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# 1250 - Another One Of Those Durn National Ordnance 'A3's
4/27/98
Darren

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
National Ordnance 1903A3 30-06 Unknown Unknown 7239****

Can you please give me a short biography of National Ordnance 1903A3s. I recently picked one up at a gun show ser.# 7239****. Are there reliability problems or other shortfalls compared to higher priced Remington 1903s of the same era? thank you Darren

Answer:
Darren, the reason that National Ordnance 1903A3's are cheaper is because they are not US government issue rifles. National Ordnance 1903A3 receivers were made in Yugoslavia and/or Spain during the late 50's and mid 60's, then the rifles were assembled with surplus GI parts... Marc


# 1248 - 200th Year Rugers
4/27/98
Rich, Billings, MT

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ruger New Model Blackhawk .357 Magnum 6 1/2" Stainless 33-25XXX

Top of barrel stamped... "Made in the 200th year of American liberty" Should I continue to shoot this gun? Will it be collectable? (because of the barrel marking) It's a great gopher gun but I don't want to ruin it if it is collectable. Thank you for your thoughts.

Answer:
Rich, all Ruger firearms that were manufactured in 1976 have "Made in the 200th Year of American Liberty" stamped on their barrels. While I can't deny that I have tried to sell Rugers with this stamping for a premium in the past, I can't think of a time when I was ever able to pull it off. I have heard that 200th year Rugers that are unfired and in the original box will bring a premium, but I have even started to doubt that. My advise would be to take good care of your Ruger but go ahead and keep using it... Marc


# 1236 - Remington Sportsman Shotgun
4/27/98
rkc@mail.clis.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Shotgun Sportsman 12 Gauge Full Unknown 761XXX

has duck in flight engraved left side has pheasant engraved right side trying to find approximate age and value.

Answer:
Remington manufactured the Sportsman shotgun form 1931 to 1949 in 12, 16 and 20 Gauge. Sportsman Shotguns usually came with a plain, solid rib or vent rib 26 inch barrel, but skeet and riot configurations were also available. There is not much collector interest in this shotgun and values for examples in excellent condition usually fall in the $175.00 or less range... Marc


# 1118 - J. Stevens Rifle
4/24/98
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J. Stevens Unknown .32 long rifle 22 1/2" nickel 54XXX

This rifle has a octagonal barrel 22 1/2 inches long. The front sight is a rounded blade, and the rear is a V notch blade. It has a lever/drop block style action. It has a high cheek rest and has curved nickel plated but plate. It has a fore stock and the numbers 5 then a smaller 4 and then 984 appear in front of the fore stock. On top of the chamber J. Stevens A. & T. CO. Chicopee Falls,MASS.U.S.A.PAT.APR.17.94 and 32.LONG R.F. below that. How old is this rifle and does it have any value?

Answer:
David, J. Stevens Arms Company was founded in 1864 at Chicopee Falls, MA as J. Stevens & Co. In 1886 the company name was changed to J. Stevens Arms and Tool Co. In 1916, the company name was changed to New England Westinghouse. New England Westinghouse manufactured both Browning machine guns and Moisin-Nagant (Russian Military) Rifles. In 1920, New England Westinghouse was sold to the Savage Arms Corp. who manufactured firearms marked "J. Stevens Arms Co.". The "J. Stevens Arms Co." designation was dropped in the late 1940s, and only the name "Stevens" was used up to 1990. In 1990, Savage Arms discontinued the manufacture of all firearms (rifles and shotguns) bearing the Stevens trademark. From the markings that you describe, I would guess that your rifle was manufactured between 1886 and 1916 and is a Model 44 - 54 single shot. These rifles were manufactured in many different configurations and calibers, blue book values for specimens in excellent condition are in the $600 - $800 (or more) range depending upon the exact model, deduct 20% for rimfire calibers. For a better identification, we would need some good photographs, let us know if you want to sell this rifle... Marc


# 1287 - Unidentified Bayonet
4/24/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a bayonet that I am interested in finding out how old it is and what it is worth. It is approximately 14 inches long has a indented strip in the knife portion and has a hook off the bottom.

Answer:
Sir, From your description we can tell it is a "knife" bayonet (as opposed to a "socket" bayonet with a triangular blade, or a "sword" bayonet with a blade 18-24 inches long, often curved or "yataghan" style.) Short knife bayonets became popular around 1890, often with relatively short blades for use on rifles and similar bayonets with longer blades for use shorter carbines or short rifles, so that they would have similar length or "reach". The best source for identifying an unknown bayonet is to look through the drawings in Jerry Janzen's great book "Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook". It is organized alphabetically by country, and within each country from oldest to newest. From there you could go to more specialized books for sharp details that collectors find fascinating but others might find pointless. Just about any bayonet is worth $20.00 to a lot of people, and maybe a lot more to a few, but people usually want to know what it is first. Good luck... John


# 1266 - Hamilton Model 51
4/21/98
Ron

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hamilton 51 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a friend who has a Hamilton rifle #51. It is a single shot 22 cal. youth size. I would grade it at about 70%. The only thing we've been able to find out is C.J. Hamilton of Plymouth Michigan designed air rifles and had a manufacturing company there until 1933. Are these so rare that they aren't listed in the price guides? I've spent hours on the web and found very little. Any help would be appreciated. Ron P.S. this rifle is NOT an air rifle, it shoots short, long, or long rifle.

Answer:
Hamilton made at least a dozen different rifles, some air, mostly .22caliber rimfires. All were simply, or even crudely made with lots of stamped parts. The company began production in 1900 and lasted until about 1945,overlapping the Daisy Air Rifle production which also took place at a plant in Plymouth, Michigan. The Model 51 is a conventional single-shot bolt action which must be manually cocked. The bolt is removed by holding the trigger back while you remove it. Two styles of stocks were used, most often a flat board type made from birch with a walnut stain, and sometimes an oval shaped walnut stock. The model 51 was the first Hamilton which would also take the .22 long rifle cartridge. These were made from 1935 to 1941, probably in large numbers. I don't know what price guide you checked, but the very complete and useful "Standard Catalog of Firearms" lists this model and indicates a value of $200 in fair and $350 in very good condition, although their definitions of condition are unclear. The other information is from the out of print book "American Boys Rifles" by Jim Perkins. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1259 - Crown over N proof marks on Walther P.38
4/21/98
Michael

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther (ac) P.38 9mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

Good morning, I just surfed on in here and have been enjoying your site. I have a comment about the proofmarks on a German gun owned by one of the posters. You stated that the crown over "N" was an East German post 1950 nitro proofmark. Actually, that mark was also used on pre-war Walthers until 1939.

Answer:
Michael, Thanks for your comment. You are correct that the crown over N proof mark is also a 1939 German Nitro proof. This proof was actually used on Walther and Mauser P-38 pistols procured for the police. The 1939 crown over N would have been stamped on the left side of the slide below the extractor, and on the left side of the barrel group assembly but not on the frame. Walther police pistols would also have the police acceptance stamp (eagle over x in a circle with an F to the right) located on the right side of the slide above the trigger. Because of the absence of a police acceptance stamp and because the crown over N was stamped on the frame, barrel and slide (not just the slide and barrel), I think that it is most likely that the crown over N stamping in question is an East German proof mark... Marc


# 1258 - Model 1861 Navy Or Model 1860 Army?
4/21/98
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Navy .44 Unknown Unknown 143XXX

I have a replica of a 1861 Colt .44 caliber cap and ball Navy issue revolver. A friend of mine has what appears to be the real thing. The serial number of his gun is143XXX. For $300.00 the Colt museum is willing to research it's history. Is there any way an individual could research a revolver's history through the Internet or otherwise? Due to it's age, I would be curious as to it's history. Due to preliminary information from Colt that they only had paperwork on certain ranges of serial numbers and the above serial number was not in their range might infer that due to the Civil War, Colt was farming out work and this may have been one made by a third party for Colt. Or, they (Colt) did not keep as detailed of records for bulk shipments to Union Arsenals - no records or the records were destroyed for all shipments to confederate arsenals? The gun was gone over many years ago by a competent gunsmith and rendered to be in good working order. The gunsmith also recommended that although in good working order, he suggested strongly that it be retired in order to preserve it's value! While in his possession, a person offered $5,000.00 for the revolver (over 20 years ago). I was attempting to seek information on the Internet on this gun and ran across your home page. Your page indicated that you were willing and game for any and all questions. I hope you have better luck than I have had so far. Thank you, Michael

Answer:
Mike- First, we are not sure exactly what sort of gun you are asking about. The Model 1861 Navy was in .36 caliber, and serial numbers only went up to about 38843. The Model 1860 Army was in .44 caliber, and serial number went up to about 200500. Therefore we assume you are actually asking about a Model 1860 Army revolver. If so, it was probably made in late 1863. Colt lacks records for most arms made before early 1864 because their factory burned down in February 1864. Records were kept in various forms, but for shipments on government purchases they generally would have been nothing more specific than something like a date and "100 revolvers [brief description of the model] to [receiving officer and location- usually in New York]" and a listing of the serial numbers in the shipment. To the best of my knowledge, all Colt revolvers during the Civil War were made by Colt, not third parties. Colt did make some sales to Southern states and perhaps even some private speculators who shipped them south, but this stopped about the time Fort Sumter was fired upon (April 12, 1861), long before your pistol was made. In addition to U.S. government sales, many revolvers were sold to state governments, to retailers and directly to individuals. Only the presence of U.S. military inspector markings will indicate if it was or was not a U.S. military purchased item, and even then there can be exceptions. Research in the National Archives by the Springfield Research Service of Silver Springs, MD, has turned up serial numbers of some of the Colts purchased during the Civil War. However, the military records were temporary items and mostly destroyed, so it is unusual to find anything listed. There are records of a Model 1860 Army revolver in the 143,700 range being issued to a New York Cavalry unit, but no record of your gun. If privately purchased, there is no way to trace the history of a specific gun without at least a letter from Colt to indicate its initial destination. If that is available, in a very, very few cases there may be records from some of the old wholesalers still in existence, but the odds are very heavy against finding anything. From your description, if someone offered $5,000 for a Model 1860 Army over 20 years ago the gun must have some special features you have not mentioned, of they must know something that we don't, or else it was a very generous offer. Even today that should buy an example approaching NRA antique "Fine" condition. Hope this is helpful. In order to be more specific we would have to see the gun. You may want to have a Colt specialist look at it an give you their opinion. I do not know any in your area, even though I am a life member of the Ohio Gun Collectors Association. I would recommend you contact Jim Alley at IDSA Books (in Piqua) and see if he can recommend someone. He is one of the biggest dealers in gun books in the country, and in my opinion the best of a nice group of people... John Spangler--


# 1230 - Desperately Need Sharps Rifle
4/18/98
Chowell621@aol.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sharps Unknown Any Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm trying to marry this gale from Chicago. her father says I can have her (need permission ya know) for two ponies and a Sharpes rifle. The horses I can handle, but I'm having a tough time with the rifle. This actually started as a joke, but I want to give him a Sharpes rifle to hang on his wall. But I don't want to pay much for it either. Doesn't need to fire, can be a replica as long as "Sharpes" shows up on it somewhere. Can't be a toy though. Nothing plastic. Any chance you know where I might be able to get something like that for about $500?

Answer:
Choose wisely. A lawyer will demand 6 ponies, a stagecoach, a case of Sharps rifles and a pair of gold plated Colts to undo a deal. An original Sharps rifle (note spelling, the TV series was Sharpe's Rifles) in any condition you would be willing to give as a gift will probably be about $1,000. There are several makers of reproduction Sharps. Shiloh, and C. Sharps in the US make tremendous quality pieces with a long waiting list and price tags in the $2,000 (and up) range. Several others are made in Italy, and the quality and price tags are considerably lower. They are available in both percussion and cartridge versions, and rifle and carbine lengths. Cartridge versions are fun to shoot, but are subject to the same paperwork as modern arms. Percussion ones are fun to shoot-once, and something of a nuisance after that. They also tend to get out of adjustment (particularly the plate that seals the breech) but are usually exempt from the paperwork hassle. I think the repros all say Sharps somewhere, along with Alberto Uberti or some other Italian names. New version will run in the $600-700 range, but a used one in the $300-500 range is probably obtainable. Recommend you try the following. Place an ad on our free "wanted" page (Need Sharps rifle or carbine to trade for good woman, any caliber....etc). Surf around and find a site with "North South Skirmish Association" in it and see about posting a want there, or read their for sale ads. Those folks are Civil War shooters, and probably have one to spare for a worthwhile cause. Maybe you need to include one of those bumper stickers (when you present the rifle) "I got a gun for my wife- Best trade I ever made "suitably altered to read "daughter". There are a number of fine firearms museums you could visit on your honeymoon........John


# 1229 - Model 1884 Carbine
4/18/98
Tommy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1884 Carbine Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a carbine that has a date on the bolt. U.S. Model 1873. I can not find a serial number. On the bottom of the stock it has a thumb to open door. Is this a fake? It has a ring holder on the left side, but no ring. It has an adjustable sight from 3 to 19, side 0-3-6 right and left. It has a single smooth locking ring.

Answer:
Tommy- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Without seeing the gun it is hard to tell. The Model 1884 carbine sight is graduated to 19 and has the letter "C" above the 19. Most fakers don't bother using a real sight, so that is a good sign. Fakers usually include the ring on the bar, so that is another good sign. The trap in the butt plate is a good sign (for any but the real early carbines.) The "U.S. Model 1873" marking on the bolt (actually "breechblock") is pretty standard from 1876 to 1886. The serial number is (or was) on the top of the receiver, visible when the breech block is opened. I am about 75% sure you have a real carbine, but a later 1877 or 1879 model. The marking on the breechblock only refers to the breechblock, not the whole gun, and would be correct for either one of these. The model 1884 sight was frequently installed as an update in the field. The band may have a slight notch to clear the front of the sight, or it may be a type with a large sloping front to keep the sight leaf from catching when put into a saddle scabbard. Hope this helps. Let us know if you want us to help you sell it... John


# 1228 - Winchester Miss Stamp
4/18/98
Robert

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 94 Unknown Unknown Unknown #L03L7L

I have a Winchester model 94 #L03L7L, It is to my understanding that it is a Winchester miss stamp manufactured in 1897. It has been re-barreled in pre 64 and restocked about the same time. The tubular magazine I am not sure of. But the receiver and all workings are original. There is engraving done on both sides of the receiver. If you can do you have an approximate value for this (at least the receiver and guts) it is in 90%with bluing wear but that's it, it really is immaculate, my grandfather and myself are meticulous when it comes to firearms care. Thank You Robert

Answer:
Robert- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Sounds like an interesting piece. However with the changes made, I doubt if anyone but a very advanced Winchester collector seeking minute variations would have much interest, or appreciate the good points more than the unfortunate bad points. 9,999 people out of 10,000 would probably only be interested as a shooter in the $250 range. That other guy if he saw something exciting MIGHT be two or three times that. Odd stuff only appeals to a few people and finding them can be real tough. Good luck... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 1226 - Remington / Colt 1911
4/14/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 1911 45 4" Blue 605XXX

Marking are as follows: Left side of slide as staring at hammer Patented Dec. 19, 1905 Feb. 14 1911 Aug. 19 1913 Manufactured by Remington Arms UMC Co. Inc. Colts PT. F.A. MFG. Co. Bridgeport, Conn U.S.A. also a circle with Remington UMC stamped inside circle Right side of slide Model of 1911 U.S. Army Caliber .45 Wooden Grips other markings: United States Property NO 605XXX there is also a stamp on the left side of a figure I couldn't make out and the number S12 I have recently come into possession of a Remington .45 ACP semiautomatic pistol. It is in pretty good condition except for the bluing on it. It is marked as U.S. Government Property. I have never heard of Remington making handguns, and I was curious about this one. Any information on this would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Robert- Remington did make M1911 pistols during WW1, but not at the main Remington plant in Ilion, NY. They made about 21,600 M1911 pistols (along side Russian rifles, flare pistols, Pedersen devices and a lot of other stuff) at the Remington-UMC factory in Bridgeport, Conn. Colt was the main producer of .45 pistols during and slightly after WW1. The frame of your pistol was made in early 1919 by Colt. The slide was made in 1918 or early 1919 by Remington UMC. How they got together is anyone's guess, but probably mixed in the field when a bunch of pistols got cleaned at the same time and parts got switched. Remington-Rand also made .45s, but they made M1911A1s during WW2. They were part of the typewriter company that was sold off by Remington many years earlier. Hope this helps... John


# 1221 - Argentine Sword
4/14/98
Diego

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Solingen Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Maybe you can help me. I have an old sword from 1898. You can read two inscriptions on it: WEYERSBERG KIRSCHBAUM & Co SOLINGEN and this one SABLE DE OFICIAL MODELO 1898 I know it is from Argentinean's Army. But that is all I know. Do you know where to know more about this weapon? I the first inscription the name of a factory or something? Thank you in advance. Diego

Answer:
Diego- You are absolutely right. The first is the maker, one of numerous edged weapons makers in Solingen Germany. The Argentines were very good about marking items with model designations. Although I am not familiar with all the different models, quite a few have been sold on the surplus market in the last 20 years, often in very nice condition at modest prices. Hope this helps... John


# 1220 - Early Colt Double Action
4/14/98
Robert

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Unknown 41 Unknown Unknown Unknown

When my father died, I came into possession of an old revolver, and I haven't been able to find out anything from the gun shops in my area. Maybe you can help me. It was manufactured by Colt and is a double action. The cylinder revolves counter-clockwise. Markings indicate Colt D.A. 41. Pat. Aug.5 84, Nov. 6, 1888 Serial #27112 Plastic grips with the word Colt on the top of them. The ammunition that I received with the gun has 41160 LGCOLT LHBRN on the box. Is there any information you can send to me regarding this pistol.

Answer:
Robert- Glad to help. Better check those gun shops and see how much they really know. ("Can you spell SKS? How many rounds does a single shot shotgun hold? etc.) They should invest in a copy of Flaydersman's Guide. That would make it easy for them to tell you that it is either a Model 1889 Navy Double Action revolver, or the nearly identical New Army & Navy Revolver. Both were made in .38 Colt and .41 Colt calibers, both with 3 inch (rare), 4.5 inch or 6 inch barrels, and both had the1884 and 1888 patent date markings. If the 1889 Navy model, yours was made in 1893, and if the New Army & Navy model, it was made in 1895(before they added the 18895 or 1901 patent dates. These were the first swingout cylinder double action revolvers in the Colt line, and quite a jump forward from the old Single Action Army and its cousins. All that is the good news. The bad news is that collector interest is pretty small (except for the military marked examples) and in very good condition runs about $275 or $150 for the older and newer models respectively in NRA antique very good condition, and $700 or $350 in Excellent. I think these are a seriously undervalued collector arm, and one that would be fun to collect. Hope this helps... John


# 1219 - Drilling
4/10/98
Harry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Drilling Krieghoff-Ulm 12 GA Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have an shotgun that was given to me 30 years ago, by my father, who acquired it during WWII. The information on it says Krieghoff-Ulm Drilling. Its a 12 GA. side-by-side with a rifle bore underneath (possibly 30-30). It's heavily engraved, has pop-up sites, a trap door in the stock that holds rifle ammo, and a fitted leather case that the gun slips into when broken down. Can you give me a value range? I live in VA. I can give you more information on the gun (most of this is from memory since I'm at work and the gun is at home. Thanks

Answer:
Harry- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters You have a German "drilling" (pronounced dry' ling) or three barrel gun. Krieghoff pieces are excellent quality, and in 12 GA should be fairly valuable. It is possible the rifle barrel is .30-30, but more likely one of the German calibers such as 9.3x72mm rimmed. Value, depending on condition and features, may be as little as $1,000 and perhaps $5,000. This is an area outside my expertise, so those may be off somewhat, but I think not too far off. If you get a chance, take it to one of the gun shows in Richmond (at the fairgrounds, sponsored by Great Southern Arms shows) where there area coupe of dealers in fine shotguns who could help you. Mahlon Kelly of Albermarle Fine Arms in Charlottesville specializes in high grade piece sand I highly recommend him as an ethical and reliable dealer. (Check our links page for Thierry Duget's engraving. He is a long time associate of Kelly's, which should give you a feel for the type stuff he likes.)Hope this helps... John


# 1208 - French Model 1874 Bayonet
4/10/98
Mary

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
France Bayonet Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a bayonet that my grandfather brought home from the first world war in France. However, it is not from that war. It is dated 1881 and the inscription on the blade is Mre d'Armes de Chat = Glere = 1881. It has a hooked quillion, a wood grip and a brass pommel with a push button release. There are numerous numbers and markings on all parts, including the scabbard. Its overall length is about 25 inches. Could you please tell me where I could find more information about this item? Mary

Answer:
Mary- Your Grandfather brought home a French Model 1874 bayonet, made for the 11mm Model 1874 Gras rifle. The markings on the top of the blade indicate the place and date of manufacture. The script writing is often hard to read, (but much easier when you know the probable words). These were made at various French arsenals, including Chatterlaut, Sainte Etienne, Tulle, and maybe one or two others. These bayonets are probably one of the most common antique bayonets on the market, and usually found in very nice condition. However, despite being very old and very handsome, they are not very valuable. They normally sell in the $45-60 price range. Keep it for the sentimental value, but don't plan to get rich selling it. Hope this helps... John


# 1206 - Mauser Model 1934
4/10/98
Gary, Carpentersville, IL

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Pistol Unknown 7,65 About 3" Blued 529XXX

Left side: serial and MAUSER-WERKE A.G. OBERNDORF a.N. on slide - Mauser logo on frame Right side: Cal. 7,65-D.R.P.u.A.P.Bottom of frame next to trigger has last 3 digits of serial number '061'Same on rear of frame above grip. Matching serial numbers, leather holster, Mauser magazine, checkered walnut grips. Includes export certificate from Allied occupational forces with description & serial. Very clean. What, when, and who? Also approximate value appreciated. Thanks Gary M. Rose NRA Endowment member.

Answer:
Gary, your description leads me to believe that you have a Model 1934 Mauser. Mauser Werke of Obendorf, Germany manufactured the Model 1934 from 1934 to 1941. Model 1934's were procured by the German military in 1940 and 1941 and have serial numbers between 589562 - 624225. Values for commercial 1934 Mausers run from $140 to $225 depending upon condition, capture papers and a holster could add 10 to 20 percent... Marc


# 1207 - Bridesburg Rifles
4/8/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bridesburg Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

A friend of mine asked me to check out if I could find out anything on 1861 Bridesburg rifles. They are Jenkins conversion to centerfire. He has an 1861 &1864 yr models. If you could help me I would greatly appreciate it.

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. I think your friend has some informatioin mixed up. Bridesburg marked M1861 muskets were made by Alfred Jenks & Son of Philadelphis (Bridesburg is part of Phila.). The conversions usually found on Bridesburg muskets is the Needham conversion, based on a system patented in England in 1867, although the work was done in Trenton circa 1869. Quantity is unknown, but they are encountered fairly often (I have seen 3 in last 6 months) and I would estimate about 2,500-5,000. This has a gate that is hinged to open on the right side of the barrel, and has a portion of the lock plate cutaway to permit this. There is a long pined extension on the hammernose. Flayderman's Guide gives a good description of these, and links their use to the "Fenian" raid into Canada in 1870. He lists a value of $550in NRA antique good and $850 in fine. I know of an excellent one while recently sold for $1000.Hope this helps... John


# 1199 - Parts 1911A1 ?
4/8/98
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ithaca / Remington Rand 1911A1 45 4" Park Unknown

I'm wondering if you could shed any light on a question I have regarding "frame" id's on US M1911A1's? I'm trying to figure out if an Ithaca (slide marked) 1911A1 which has a serial number appx. 2,000 digits into the Remington Rand range could possibly be correct. I know that due to wartime contingencies that there was allot of part swapping going on between manufacturers, and with the s.n's being so close, how could I possibly know if this gun is "correct" in this configuration. I don't have the number "at hand" but it's close. The frame carries the "FJA" cartouche ,and the piece shows virtually NO wear...Of course it could also easily be a post war rebuild. Do you have any ideas as to how I could possibly know if the frame were made by Ithaca? Was the FJA cartouche also used on pistols produced by Ithaca? Thanks in advance for your input. David

Answer:
David- Frank J. Atwood was the inspector for both Rem-Rand and Ithaca production. Colt had overlapping (duplicated) serial numbers in ranges which had been assigned to Rem-Rand, Ithaca, and US&S. However, I could not find any mention of Ithaca overlapping with Rem-Rand in Clawson's definitive "Colt .45 Service Pistols". Although there was some parts swapping among the makers, Ithaca and Rem-Rand did not like each other, and I doubt if they would have provided slides. I suspect it is just a case of mixing parts by GIs cleaning pistols, or perhaps during rebuild... John


# 1188 - Winchester Model 58
4/8/98
Troy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 58 .22 Short-long Unknown Unknown Unknown

I would like some info. about a .22 short-long rifle I have. It say son the barrel that it is a model 58 Winchester and the date engraved in the barrel says August 29, 1898.It was handed down to me from a great grandfather. Do you have any info. on this rifle? I would appreciate anything you have. Thank you, Troy

Answer:
Troy, Approximately 38,992 Model 58 Winchester single shot rifles were manufactured between 1928 and 1931. The August 29, 1898 date that is stamped upon your barrel is probably a patent date. The 58 is a takedown model and was offered in .22 caliber with an eighteen inch round barrel and open sights. Model 58 values range from $100 to $300 depending upon condition... Marc


# 1198 - Flaig Sporter
4/6/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Flaig 98 Mauser Action 243 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Have you ever heard of a Flaig ace 243 Winchester caliber model 98. It has a nazi insignia on the barrel area. It is bolt action and has the data 1940 inscribed on the top of the barrel. It is missing a scope and has no sights at the end of barrel. The question is, is this some kind of sniper rifle from WWII. Is it valuable or should I let my kid use it for hunting. I would appreciate some help from you. Also, if you can not give me help, could you point me in the right direction. Also if you can locate or point me in the direction of the source that has the scope for the gun I have would be most appreciated. I would like to restore it so that it has all the original parts on it.

Answer:
Sir- Sorry to disappoint you. Not a rare sniper rifle or anything close. Flaig was a big gun dealer in the Pittsburgh area in the post-WW2period. They made up lots of sporters, including many on 98 Mauser actions. Sounds like your rifle still has the original markings on the receiver, typical of the less expensive models. It would probably be a good rifle for varmints, or maybe even small deer at short range. Have it checked by a competent gunsmsmith first. Hope this helps... John


# 1197 - Green In Mint Condition
4/6/98
Terry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Green Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a friend that has a Green in mint condition (believed never to have been fired). Do you know the history of this weapon, how many were made, and an approximate value of one in this condition? Any information that you can provide I will pass on to him. Thank you Terry

Answer:
Terry- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters These are nice old guns. About 1500 were made for U.S. use and about 3000 for a Russian contract circa 1859-early 1860s. In NRA antique excellent condition these are listed in Flayderman's Guide at $2,000 on the retail market. A nice item. Let us know if you want to sell it... John


# 1187 - Nds Marked PP
4/6/98
Michael, College Station, TX mlb7557@unix.tamu.edu

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther PP 7.65mm (.32 Cal) 3 Inches (?) Blue Unknown

This model has the "eagle over N" marking which show that it was accepted by the German Army during the Second World War, and has "Nds" stamped on the slide and the frame. My question is: Are the "Nds" markings on my PP from the German Government or are they from an importer. I have searched for the answer and find no reference to the markings. Thank you for your help regarding this question.

Answer:
Michael, I am afraid that I can't help you identify the Nds markings that you describe, they are not mentioned in any of my reference books and I have never seen markings of this type before. I can help you with the eagle over N stamping that you have erroneously identified as a German military acceptance stamp. The eagle over N stamp is actually a German commercial test proof whose design was set forth in the National Proof Law of June 7, 1939, and which became effective April 1 1940. The 'N' is an abbreviation for Nitro (smokeless) powder... Marc


# 1196 - Model Six
4/3/98
Jim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Six 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

We were just wondering if you would have any information on a Remington Model Six 22 rifle. We have one of these rifles that was passed down from my grandfather. It is in real nice firing condition, and we were just wondering about what something like this would be worth and if there is any information about these rifles available. We are not interested in selling it, just curious about its worth. Any information would be appreciated! Jim

Answer:
Jim- About 250,000 were made in 1902-1903, specifically for sale as "boy's rifles" for use by youngsters. Value is in the $100-300 range depending on condition. Hope this helps... John


# 1195 - Winchester 22 Calibre Rifle, Model '06
4/3/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester '06 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi, I read your site and understand you do not give free evaluations. I would like to know if you could give me an indication of whether I should get a formal evaluation done. We found an old rifle in my grandfather's house recently. It is a Winchester 22 calibre rifle, Model '06. Probably has not been fired in 50 years, but it appears to be fully functional. The serial number is 623208, and according to another site I looked at, it was manufactured around 1924. I know absolutely nothing about guns and am not intending to sell it. I was thinking of mounting it over my bar. As far as I know it could be worth $10 or $1,000. Any guidance you can give me would be appreciated. Thanks.

Answer:
David- They are very collectable old guns, and $500 is not unrealistic for a good one, while a really great one will be several times that. If you hang it over the bar, make sure it gets oiled once in a while, and not handled by bar patrons... John


# 1171 - Webley No.1 Mark VI
4/3/98
Daryl, Santee, Ca.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
WEBLEY Mark VI 45 6"? Blue #162XXX

R.A.F.2B stamped under cylinder DRC with upside down 5 stamped on trigger guard ENGLAND stamped on barrel right side patents 1915stamped on left side under cylinder an"S" shaped stamped on bottom of grips Looking for history on pistol and possibly who this piece was issued to. A friend inherited the gun, and I volunteered my computer along with your knowledge. Thanks

Answer:
Daryl, .455 caliber Webley revolvers were used by the British armed forces for 60 years. The Mark I Webley was adopted in November 1887, and the last of the Webley service revolvers (the No. 1 Mark VI) was declared obsolete in 1947. All Webley service revolvers were of a similar top-breaking design with a heavy stirrup type catch. All of the Webley service revolvers have a "birds head" type grip except for the Mark VI whose grip is square. The Mark VI (called No.1 Mark VI after 1927), was adopted in May 1915, and over 300,000 were manufactured by Webley & Scott at Birmingham during World War I. After World War I some Mark VI's were produced at Enfield Lock. The British decided that .455 was too heavy a cartridge for the most effective use after World War I, and decided to use a .38 caliber cartridge based on the .38 Smith & Wesson instead. Webley designed a new pistol using many of the features of their commercial Mark III caliber .38 revolver. The .38 caliber design was taken over by Royal Small Arms Factory and adopted in World War II. I also have a Mk VI Webley with RAF markings. John has told me that he is highly suspicious that the RAF markings on my Webley are not real. Maybe one of our readers will be able to shed some light on this matter... Marc


# 1194 - Gobbles Signed Book
4/1/98
Keith

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have come across a book (titled Adolph Hitler ) written in German and has original pix pasted into the book where photo's would be printed. It was brought over from Germany by his parents circa '38 when things were getting out of hand and appears to be signed by Josef Goebbels. What would an original signature of his be worth and is picture format the way the books were printed at the time. Or does he have something that is possibly so rare that it wouldn't be able to be catalogued? -Keith

Answer:
Keith- I am nearly as lost as you. The (usually rather strange) folks who lust after high level Nazi stuff throw away huge sums in the process. I am not sure if the individual photos pasted in would be a big plus, or a warning. They had a lot of mass produced stuff with blank spots for photos, and then gave out photos with cigarettes, at the movies or in cereal boxes or something and folks would collect them and paste them in their book. I am sure Goebbels autograph is worth a reasonable amount, but not as much as one of the really notorious guys. My guess (and no more than that) is that it may be in the $150-600range. You might check with an autograph dealer (must be one in the Chicago area) and see what they can tell you. Also check some of the guys over on TMCX site that peddle German stuff. Hope this helps... John


# 1190 - Belgian Caplock
4/1/98
Michael

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 36 3 1/8 in. Unknown Unknown

I am trying to identify a caplock pistol that belonged to my great great grandfather, which should make it about 150-200 yrs. old. The pistols over-all length is 5 1/4". It has a brass barrel that is 3 1/8 in. in length. The barrel is octagon with a bulb type end, that has four rings around it. The outer rings are more like bevels with the inner rings being very pronounced. It has a proof mark with the letters L E G in a small oval on the left side of the barrel just ahead of the trigger mechanism. If the barrel were pointing straight up, (the oval like a clock), the "L" would be in the 9 o'clock, the "E" in the 12 o'clock and the "G" in the 3 o'clock position. There appears to be a "crown" in the 6 o'clock position. There is a deep proof mark about 1/8in.X 3/16in. and about 1/16in. deep under the oval, directly above the weld on the forward part of the trigger guard, but there are no discernable letters or numbers in it. There is an 11/16in. X 7/16in. plate on the left side of the trigger mechanism, allowing access into what I would assume to be the spring and what firing mechanism. I was told that it is a 36 caliber. The handle is wooden and unremarkable. My Great Great Grandfather was Pennsylvania-Dutch, so it might be that the origin was Germany. Any information you could provide would be sincerely appreciated. Thanking you in advance, Sincerely Michael

Answer:
Michael- Your pistol was made in Belgium, according to the ELG proof markings. This general type is fairly common, but brass barrels are not seen very often, and the "cannon muzzle" is another unusual feature. I would guess that it is fairly early for this type (say about 1830-1840)although similar pistols were being made and sold up until maybe 1870.Quality (and original price) ranged from extremely low to moderate. There is little collector interest in these, and common examples are often seen in the $50-150 range, while nicer ones run a little higher. Most of these were made for export to the US and various other countries. Hope this helps... John


# 1170 - Albion No. 2 Mark 1 Revolver
4/1/98
Daryl, Santee, Ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
ALBION MK I 1943 38 6"? Blue UNKNOWN

Llooking for history on this pistol.

Answer:
Daryl, The No. 2 Mark 1 revolver was officially adopted by the British government on June 2, 1932. No. 2 Mark 1 ** revolvers were made by Enfield and by Albion Motors at Glasgow. Singer Sewing Machine of Great Britain made No. 2 Mark 1 ** parts, which were assembled into complete revolvers at Enfield. In 1957, No. 2 Mark 1 ** revolvers were dropped as standard service issue and replaced by the FN Browning Hi-Power semi automatic pistol. No. 2 Mark 1 ** revolvers are still in extensive use in former British territories and are considered a reserve weapon in the United Kingdom... Marc


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