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# 530 - Boys Rifle- Herstal Belgique
4/30/97
jm, w.farmington, ohio usa burton@geauga.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
BREVETE-S.G.D.G. Herstal-Belgique 22 Single-shot Bolt Action 18" ? Blue 362xxx

barrel, stock, bolt, and trigger all have matching serial # there are about 4 diff. markings...one is a castle, a letter "R", the rest, I'm not sure of.

Do you have any information about the date and country of manufacture? and any possible value? It was an inherited gun, and we are unsure of its original country origins. Thank You for any information you may find.

Answer:
JM- Your rifle was made in Belgium, in the same city where fine Browning guns were made for most of this century, but home to many other makers of varying quality. Your rifle may be one sold as "the New Century model" by Sears and other mail order merchants circa 1903-1910. Price was between $2.50 and $3.00, and many thousands were imported and sold. Unless in exceptionally nice condition (somehow not often the case with "boys rifles") it is probably in the $40.00-75.00 range... John Spangler


# 535 - Stevens .22 Rifle "Gallery No. 80"
4/30/97
Alex, Los Angeles, CA USA shutterbug@earthlink.n

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
DJ. Stevens Arms & Tool Co Gallery NO-80 22 Short, Long, And Long Rifle 22 Inch Aproz. Blue Smooth Not Hex. 263XX

Pump action open sights, wood stock, tube feed, a very dangerous safety. It is necessary to break down the action to change from short to long or long rifle by moving a slide switch.

When was this model manufactured and is there any value to it. I acquired it from a yard sale a while back and cleaned it up.

Answer:
Alex- Your rifle was only made between 1906 and 1910. Not a great collector prize unless in really nice shape. One price guide lists a value of $225 in their idea of "good" condition. This model was replaced by the "Visible Loader" model in 1907. Often called a "miserable loader" it too was a mechanical nightmare to keep operating. However, used mainly by young kids, they were badly abused which may account for some difficulties keeping them going... John Spangler


# 533 - Rossi (M1906 Wincheter Copy)Parts
4/30/97
Rod, Auckland, New Zealand, rodnrob@ihug.co.nz

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Rossi Unknown .22 Unknown Blue 626XXX

I have a Brazilian replica of an '06 Winchester pump action made by Rossi. It's a nice little plinker but will not feed properly if there is more than one cartridge in the magazine. It seems that some time in the past (before I got it) it was repaired and the hammer was replaced with one off a genuine '06 Winchester. Can you tell me where I can get genuine Rossi parts for this rifle? Contact E-mail or fax numbers and/or postal addresses would be appreciated. Thanks.

Answer:
Rod- I checked my Gun Parts Corporation catalog (West Hurley, NY 12491 phone (914)679-2417 FAX (914)679-5849) but they don't list any Rossi rifle stuff. You might contact them anyway. I don't have any other ideas. Maybe someone else will know. HELP! By the way, are you still allowed to have guns in New Zealand, or have you fallen to the epidemic of gun-banning sweeping the old British Empire?.. John


# 539 - Shotgun- Jannsen
4/30/97
Mike, Clovis NM, US, asplundm@3lefties.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Jannsen Sons Double Barrel Shotgun Black Powder Unknown Rusted, Looks Blued Unknown

Any information about the company and age of the shotgun.

Answer:
Mike- We are happy to answer your question because we know it is important to you. Not everyone is able to spend gazillions of dollars on fancy engraved Colts and Winchesters, and Grandpa may only have left a gun like this. Someday you may win the lottery, or have a lawyer sue somebody rich and share the loot with you, or something, and be able to afford some really nice, expensive stuff. Just remember who loves ya. We're just as happy to talk to rich folks as anyone else. (Hey, even if you are not rich, buy some of our inexpensive items or save up your money for the big stuff.) Anyway, Jannsen Freres (a little Flemish lingo there) operated at 42 Rue Fusche and 29 Rue Duvivier in Liege Belgium from 1925 to 1939. They have have operated at earlier dates, and there are single makers named Jannsen in London and Munich at earlier dates, but it is unlikely they have anything to do with your gun... John Spangler


# 545 - Sales To South African Collector
4/30/97
apres.marcs@mega.co.za

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am a South African that will be traveling to the States in August 1997, I am also a reg. gun collector in SA I have more than ones tried to purchase weapon on the US for export to SA without success. I am interested in a Thompson WWII issue, a M7, ACP ext. as these are hard to find in SA, any help would be a greatly apres.marcs@mega.co.zaPS It is nice to find another Marc who spells his mane correctly.

Answer:
Marc- Thanks for your Question, unfortunately, we are not into the import/export bureaucratic maze game, so we cannot help you at all. Maybe one of our guests will be able to contact you directly and offer some help... John & Marc


# 547 - Combination Rifle/shotgun By Atkinson
4/30/97
Arch ,Sadler, TX, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Atkinson Unknown Unknown 36 Inches Brown NONE

This a Damascus barreled side by side-one side is approx. .36 cal rifled, the other side appears to be approx. 16 gauge smoothbore. It is decorated with (I have been told) German Silver. Engraving on both side frames. Marking says "Atkinson Warranted. I have not been able to obtain any history of this gun and am very curious. It is in shooting condition. Any help would be appreciated-I currently support and contribute to the NRA. Thanks, Arch Milliken

See above

Answer:
Arch- Glad to serve a fellow NRA supporter. (BY THE WAY- YOU OTHER QUESTION-ASKERS NEED TO CHIP IN A FEW BUCKS TO HELP DEFEND YOUR RIGHT TO OWN THESE THING! See note when you submit questions. late payments gratefully accepted. It ain't for us, we send the checks to the NRA. Thanks for your support!) Sorry, Arch, sometimes ya gotta remind kids not to play in the street too, until they learn to watch out for their own safety. Percussion combination guns were popular from about 1840-1880, and there are several American Atkinsons who might be the culprit, er maker. Joel in Parkesburg, KY from 1877-1883 made percussion guns; Peter in Monticello, KY in the 1880s; S.W. in Lawerence, Mass 1878-1891. I couldn't find any foreign Atkinsons, but "warranted" has a British sound as much as American. Mail, or scan us a picture and we might be able to tell a little more from the style of the gun. All the inlays and stuff were pretty common for guns of that period. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 528 - U.S. Revolver Co.
4/25/97
Alan Broseley, MO shack@ldd.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
U.S. REVOLVER CO. Hammerless .32 2" Blue 27XXX

Large U.S. on upper part of grip (similar to the old colt marking)hammerless break-over style of loading with auto-ejector I have been unable to find any information on this gun. When was it made? How many were made? Was it designed for the military? app. value?

Answer:
Alan, U.S. Revolver Co. revolvers were not used by the US Military. Arms made under the U.S. Revolver Co. name were cheaper versions of the Iver Johnson line. U.S. Revolver Co. paralleled the solid frame Iver Johnson Model 1900 and the Hinged Frame Safety Automatic models, but did not have the safety hammer feature, they also had some consequent minor changes in the lockwork and a lesser quality of finish. US revolvers were offered in .22, .32 and .38 calibres, and were sold at the same time as the main Iver Johnson line until the 1940s. The pistols were marked 'U.S. Revolver Co.' on the barrel, and had 'US' molded into the grips. U.S. Revolver Co. values fall in the $50.00 dollar range... Marc


# 529 - German SS(?) Sword
4/25/97
Ken, Harbor Springs, MI USA kparada@msms.org

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
E. U. F.Horster SS Sword And Scabbard Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Solingen. SS stamp on handguard.

My father brought this sword back at the end of WWII. He told me it was presented to him by a German officer upon surrender (I know, Iknow . . "all these swords come with that story!"). I would like to know what type of sword this is and some idea of its value if possible. The blade is straight, 29'' with bilateral blood grooves; steel is shiny with one tiny pit and a few pin-point discoloration's. There is a leather "slam pad" at the hilt. The handle is rolled leather divided by strips of wire; raised Nazi crest (eagle atop swastika) on handle and an oak leaf and acorn ferrule at the hilt. The handguard appears brass-like (plated?) with a light stippling apparently from oxidation. The scabbard is black matte finished metal with one obvious dent and lots of surface scratches. There's a basket-weave metal ferrule at the hilt of the scabbard, as well as a metal tip protector, both attached with screws. Scabbard has a rigid loop with an attached "saddle ring". Thanks for any help you can provide. This is a great site!

Answer:
Ken- Thanks for the kind words, but saying nice stuff won't make us any smarter. We plead ignorance on this item. I notice you also asked on The Military Collectors Exchange page (www.TMCX). Hope someone there will be able to help... John & Marc


# 527 - Flintlock Pistol, Italian?
4/25/97
Patty, Salem, Oregon, USA, pschorsch@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Flint Lock - ???? ?????? ????? 7 1/2" Wood - Silver Or Iron Or Silver Metal Unknown

Too many markings to describe Wood is carved with designs Metal parts on barrel and metal on stock have ornate carvings. They seem to be a dueling pair. where the cock is attached., one pistol says: J G DACHTIN AAiX LACHAPE The other says:J G DACHTIN II AAiX LACHAPE The "A" seem to have a right facing arrow under the "A"

The barrel has the name COMMUNAZO on it. It also has a word before this that seems to be D???RO or L???RO or something like this. I have found references or Comminazzi, Cominazzo, and other spellings but none with this spelling. The guns are supposed to be circa 1650 or so. Is the barrel a forged Cominazzo barrel or could it possibly be an alternate spelling of the Cominazzo family.

Answer:
Patty- You have done some good research already. Your question concerning "alernate spelling" or "forged signature" is excellent, and predates the Belgian variations on the better English makers' names by a cuple hundred years. Wish we could tell you for sure. It really takes a specialist to tell much about the pre-1700 stuff, and neither of us claim that honor. I would probably try to fake it if I had a multi-volum, multi hundred dollar reference set "Der Neue Stockel" which is the best refrence on old European stuff. But, I've never been interested enough....Okay, so my wife wouldn't let me buy them... Sorry John & Marc


# 526 - Webley "Senior" Air Pistol
4/25/97
malcolm@speight.prestel.co.uk

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley Senior Air Pistol .22 6.5 Inches Blue XXX

I have recently been given a Webley "Senior" air pistol - in .22 calibre. It is in very fine condition and bears what appears to be an early serial number as shown above. My interest, remembering my father had a Webley Senior just after the last war, is how old it is. Has anyone out there got any record via the serial number of when this may have been made?

Answer:
Malcolm- Sorry we cannot help on this one. My Webley references only cover firearms, not air guns. Are you sure you are still allowed to have air guns in the UK? If legal today, I am sure some real or imagined incident will result in their confiscation within a few more years. I hope US citizens are learning from your misfortunes. They better give generously to the NRA to fight such foolishness NOW, not when the danger is obvious... John Spangler


# 525 - Richardson "Guerrilla Gun"
4/21/97
Kelly kellanj@webzone.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Richardson Industries Guerrilla Gun 8 Or 10 Gauge 18" Or So Blue I Think Unknown

This shotgun (?) has burned in lettering that says GUERRILLA GUN patent pending and on the other side of the stock it says RICHARD INDUSTRIES INC. EAST HAVEN CONN. There is no trigger. It seems to be a bang gun. To shoot it you must loosen the screw on the receiver, take off the barrel, load a shell and pull the barrel toward the receiver to shoot it. It was my grandfathers and I would like some information if you have some. Thanks, Kelly

Answer:
Kelly- In the early 1900s Filipinos often made crude shotguns using old pipes for the barrels (3/4 inch pipe was close enough for weak 12 gauge shells). These guns required the barrel with the shell in it to be shoved back against the fixed firing pin in the breech. The natives called these "Paliuntod" guns. During WW2 a US Navy Ensigh Iliff D. Richardson worked with guerrillas fighting against the Japanese and became familiar with the design. He thought they were neat and would be a profitable item to make in the US after WW2 was over. "Constructed of proper materials and well finished...the Richardson guns did not enjoy good sales even though they were quite inexpensive. The entire enterprise was a dismal failure. The American market would not tolerate such a primitive firearm, even as a curio." (Thomas Swearengen "World's Fighting Shotguns" p. 37) These usually have a "trigger" although it only functions as a safety, and I think they were all 12 gauge. I am not sure why anyone would want one of these, but Grandpa probably thought it was neat. Maybe he won (or lost) a bet and got it that way. Who knows? Better make sure the barrel is at least 18 inches long to be legal... John Spangler


# 524 - Winchester Single Shot Rifle .25RF
4/21/97
royce at rmlovern@mailusmo.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Single Shot Lever Action 25 Rf 25 Inches Blue 68XXX

octagon barrel

any idea when this gun was made and potential value?

Answer:
Royce- Making it tough for me, kinda like "I got a car with 4 wheels, what kind is it?" Well, we can play your game! (We get real good at mind reading, so be careful what you think!) You tripped up by saying it is "lever action" and that let us figure out that it is probably the Model 1885 single shot. This model was the first of many highly successful designs for Winchester by that genius John M. Browning. These were made in calibers from .22 BB cap up to .577 Eley. They offered six different choices of chambers for .22 rimfire cartridges alone! The single shot rifles were made in all sorts of variations of barrel lengths and weights, stock designs, high-wall and low-wall receivers,etc. Based on serial number 68XXX it was made in 18XX (probably 1893), and blue finish was standard in this period. You probably have the number 1 weight barrel, 24 inches long. Value is probably in the $XXX to $XXX range, depending on condition and exactly which variation you have... John Spangler


# 523 - FN 49 With "AL" And Flaming Bomb Markings
4/21/97
Victor EODVic@prodigy.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Fabrique Nationale FN49 30-06 23 Inches Laquered 38XX

"AL" on top of the chamber, "FABRIQUE NATIONALE D'ARMES DE GUERRE_HERSTAL BELGIQUE", on the left side of the receiver, also on the left side, a flaming bomb just like our own (US) Ordnance Crest with a "2" next to it.

My question is: I have a couple FN49 rifles, but none of them have this "Flaming bomb" stamped on it, Was this rifle tested or owned by the U.S.?, Was this mark use by other countries?, thanks in advance for any information Victor

Answer:
Victor- I am not familiar with the AL marking. There is a "ABL" marking on Mausers and I believe FN 49s for "Armee Belge Leger" meaning "Belgian Army". The "flaming bomb" has been used by many nations all over the world with various specific military meaning. Some include: Grenadiers, artillery, ordnance manufacture, or inspector markings, in more modern times usually closely associated with arms and ammunition. I got all excited when I found two Spanish M1893 Mauser rifles with flaming bomb marks, hoping to find that they were ones tested at Springfield after the Spanish American War 99 years ago. However, I learned that are just part of the marks used when originally made for the Spanish. The Belgians have also used a flaming bomb symbol as a proof mark for guns of foreign make since 1924. Perhaps it is an internal subinspector mark or something. In any case, I am nearly positive that your FN49 does not have any US military connection. We were pretty stuck on evolving the M1 rifle during the FN 49's time frame, but we did later do a lot of tests on the FN FAL series, both Belgian made and the T65s made in the US. (Hey everybody, I would like to get one of those, let me know if you have one looking for a good home.)... John Spangler


# 519 - Mauser Model 1888 Sporter
4/21/97
tom tom.vandermeer@greatbend.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser? 8 Mm Unknown Unknown Unknown SN 92XX

I have what appears to be an European Bolt Action rifle, approx. 8mm.Receiver band marked on right side: 2.75 d G.B.P St. m. GIt has a hex barrel, blended into round at the end of the forestock - matted rib on the barrel. Barrel is marked "A. Dickure Giessen "It has a tang peep sight that folds down into the stock, behind the action. It has a dual set of triggers. The stock is of high quality wood with checkering on the pistol grip. Most of the metal surfaces are etched or engraved (receiver, rib, wedge and faces of screws. Rifle appears to be classic European and in good condition. The action and magazine appear similar to German Mauser 88 (Kar88), Mauser-Manlicher, including flat turned down bolt handle.

Can anyone properly identify the rifle, and what is it's value?

Answer:
Tom- Up until about WWI, the 1888 Mauser action was very popular as the basis for high grade custom sporting rifles in Germany. Sounds like yours is one of the really fine ones. The tang sight is unusual, but the classy octagon to round barrel, double set triggers, profuse engraving, "spoon" bolt handle, etc. are all typical features the rich guys wanted on their fancy rifles. These were all basically one of a kind custom guns, and sometimes marked with the maker's name, or the retailer's (similar to Abercrombie & Fitch) or maybe the owner's. There is no easy way to track any of these down, although the proof marks will sometimes narrow the date range a little. While superbly made and finished guns, be careful if you intend to shoot one. They were made in all sorts of oddball calibers (whatever the customer wanted) and may not be suitable for ammo you can find easily. Have it checked by a competent gunsmith, or at least get a hungry lawyer to sue everyone else even if you did something stupid. I see rifles like this for sale anywhere from a few hundred dollars in the boonies, up to several thousand bucks in places where rich folks might stop by... John Spangler


# 540 - Ruger Mini-14 in .222 caliber
4/21/97
mart@theriver.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ruger Mini-14 .222 Unknown Unknown Unknown

What can you tell me about a Ruger mini-14 in .222 cal not the usual.223 cal.??? mart@theriver.com

Answer:
mart@theriver.com, Not much. When the Mini-14 came out in 1975, the .223 cartridge was not as readily available as it is now, and a lot of the public perception of the .223 was negative due to problems with the early M16s in Vietnam. Guess old Bill Ruger wanted to give people a choice. One gun value reference book states the .222 versions have been discontinued. Another says that .222s "will bring a premium." There are a lot of Ruger collectors out there, and if they gotta have "one of every model" they will probably be excited about one in .222. If someone just likes a shooter, and is tired of playing with his or her (notice- we try to avoid stereotypes here) SKS, they will probably see lots of cheap 5.56/.223 ammo and not even look at one in .222. Freedom to make choices! Is this a great country or what?... John


# 518 - Bayonet With Nickel Finish
4/18/97
Gary-G MAYU@aol.com.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bayonet Mauser Unknown Unknown Unknown Nickle , Wood Handles, Blued Sheath NONE

mfg. by Weyersberg Kirscbaum & Co.-overall 14.80 in.-blade 9.91 in. mfg. by Weyersberg Kirscbaum & Co. Solingen Shield with shooting five point star-Three circles, somewhat like the Olympic insignia. Nothing fancy but great mfg. quality. Not able to find information at local library.

Would like to find year of mfg. and what rifles used them. Where were they manufactured? If unable to answer questions, please submit book title that would have this information. Thank you, Gary

Answer:
Gary- Most of the nickel-plated bayonets are German "dress" bayonets. Don't let the name fool you, these were not for women troops, but for ceremonial occasions and "walking out" when off duty, in town trying to pick up those who wore dresses. The bayonets are found in many different styles and quality levels but all are similar to standard German bayonets of the WW1-WW2 eras. Many would fit the 98 Mauser series of rifles, but some were strictly decorative and lacked the slots and catches to attach on a rifle. Yours was made in Solingen, a town noted for high quality edged weapons for several centuries. There are several books dealing with bayonets. The best single volume for anyone even remotely interested in bayonets of all countries and all periods is Jerry Janzen's "Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook" which you can special order from a bookstore for about $35-40. There are some highly specialized volumes specifically dealing with German bayonets, (John Walters, I think is the author) but they are very difficult to find. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 517 - Gyrojet
4/18/97
blakely

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
MBA Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I believe that in the late 1960s, a company on the West Coast, maybe named "MBA", or "MB Associates" -- made a line of pistols/rifles firing a small rocket propelled projectile.. They were actually featured in one of the James Bond films at the time (You Only Live Twice).Do you know of these? who has any?. Steve Blakely

Answer:
Steve, M.B.A. MBAssociates, San Ramon, California, U.S.A. Gyrojet. MBAssociates was formed by Robert Mainhardt and Art Biehl early in 1960, as entrepreneurs looking for suitable ideas to back. The two men became interested in weapons technology, deciding that since the existing technology was over fifty years old and nothing really new had happened in that time (Mainhardt's words) there was room for improvement. Eventually they hit on the idea of small spin-stabilized rockets and having developed the rockets, followed up by developing a hand-held launcher. In effect, it was a pistol. discharging l3mm rockets instead of firing conventional ammunition. Whether MBA knew it or not. there was little novelty in the basic idea of a small- caliber spin-stabilized rocket. The German Army had produced 'Ftiegerfaust' in 1945, a nine-barreled shoulder weapon launching 20mm spin-stabilized rockets at I,OOO ft/sec and 2 600 revolutions per minute to a range of 2,000 meters as a close-in anti-aircraft weapon. Nevertheless, the Gyrojet rockets were a considerable technical achievement l3mm caliber and about 1.5 inches long, the rockets had a solid head and tubular body containing a solid propellant charge. The base of the rocket was closed by a venturiplate, with four jets angled to give spin as well as forward thrust, and there was a central percussion primer between the jets. The hand-held launcher resembled an automatic pistol in outline, and carried six rockets in the butt. The hammer was above the trigger and struck backwards to hit the nose of the rocket in the 'breech' and drive it back so that the primer struck a fixed firing pin. As the rocket moved off, it forced the hammer down and cocked it once more. By I965, the company had developed the 'pistol', and a number of shoulder-fired 'carbines' in a variety of experimental calibers, and had put the 'pistol' on the market. It sold well on its novelty value - even at the then high price of $250 - but they had no success in selling the idea as a military weapon. The accuracy is far below that of a conventional pistol, one report speaks of 11 inch groups at ten yards range - the cost of the ammunition is high, and the fall-off in velocity at ranges over 300 yards is detrimental to accuracy and ranging ability. Due to restrictions placed on arms over .50 caliber by the Gun Control Act of 1968, Gyrojets made after that date were 12mm instead of l3mm. I seem to remember Gyrojets being offered for sale in the Shotgun News within the last 5 years, but I can not remember by who... Marc


# 514 - H&R .32 Caliber Revolver
4/18/97
Doug

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Harrington And Richardson Unknown 32 Smith And Wesson 3" Blue 3203XX

Harrington and Richardson on top rib above barrel, the letters "32 S&W CTGE" on left side of barrel. The serial number on the bottom of the grip frame. Grips marked with Bullseye at the top, nearest the cylinder.

What year manufacture? Can 32 auto ammo be used? If not, what is the difference (besides case length)?Any antique value? I ask because the spring for returning the trigger to a "ready" position is weak, leaving the trigger back when fired. Should it be repaired? Any other general info would be appreciated. By the way, NRA member and proud of it! Have a C&R FFL primary interest in the7.62X54R caliber long rifles (Mosin Nagants and variants)

Answer:
Doug, thanks for visiting our site. H & R has been a manufacturer of utilitarian firearms for over 115 years, H & R ceased operation on January 24, 1986. Even though a new manufacturer ( H & R 1871, Inc.) is utilizing the H & R trademark. All that I can tell you about your H&R's manufacture date is that it falls sometime before 1940, because all H&R serial numbers produced after 1940 have a letter prefix from which the year of manufacture can be determined. H&R handguns have little or no collector value and prices for them fall in the $100 dollar range... Marc


# 513 - Shotgun- Hopkins & Allen Double Barrel Hammer Type
4/18/97
Scott Email at CTDuckhntr@AOL.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hopkins Side By Side Double Barrel 12 Gauge 27" Rust Blue NONE FOUND

Top of barrel ribbing it states "London Laquered Steel"

I have recently purchased a side by side 12 Ga. double barrel muzzle-loading outside hammer dual trigger shotgun. The name on the gun is "Hopkins" This appears to be an old gun and I am refinishing it to be a nice wall hanger. I tried to do a little research on the maker of this shotgun and I only came up with Hopkins and Allen, and another C.W. Hopkins that seemed to only make some revolvers. Is there another "Hopkins" gun manufacturer? If so what is the approximate age of this shotgun and where was it made? It seems that Hopkins and Allen made allot of reproductions after being acquired by Numrich or under the Numrich name. To me this does not seem to be a reproduction firearm. Any idea on the maker or age of this gun? I would sincerely appreciate any information you can give me. Thanks

Answer:
Scott- I can find 15 Hopkins gunsmiths, ranging from Charles to William . However, I would bet that Hopkins & Allen is the right one. Regardless of anything that Numrich produced later, the original outfit operated from 1868 to 1917 and made all sort of rifles, pistols and shotguns... John Spangler


# 511 - 141 Game Master
4/18/97
Larry NRALIFEMBR @ AOL.COM

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 141 Game Master 30 Remington ?? 24 Inches Or So Blue 63XXX

Manufacturers mark on Left side of barrel O TTI'm guessing this is the date of manufacture, maybe July of 1950, just a guess.

My father has inherited this rifle from his mother and found that the 30 Remington caliber was very odd. Is this a rare rifle? My grandmother seemed to think so. He also has 94 rounds of 30 Remington ammo. I told him not to shoot this rifle until we could understand more about it and the ammo. I have looked, and the Major ammo manufacturers don't make30 Remington any more and I haven't looked too hard but I'm not finding reloading components either. Do you have any sources or opinions on this rifle. It is also fitted with a Weaver 4X scope of the same vintage as the rifle. It is in very good condition, no rust and from the looks of the action and rifling in the barrel, it hasn't been shot very much. Thank you for your time. Larry NRA Life Member

Answer:
Larry, the success of the Remington slide-action rimfire Model 12 inspired Remington to introduce the Model 14 which was an enlargement of the sturdy Pedersen tipping-bolt Model 12 action for center-fire ammunition. A special spiral magazine was used to prevent cartridge noses from igniting the primer ahead of them. The Model 14 was the first truly successful slide-action center-fire sporting rifle. Optional extras included half pistol-grip butts and differing finishes. The carbine version of the Model 14 had an 18 in barrel and a straightstock. The Model 14 was replaced by the Model 141A Game Master which was offered in 30, .32 or .35 Remington calibers. The 141A was available only in standard grade, with a 24 in round barrel. The Game Master had a pistol-grip butt and a finely ribbed fore-end, the 141A as discontinued in 1950. Values for Remington 141's in excellent condition fall in the $250 to $300 dollar range. Yukon Arms, would probably be a good source of ammunition, there is a link to them on our links page... Marc


# 508 - Colt Navy Or Army Pistol
4/15/97
Dave

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Navy ? Unknown 8" Unknown 17XXX

On top of barrel is stamped "-ADDRESS COL. SAM (OR POSSIBLY SAML) COLT U.S. AMERICA-"All serial numbers match (on the frame, grip frame, and barrel assembly) it has what appear to be the original grip (look like walnut) and the bottom of the grip frame has a notch at the back (I'm guessing) possibly for a rifle stock attachment. The grip frame is brass.

I'm wondering if you can tell me when it was manufactured and it's approximate value. The condition of the piece is surface rust and mechanically it works fine with the exception of the ram mechanism, which works but is badly worn so that you have work it a little to get back up to the barrel latch. Thank You for any information you may be able to furnish me.

Answer:
Dave- First, let's make sure we are talking about the Model 1851 .36 caliber Navy model with a 7.5 inch barrel. The barrel on these are octagonal. The very similar Model 1860 .44 caliber Army model has a 7.5 or 8 inch barrel but is rounded shape. If a Navy, it was made in 1852, if the Army, it was made in 1861. There is strong demand for these in just about any condition. However, the condition of yours makes a fair retail price probably in the $400-600 range. Please check the barrel marking- it probably reads "Address Col. Sam Colt, New York, US America" The notch at the rear of the grip strap is indeed for attaching a shoulder stock. Hope this helps. Let us know if we can help you sell it... John Spangler


# 505 - Colt New Service-Model 1909 .45 Revolver
4/15/97
Gary

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt US Army Model 1909 45 DA .45 6in I Assume It Is Stainless 316XX

RAC

An uncle of mine who was a country western signing cowboy in the 30s and 40s just gave me this revolver. It was one of his "show" guns. I know-nothing about its origin or value. Any info you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Gary- Your pistol was made in 1911 and inspected by Rinaldo A. Carr. It is made of regular steel, and was originally blued. It has apparently been nickel or chrome plated, probably something done with lots of old "cowboy guns" for the show business folks. Normally the value would be as an old Colt Military revolver. However, there is a lot of interest in Western and show business memorabilia, so I think that it would still have a fair amount of collector interest (although from a slightly different bunch of collectors.) If you had some old photos of your uncle wearing this, and old records, or whatever, and maybe other parts of his outfit, especially holsters, that would add a lot to value and interest. I'd guess somewhere in the $300-600 range. This is the sort of thing that would be nice to keep in the family rather than just selling to some stranger... Enjoy! John Spangler


# 512 - More About Japanese Rifle Crests
4/15/97

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Lynn Lyon sent us the following story about Japanese WWII rifle crests, I thought others might enjoy reading it.

Answer:
Marc, I saw your response about the removal of crests from Japanese rifles. I loved the story that Japanese soldiers before they died removed the crest. One of the best I'd heard. I read the biography of Admiral Halsey many years ago, and he commented that he was concerned about the preservation of any symbols of the emperor. He had served as a young naval officer during WW I and after the war been entertained in French homes, and was surprised to see swords and other memorabilia of Napoleon prominently displayed. He offered this as his reason for trying to eradicate any symbols of the Japanese emperor, and for the removal of the Imperial crest. One gentleman at gun show told me that when his company was marched to their boat to go home from Tokyo many had Japanese rifles. They were lined up and marched through a workshop where a man with a portable grinder removed the crest. The rifles were then permitted to go to the U.S.... Lynn Lyon


# 510 - Colt Woodsman 1st Series
4/11/97
Pat

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt The Woodsman 22LR 6.5 Inches Approx Blue 84XXX

This looks to be factory new to me but has been fired so it may be NRA excellent. I inherited this automatic handgun and believe it is from the '30s. Could you give me some idea of its value? Also, it came with a box of ammo from the same period. Is this ammo safe? Can it be used, or sold? If not, how does one dispose of old ammo? Thanks for any help you can give, Pat

Answer:
Pat, My records indicate that your Woodsman was manufactured in 1932. The Colt Woodsman .22 Automatic Pistol is the first of a series based on the basic type which was designed by John Browning. The Woodsman name was not adopted until 1927, and pistols manufactured before then are sometimes called Pre Woodsman. There are 3 series of Woodsman pistols plus the Pre- Woodsman your Woodsman is a first series. The Woodsman was made as a general-purpose target and hunting weapon, firing the .22 Long Rifle cartridge. It is a ten-shot long-barreled semi-automatic, operated by simple blow-back, with a concealed hammer. The safety is a slide locking catch, pushed with the right thumb. To accept the recoil of the Long Rifle cartridge, the weight of the pistol had to be fairly high (28oz). The Woodsman's balance is good, and the trigger action and general handling are excellent. The Woodsman gained a good name for low-cost accurate shooting and by 1932, 84,000 had been made. In 1932 minor changes were made to the Woodsman design, and it was continued in two slightly different versions with two barrel sizes (4.5 inch and 6.5 inch) and a variety of finishes, trigger pulls and sights. Values for Woodsman pistols in the condition that you describe are quite high, in the $750 to $1000 dollar range. The box of vintage ammunition is also a collectors item, you should not shoot it and keep it with the pistol. If you ever want to sell your Woodsman, let us know... Marc


# 504 - Would A Gun Fire A Bullet In Outer Space?
4/11/97
Mike Robinson

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Would a gun fire a bullet in outer space (complete vacuum)? Is there enough air in the shell to explode the bullet? Does gunpowder need oxygen to ignite? Please answer this to the best of your ability. Facts would be appreciated. Thank you, Mike Robinson

Answer:
Well, about 32 years ago, Uncle taught me all about Navy explosives and guns and stuff. I don't remember a thing, but as a history major, I should know where to look up just about anything. "Elements of Ordnance-a textbook for Cadets at the U.S. Military Academy" written by Earl McFarland (later commander of Springfield Armory) was revised by some General Hayes in 1938, sure helped a lot. Another great book full of answers to fascinating gun questions you never thought to ask is "Hatcher's Notebook" by Gen J.S, Hatcher. We assume that in the vacuum of space, the only stuff we have to work with is what is contained in the cartridge we brought with us from earth, and we are dealing with "propellant" powder not "explosive" warheads (although the science is the same for both). Gunpowder propellants in a cartridge work from the combustion of the powder charge in a confined space with little or no air available to support any burning. This is not like burning of something in the open, like a wood fire, where you use the wood fuel and get oxygen from the atmosphere. Gunpowder has sufficient oxygen included in its chemical makeup to burn and produce a large volume of gases which raises the pressure to spit out a bullet. However, many smokeless powders are slightly deficient in oxygen content to completely burn, causing muzzle flash when the partially burned stuff gets some more oxygen after leaving the muzzle. Here is a chemical formula for one nitrocellulose compound used as gunpowder that will show the high percentage of oxygen included. C24 H28 O20 (NO2)12. (Don't try making this at home, folks!) I don't know if you could light a match in space, but cartridge primers work on friction from the firing pin crushing the sensitive stuff in the primer mixture, causing it to ignite. That provides the heat to ignite the powder charge. All that should work just fine in space. This is all "interior ballistics" figuring out how to get stuff out of the gun. There is another science, "external ballistics" dealing with what happens to the bullet after it leaves the barrel and the forces of gravity, and resistance from the air and force of any wind influence it. Since those factors don't exist (for all practical purposes) in space, I can't begin to tell you how you are going to hit anything once you start shooting in space. Now, if only Neil Armstrong was a shooter instead of a golfer, we might have known the answer to that.... John Spangler (who barely passed high school Physics and Chemistry)


# 506 - High Standard Victor
4/11/97
Fred (FredLom@aol.com)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
High Standard The Victor .22 Long Rifle 5.5 Inches Nickel 2431XXX

Gold (tone) trigger, and safety. The word "Military" above trigger on right hand side.

Recently purchased from my father for $350.00,along with gun box, spotting scope, and 2 magazines. Questions...1) Could you please supply a little history(i.e. date of manufacture. Quality. Value (in excellent condition)... 2) Did I pay too much. Thanx. Fred.

Answer:
Fred, my records indicate that your Victor was manufactured in 1974. The Hi Standard Victor was introduced in 1972 and was their most expensive production target pistol. The Victor had an all steel vented rib running the full length of the barrel. Early model Victors had adjustable rear sights which were located on the rear of the barrel on the rib, a bridge sight replaced the barrel mounted rear sight in later production pistols. The Victor was chambered in .22 long rifle and was built on a military frame, it had walnut grips and was offered with 4.5 or 5.5 inch barrels. Values for Victors in excellent condition are in the $600 to $700 dollar range (give your Father some more money so your conscience won't bother you)... Marc


# 502 - British Bayonet- Wilkinson 1907
4/11/97
Rich - RLS1077@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Wilkinson Bayonet None Blade Length:17 Inches Overall Length: Under None none

The base of the blade has the date "1907" stamped; just above the date is a crown; just below the date is a "9" then a space and a "16"; below these numbers is the word: "Wilkinson"on the other side of the blade at the base there is an"X" and to the right the number 2 or 27. The grips are made of nice maple or walnut or cherry wood. There is allot of tarnish, a little pitting but it is in overall great shape.

I heard you can clean and buff the blade with very fine steel wool. Will this do any damage? Where was this made? Is "1907" the date of manufacture? What rifle was it made for and what is it value?? Thanks

Answer:
Rich- Your bayonet is a "Pattern 1907" made for the British army in September 1916, and undoubtedly saw use in WWI. It was made by the Wilkinson Sword Company (who also made razor blades). The "X" is probably a "broad arrow" marking which indicated British government property. It fits the British Short Magazine Lee-Enfield (SMLE) rifle No 1 Mark III. These were finished with a dull sandblasted finish on the blade and the guard and hilt were blue, but usually painted with black paint. A little WD-40 and fine steel wool probably won't hurt anything, but I'd probably leave it alone. I got $45 for a similar one I sold last month, with scabbard... John Spangler


# 501 - LF&C Sword (U.S. Model 1913 "Patton")
4/11/97
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
L.F. & Co. Sword Or Cutlass N/A N/A N/A N/A

Double-edged straight blade, 35" long. Large guard. Handle, 7" long, of a black composite material. One side of blade marked L.F. & Co., 1919, and carries the Ordnance "bomb". Other side of blade is marked U.S. and No. 14.

Any information about the item, and possible value, would be appreciated.

Answer:
Mike- You have a Model 1913 "Patton" cavalry sabre. Designed by LT (later GEN) George S. Patton, who was an Olympic level swordsman in 1912. These were made by Springfield Armory as well as Landers, Frary and Clark, from 1913 until shortly after WWI. They remained in use with mounted US cavalry units until they were "dehorsed" in 1943. The scabbards were attached to the saddle, not to the belt like other US military swords/sabres, so you will never see pictures of troops wearing them dismounted. Complete with scabbard these seem to sell in the $250-450 range depending on condition and maker, with Springfields bringing more than LF&C. Neat old item. Let us know if you decide to sell it... John Spangler


# 467 - Martin-Henry Rifle
4/7/97
dennis dheney@ix.netcom.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Martini-Henry Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am a pure amateur, but am interested in learning more about the classic rifle of the British Empire in the 1870's. Is it possible to purchase one and how much do they run? Thank you.

Answer:
Dennis- Nothing wrong with being an amateur. I was born good looking (at least my Mom thinks so) but it has taken a long time to learn what little I know, so maybe I'm still an amateur in a lot of areas. The entire field of early single shot military rifles is a fascinating one, and overlooked by most collectors, so that prices are still fairly reasonable. You can probably find one well used and abused by the natives in a former colony for $250, and a pretty nice one for $500. They come in a variety of calibers, and the action is still used by some modern shooter in various calibers from .22 rimfire up to African big game sizes. Have fun!... John


# 456 - Krag Carbine(?)
4/7/97
rsexton@netgsi.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Armory Model 1898 .30 22 Inches Blue 457XXX

Three notches can be found on the left side of the rifle, below the plate opposite the trap door.

This .30-40 Kraig has been handed down to me, and I must, therefore, question its legitimacy: Was this rifle manufactured as a carbine or has it been "sportorized"? I have presented this question to several collectors, and the responses have ranged from "your rifle may have seen bunker hill" to "your rifle has seen a lot of deer hunting". I would very much appreciate any information you may be able to provide. Thank You. RAS II msupon

Answer:
RAS- Your rifle (note that word) falls outside the range of known Krag Carbines. The serial number puts the date of manufacture sometime in 1903. If a carbine, the receiver would be marked Model 1899, but yours is probably marked Model 1898, the rifle marking. Many Krags have been cut down to carbine length over the years. Most were fitted with front sights on a band the fits around the barrel, while carbines had sights dovetailed and brazed like the rifles. Lots of people still like the Krag's exceptionally smooth action and use them for deer hunting. Collector interest in cut down versions is very low, somewhere I the $150 range, mostly as parts. The three notches? Gotta make up your own explanation for those... John


# 498 - Winchester Saddle Ring Carbine
4/7/97
Rich - RLS1077@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 Carbine 30WCF 20" Blue either 114xxx or444xxx (hard to read)

This is an old Winchester and the markings are worn (especially the serial #) but this is what I can read: The tang has 3 lines; 1st line: "Model 1894"; 2nd line: "Winchester"; 3rd line: "Trademark". The barrel has on 1st line"-Nickel Steel Barrel-; 2nd line: "Especially for smokeless powder". The Magazine cap is slotted and there is an original saddle ring on the left side of the receiver.

This gun saw allot of use and the barrel is in poor to fair condition with allot of residue and or corrosion but the gun seems all original and seems to be in good working order. How old is the gun? What is the value? Is it safe to shoot with modern 30-30 ammo? What can I do to clean the barrel? I heard if you fire a full metal jacket bullet through a bore like this you can loosen some of the "crud and lead" residue which will help clean up the bore. Any truth to that? Thanks for your help!

Answer:
Rich, first and most important DO NOT FIRE A FULL METAL JACKET BULLET IN YOUR 1894 TO CLEAN OUT THE BORE. If your bore is too obstructed the resulting excessive pressure could cause your rifle to explode. Take your Winchester to a competent gunsmith and have him inspect it for safety and clean the bore for you. If you want to clean your barrel yourself, I recommend using a good solvent like Accubore and a stainless steel wire brush. You should still have a gunsmith check your Winchester for safety even if you clean the barrel yourself. Your description sounds like your Winchester is a Saddle Ring Carbine. Values for Saddle Ring Carbines range from about $300.00 to over $1000.00 depending upon condition. Your Winchester's year of manufacture is 1898 or 1908... Marc


# 495 - Whitney Revolver
4/7/97
Gerhard

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Whitney ?? Unknown 8mm Diameter 5 Inch Unfinished 22XXX

This is a 5 shop percussion pistol with an octagonal barrel. Number 19658 F on top of tamping mechanism. Finely etched markings on the cylinder including A shield with lettering "---tney v---" ..A three masted sailing ship with furled sails...maybe a fort...a recimbant lion..another shield with no letters...and an eagle with spread wings.

My wife inherited this pistol from her great uncle- a 94 year old Connecticut Yankee. We just wonder what it might be. Thank you very much.

Answer:
Gerhard- Normally we would have to say "Huh?" and tell you to send a picture. However, you gave just enough clues that we were able to put the puzzle together. You are correct, it is a revolver made by Eli Whitney, Jr., son of the famous inventor of the cotton gin and developer of interchangeable parts use in manufacturing. It was made in the early 1860s, and could have been carried in the Civil War as a privately purchased item. This model is known as the "Pocket Model Percussion Revolver, Second Model, second type" and is .31 caliber (just about 8mm), the common caliber for "pocket" pistols of the time. The full inscription is "Whitneyville" where the armory was located near New Haven, CT. The later versions included both a lion and a naval scene. Flayderman lists a value of $250 for this model in NRA antique Good condition (see link) and $475 in Fine. Mismatched serial numbers on parts is not unusual, but the last three digits being the same is odd. These originally had a blue finish, with case hardened loading levers. Nice old collectable guns, but not quite as pricy as Colts and Remingtons. If you decide not to keep it, we could see that it gets a good home... John Spangler


# 493 - Suhl Musket
4/5/97
Daniel

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Suhl Muzzleloader Muzzleloader , Milatary With Bayonet Clip Approx. 69 41.25 Clear 18XX

Suhl on left side with "G H" below the Suhl. Also a proof mark of "s" with a crown above

Who made this weapon, when ,and about what is it worth.

Answer:
Daniel- Your musket is a Prussian model somewhere around 1808 as a flintlock, with about .69-71 caliber bore. It was made at the arsenal in Suhl. While US arms are usually dated on the lockplate, early ones were marked on the buttplate as well. The Prussians also seem to have marked the dates on their buttplates, so I am pretty sure that 1816 is the date of manufacture. Most of these were converted to percussion, and huge quantities were imported during the Civil War by the Union and Confederate governments. They were considered mediocre arms, and replaced as soon as possible with .58 caliber Springfield or .577 caliber Enfields. Neat old guns, but they tend to bring far less than US made arms of the same period. The typical Suhl musket converted to percussion and used in the Civil War goes for $250-450, maybe a little more in really great condition... John Spangler


# 492 - Springfield M1 Garands (early)
4/5/97
JERRY, AT Jerry.Maria.Ellis@Worldnet.att.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Garand M1 30.06 ? Parkerized 27XX AND 47XX

What do you think of such low serial numbers for the Springfield M1? They both have all original parts, with no mis-matches. Although they are returned from Korea what do you think is a fair price for each.

Answer:
Jerry- If those two are all original matching as made in 1938, I'd give you at least $2000 for one of them! However, we need to be sure what you mean by "all original parts, with no mismatches". Most of the guns "returned from Korea" have been rebuilt several times and all sorts of parts changed (in addition to whatever parts got switched by troops in the field cleaning stuff and tossing parts into big piles.) Prior to 1941, the Garand used a "gas trap" system on the end of the barrel. SEE DRAWING (The top example in the drawing is the early variation). This included the following parts different from what is common on the later Garands- Barrel, gas "cylinder", the small parts at the front of the gas "cylinder", the front handguard, and some differences in the operating springs back near the receiver, and picky little details on most other parts as well. Nearly every Garand part is marked with tiny numbers indicating the blueprint number INCLUDING THE LATEST CHANGE, and a code for the place it was made. Scott Duff's excellent books on the Garand thoroughly track these numbers so you can tell if parts are "original with no mismatches." If you have one of the early ones, and my $2000 offer isn't enough, tell me how much more I have to beg from the wife so I can own one. However, if your rifles are the later type, they probably are in the $300-450 range as shooters, depending on condition of the bore and other parts, especially stocks... John


# 490 - Remington Manufacture Dates
4/5/97
MIKE E-MAIL IS NUGNUG@AOL.COM

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Wingmaster 870TB 12 Ga. Shotgun 30" Blue 1233XXXV

Checkered front stock and pistol grip. monte carlo stock.

What is the production date of this shotgun?

Answer:
Mike, I only have information on Remingtons made between 1921 and 1972. Remingtons made between 1921 and 1972 have a code located on the left side of the barrel near the frame that identifies the year and month of manufacture. The following letters correspond to the months of the year, for example B=January, L= February and so on [ B - L - A - C - K - P - O - W - D - E - R - X ]. The following letters correspond to the year of manufacture starting in 1921 and ending in 1972. [ M - N - P - R - S - T - U - W - X - Y - Z - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K - L - MM - NN - PP - RR - SS - TT - UU - WW - XX - YY - ZZ - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K - L - M - N - P - R - S - T - U - W ]. As you can see there are some problems with this dating system. If any of our readers have better dating information for Remingtons it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass it on to us... Marc


# 487 - M1 Carbine- Inland " Hand Stamped? "
4/5/97
Chris - ccone@ix.netcom.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Inland M1 Carbine .30 16" Parkerized 4,614,XXX

This is your standard early features Inland (high wood, flip sight, flat bolt, type one band). It's marked WB-LP-2338 with a machine stamp on the trigger guard. The IO stock is stamped "151" over the circle P. My question relates to the serial number. It's stamped by hand. The first number was originally stamped upside down and then restruck properly. The rest are well lined up, but obviously hand stamped. I've heard vague references to this "hand stamped Inland" being a known variant but I can't confirm this. Can you?

Answer:
Chris- The collector term "hand stamped" usually refers to the designation on the receiver ring, either M1 or M2. Since production was underway concurrently on both models, the 1 or 2 would be stamped after pulling them for assembly into the respective model. By the way, ALL carbines marked "M2" are considered to be machine guns, and illegal to have without full class three paperwork, even if they only have standard semi-auto M1 carbine parts in them. Silly, but BATF finds it easy to enforce this rule. Okay- now for the bad news. The serial number you provided is one assigned to Rock-Ola, not Inland. I have never seen or heard of a serial number (in the normal position behind the rear sight) stamped upside down. Sometimes if the serial number was obscured after addition of the adjustable sights, the number was stamped again in front of the sight, and that could have been upside down on some. The number on the trigger guard does not match up with anything I have ever heard of. Also, the 16 inch barrel length is odd. If not the standard 18 inches, it might be a barrel that was cut down, and a lot of those got used on rewelded guns in the 50s and 60s before carbines were released for sale. I'm not sure what you have, but it sure smells like someone's parts project. Larry Ruth's "War Baby" (2 volumes) is the standard reference on everything related to the M1 carbine. Membership in the "Carbine Club" is a must for serious collectors (Email me for info)... John Spangler.


# 481 - Webley & Scott .32 Automatic Pistol Model,1906
4/5/97
Pablo egitli@sol.racsa.co.cr

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley & Scott Unknown 7.62m/m & 32 Automatic 3 1/2 Inches Aprox Unknown 48XXX

What appears to be BV SP at the base of the chamber (visible through the ejection hole) The marking are very tiny, though, and I might not have read right

I would like to know it's year of manufacture, if it was a service pistol and any bit of history or technical data you might have on it. I thank you in advance and really appreciate your effort. It's hard to get this kind of information in Costa Rica

Answer:
Pablo, it sounds like you have a Webley & Scott .32 Automatic Pistol Model,1906 (Patent 15,982. 4 August 1905). The Model 1906 was first offered on the market in 1906, and was still being sold in 1940. It was first adopted by the Metropolitan Police in 1911, legend has it that the famous Siege of Sidney Street inspired the police to discard their revolvers and take to automatics, although revolvers continued in police service until the present day. Throughout the existence of this pistol, it underwent several changes, none of them fundamental, and all intended to simplify manufacture or assist in use. The most obvious change concerns the safety, which on the first models was a catch on the left side of the external hammer By pressing the catch down when the hammer was at half-cock, it was locked and the pistol could be carried without danger. On later versions, the catch was positioned on the left of the frame above the grip, where it could be worked with the right thumb. Barrel length was 3.5 inches, the magazine held eight rounds and it was chambered for 32ACP and .380, both rimless cartridges. A feature of all these small Webley automatic pistols was that the spring-steel trigger guard was used to lock the barrel to the body by means of two lugs on the front leg of the guard. The BV and SP markings that you mention are Birmingham proof marks... Marc


# 480 - Marlin Model 1893 ?
4/3/97
Bill Quantum@cybersol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin 30/30 30/30 Unknown Blue 281XXX

Hexagon barrel, made in the late 1800s. Full hammer, horn type rear site.

This gun was owned by my Grandfather, and given to my father who passed it on to me. It is over 100 years old. Does it have any collectors value? It has been recently stolen and your answer may help locate it. I want this rifle back for the sentimental worth is had to me.

Answer:
Bill, I could find no references to a Marlin Model 30/30 that was manufactured in the late 1800's. My records indicate that your Marlin was manufactured in 1903 plus or minus 1 year. The only Marlin that I could find which had a standard chambering in 30/30 that was manufactured around 1903 is the Model 1893. The Marlin Model 1893 Lever Action Rifle was manufactured from 1893 to 1936. Total quantity produced is estimated from 8,50,000 to 1,000,000. The Model 1893 was chambered in the following calibers 25-36; 30-30; 32 Special; 32-40; 38-55 and came standard with a full length tubular magazine. Octagon or round barrels were available in lengths from 24" to 32" (at 2" intervals), a 20" carbine was also made. Standard sights were buckhorn rear and blade type front sights. Standard finish was a casehardened receiver, hammer, lever and butt-plate, blued barrel and magazine tube and varnished walnut stocks. Barrels were marked MARLIN FIRE-ARMS C0. NEW-HAVEN, CT. U.S.A./PATENTED. OCT.11.1887. APRIL2.1889. AUG.1.1893 before 1919. After 1919 barrels were marked THE MARLIN FIREARMS CORPORATION/NEW HAVEN, CONN.U.S.A.-PATENTED. Caliber markings were on top of barrel at breech. Rifles made after 1904 have a marking on left side of barrel SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL. MODEL 1893 was marked on upper tang, and in later production MODEL 93. The Model 1893 was Marlin's first lever action rifle chambered for the new smokeless powder cartridges. Numerous special order features were available such as sights, take-down, barrel shapes, stocks, etc. The Models 1936 and 36 follow the same design as the Model 1893, and are about identical. Values for the Model 1893 range from $200.00 to $2000,00 depending upon condition and special features... Marc


# 482 - Royal Crest on Japanese WWII Rifles
4/3/97
Jeffrey jeffrey@concentric.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Arisaka? 6.5mm Jap 6.5mm about 17 inches blue 104747

Symbol in circle ground off. Then ,reading top to bottom: 1 thin horizontal line; 1 thin horizontal line shorter than the first; 1 heavy horizontal line longer than the first two; 1 symbol similar to )( but extended at the bottom; --\+- (roughly); then an I with the bottom horizontal line longer than the top horizontal line.

Another posting you answered on the 6.5mm Japanese rifle indicated that it was common for whatever symbol was on the barrel to be ground off. Why was this done? This rifle was taken home, along with a 7.7mm Japanese rifle, by my father after the occupation of Japan. He was based within 10-30 miles of Nagasaki.

Answer:
Jeffery, over the years I have heard many explanations of why the royal crest was defaced on Japanese WWII vintage rifles. When I first starting collecting guns one gun shop owner in my home town tried to convince me that Japanese soldiers who became mortally wounded would deface the crest just before they died. I believe the following explanation to be the most accurate. The sixteen-petalled chrysanthemum is the emblem of the Imperial Family. The chrysanthemum emblem will be found stamped onto the barrel of Types 13-22 rifles and the receiver of Types 30-99 rifles and symbolizes issuance of the rifles to soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army. Although no written proof has been obtained, it has become widely accepted that the emblems were removed by order of General Douglas McArthur. Occasionally, rifles will be found with either an arsenal symbol or other overstamp on the emblem, or another symbol in place of the ground crest. This simply signifies removal of the rifle from service and reissue to, for example, a military school, or possibly even resale to a foreign country... Marc


# 477 - Remington 1903A3
4/3/97
DR NORMAN S LICHTENFELD

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 1903A3 30-06 Unknown Unknown 3815XXX

I have been searching the net for a resource on the 03. I am a novice WWII weapon collector. I am being offered a Remington model 03-a3 # 3815XXX. on the top of the barrel it has RA then a symbol that looks like a flame or candelabra with the numbers 6- 43. The stock has a number of markings.A circled "P" behind the trigger housing and a small 32 in a square with a triangle next to it. There are other markings I just can't describe.I can't find any research on this weapon. Is it authentic? What should it be worth? How can I learn more about this weapon.ThanksNorm

Answer:
Your M1903A3 sounds typical of the hundreds of thousands that we remade. The most desirable ones will have a visible inspector's crouches on the left side of the stock, opposite the bolt handle- "RA [ordnance emblem of crossed cannons and circle] FJA" These were applied when the rifle was accepted. If subsequently overhauled the stock may have been replaced and rifles lacking this cartouche are less desirable. If overhauled, additional marks may have been applied (RIA,OG, SAA, RA-P are some of the most common) but these don't seem to have much impact on value. Really nice 1903A3s seem to run around $400, with well used ones in the $250 range. The best introduction to the 1903 series (but they omit the 03A3 as little too modern) is "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values" Great descriptions, and pretty realistic pricing information. We have copies available in our catalog section, and sell it because it is so useful to all collectors, not just beginners. If you plan to collect guns you should get a copy, if not from us than a local books store (but they charge more!) Your library has (or can get on inter-library loan) either of these two outstanding reference books: Clark Campbell "The '03 Era: When Smokeless Revolutionized U.S. Riflery," or William Brophy's "Springfield 1903 Rifles". A number of smaller works also exist, including one by Bruce Canfield "Collector;s Guide to the1903 Springfield" that I don't particularly care for, but is OK as an introduction. One bit of advice on adding items to a gun collection. If you don't know your diamonds, know your jeweler. There are many reputable and well informed dealers out there, and there are some others who prey on those who have not yet learned much about the hobby. Read up on prospective purchases first, and don't be afraid to spend money on good books. I am amazed at people who spend over $500 on a gun, but object to buying a $40 book, especially when the book might keep therefrom a very poor investment. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 476 - Old Rolling Block Rifle
4/3/97
Stephen D. Burris

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My father-in-law was approached by a widow in the neighborhood, looking to dispose of her deceased husband's gun collection, with what has only been described as a "rolling block" rifle. He said there is no markings on this gun anywhere. Any ideas? Who might have made it? Where should any markings be?

Answer:
Stephen- Thanks for contacting us at Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Rolling block rifles were patented by E.Remington in 1864, and only a few very early ones were made in time to be considered true "Civil War guns" but the 1864 patent date misleads a lot of people. Probably 95% of all rolling blocks are Remington type, either made by Remington or under their patents. Markings are usually on the "tang" behind the hammer going towards the butt. Sometimes markings are on the sides of the receiver (especially those made by Springfield in 1871-71, and some of the foreign made rifles. A few were marked on the barrels, mainly the Argentine model. Other rolling block designs by Whiteny and Sevenfold be marked in any of these areas. Condition is very important in these rifles, as some people still like to shoot them, and many of the foreign models have little collector interest in lesser conditions. In the 1960s one importer ("Ye Olde Hunter" of Alexandria VA) was selling them by the pound for about the same price as hamburger. Junky ones fall into the $50 wall hanger category, but really nice ones bring many hundred dollars. Let us know what markings you find... John Spangler


# 475 - West German .22 Import Revolver
4/3/97
Leslie Steven Barbour

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown LA S Deputy (on Butt) 22 LR 6" Blue 428XXX

3 images on left side of frame below cylinder. unable to make out what they are without a magnifying glass. Gold colored insert on wooden grips with L A on top and a rhino underneath. Other: Made in Germany. 6 shot single action western style revolver. Adjustable front and rear sights. A guy owed me $75.00 20+ years ago and instead of money gave me this gun. I may have gotten ripped off, I don't know. Too late to worry about that now. I would like to know the answer to these questions if possible. I just started really getting interested in guns and would like to find out more about the ones I have. Thanks so much.1. Who makes this gun? 2. What is the value? 3. How reliable or how good of a gun is it?

Answer:
Leslie, I am sorry that I have to tell you that you have one of the famous (or infamous) cheap West German import 22 revolvers. These revolvers are usually of questionable quality, values for them fall in the $25.00 to $50.00 dollar range. I would advise you to have your revolver checked out thoroughly by a competent gunsmith before you try to fire it. I hope that I have not discouraged you from starting gun collecting as a hobby, I was once told by a gunsmith friend of mine when I was happily showing him my newest gun acquisition "I would take it to the nearest, body of water and drop it in". I was very upset because I had paid over $200.00 for that particular firearm. My advise would be that if you want to make gun collecting your hobby, go to the library and read some of the books that they have there about guns. Decide what kind of guns that you like the best and focus your reading on that particular kind. After you are well informed about the particular kind of firearm that you want to collect, you will be in a good position to start your collection... Marc


# 472 - Mauser Model 1910 ?
4/3/97
Steve sstapp@uswest.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
MAUSER MAUSER - 6.35 6.35 MM?? 3" BLUE 2797XX

WAFFENFABRK MAUSER A.G. OBERNDORF A.N. on left side of slide as , Mauser logo on left side of frame above safety.

I rcvd this from a friend, Interested in general info plus availability of magazines, since it has none now.

Answer:
Steve, you did not tell me what model Mauser you have so I will have to guess from your description that your pistol is a 1910. Mauser manufactured the Model 1910 from 1910 up to the beginning of WWII in 1934. For the first three years of production the Model 1910 was only offered in 7.65 mm, after 1913 the 6.35mm chambering became available. Values for Model 1019's fall in the $125 to $225 dollar range depending upon condition. To find a replacement magazine follow our gun parts links on the links page... Marc


# 470 - J.P. Sauer Drilling 16x16x 9.3x?
4/3/97
Dave milano@epix.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J.P. Sauer Drilling 16 Ga. / 9.3 X ? Unknown Blue 84XXX

"Fluss stahl, Krup Essen barrels; Little bits of intricate carving all over (a compass-points pattern, and a snail-shell pattern are both repeated in multiple places over the gun, various crowns and other small symbols); The rifle barrel is inscribed in one spot with "108/49" near the breech end; Stock has a cheek piece and bone cap on the butt.

This is a beautiful gun to look at, and is now hanging on my wall, but I'd like to use it in the field. Is it safe to shoot it? And what do I need to watch out for with ammo? I know the caliber is 9.3 and it takes a rimmed shell. Will I need to have a casting done to determine the proper shell length? Also, can you tell me when this gun was made?

Answer:
Dave- These fine old drillings were essentially hand made by talented gunsmiths to whatever specifications the customer wanted. the 16x16 over 9.3 rifle barrel was a popular configuration. There are both 9.3x72R and 9.3x74R cartridges, so better do a chamber cast. The crown over whatever marks are proof marks, of the period before the Nazis took over in the mid 30s. Although well made initially, and subject to German proof testing, I wouldn't have a clue if it is safe to shoot now. (What did previous owners do to it, what ammo will be used, are the barrels coming apart, did the former German owner sabotage it before it was "liberated" by some GI....?) Have it checked by a competent gunsmith before firing. Be aware that most of the 16 gauge barrels are the old short European chambers, not suited for modern US ammo. Even if you never fire it, these are beautiful guns... John Spangler


# 468 - M1 Carbines By ERMA And ERMA's
4/3/97
George Rose

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ermas Mfg Co M1 Carbine Reproduction 30 Carbine Unknown Blued Finish Unknown

My dad gave me this gun in the early sixties and I would like to know its origins. The Blue Book of Gun Values does not indicate that Erma mfg. co made any post war MI carbines. Is this one of theirs or is "Ermas" mfg co a rip-off of their name? Will GI parts interchange?

Answer:
George- You are reading the wrong book. Larry Ruth's War Baby vol. 2 has the answers. Erma-Werke of Dachau, Germany, began manufacturing carbine parts to support the German Bundeswehr which was initially equipped with US weapons. Eventually they made complete carbines, fully interchangeable with the US version. One of these would be a real treasure for a serious collector. Erma-Werke also made a .22 rimfire "look alike" of the carbine. Okay, back to the good old U.S.of A. in the town of Steelvill, Missouri. Some guys there formed the "Erma's Firearms Manufacturing Company in the early 1960s, and began making carbines. They used a lot of surplus parts and modified some stuff, so not everything will interchange. They became the Steelville Manufacturing Company in the mid 1960s, and apparently sold off everything around 1967. Only a couple of years after the time DCM began selling carbines for $20.00, but that is just a coincidence... John


# 491 - Shotgun- Neumann Brothers
4/1/97
Rich - RLS1077@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Neumann Bros External Hammers - Side By Side Shotgun 12 Gauge 28 Inches Blue 99XX

On left side of receiver, just below and forward of the hammer, the name "Neumann Bros" is present. On the right side of the receiver the words "Machine Made" are present. On the top of the rib in between the barrels the words "Belgium Damascus Finish" are present. On the left barrel, about 4 inches from the breech, the words "Choke Bore" are present. Finally, on the bottom of the pistol grip type stock (where you would sometimes find a brass cap), there is a silver inlaid badge (no writing is visible)

I have learned that allot of these type of shotguns were imported at the turn of the century and sold under private label names. Is this gun, as described, one of these imports? It appears to be in remarkably good condition with checkered stock and forearm in fine condition. Is there any significance to the inlaid silver badge? Is it possible this gun belonged to a law enforcement agency? How old is this gun and what do you think the value of the gun is as described? Thank you for your help and assistance.

Answer:
Rich- This company was run by Alfred E. Neumann, his brother Darryl Neumann, and his other brother Darryl Neumann. They imported top quality English shotguns made by Purdy, Lancaster, Holland and Holland and the like. Unable to sell these at high prices, they removed the English markings and put on fake Belgian markings and sold them through retail outlets like Sears and others for the same prices as real Belgian shotguns. The federal government disliked this use of fake markings, and felt that the guns shot so much better that they were a threat to endangered species which couldn't be harmed by the inferior, real, Belgian guns. Therefore the BATF raided Neumann Brothers headquarters in New York on April 1, 1912 and seized their inventory and put them out of business. The BATF then put small badge insignias in the stocks to commerate their triumph over evil-doers, and awarded them as trophies to their agents. As a result these old shotguns are prized by collectors and you should be able to get $5,000 to $10,000 for it. (Hey, how about sending us a couple bucks when you sell it!). Well, maybe not. Just another old cheap import wallhanger, with a fancy inlay ("escutcheon") to give it some class. Sorry, but being April 1st we wanted to see if anybody actually reads this stuff anymore... John and Marc


# 471 - Marlin 22
4/1/97
Marlin Firearms Corporation

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown 22 Long Rifle 21 3/4 Inches Blue Orginal, now worn & slightly rusty none Unknown

None

This rifle is an automatic, it has no model number, and is clip fed. It is an open breach, blow-back type with the fireing pin being a raised ridge across the face of the bolt. There is no ejector as the bolt is blown back a small pin located in the wall of the receiver hits the base of the cartridge and kick the empty out. My question is does it have a model #, and when was it manufactured? Thanks for your help.

Answer:
From 1930 to date, Marlin has made more than 25 different models of .22 cal. semi-automatic rimfire rifles. These Marlin's have normally been good quality, inexpensive weapons. In 1960, the name Glenfield was also used in connection with inexpensive Marlin rifles. Because of the quantity of models that Marlin has turned out in the last 65+ years it would be hard to determine what model that you have. Used values for this type of Marlin are usually in the $25 to $30 dollar range... Marc


# 464 - Dreyse Needle-gun Duelling Pistol
4/1/97
Aimee rags@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
V.dreyse Needle-fire Dueling Pistol Unknown Unknown 9.5 Inches Wood Handle, Metal Barrel Unknown

Grip has the number 3746. top of barrel says v.Dreyse Sommerda. under the rotating needle-fire part, it says...Cal:d.Zdsp:0,35,1/24Pulv: 1 1/2 / 24 Schroot My father is in late stage Parkinson's Disease, and would love to know any info you have about this gun. He has had it since WWII, and some have told us it was made in 1830-1850. They think the manufacturer is v.Dreyse, who supposedly made weapons for the Russian army. This dueling pistol was at one time one of a set that was kept in a box with its mate. We only have the one dueling pistol now. It is a ball and black powder unrifled pistol. If you can possibly tell me the history of this gun and an approximate age, I would be deeply grateful. My father will probably not live much longer, and he would really like to know more about this gun that he treasures so much. Thank you for any help you can give me in my search.

Answer:
Aimee- Johann Nikolaus von Dreyse perfected his design in 1827, and in 1836 a version was adopted by the German army produced as the 1841 Zundnadelgewehr, or needle gun. This had a crude bolt action mechanism and used a paper cartridge that had a percussion cap in the base of the bullet. the extra-long firing pin (or "needle") penetrated the cartridge until it reached the percussion cap to fire the cartridge. The rifle was .60 caliber and used 74 grain blackpowder charge. Dreyse and a partner Collembusch made these in Dreyse's home town of Sommerda, Prussia (not Russia) until Dreyse's death in 1860. The successor firm, Dreyse Rheinische Metallwaaren Machionfabrik, continued in operation making military arms until destroyed by Allied bombing in late 1944. Undoubtedly Dreyse also used his design on guns for the civilian market, and the 1840-50 period is probably about right. Any of these are quite rare, and would have considerable collector interest. A cased pair would be highly valuable, while a single pistol would be worth much less. I would guess in the $500 to $1500 range, depending on condition. The markings probably indicate the caliber and powder charge. I would guess that cartridges would be in the $100 and up range if you have any. If not, I guess you won't get a chance to shoot it. A fine old gun. Take care of it for its own historical significance, with the added bonus of having special family connections. Hope this information is helpful. Sorry for the delay replying, but I have been out of town for most of March... John Spangler


# 462 - 9x51SMAW Cartridge
4/1/97
Rick dryfoot@labyrinth.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have recently acquired a cartridge for my collection and through measurements have determined that it is a 9mmX51mm S.M.A.W. My questions are: What does S.M.A.W. stand for? What rifle was chambered for this caliber? I am a member of the NRA and NRA/ILA and contribute regularly. Thank-you for any information you can give me concerning this cartridge. Rick

Answer:
Rick- Glad to help someone who gives to NRA/ILA! You are telling us that you have a cartridge that has a projectile diameter of 9mm and a cartridge case 51mm long, pretty much like a 7.62mm NATO round without a bottleneck. I recall seeing something like this in one of the old International Ammunition Association journals, or in the Ammunition section of Gun Report. (Both excellent information sources for cartridge collectors.) However, I don't recall details, and don't have time to dig through them all. SMAW is not one of the acronyms I recognize. Since WW2 there have been hundreds of nifty (or sometimes drifty) ideas on ways to make military ammo and guns that will kill people faster, quicker, or cheaper. Millions of dollars have been spent on design, prototype development and tests. Some ideas have worked, some didn't. Ideas have included flechette projectiles, primer actuated cartridges, silent rounds, underwater ammunition, multiple projectiles, saboted projectiles, special operations oddities, and who knows what else. Very few rounds have escaped into collector's hands, so very little is printed on them. Nothing in the SPIW (Special Purpose Individual Weapon) program was close to 9x51. Based on the 51mm case length, I would guess it is post 1964 design. You might send a photo and letter to the Gun Report ammo folks, they probably know. Maybe a phone call to the Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen might locate someone who knows. Sorry we can't give you a good answer on this one... John Spangler


# 446 - Pieper Boys Rifle
4/1/97
Rich. gunnar@cybertoyrs.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bayard Depose .22 18 In. Blue 701XX

On barrel it says ANCIENS ETABLISSEMENTS PIEPER HERSTAL-BELGIUM. BREVETES.G.D.G. PATENTED JAN.12,1909. MODELE DEPOSE. On the receiver is what appears to be a knight, with a lance on horseback. There is also what looks like a crown with a G under it.

This is a nice little rifle with only a few small small dents in the stock, and minor scratches on the barrel. The bluing is mostly gone and it has a brass butt plate. I have looked in The Blue Book of Gun Values, but can't find anything about it. I would say it is in good condition. Any information you can provide would be much appreciated. I have just recently found your web site, and think it's great!!! Please keep up the good work. And, yes, I am a proud member of the NRA. Thanks, Rich.

Answer:
Rich- Always glad to help fellow NRA members. (If YOU guys and gals reading this are not, go to our link and hit the NRA site and join up TODAY. They are the only viable show in town protecting your right to be interested in the sort of stuff you read about here!) Henri Pieper set up shop in Liege Belgium about 1859, and his son Nicolas formed the company of that name in 1898. Best known for a series of semi-automatic pistols, they also made some revolvers and rifles. I couldn't find anything specific on this model rifle, but it is probably among those imported and sold (cheap) by Sears or Montgomery Ward and other mail order houses in the 1900-1930 period. Probably not a high dollar prize, but some kid probably spent many a happy hour safely using that little rifle... John Spangler


# 416 - Early Colt 1911A1
4/1/97
Alberto

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911 A1 45 a.c.p. 5 in. blue 734196

I am since the early Sixties member of NRA (MTD8341W). I have a Colt 1911 A1 that remained in Italy since the Second World War complete with holster belt and magazines pouch. It is one of the 46000 made in blue finish. Condition overall inside and outside is 85-90%. Serial number n. 734XXX

When was it made and where was it shipped? Thank you in advance for your answer. Yours faithfully. Alberto Merli.

Answer:
Alberto, we are glad to be able to answer a question for someone who has a been an NRA member for as long as you have. Our records indicate that your 1911A1 was one of a lot of 1000 pistols shipped to the Commanding General at the Springfield Armory on July 18, 1941. Colt records normally do not list the type of finish that is on a pistol, but there is one with a lower serial number than yours (729993 assembled May 19, 1941) that is listed as being parkerized. Your pistol is probably one of the last military Colt 1911A1's to come from the Colt factory with a blue finish. Your pistol sounds like a very special item, if you ever want to sell it let us know... Marc


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This page was last updated 5/2/97 5:25:58 PM