon condition... Marc


# 1113 - Winchester Model 1873 Rifle
3/4/98
Mike Sacramento CA USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1873 .44 Cal 29" Blued 383XXXX

Standard barrel & breech block markings I've had this gun since the 1950's - bought it for deer hunting when I was into muzzle-loading trap shooting and wanted to 'expand my horizons'. It's the only old gun I have left since giving up collecting years ago. Is this a musket or just a standard rifle - and does it have any collector value? The bore is still sharp and the finish evenly worn to a nice patina - not much blue left. I know it was a good shooter - still have 1/2 box of shells. Guess I want to know the value and desirability.

Answer:
Mike- Muskets had a standard barrel length of 30 inches (muzzle to the face of the bolt.) and the stock had three bands and extended to within about 4 inches of the muzzle. However, rifles were available with barrels up to 32 inches long. A "factory letter" would confirm the original configuration of your rifle. The 1873 is a very popular model, and muskets or long barrel variations are pretty desirable. Depending on any special features, I would estimate you are in the $1,000 to $2,000 range. We would be glad to help you find a good home for it... John Spangler


# 1112 - Winchester 66 Carbine Serial Number 49
3/4/98
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 66 44-40 Unknown Unknown 49

The 66 Winchester I have is a carbine with saddle ring in 44.40 cal rimfire The question I have is the serial #, its two digits how can this be? I Thought the serial #s were continued after the henrys. My cousin, while flying With air Canada, picked this gun up in Malta, along with two colt lightnings, One of them is cased with original ammo. Thanks for your time James Life member NRA.

Answer:
James- Sure sounds like an interesting gun. Unfortunately we have no explanation for the anomaly. My guess (and ONLY a guess) is that it might be that the serial number was removed at some time for unknown reasons, and a new number applied, or that you have an assembly number instead of a serial number. Guess those pilots get some great guns (just like the ones who are our customers!). Thanks for your support of NRA, wish we could do more for you. You might check with a Winchester specialist who can date your piece by subtle features... John


# 1111 - National Ordinance M1A?
3/4/98
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
National Ordnance M1A .308 Standard Mil. Spec. Pre-ban W/ Bayonet Lug & Parkerized Unknown

What is the history and reliably of the National Ordnance Receiver? All parts appear to be m14 surplus. Stock is an M14 with the selector cutfilled in. The receiver appears to be investment caste rather than milled but I am not sure. My main concern is whether it is safe to shoot. Second is whether it is well regarded. Third, what is the value? Thank you.

Answer:
David, To be honest I didn't know that National Ordnance made an M1A. I remember National Ordnance for the 1903A3 's that they turned out. I always cuss when I pick up a National Ordnance 1903A3 in a pawn shop thinking that I have found a treasure and it turns out not to be. The companies that I know of who manufactured M1A receivers, in order of quality (my opinion ) are Springfield (Geniso), Smith Enterprises, Armscorp, Fedord and a couple in China whose names aren't worth mentioning. As for your question about safety, I would advise you to have a qualified gunsmith check any firearm that you are not sure of before you fire it. I would guess that values for a National Ordnance M1A would fall somewhere between the Chinese versions (about $500.00) and a good Springfield (about $1200.00)... Marc


# 1100 - 1930 Commercial broom Handle Mauser
3/2/98
W.W. Johnson (Johnny) Flag. AZ.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Broom Handle 9mm 5.5in Blue 8094XX

Mauser left side of frame, Waffenfabrik Mauser Oberndorfyn on top of chamber. Waffenfabrik Oberndorf a Neckar on right side of frame. 13 rings on grips. Proofmark: letter U under crown with cross over crown Is it a commercial or Military ? Are grips correct ? What year ? Also did they ever build a barrel length of 10.5 in. for a pistol with the slot for the stock cut into the grip, or is that carbine only ??????

Answer:
Johnny, my records indicate that your Mauser is an early 1930 commercial model manufactured between 1930 and 1932. Early 1930 commercial models are usually found in the 800000 - 890000 range and grips have 12 grooves. The crown over U proof mark that you describe is a German final or definitive proof mark that was used on firearms that were proofed in the finished state, use of this mark was discontinued in 1939. There were several changes incorporated into the 1930 Broomhandle design including:

1. A step which was added to the barrel contour just ahead of the chamber.

2. The safety mechanism was changed to allow the hammer to be dropped from a cocked position, without danger, by pulling the trigger, (this was called the Universal Safety).

3. The front of the grip frame was widened to equal the width of the rear part of the frame where the stock slot is.

I can find no records of Mauser Broomhandle carbines being produced with 10.5-inch barrels and a stock cut in the backstrap. On page 178 of Belford & Dunlap's book "The Mauser Self-Loading Pistol", there is a picture of a 13.5-inch carbine with the stock slot cut in the backstrap.


# 1110 - Springfield Model 1873 Rifle
3/2/98
Hank,Gardner,Kansas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield M1873 .45-70 31.625 Inches Blue 104XXX

VP on barrel. Also a small T behind sight Were did this rifle spend it's career? What kind of troops would have used it?

Answer:
Hank- Your rifle was made about 1879. I could not find any specific listing for it being issued. Rifles from that general range were used by various Army units in the 1880s-90s, and some by an Alabama unit in the Spanish American War. These were the standard arm of infantry units until replaced by Krags in the mid to late 1890s... John Spangler


# 1109 - Colt 1860 Army .44 Caliber
3/2/98
Randy , Point, Tx, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Revolver 44 8' Blue 180XXX

Colts Patent on left side above trigger housing; 44 Cal on trigger housing left side ; Serial # in 3 places, on trigger housing , bottom side ,between trigger housing and under cylinder housing, underneath side of barrel body Gun has a brass trigger housing , 1 front sight- brass, Hammer has checkering on top where thumb would be placed Can you tell me when the gun was made and the approximate worth the gun is all original , letters an numbers are legible , but the gun is moderately pitted from rust. Should I attempt to clean, sand are refinish gun if so what would this do to value? The wood is in very good shape.

Answer:
Randy- Don't you dare touch that!!!! Your pistol was made in 1869 (same year as they finally finished the transcontinental railroad at Promentory Point). Probably carried by some old cowboy and then slowly got further down the family tree as it became more obsolete. Just squirt some WD-40 on it, and maybe rub a little with 0000 steel wool to get any light surface rust off. Nothing more aggressive than that, or you will drop the value by several hundred dollars from the maybe $750-$1000 it might be worth now... John Spangler


# 1106 - Shotgun, Winchester Model 12
3/2/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Guys; My name is Thom. I live in Dingmans Ferry Pennsylvania. I was wondering if you know of a good reference book on the Winchester model 12shotgun. I read in an old (1954) issue of the American Rifleman that the model 12 had 25 adjustments for wear take up and had a triple safety. I love my old model 12 and would like to keep it running in top shape. It was made in 1928.Thanks for your time

Answer:
Thom- (Been rowing Durham boats across the Delaware for General Washington lately?) The model 12 sure is a good gun. George Madis has a whole book on it. Catchy sounding title is "The Winchester Model 12 Shotgun". It gets more into the different model variations than into the gunsmithing area. The adjustment is pretty easy and explained in various gunsmithing books, and I think in the NRA firearms disassembly book as well. It is the same for the Model 97, so check them both. (Take it down, back off the locking piece screw, slide the lock back, turn the adjusting sleeve a notch or two and try it out. Repeat until it snugs up. You can get those "loose" old guns real cheap when the owner doesn't know how easy the adjustment is. Hope you enjoy yours for years. John Spangler


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