Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters OldGuns.net FineOldGuns.com

 

 

Questions And Answers Page

If you have a question about firearms and you want it posted on this page click here.

Return to Collectors Headquarters.

Click here to go to the question and answer monthly index.

Click here to go to the question and answer subject index.


# 2000 - A Look In To The Future Here In The US?
3/30/99
R.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911A1 45 Unknown Unknown 822006

I own a 1911a1, serial number 822006. Colt have confirmed this was sold to the US Govt. and shipped to the Transportation Office at Springfield Armory on September 11, 1942. I purchased this pistol in England about three years ago and understood that it was one of the 12,997 supplied to Russia under the Lend-Lease scheme. It is in mint unfired condition and has a small Munich proof mark on the frame. As you may know virtually all hand guns in the UK have been confiscated by the British Govt. and will be destroyed. If I can obtain evidence that this is one of the pistols supplied to Russia it may be classed as being of historical importance and saved from the blow torch. If anyone can make any suggestions as to where I may be able to find a list of serial numbers of the pistols supplied to Russia I would be very much obliged.

Answer:
R.- As far as I know, there is no known complete listing of arms shipped to allies during WW2. There are a few very fragmentary records with a handful of numbers but I do not have access to them right now (am traveling). Unfortunately, while you and I may treasure this gun, and believe it is historically significant, I doubt that the bureaucrats in charge of disarming Her Majesty's subjects share very many of our beliefs. Their goal is more likely to confiscate and destroy as many guns as possible, not listen to weak excuses about why your gun should be spared. Sent to Russia, used by your grandfather in the RAF, captured in hand to hand combat from the Hun, used to win international championships.... are all incomprehensible sniveling to the civil servants. By the way, I just saw a copy of the advertisement published in 1940, begging for guns of any type to be sent to England to defend against invasion. Americans helped then. But it appears that we are too late to rescue our UK cousins from political stupidity. Just surrender your guns peacefully and be herded along wherever the benevolent despots decide you will be well cared for. Fortunately, the U.S. Constitution, and those of most of our states, guarantee the right of our people to keep and bear arms. Although weakened, and assaulted on a regular (near daily) basis, it will be difficult, (but possible, if unconstitutional) to force U.S. citizens to surrender their guns. Too late for you, my friend, but maybe U.S. citizens will become politically involved in time to prevent such stupidity here. John Spangler


# 1999 - Looking for a "Brown Bess"
3/30/99
Tim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently graduated with a Military History degree, and I'm trying to establish a new collection. My first goal is a "Brown Bess" from the colonial era. Either a replica or an original -- for display purposes and for show in a "revolutionary war" class. Any information you can give will be much appreciated.

Answer:
Tim- Congratulations on achieving a satisfying goal, although one not likely to lead to a lucrative career. (Unless you become an antique arms dealer, there are a few who make money, but most do it until they go broke.) You can get repro Braon Bess muskets from reenactors that have been used a bit and look "old" for about $500. If you get one of these, make sure you roll up some cartridges and shoot it a few times. You might even want to get into reenacting yourself. ("Living History participants" if you want to sound scholarly, instead of like just guys having a good time.) For an original, plan on spending anywhere from about $1500 for a rough one to $5,000 or a lot more for a very nice one. Do not ever fire one of these, and risk destroying a 200 year old piece of history. You are welcome to post your wants on our free wanted page. You can also check links for reenactor sites to see if someone has something for wale there. John Spangler


# 1918 - Another Stevens Question, The Model 15
3/30/99
Robert, Jacksonville, NC

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Model 15 22 Short/long, Or Long Rifle Unknown Unknown NONE

J. Stevens Arms Company Chicopee Falls Mass, USA Would just like to know the age, how many produced, value why there is no ser. number, any other inf. you can provide. Its the 22 I grew up with from my father, he received it when he was a kid Thank you for your work and this web site. R.A. Murphy

Answer:
Robert, the Stevens-Springfield Model 15 was a simple single shot design, whose short action allowed the bolt handle to lie almost directly above the trigger. Standard configuration was a 22 inch round barrel with a weight of aprox. 3.75 1bs. I have been unable to find any information about when the Model 15 was first intruduced but references indicate that procudtion was temperrarley suspended due to WWII. After the war, the Model l5 "New Pattern" was manufacthred form 1948 to 1965, it was a modification of the orignal model 15 that was sold under the Stevens name. The New Pattern Model 15 had a 24 inch barrel and weighed 5 1bs, with an improved half-stock. The Model 15Y (youth) rifle was manufactured from 1958 to 1965, it was a junior version of the Model 15, that had a 2l inch barrel and a shortened buttstock. Marc


# 1997 - M1 Garand Receiver Availability
3/27/99
Jack

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown M1 Garand 30-06 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have an immediate need for a receiver. I am not particular about manufacture, but would like to know what my FFL dealer will need to do in order to place an thanks.

Answer:
Jack- You and about a million other guys are looking for Garand receivers. There is a remote possibility that the recent influx of parts kits consisting of everything but the receiver for not very much money may have had something to do with this phenomenon. I have only seen a few dealers advertising receivers in recent months, mostly in rough condition. You may find a few floating around somewhere, but will be very lucky if you do. Now the good news. In our glorious free enterprise system, increased demand often causes an increase in supply. Some outfit will probably start making receivers. The commercial Springfield Armory folks in Illinois made them for a while and could start up again. It was not a very good idea a couple of years ago when the market was flooded with complete M1 rifles for $219-249. Good luck. John Spangler


# 1996 - Ancient Musket
3/27/99
Rick

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown About .50 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently purchased an ancient musket (at a shoe shop) here in England. It is so old that the stock is nearly straight (not angled down as with modern longguns) and there is no trace of any numbering or words. It's really old. It is a flintlock, very slight in build and has the plunger with it. Appears to be about .50 caliber. Any idea where I could find a photo database to look it up by photo?

Answer:
Rick- From your description, the "nearly straight" stock is the key feature. This is frequently found on guns made in India or adjacent areas. They usually have a buttstock with squared off edges rather than smoothly rounded as on most other guns. There are probably some reference books in the library that would have some drawings or photos, but I do not know of any on line resources. If you send us a photo we might be able to do more for you. John Spangler


# 1909 - Stevens Springfield Model 82
3/27/99
Paul Bartley, Montgomery, AL, USA.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens Springfield Model 82 22 Short, Long, Or Long Rifle 22 Inches Blue NONE FOUND ANYWHERE ON GUN

Would like to know about the Co., when made (if can be known without SN#), value, availability of parts, and any other interesting info you might have. Rifle has a pull knob on the rear of the bolt which must be pulled from the safety position to fire. Is in respectable condition and is mechanically fit for use. When disassembled for cleaning, I noticed the parts are not well machined. No Patent stamp or number found on gun. Could it be counterfeit? Inherited from my grandfather, family says it was his father's (died 1947 at 80+ yrs). Many thanks in advance, Paul

Answer:
Paul, J. Stevens Arms Company was founded in 1864 at Chicopee Falls, MA as J. Stevens & Co. In 1886 the company name was changed to J. Stevens Arms and Tool Co. In 1916, the company name was changed to New England Westinghouse. New England Westinghouse manufactured both Browning machine guns and Moisin-Nagant (Russian Military) Rifles. In 1920, New England Westinghouse was sold to the Savage Arms Corp., who manufactured firearms marked "J. Stevens Arms Co.". Savage dropped the "J. Stevens Arms Co." designation in the late 1940s, and used only the name "Stevens" was up to 1990. In 1990, Savage discontinued manufacture of all firearms bearing the Stevens trademark.

The Stevens Model 82 Sporting rifle was manufactured from 1935 to 1939, and would fire 22 Short, 22 Long and 22 Long Rifle cartridges. The Model 82 was not serial numbered, it was a simple single shot take-down design with a plain hardwood pistol grip half-stock that had a long finger groove in the forend, 22 inch barrel and weighed about 4 pounds. The rear sight was a spring-leaf and elevator type and was used in conjunction with a gold bead front site. Values for these rifles is not high so I doubt that there would be much incentive to counterfeit one. Marc


# 1995 - Sword- "Volunteer Rifles"
3/23/99
Chris

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Please can you help me I have sword that is in great condition and the blade is engraved, half way up the blade is the words volunteer under this is a plume and then a hunting horn then the words rifles, on the other side is a crown and what looks like a E or V and then R, on the hilt is a crown, plume, and a hunting horn it is said from the old man who I got the sword from, that it is 1827? but I can not find out any thing about this sword, many thanks from the UK Chris.

Answer:
Chris- In British and U.S, military usage, "Riflemen" were more or less an elite type unit (compared to the smoothbore musket and bayonet equipped Infantrymen), and there were far fewer Riflemen than Infantrymen. At various times riflemen were merely designated men in Infantry units with slightly different arms and perhaps uniforms. At other times, they were essentially separate units with distinctive uniforms as well as their rifles. Green was the usual color, "Hunter's green" bringing with it the image of skilled marksmanship and woodsmanship, as well as a touch of what we would now call camouflage. The circular hunter's horn was the usual insignia of riflemen, although later adopted by the infantry in general. Most armies have a clear distinction between "Regulars" or career soldiers (dedicated patriots, or dim witted drunks needing daily supervision, rations and discipline) and "Volunteers" raised to serve during wartime or as a part time militia during peacetime. Generally the "Volunteer" militia were from higher social classes, and tended to more elite branches with superior (gaudy?) uniforms and arms selected (and often supplied) by their commanders. Therefore Volunteer equipment sometimes was identical to that of regulars, but usually was more or less different. You certainly know (but lots of us in the former colonies have forgotten) that the Royal Cipher indicates the reigning monarch. If it is VR as you suggest, that is probably for Victoria who reigned from 1837 to 1897 (according to my dim recollection, but better check that to be sure.) The feathers also have some significance in heraldry, that is beyond my knowledge. With some photos of the sword, we might be able to better pin down the pattern for you. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1994 - $200,000 Custom Lefever Shotgun?
3/23/99
pigpen

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lefever Unknown 20 Gauge / 9mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

This gun has never been able to be appraised. Some offers have gone as high as $200,000.00. It is as far as we know an original custom made for a single person by Lefever in 1886 side by side 20 gauge with an over the top 9 mm with flip up sight and beautifully engraved picture on the trigger guard. Have you ever heard of this gun? The gun also has baleen on the butt and stock. It is rumored that the individual also had a rifle made with matching markings before traveling west.

Answer:
Pigpen- For one of a kind items, value is determined when a willing buyer and willing seller agree on a price. If you had an offer of $200,000 for this gun you were most unwise not to accept it. That is about five to ten times what very top quality guns by famous makers sell for. We have no specific knowledge about your gun, but think your expectations are wildly optimistic. Sorry we cannot be more helpful. John Spangler


# 1993 - Old Sword
3/23/99
Adam

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello, I was wondering if you might be able to tell me how I can identify a sword I have. It was my great-grandfather and I believe it is from the Philippine Insurrection or the Spanish/American war. The blade is about 18in and has Al Sor Don Arluro Dancel Emilio Qurbanowritten in gold on the blade Thanks for the help Adam

Answer:
Adam- Sounds like an interesting piece, but not one that I can identify from your description. Sounds very Spanish, and I believe they did have machete type arms as a standard issue item. Could be one that was fancied up for presentation to someone leaving for home, or visiting Comandante, or some such thing. Too late to holler at your great grandfather for not writing down the info about it. However, it is a good warning to all those folks with WW2, Korea, Vietnam, or Desert Storm souvenirs- Write the story down NOW and make several copies so people will know. John Spangler


# 1907 - Bayonet Dated 1712
3/20/99
Lori

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My father obtained a bayonet years ago that is dated 1712 and has the stamp of Queen Anne on it. Can you point us in the direction of some books that could give us some history on this bayonet? Any help would be appreciated.

Answer:
Lori- Sounds like an interesting piece. There are two books which might be helpful. Ian Skennerton's "British and Commonwealth Bayonets" is the standard reference work in the field and would probably assist in confirming the date and type of weapon. (Dates marked on British military items are often "stores" or inventory dates rather than actual dates of manufacture). If I had some good photos, and measurements (overall length, length of the round socket, diameter of the inside of the socket, width of the blade at its widest point and a good view of the slot in the socket) we can research it in Skennerton's book for you. Include a pencil rubbing of all the markings or an image made by using candle smoke to soot the area around the marking and then lifting it off with scotch tape and placing it on paper. The other book I do not have, but it specializes in the very early British bayonets for the Brown Bess. It is written by Graham Priest, the recognized authority in that specialty. I can forward the information to him and see if he can add anything. Any background you know about the bayonet would be interesting or enlightening. Early 18th century British military items do not usually turn up in Alaska so there may be a good story there. John Spangler


# 1906 - Trench Art
3/20/99
John

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi I collect trench art and I am in the process of attempting to identify the different types of shells used by each country. I am looking for something that will give me details of the various markings found on the base of shell cases.

Answer:
John- Sorry, we do not have any good references to recommend. This kind of info is picked up bit by bit. Some practices parallel small arms ammo markings, and sometimes the caliber or language gives a clue. Good luck! John Spangler


# 1905 - Civil War Longarms
3/20/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

How often do you see a model 1861 or 1863 that can actually be identified to a Union or Confederate Soilder and how much do they usually cost? My wife has a great interest in the Civil War and said that eventually she would like to own one. Although we don't have much in the way of resources now I hope that in a few years I might be able get her one, so I figured it might be a good idea to learn as much as I can now. I personally have an interest in WWI and WWII weaponry and own a model 1903 Springfield with a WWI bayonet that doesn't quite fit although I don't know why.

Answer:
Sir- Civil War Arms that can be ACCURATELY DOCUMENTED to a specific soldier are very few in number and usually pretty expensive. For a musket in average condition with no history, plan on spending about $600-1200. In my opinion, Civil war items are probably no longer affordable for most beginning collectors (unless you have a sickly rich relative or a darn good job!). As an alternate endeavor, you might consider looking into Civil War reenactment groups (living history seems to be the preferred term by some) or the North-South Skirmish Association. Both emphasize learning about the arms, equipment, camp life, and other facets of the period. The former folks get involved in recreating battles or doing "impressions" of them at other sites. The Skirmish folks emphasize uniformed teams shooting real bullets at targets using percussion revolvers, .58 muskets, various carbines, and even full size artillery pieces. Check some of our links to find out more about these groups and from the links you can probably find a contact in your area and attend an event just for fun to see if it might appeal to you. Both types emphasize family participation and safety. Cowboy Action shooting has many of the same features and is more popular in regions where the Civil War is forgotten. Good luck. Just remember who we are in case you find a lottery ticket and need to invest in some of the stuff we offer. John Spangler


# 1964 - S&W Terrier
3/16/99
Kent

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
S&W Terrier 38 S&W Unknown Unknown R58123

I just inherited a NIB 38 S&W Terrier Serial# R58123 complete with all factory paperwork. Any idea how old it is or what it may be worth? Thanks - Kent

Answer:
Kent, The S&W .38 Terrier or Model .38/32, is a .38 revolver built on a smaller .32 frame. The "R" prefix was added to Terrier serial numbers on 1/17/69 so your revolver was manufactured between 1969 and 1974 when this model was discontinued. Book values for these revolvers range from $100 to $300 depending on condition, but collector demand is not high. My opinion (offered as usual with a full money back guarantee) is that a fair price would be in the $200 to $250 range. Marc


# 1904 - Old Gun?
3/16/99
James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Navy Arms Co 1860 36 Unknown Unknown 208054

How do I tell if it is authentic and how much it is worth plate # 1860 Made in Italy Navy arms co. Ridgefield nj Black powder 36 Cal.

Answer:
James - I am sure it is an "authentic" gun. However, that needs to be carefully defined. Navy Arms was founded about 1960 by Val Forgett in Ridgefield, NJ. They were among the first to have Italian gunmakers turn out copies of Civil War and other antique firearms. Bill Edwards excellent book "Civil War Guns" describes these early efforts, including the problem when the first batch all had bent trigger guards, just like the original they had copied! Besides Navy Arms, you will find copies of Colt 1851 .36 caliber Navy revolvers, or .44 caliber M1860 Army revolvers made with the names of various importers including Centennial Arms, Dixie Gun Works, Lyman, CVA, EMF, Armsport, Cimarron, Euroarms, Federal Ordnance, Mitchell, Richland Arms, Stone Mountain, Taylor's, Traditions, and a couple of others. You will find them under the names of various Italian makers (I think several firms are making them, not just one outfit with different names for good, better, and best grade pieces) like Uberti, Pedersoli, ArmiSanMarco. This could be a fascinating challenge trying to collect examples of all these, but most would be pretty reasonable and thus far exempt from permits and license requirements. An original Colt 1860 Army with traces of finish and in good mechanical condition but definitely looking 140 years old will run about $1,000-1,500 such as the two nice ones on our collectible arms page. A Navy Arms copy in the same condition should sell for about $50-100. Please don't tell us what you paid for yours. Before buying the first gun for a collection it is essential to get some good reference material. We recommend "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Arms and their Values." The $32.95 invested in that will make (or save) thousands of dollars for you when you start buying guns. Also, deal with dealers with a good reputation (like us!). John Spangler


# 1903 - Confederate Bowie Knife?
3/16/99
Graham

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Boys / Company Bowie Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a Bowie knife inscribed with flowing script: "The Bowie Knife Boys/Company C Cass County/1st. Georgia Infantry" I would like to sell this, are you interested? Do you think it would be worthwhile to take the piece to an analytical laboratory to carbon date the age of the steel? Graham

Answer:
Graham- If an authentic Civil War piece and the inscription is authentic it is probably worth several thousand dollars. Otherwise it is worth maybe $50 if the workmanship is nice and it looks appealing. There are so many fake Confederate items on the market that we do not want to be associated with any that we are not are not absolutely convinced beyond a doubt is authentic. Detailed authentication of knives not being one of our specialties we must respectfully decline having anything to do with selling this. We certainly do appreciate your offering it to us. I think this sort of thing sells quite well on Ebay.com. However in order to protect yourself from lawsuits you may want to make sure any statements about being genuine Confederate item are ones that you are prepared to defend in court Carbon dating probably would not be sufficient to prove authenticity. Clever fakers use old metal (plenty around from the 1860s) and the cost would probably be significant. I would look at the following: General style of the knife- is it appropriate to the period? Does it appear to be old, or a recent piece that has been acid aged? (old rust tends to be black while acid usually results in a brownish color. Is the inscription of the style popular in the period or appear more recent? Is there evidence of age UNDER the inscription to show it was recently added? Is there any evidence that 1st GA Co C was raised in Cass County, or that they were known as the "Bowie Boys?" The background of the knife is important- do the circumstances of finding it support it being original? If you found it in Gandma's attic and someone in her family was a Civil War soldier (especially in Georgia) that is one thing. If the guy who sold it to you claims is buddy's cousin's uncle found it 50 years ago that is another. If you bought it, what did the seller claim it to be, and did they give you a written receipt stating the same? (If not, they may not have wanted to provide any proof to be used against them in a fraud case.) If a dealer, what is that dealer's reputation. If you have a receipt from Norm Flayderman and a copy of the catalog listing it, you probably have a winner. On the other hand there are a couple of dealers I would NEVER buy ANYTHING from due to their reputation for fakery. In my opinion probably 50% of the "Confederate" stuff on the market today or sold in the last 40 years is fake or grossly misrepresented. Some is merely Yankee stuff claimed to be Confederate. Some is old stuff doctored to appear Confederate. Some is modern stuff used by reenactors or North-South Skirmish shooters for a while and now showing some age and being sold as pre-1865. Some is just outright fakery with malice aforethought and intent to deceive. Some will fool only the least informed or incredibly optimistic (or greedy) collector, while others will fool even the experts. P.T. Barnum was probably right, there is a sucker born every minute, but we all hope it is someone else. As the late Harold Peterson wrote- "I don't worry about the fakes I recognize, but I worry a lot about the ones I don't." Send some photos to me at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT and I will be glad to give my free opinion. If I knew you location I may be able to recommend a reputable dealer in your area to take a look at it. Again, if authentic it is a very valuable piece. John Spangler


# 1941 - H. & D. Folsom Arms Company Shotgun
3/13/99
David Lebanon, OR

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
American Gun Company, New York Double Barrel Shotgun, Double Trigger Unknown Approx. 24" Blue 63437

has "#5" stamped above serial number when was this shotgun made, it was recently purchased from an estate sale and we are curious about it and would appreciate any information on it.

Answer:
David, your American Gun Company shotgun was manufactured by the firm of H. & D. Folsom Arms Company of New York. H. & D. Folsom Arms dominated the field of American-made and American-imported double barrel shotguns at the turn-of-century. Folsom imported English and European shotguns and also manufactured American shotguns simultaneously offering both types in low and medium price ranges to the public directly under their own "house" and "brand" names, as well as making other "house/brand" names under direct contract to hardware stores, mail order houses, and distributors, using any names specially requested by the purchaser. There are over 100 known brand names used by Folsom including the AMERICAN GUN COMPANY which was Folsom's principal house brand name sold directly to stores or firms not wishing to have their own special names marked. Marc


# 1881 - Pistol- 7.63 Mauser ??????
3/13/99
Brian, Wytheville, VA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 7.63 Mauser 4 Inches Stainless 2420

on the side of the gun it reads JIOMT RUS LNETG. where, when, and who made it? The gun has a ten round clip, weighs about 4 pounds unloaded, has fixed sights, a lanyard ring, and I have yet to figure out how you break it down. please help if you can.

Answer:
Brian- I would bet that you have something made in the "Khyber Pass" region somewhere over in India/Pakistan/Afghanistan. (We provide answers about guns but you gotta go somewhere else for a free geography lesson). The clever artisans there have been making guns for over a century, almost entirely by hand using whatever materials they can scrounge. An old American Rifleman article (circa late 1950s- it is well worth owning a set of these and reading them!) described their operations and showed some of their products. At that time they were still mostly making copies of SMLE Enfield rifles, Martini Henry rifles, various revolvers and some Browning or Mauser Broomhandle semi auto pistols. Using hacksaws, hand drills, files and chisels they patiently made working guns. Ammunition used to be made using nitrocellulose based movie film with matched material for priming compound. Customers and craftsmen were usually illiterate, so the markings were copied for their general style without much attention to details like spelling. During the British Empire period the British actually purchased some of these guns, but mainly to keep them out of the hands of the locals who have been fighting each other and the latest set of conquering foreigners for decades. I recently saw a pretty good copy of a S&W Military & Police model with 6 inch barrel and checkered grips. The ".38 SMITH &WESON" marking was a pretty good clue, and the backstrap being cut for a shoulder stock attachment was nice too. A friend obtained a copy of the No 1 Mk III SMLE rifle made there. At another show a guy brought in a nifty pistol his father had brought back from the China-Burma-India Theater in WW2. It had the round forward portion of the slide enclosing a recoil spring like an Astra. The magazine was in the grip like most Brownings, and the rear of the slide had what appeared to be the bolt as used on a broomhandle Mauser (but actually just the solid back of the slide made to look like that). I think it also had imaginative spellings on it. You and I should never attempt to fire any of these, but they sure would be a neat collecting field. I understand that the Khyber Pass gun makers now make AK47s as well as more traditional arms, and if customers want to buy stainless guns, I am sure they will oblige. John Spangler


# 1875 - Another Question For The Gun Psychics
3/13/99
TNTMELTON@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

mid 18oos belgium military revolver

Answer:
Sir- I have an old car in my driveway, what is it worth? Kind of tough to tell without knowing a little more like what model, when it was made, the condition, and any special history. We would need a complete description including barrel length, caliber, all markings, percussion or cartridge design, type of finish, amount of finish and preferably some good photographs in order to tell you anything useful. As a wild guess I would say $50-100 based on your description. If you tell me my car is worth $500 I will be delighted (as long as it is a 1972 Pinto sitting on blocks with no engine), but would be highly insulted that anyone would think a fully restored 1928 Packard is worth that. We are getting better at mind reading, but this one is too hard for even people as talented (and handsome) as John and Marc! Send some photos, along with a contribution to the NRA to us at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171 and we will try to do a better job for you. John Spangler


# 1928 - Remington Model 600 Carbine In 6mm
3/9/99
Richard Menomonee MI USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 600 6mm 18 Unknown 10560

How can I find out how many of these model 600s in this caliber were made? It has a vented barrel thanks

Answer:
Richard, Remington introduced it's new high-power, bolt-action sporting firearm, the Model 600 Carbine in 1964. Initial chamberings included .222 Remington, 6mm Remington, .308 Win., and .35 Remington. The Model 600 Carbine came with an 18.5 inch barrel topped by an unusual nylon rib, blade ramp front sight, U-notch rear sight adjustable for windage and elevation, custom-checkered American walnut stock with Monte Carlo fluted comb and a fixed box magazine. Weight was five pounds, eight ounces. In 1965 Remington started chambering Model 600 Carbines in .243 Winchester. Remington also manufactured 315 Model 600 Carbines in .223 Remington between 1965 and 1968. In 1964 Billings Hardware Co. asked Remington to produce 1,000 special-order Model 600 Carbines in 6mm Rem. to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Montana's Statehood and the l00th Anniversary of Montana as a Territory, these limited-edition guns were sold for $125 each and all featured a commemorative medallion inletted into the stock and a special inscription stamped on the receiver. Remington introduced the Model 600 Magnum Carbine in 1965 chambered in .350 Remington Magnum and 6.5mm Remington Magnum. The 600 Magnum Carbine had a laminated stock of American walnut and beech wood, Monte Carlo cheekpiece, rubber recoil pad, and an 18.5 inch vent-rib barrel. The 600 Magnum Carbine had a four-shot fixed-box magazine, and weighed six pounds, eight ounces. Remington dropped the Model 600 Carbine in December 1967, after 80,944 were sold. I can find no data on how many Model 600 Carbines were chambered in 6mm, but it does not seem to be an uncommon caliber. Marc


# 1873 - NRA And Other Groups
3/9/99
Barry Milk River, AB, Can

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

re: request small donation to NRA details next page. Where is the next page? Is a small donation to NFA, (Canada) just as good? In view of what is happening right now this could benefit US friends of firearms as well. Thanks for your attention, Barry

Answer:
Barry- It appears it is too late to save gun rights in Canada. Maybe you will be able to slowly win a few concessions back in coming decades, but I would not bet on it. Likewise in Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand. Perhaps the U.S. citizens who love freedom and understand the difference between "Rights guaranteed by a constitution" and "privileges graciously granted at the whim of a government" will have the guts to hold the line against further erosion. Tough to do when the TV will show a bloody body and blame it on "guns" instead of a criminal. Ever see a picture of someone who thwarted a crime with a legally owned gun on TV? There has been a change in cultural attitudes towards guns as people grow reluctant to be "judgmental" about people's actions and want to blame something (or someone) else. Just look at the people who want to ban guns, they usually support the actions of President Clinton. So why should you believe them about any subject? Give to any pro gun group you want to, but it is far more important get involved and politically active. John Spangler


# 1872 - Civil War Joslyn Carbine
3/9/99
Gerrry, Cuyahoga Falls, OH, US

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
JOSYLN 1862 Unknown 21" Unknown 2204

U.S. military proofmarks on stock. Inspector's initials TKL on barrel. This gun was given to me and I do not know its history. I would like to sell it. I know nothing about gun prices. Where can I find a buyer whom I can trust to give me its fair value. ---Gerry

Answer:
Gerry- These were one of over a dozen innovative breechloading designs purchased during the Civil War to arm cavalry troops. (Ignore what some writers claim about the Ordnance Department rejecting change or improvement at every opportunity.) The Joslyn was simple and reliable, and used a rimfire cartridge very much like the Spencer. However the Spencer design with a seven shot magazine was much better than a single shot, so Joslyns were retired from service at the end of the war. The best place to check value is a copy of "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their values." That places the value of a Joslyn at $900 to $2750 in NRA antique good and fine condition respectively (see our links for definitions) As for selling it, we have a discussion of various options at www.Oldguns.net/CnsgnSale.htm. Of course, we will be glad to sell this for you on a consignment basis, just as we have done for many other people. (The Civil War Sharps, Burnside and Maynard carbines we have offered recently were all consignment pieces). We will be glad to provide references if you want to hear all the nice things they say about us. John Spangler


# 1883 - Winchester Model 1902 Or 1903?
3/6/99
Ken Graves Tacoma, Wash.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
WINCHESTER 1902 22 CAL AUTOMATIC 20in ?? ? 40267

where can info. be found on this? It has not been used for 40 years and will need a cleaning. It has automatic stamped on it and AUG 27 20ThanksKen Graves

Answer:
Ken, you came to the right place to find information on your rifle. The Winchester Model 1902 was a 22 caliber bolt action design, that was not serial numbered, is it possible that you are looking for information about the Winchester Model 1903? The Winchester Model 1903 was designed by Thomas C. Johnson and was manufactured from 1903 to 1932, total production was about 126,000, according to my records your 1903 (?) was manufactured in 1908. The Model 1903 was a semi-automatic blowback, design with no mechanical breech lock, chambered in 22 Winchester Automatic Smokeless. It came with a 20 inch round barrel and 10 round tubular magazine located in the buttstock, weight was 5.75 pounds. Loading was done through a port on the right side of the butt. Most stocks had plain straight wrists, but some were produced with selected walnut pistol grips and fancy checkering. The Model 1903 action was cocked by pressing back on a rod protruding from the forend beneath the barrel. After about 5000 guns had been made, a separate trigger lock was added to eliminate 'doubling' (firing a two shots with pull of the trigger). The firing pin was changed from bronze to steel in 1906 to reduce breakages, but few other changes were required during a 30-year production life. Winchester Model 1903 values range for $150 to over $800 depending upon condition and options, let us know if you are interested in selling. Marc


# 1870 - Krag Rifle Handguard
3/6/99
Homer, Richland WA USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Krag 1896 .30-40 Rifle Blue 830 86

Model 1896 on receiver, 1898 on cartouche First off, I am not a beginner; have been a collector for 50 years and NRA lifer for 35. Have hit a problem that I can't find the answer to, though. My grandson has inherited this Krag, it belonged to his mother's grandfather who was a forest ranger. Everything checks out, good wood, finish a little worn - mostly on the back side of the magazine - and very good to excellent bore. The problem is with the handguard. It has the "humpback" style, with the bump in front of the rear sight, that I have never seen except in carbines, to protect the sight in a scabbard. My question, is this something not out of the ordinary, just new to me? Or, is this some kind of Forest Service special equipment, intended to be carried in a boot or scabbard most of the time? Never too late to learn something new! I'll be grateful for an answer.

Answer:
Homer- As an "experienced" collector you are probably too deep in the forest to see the trees. My opinion is that the handguard is a replacement for one that broke, and they happened to have a carbine type with the hump and used it. There are four different rifle handguards and three different for the carbines. Except for the real short one for the 1896 and 1898 carbines, any of the handguards will interchange between rifles or carbines with the same basic sight. All these handguards were easily broken so replacements are not uncommon. For many years a talented craftsman in New Jersey made replacements every bit as good as the Springfield Armory originals, but quit when he found out that his fingers didn't make as good a product as walnut. We should all be grateful for his help restoring these old rifles and hope he resumes production.


# 1868 - Wilmot Shotgun
3/6/99
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Wilmot Shotgun Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Where can I get information on the general value of old shotguns. My wife was given an old shotgun by her mother. Wilmot Gun Company, open hammer double Damascus barrel, silver inlays.

Answer:
Mike- Wilmot shotguns were listed on page 672 of the 1907 Sears Roebuck catalog for $12.35. As with most "house brand" shotguns of that period there is little collector interest and values run in the $50-150 range mainly as wall hangers. They should not be shot with modern ammunition. Colt Single Action Army revolvers were selling for about the same amount then, and now run in the $1000-2000 range. Looks like Grandma bet on the wrong horse! John Spangler


# 1867 - 1891 Argentine Mauser Rifle
3/2/99
Steve

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 1891 Argentine 7.65 MM Unknown Unknown S91XX

I am very interested if you have any resource, like books or articles, about the 1891 Argentine Mauser rifle. I have one in excellent condition. The only wear I can see is on the edges of the bluing. It most likely has been shot, but not much, I can see no signs of it. The crest has been ground off the receiver and it has the shaking hands on the side of the receiver, rear end side of the bolt and side of sight. The manufacture stamp on the side of the receiver is " MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891. DEUTSCHE WAFFEN - UND MUNITIONSFABRIKEN, BERLIN." The serial number is: S91XX. It has all matching serial numbers. I am greatly interested in the history of this rifle and would like to know the year and the period that it was manufactured? Also is it safe to fire 1971 military load ammo through it? I would appreciate any help on finding resources on this rifle. Also I'm looking for a book: FSTC-CW-7-68, Small Arms Ammunition Identification Guide. Any help in finding this book would be appreciated also.

Answer:
Steve- These are great guns and can be the starting point for a collection of South American Mausers. Many different varieties, and most available at reasonable prices. If you don't want to cover all of South America, there are a lot of different Argentine arms available (1891 rifles & carbines, 1909 Rifles, 1912 rifles, a bunch of M1911 .45 auto variants, and several bayonets, swords and even lances). The Model 1891 was made fire by Ludwig Loewe & CO in Berlin and then at the same plant but under the DWM name after Loewe and the Mauser Brothers combined to form DWM about 1896. Believe production of these stopped about 1898 but certainly by 1909. There is no way to track specific history on these. My lawyer won't let me tell you if your rifle is safe to shoot. However, the Argentine military ammo is reported to be good stuff and was made to be used in all of their 7.65 mm rifles. John Spangler


# 1866 - Pistol Identification
3/2/99
Dave

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Cap & Ball 45? 4" Inside 4 1/2" Overall None Unknown

Six sided barrel with 2 identical proof marks on lower right side, looks like an X with something in each space, but can not make out what. Top of barrel has LONDON FINE TWIST Has brass front bead sight. Engraving on barrel, lock plate, trigger guard & hammer. Has WINCHESTER stamped in lock plate. Looks like silver trim on front of wood under barrel, also where flat pin locks barrel on, and a rectangle square on top of grip. Pistol measurers 9 1/4" overall & has a 4 1/2" wooden ram rod. My question is, does this pistol have any connection with Oliver Winchester's family? Thanks Dave

Answer:
Dave- I have no information that would lead me to believe this is related to Oliver Winchester family. Your description of the proof marks sounds like English proofs, although London Fine Twist was sometimes marked by sneaky Belgians on lesser quality arms. Winchester Repeating Arms Co. did import some double barrel shotguns from England circa 1879-1884 and marked them on the barrel and locks with the Winchester name. Perhaps this is one of those cut to pistol size, or made use of parts from one. John Spangler


# 1865 - Wooden Training Rifles
3/2/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am looking for information about when and where wooden training rifles were used in military .

Answer:
Sir- The most common version, the Parris-Dunn Corp "USN Dummy Training Rifle Mark I" was used during WW2 for Navy Boot camp training in the manual of arms, close order drill, etc. They remained in use for color guards and the like well into the 1970s. The Navy attitude towards small arms seems to be don't give people real guns, they might hurt themselves, or the guns might get stolen. (Based on my 26 years in USN, often in weapons related jobs). Next most common are "fencing muskets" used for bayonet training exercises. These were popular from about 1860 through WW1, in several different models. The most "impressive" is the WW1 version made of solid wood to the size of a M1903 Springfield with the bayonet attached. Rumored use of "broomsticks" or the like because of a shortage of rifles are common during most rapid expansion of US military strength since the Revolution. However I believe it is exaggerated. Foreign armies have often used similar dummy guns for training. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1855 - Model 1934 Beretta
3/2/99
Ken, Manhattan, KS

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Beretta 1934-brevet 9mmKurz/.380 Acp 3 3/8 Blue 898473

In the lower left rear corner of the butt are what appear to be the letters, HA . Sill on the left side but higher up and toward the rear of the gun, about 1" below the hammer, is what appears to be a crown, with R-E below it. On the right side of the gun about 1" below the hammer are the letters IVU enclosed in an oval. On the right side of the trigger guard is the letter E enclosed in a square. The grips are plastic or some similar material, have a metal strip around the edge of them, have a textured finish, except for the outer 1/4 inch all way around and have a script PB inset in them. Would like to know whatever you can tell me about this gun. When it was manufactured, and the history of it if possible. Also, what it might be worth. Thank you: Ken (not sure what a parkerized finish is.)

Answer:
Ken, the Beretta 1934 was chambered in 380 ACP, (9mm Kurz), it had a blue/black or parkerized finish with a 3 & 3/8 inch barrel, fixed sights, and plastic grips. The model 1934 was Italy's service weapon in WWII, and over one million were manufactured between 1934-1980. Military Model 1934 pistols are usually fit with metal-backed grips. Military slides were marked P. Beretta Cal 9 Corto - Mo 1934 Brevet Gardone VT followed by the date of manufacture. The date of manufacture is usually given in two systems (except on late wartime production models) the Christian calendar - e.g. 1942 - followed by a Roman numeral denoting the year of the Fascist calendar which began in 1922. Thus, an inscription might read 1942 XX or 1937 XV. WWII military weapons were also marked `RE' (Regia Esercito); RA (Regia Aeronautica); or RM (Regia Marine), while police weapons were marked PS (Publica Sicurezza) at the left rear of the frame. Model 1934-s were also sold commercially during WWII but only in relatively small numbers, since most of the production was taken by the Italian forces. Later production model 1934-s have an alphabetical prefix. Post war production models have serial numbers that start with C00001. I have been unable to find any reference to the 'HA' and 'IVU' markings that you describe, If any of our readers know, I hope that they will let us know, I will post any answers that I receive... Marc


Return to Collectors Headquarters.