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# 1315 - H&R Shotgun
5/28/98
Keith

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H&R Unknown 16 GA Unknown Unknown Unknown

A friend of the family recently passed on and left behind a shotgun. This is what I can tell you about it from any information on the firearm itself. Maker: Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. Manufactured in Worschester, Mass. 16 gauge single bore shotgun US Pat Feb 27, 1900 Wooden butt and I believe steel barrel. It is in perfect condition. Absolutely minimal rust on barrel and the inside of the barrel is very clean. Any information you could tell me would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Keith- Your shotgun is typical of tens of thousands that were made in the early years of the 20th century. H&R was a maker of inexpensive guns, solid, durable, but plain and cheap. Single shot 16 gauge guns were popular for youngsters just starting hunting, or for leaving in the barn for shooting rats or birds etc. Even in nice condition, there is about zero collector interest in these old shotguns. Values are well under $100, and usually under $50.00. Keep it as a family heirloom from the days when people owned and used guns safely and responsibly without the need for draconian government supervision to make it "safe for our kids"... John Spangler


# 1305 - Model 1909 Mauser
5/28/98
Odin

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 1909 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello there. Can you tell me any value of this gun. Because my friend here did get this gun and asked me to se if I could find any information about this gun and also if it is any value for that kind of riffle:

Answer:
Odin- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. The Model 1909 Mauser was a minor variation of the familiar Model 98 Mauser, made mainly for Argentina and a few other countries. These were very well made and many of the best custom gun makers use them as the starting point for their work. These have been common on the U.S. surplus market in recent years at prices ranging from US$150 for mismatched number used examples made in Argentina up to US $450 for matching unfired examples made in Germany... John Spangler


# 1298 - Slotter & Co Rifle
5/28/98
MANNY, Buena Park, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Slotter & Co ,Phila Unknown .50 32",octagonal Parkerized 11**

behind v-notch rear sight 'SLOTTER & CO PHILA' MADE FOR A.J. PLATE SAN FRANCISCO On the opposite side of the hammer GAIN TWIST WART 1148 When my mother-in-law passed away we found this old black powder rifle in her closet. I was just curious of the history of the maker and approximately how old it could be

Answer:
Manny, Slotter & Co of Philadelphia was founded by two brothers Henry and Frederick Schlotterbeck with other former employees of Henry Derringer. Slotter & Co is most known for the pocket pistols that they produced form 1860 to about 1869 which were very close copies of Henry Derringer type firearms. The markings that you have told me about lead me to believe that this is a custom order rifle made for A.J. Plate. It may be worth your wile to try to find out who A.J. Plate was, documentation of any historical significance would add value to the rifle... Marc


# 1296 - EM-GE Derringer
5/25/98
Kristi, Norfolk, Va.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
EM-GE Mod. 5 .320 1 1/4 blued no serial number

This double barrel derringer was taken from a dead German fighter pilot during WWII by a relative. Her surviving widow would like to know the identity of this piece as well as some history and an approximate value. Some one told her it was a gut gun or a suicide gun. Any information would be helpful. Thank-you .

Answer:
Kristi, EM-GE is a Tradename used on firearms manufactured by Moritz & Gerstenberger (before 1939) or Gerstenberger & Eberwein (after 1939) of Gussenstadt, Germany. EM-GE manufactures a line of cheap firearms and starter pistols that were banned from import into the US by the gun control act of 1968. It is very doubtful that this weapon is of military issue, my guess is that it was purchased privately and carried by the pilot as an emergency self defense weapon. Your other source was correct, this is definitely a "suicide gun " or "Saturday night special", value would be in the $50.00 or less range... Marc


# 1288 - J. Stevens .22
5/25/98
Don

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J. Stevens Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Can you tell me where I can get information concerning a 22 caliber rifle made by the J. Stevens A&T Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass. USA pat. April 1794

Answer:
Don- Thanks for contacting us. Stevens operated under the name "J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co." from 1886 to 1916, so that pretty well dates your piece. There are a bewildering variety of models made during that time. For further research, I would start with Flayderman's Guide (available on our book page) and then Jay Kimmel's Savage & Stevens Arms: A Collectors History. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1162 - Remington Rolling Block Rifle Conversion
5/25/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Rolling Block .25-10 26 Inch Taper Octagon Blue Unknown

Barrel marked E. Remington & Sons, Ilion NY no receiver tang marks patents listed on side of receiver, last date is 1873 I am lucky enough to have two boxes of original Winchester .25 Stevens ammo, in perfect condition, in perfect boxes. This gun is in fine to excellent condition with 80% or so original blue finish, turning purplish gray. Case hardening on receiver is brownish/grayish and lightly stained. Front sight has been replaced, rear has old sight appropriate for the gun, but tang is drilled and has screws for tang peep sight. Wood is oil stained, but in excellent condition otherwise. The bore is slightly rough and pitted, but has fair rifling. Mechanically, the gun is as new. I have two questions about this gun. The first is when was it made? By the markings, I believe it was made prior to 1874, since there is a 1874 patent on later rifles. However, the 25 Stevens cartridge was not made until about 1893 according to Cartridges of the World. The second question relates to the value of the gun, the unavailability of ammunition, and the dilemma I am in as to whether to make the gun shootable. I would like to shoot the gun without destroying valuable antique ammo. I have made a die to convert shortened .22 hornet brass to the right size, although I have to turn the rim smaller and thinner in my lathe. I have fired the gun by using a .22 chamber reamer to ream the homemade brass to accept .22 caliber nail gun power loads, and loading .25 auto bullets. (The bore slugs .251.) Groups are about 1.5 inches at 25 feet! I see that I have three options to shoot this rifle. I can get a centerfire breechblock or modify the rimfire one. I can then shoot the centerfire brass I have made. I am also considering relining it to .25-20. A third option is to remove the barrel and re-barrel to one of the currently popular nostalgia black powder cartridges. In any case, I would have less money invested than in a new re pro rolling block, even considering the value of the rifle as is. The value of the ammo I have would come close to covering the cost of all the work. I am somewhat sensitive to the impropriety of ruining a fine old collectible piece to make a mundane shooter, but the unavailability of .25 rimfire is irritating. Incidentally, I also have a .32 rimfire, and it appears to be heading the same direction, as ammo is hard to find and about$20 per box. Would relining or rebarreling the gun substantially lower the value? Are there any alternatives I haven't found for shooting .25 rimfire? Thanks for your help.

Answer:
Sir- You have done your homework to identify what you have and what your options are. The choices seem to be (a) go broke shooting up obsolete old ammo if you can find it; (b) spend all your time tinkering with stuff to make your own ammo, or (c) forget about any collector value and alter the rifle as necessary to have some fun shooting it. My collector friends vote for (a), the reloaders and lawyers vote for (b), and the American Single Shot Rifle Association members vote for (c) and hope you will join them in this nostalgic and challenging shooting sport, even if you decide to do (a) or (b). Enjoy!... John Spangler


# 1295 - John M. Smyth Co. Shotgun
5/21/98
Mark, San Diego, CA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
John M. Smyth Co. Faultless Special 12 GA 31 1/2" Looks Like Stainless Unknown

"Choke Bored" stamped on barrel" Silver City, New Mexico" and "1938" carved into stock Ever heard of it? What would you think the approximate year that it was made? Any idea of the value? Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Answer:
Mark, Faultless Special is a tradename used on inexpensive shotguns marketed by the John M. Smythe Hardware Company of Chicago, Illinois. Faultless Special shotguns were manufactured by the Crescent Fire Arms Company which was established in Norwich, Connecticut in 1892. Crescent, who manufactured shotguns and handguns, was purchased by H&D Folsom in 1893, and absorbed by J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company in 1926. There is no collectors interest in this type of shotgun and values would be in the $50.00 or less range... Marc


# 1160 - Winchester 1873 Captured In China By US Sailor
5/21/98
Bruce

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 73 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have recently purchased a 73 carbine blued, with the inscription on it "Captured at Tienstien by xxx. Do you have any info of a large order for these guns being delivered by Win. to the Chinese Govt. My letter from Win. says this was part of a 460 same gun order. Obviously to big for a private party or even a commercial operation. Also could you advise anybody who could research the sailor who captured this gun during the boxer rebellion and his unit. I have his letters to his sister that came with the gun, and it gives unit info. I would be happy to pay for the service as I do not have time to do the research myself, but feel it would make a great article for the NRA collector mag. Thanks for any help Bruce

Answer:
Bruce- Sounds like an interesting story. Better than I could make up on short notice. Sorry I don't know anything (at least about large Chinese orders...) There are a couple of books that get very deeply into Winchester Model 1873s that may be useful, but I have not read them. Please recognize that the order may not have been directly from the Chinese government, but from a merchant selling to the Chinese government, possibly with a small kickback for various officials at various levels. (Hey, it could happen!) Researching the sailor is a little easier. Some old service record is available in the National Archives in Washington DC, while newer records are warehoused at the national Military Records Center in St. Louis. I would highly recommend William Urick to do any research on Naval topics circa 1865-1910. He is the author of two excellent articles in Gun Report on Small Arms of the Sea Service in the Spanish-American War. He is a regular customer of mine, and I will be glad to forward any e-mail or written communications to him. If he wants to take on the work, he will reply directly... John Spangler


# 1148 - Winchester 94 With Canadian Markings
5/21/98
Jim, Anchorage, Alaska

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 Carbine 30WCF 20" Blue 1335***

Canadian "C" and Broad Arrow on the stock, receiver, and forearm. Also has a front sling band and sling swivel with original strap also marked the same as the carbine. Need any information on Canadian Coastal Defense Guns.

Answer:
Jim- Another Canadian question, eh? The Broad arrow is a British military property marking , and when found inside a large "C" it indicated Canadian military property, as often seen on M1917 rifles given to Canada under lend lease during WW2. Some Winchesters were used by the RCMP ("Mounties") and there is a whole book on that subject ("Guns of the RCMP"). During WW2 there was a loosely organized quasi-military group composed of Native Americans (can you still use the term Indians"?) along the Pacific coast. I believe the correct name is "Pacific Coast Rangers". I believe the Company of Military Historians did a uniform plate on this group several years ago, and included a description of the markings on their Winchester Model 94 carbines (or rifles, I forget which). Check our links for "The Brothers" and ask some Canadian experts if you need more info... John


# 1294 - Winchester Model 1897 Trench Gun?
5/18/98
Mark, San Diego, CA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1897 12GA 20 Inches Blue (about Totally Worn Off) 411*** D

Barrel stamped with "Full Choke" I have not seen an 1897 with such a short barrel. It is rumored to have been an army trench gun or a police riot gun. It is a factory barrel and the serial number on the barrel matches the number on the butt. What is the approximate value? I have thought about getting it refinished -what will that do to the value? What is the possibility of it being a trench gun or a police issue? Thanks

Answer:
Mark, your Model 1897 was manufactured in 1909. It is possible that your 97 could have been a police riot gun, but it is unlikely that it was a U.S. military issue trench or riot gun. Not all, but the great majority of U.S. military issue Model 97's have a U. S. and / or ordnance bomb marking on left side of the receiver, the barrel should be marked with an ordnance bomb. U.S. military Model 97 serial numbers were preceded with an E and fell into 3 ranges 433144 - 4741304; 514382 - 566857; and 613303 - 697066 with most examples falling into the latter 613303 - 697066 range. If your Model 97 were U.S. issue, it could be quite valuable. Values for regular cut down commercial models with very little remaining finish are in the $100.00 to $150.00 range. I would advise against having this shotgun reblued... Marc


# 1145 - Bayonet- "Zouave"
5/18/98
Troy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Suave bayonet Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

S.Marco - Made in N. Italy. Looking to find out what I actually have, and perhaps when it might have been made. The best guess that I have gotten is that it is a bayonet (in a belt scabbard) for an Italian Suave rifle. - leather and brass scabbard, brass hilt. Blade is approximately 20 inches in length. Also an idea of its value would be nice. Thanks Troy

Answer:
Troy- Identifying big old brass handled sword bayonets is almost an art form practiced by gypsies and psychics due to the lack of good reference material. "Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook" is a good place to start, and Al Hardin's pioneering but somewhat dated and incomplete "American Bayonets" have about all the rest that is available to the public. Having added a bat wing and newt eye to my boiling cauldron, I can now positively identify your bayonet as one made in Italy (pretty good so far, huh?). These have been made since about 1960 along with reproduction Zouave muskets of good to poor quality. I know the bayonets are worth $25 because I paid that much for one several years ago. I know they are not worth $49 because I have been unable to sell it. Original Zouave Bayonets are easy to identify- they have the inspector initials "BH" on the top flat of the brass handle. The others get too complicated to describe. Good luck... John Spangler


# 1142 - Rifle- Ross Mark II**
5/18/98
Craig

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ross MK II** Unknown Unknown Unknown 50**

Looking for any information on the Ross I own. It is a Mark II ** Civilian Match Rifle with BSA target sights. Interesting serial # is 50**. If anyone has any idea if this rifle could have been used in the Bisley Matches by a Canadian team, I would dearly like to hear from you.

Answer:
Craig- First we need to explain to those unfamiliar with British (and Canadian) nomenclature that military items were designated with a name such as "Rifle" and a "Mark" in Roman numerals, very similar to the U.S practice of "U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30 M1". Each mark was a distinct new model, just as the M14 rifle is a different critter from the M16 rifle. Subsequent changes in the basic model were denoted by adding a "star" in British/Commonwealth practice, while U.S. practice is to add the letter "A" and then count up. Hence the Ross "Rifle Mark II**' (spoken as "Mark two- two star" ) is similar to the M16 which became the M16A1, then the M16A2.

Now that you know all that, you can forget about half. The Brits changed the system in the 1920s to get rid of "Pattern" dates for small arms, and added "Number" in addition to marks. That is why the WWI .303 "Pattern 1914" rifles left over from WW1 were not often mentioned in WW2. They had become "Rifles No 3 Mark I." Later on in the NATO period (after some folks had just about figured out the Number and Mark system) the changed over to a system using "L" and "A", so the FN FAL became the L1A1, and the Canadians' national pride demanded the use of "C" for designating their stuff. (Wonder if "C" is the same in English and French..?)

Anyway, if we put in all this good stuff, maybe people will forget your original question, and not realize we don't have an answer for it. While it is certainly plausible that your rifle was used in match competition, it may be tough to prove without some specific records. Just the same as every M1903 Springfield with a peep sight is not a National Match rifle. The serial number is neat, but one of a thousand rifles will end up with a number that ends in 000.

For better information on Canadian issues, we suggest you follow our links to "The Brothers" who are to be commended for their knowledge of, and support for preservation of Canadian Military History... John Spangler


# 1293 - Mod 97 Manufacture Date
5/14/98
Dennis, Seattle, WA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Model 97 12 GA Unknown Unknown e769XXX

I inherited this Model 97 from my Dad. Can you tell me from the Serial Number (E769XXX) when this shotgun was manufactured. I'm 55 and the gun has been around longer than I can remember.

Answer:
Dennis, our "Winchester Dates of Manufacture" page located at:

http://oldguns.net/snpgm/WinMods.htm

tells me that your model 97 was manufactured in 1927... Marc


# 1289 - Want To Buy A BAR
5/14/98
Al

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning BAR Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Do BAR's ever come onto the market? If so, what is the price range they fetch? Thanks, Al

Answer:
Alex- Yes, BARs are available, although not from us. Class three FFL dealers who sell machine guns carry them. Last one I saw (Blue WW1M1918, not WW2 M1918A2) was marked at $10,000. Too much for me! WW2 version will probably run about half that. There are lots of class three dealers who advertise in Shotgun News and there are some publications that concentrate on that sort of stuff. There are also legal singe shot or semi-auto copies made and non-firing dummies with mostly original parts. Prices on these are a lot less. Make sure you follow all the rules when you attempt to buy one. Failure to do so could have a price tag of $10,000 plus 10 years of your time as guest of Bill and Hillary (well, maybe even cell mates with them, if they let the truth leak out!)... John Spangler


# 1286 - Geco 22
5/14/98
Gary

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Geco 1919 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a geco mod 1919 22 long rifle carbiner single shot bolt action would you know anything about this rifle. Thanks

Answer:
Gary, the only information that I could find is that Geco is a tradename used by Gustav Genschow, Hamburg, Germany... Marc


# 1283 - Hiawatha 22
5/14/98
Ted Madison WI

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hiawatha Semi-automatic 22 Unknown Blue none

A friend got this gun from a garage sale about ten years ago. He wants to sell it to me but he's not sure what its worth. It has been jamming on him when he shoots 22 long rifle ammo. Should he be using 22 shorts and/or 22 longs? How old is this rifle? If you need more info let me know. Any info you can give me about this rifle would be helpful in my decision to buy it.

Answer:
Ted, Hiawatha is a tradename used by Gamble Skogmo on guns made for them by Savage. Hiawatha values are in the $25.00 or less wallhanger range... Marc


# 1275 - Identify Mauser HSc Markings
5/11/98
Brent

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser HSc 7,65mm Unknown Unknown 817XXX.

Gentlemen, First of all, I do so appreciate your time and attention to my inquiry; you folks do such a superb job with information, research; my hat is off to each one of you. This weapon that I just acquired (for $260) is a Nazi-proofed Mauser HSc in 99% excellent condition, not reblued or touched up; gorgeous! The slide has the two line logo after the Mauser banner, "Mauser-Werke A.G. -Oberndorf a.N." and then on "Mod. HSc Kal. 7,65mm". The serial number is 817XXX. The right side trigger guard has the "Eagle over N" (German commercial "Nitro - smokeless powder - ) proof, and the right side has the "Eagle over 135" (Army/SS inspection officer's proof, who replaced inspector 655 in 1942) proof. The magazine which is original with the weapon has the Mauser banner on the bottom, and has a black plastic finger extension much like what is seen on the Walther PPK magazines. The stumper is a proof that shows up on the BARREL (underneath chamber), on the SLIDE (in the back, inside) and on the FRAME (up where would be under the barrel). That proofmark is a capital "R" set midline above/inside a capital "W". The W's sides are curved, and come up to but do not enclose the R. In the book "The Official Guide to Gun Marks" (by House of Collectibles, Inc., editor Thomas E. Hudgeons III ISBN: 0-87637-448-8) there is the EXACT proof, to scale, un mistakenly, and it simply says, "French made Mauser HSc, made in France." I found elsewhere that those HSc's made/overseen (however it was done I am clueless about, as we hear about/read of "stolen" machinery, etc....) are supposed to have the proofmark "MR" on the trigger guard; this one does not. Then, I was told that the R/W stood for a "R. Weiss" who worked for Mauser on the Lugers (the RW seen on some Lugers) but also proofed the French assembled HSc's, for reasons unknown. I am, indeed, at a "loss" as to the real identity, the history, behind this gorgeous little piece of history! Is it a Swiss contract Mauser? It does not have any of their proofs, and it is Nazi proofed. I am at a loss; lots of facts, but some missing hard evidence! Regards, Brent

Answer:
Sorry Brent, after consulting with several of my colleagues I have been unable to come up with an answer to your question. I suggest that you contact Tom Knox, who runs the AUTO MAG. This is a publication that serves collectors of semi-automatic pistols and is also known as NAPCA National automatic pistol collectors association. The membership is $35. and gives you twelve issues a year filled with articles on all kinds of pistols, a free want/sell ad per issue, and a forum of hundreds of collectors that will respond to your questions. Contact: AUTO MAG Box 15738 Tower Grove Station St. Louis Missouri. 63163... Marc


# 1274 - Iver Johnson Champion Shotgun
5/11/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Iver Johnson Champion Shotgun 12 Gauge 30" Blue # 1FX1

Full Choke Serial # 1FX1 is stamped on receiver and barrel, no other serial number like markings Is there any significance to this serial number? This a shotgun that my grandfather owned as a very young man - he was born in 1893. I had never paid attention to the number until I recently decided I should record as much as I knew about this gun to pass on to the family in the future. I found your site attempting to find information on a Nitro Hunter shotgun which belonged to my father. I saw your response to question submitted by someone else. Thank you for that information and I hope you will be able to assist me with this question. I will gladly make your requested donation.

Answer:
I can't tell you anything about the significance of the serial number of your grandfather's shotgun. I can tell you that the Iver Johnson manufactured the Champion from 1909 to 1956. The Champion was an inexpensive firearm manufactured in both rifle and shotgun calibers, 10, 12 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and .410 gauges and .44, .45, 12MM, and 14MM rifle calibers. Champions had a 26 - 32 inch barrel, exposed hammer auto ejector and plain pistol grip stock. Champion values fall in the $75.00 or less range. Sorry that I couldn't tell you more, I hope that this helps... Marc


# 1272 - duo WWII German Ordnance Code
5/11/98
glcameron@earthlink.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 98? 8mm? 22" Blue, Faded mixed

Nazi eagle on receiver and barrel, but no caliber marking. mismatched numbers marking on receiver is "duo", under is '44' no apparent proof marks or any crests or typical Mauser markings What is the "duo 44" mark?

Answer:
Sir, are you sure that you gave me the correct ordinance code? I was unable to find the code "duo" in any of my reference books, but it is probably the WW-II German ordnance code assigned to the manufacturer of your rifle, 44 is probably the year of manufacture. I was able to find "dou" which is the WW-II German ordnance code assigned to Waffenwerke Brunn, Bystrica, Czechoslovakia. Another way to determine the manufacturer of your rifle would be the German Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark. Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks are usually "WaA" with a number. It is possible to use the number stamped with the "WaA" to identify a manufacturer... Marc


# 1269 - 1860 Colt Army Revolver
5/7/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1860 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi guys, My father is an antique gun collector and has this gun, and a letter from the Colt Manf, and he wants to research it to find out maybe to whom it was originally issued to. Any ideas???? Thanks.

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Unfortunately very few U.S. military records still exist that document issue of specific weapons to specific units, or even more rarely, to specific individuals. There is no central source of such information, and what does exist is scattered among literally millions of documents at the National Archives, with no index or other finding aids to help locate information on weapons. Mr. Frank Mallory's Springfield Research Service of Silver Spring, MD, has been working in these records for almost 20 years now, and is the best source of documentation on this subject. He has published four books (Serial Numbers of U.S. Martial Arms, volumes 1 through 4) with his findings. These cover a few Civil War arms, and larger numbers of trapdoor, Krag and M1903 era pieces, plus small numbers of WW2 arms. He has a quarterly journal (U.S. Martial Arms Collector and Springfield Research Newsletter) with newly discovered serial number data, plus other information of interest to serious U.S. military collectors. He has also published a listing of arms sold through the DCM program from 1922 to 1942. Of the several thousand numbers I have looked up, only a few dozen have been listed. However, the listings are very useful to indicate approximate ranges of specific models (e.g.- trapdoor carbines; match model M1903s, etc.) and possible units associated with certain number ranges. It is possible (but unprovable without the specific documentation) that a gun within a few numbers could have been issued to the same unit, and the records merely lost or destroyed over the years. However, it is not uncommon to find several different units, or even different branches, within a relatively small spread, so one must be very cautious about making such assumptions. For an investment of about one hundred dollars, you can purchase copies of Mallory's books and look the info up yourself. (Serious collectors definitely should invest in a set!). Others may prefer to send us a small contribution ($5.00 suggested) to be forwarded to the NRA, and we will look their guns up for them. If the gun is listed, Mr. Mallory can provide (for a fee of $30 or less) a letter with the known information and the source. Sometimes it may be nothing more than a document listing numbers of some guns being transferred to another post. In other cases it may include information about the individual to whom it was issued and their service in a specific unit. IF THE GUN IS NOT LISTED, HE CANNOT PROVIDE ANY INFORMATION, AS NO RECORDS HAVE BEEN FOUND ON THE GUN! Hope this helps. When we receive your contribution for the NRA (made out to NRA-ILA or NRA-PVF, sent to us at P.O. Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171) we will be glad to check up to 5 serial numbers for you. If any are listed, we will let you know how to contact Mr. Mallory to order a letter from him. Hope this helps... John


# 1263 - Iver Johnson Model X
5/7/98
Jim, San Jose, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works X .22 Short, Long & Long Rifle 22 Inches Not Sure.. 20XXX (I BELIEVE)

Patent 1673666 I'm just curious how old this weapon is. I realize that it probably has little or no collector value, but I'd like to get its age.

Answer:
Jim, The Iver Johnson Model X was a .22 caliber single shot bolt action rifle, it came with open sights, a 22 inch barrel, pistol grip stock and a knob forend. The Iver Johnson Model X was manufactured from 1928 to 1932. There is no collector interest in this particular rifle and values for examples in excellent condition fall in the $75.00 range... Marc


# 1252 - Mismatch 1911A1
5/7/98
Mark, LA, Calif

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ithaca 1911A1 .45 5" Parkerized 2106***

Marked "M1911 A1 US ARMY" on right side of slide and frame; "4" stamped on right side of trigger guard, cross cannon on right rear, "FJA" on left side of frame, "P" by mag release and an upside down 'star trek' symbol on right side of trigger guard, "US Property" by serial number. According to your mfg. date site for 1911s, the frame is a 1945 mfg. Ithaca but it has a colt slide with wartime roll markings. Can you tell me anything about the pistol? Does the mismatched detract heavily from its value? Is there any way to tell if the frame is a re-weld?

Answer:
Mark, I have been a Star Trek fan for a long time. I remember an episode in the original Star Trek series where a crew member, who happens to be a gun collector (like me), finds an antique .38 revolver on a planet where wishes are magically granted by a computer which can read minds and is programmed to fulfill every desire. I never thought much about collecting guns until I saw that episode (I was 12 or 13 years old at the time). I can remember thinking that gun collecting would be a pretty great hobby. I can not recall an episode where the crew of the Enterprise was issued or used 1911A1 pistols ; - )

The best way that I know of (short of getting an x-ray) to detect a re-weld is by close examination. Check for milling lines that do not match, and stampings that do not go together. In all but the most artful cases of re-welding, there's usually something there to tip you off to the re-weld.

I have double checked, and records do indicate that your frame is an Ithaca, manufactured in 1945. I suspect that this is a case of mixing parts by GIs cleaning pistols, or perhaps during rebuild. Values for mismatched guns are substantially lower than they are for examples in original condition. I would advise you to start looking at gunshows for an Ithaca slide, when you find one, you can sell your Colt slide to offset the cost of the Ithaca. You might try posting a want for an Ithaca slide on our wants page.

Live long and prosper... Marc


# 1262 - Webley Mk IV Boer War Service Revolver
5/4/98
Dave, Auburn, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley Mark IV 455 4" From Cylinder To Tip Blue 117XXX

Birds head grip, right side of barrel-750"455"6 TONS, barrel and frame serial numbers are 117XXX, cylinder has number 225665 on rear edge of cylinder, Webley Mark IV Patents on left side of frame under cylinder, several arrow type marks on barrel and frame, along top edge of barrel above cylinder it says MARK "IV", just ahead of that toward the front of the barrel is small stamping of a crown then ER then X then 2P then another crown then B3 then a sideways E. Has a lanyard attachment ring on the grip butt. This is pretty cryptic but I hope it helps. I just received this pistol from my fathers estate. It used to belong to a Constable in a small town in California during the 1940's and 50's. Can you help me establish the Vintage, history, value? It is in pretty good condition and I plan to keep it.

Answer:
Dave, I have got to tell you that you have one UGLEY revolver, I guess that the reason that I have always liked Webleys so much is because their ugliness appeals to me. The Webley Mk IV service revolver was manufactured from 1899 to 1913. The Mk IV is commonly called the "Boer War Model" because its introduction occurred at the same time as the start of the Boer War, and because many British volunteer troops who fought in the Boer War were equipped with Mk IV revolvers. Many Mk IV revolvers that were imported into the US had the back of their cylinders milled off to allow them to fire .45 ACP ammunition using "half moon clips", this milling of the cylinder will reduce the value of the revolver. An easy way to determine if a cylinder has been milled is to look at the numbers stamped along the rear edge of the cylinder, if the numbers are cut off at the bottom then it is a good bet that the cylinder has been milled. Values for Webley Mk IV revolvers in 80% or better condition, with matching numbers and non-milled cylinders are in the $275 to $375 range... Marc


# 1257 - Marlin Model 93
5/4/98
Jim, Union City, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin Model 93 .30-30 24" blue 6319 on bottom tang, under lever

<>SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL<> on left side of barrel, forward of receiver. MARLIN SAFETY on top of receiver Marlin Fire Arms Co. New Haven CT, USAPat'd Oct 11, 1887, April 2, 1889, Aug 1, 1893 in two lines on top of barrel This rifle was given to my nephew by his grandfather, who acquired in about 1928. We would like to know the manufacturing date, and, of course, the approximate value. The rifle has been well maintained, the bluing has now oxidized to a pale gray. The receiver has been tapped for a scope mount, other than that it appears to be all original. The serial number appears to have been hand stamped with individual dies. The 631 are of about the same size but slightly irregular in depth and spacing, the 9 is nearly 1/2 the size of the %0!D other numbers and spaced about 1 1/2 spaces from the 1 and about a 1/2 line higher, almost as if it were a "super" notation. My wife and I are both NRA Life members. I am a NMLRA member, she is a charter founder of the Second Amendment Task Force and we both support the NRA/ILA.I appreciate seeing your recommendation on the NRA bylaw change and Board of Directors recommendations. We must all stand together and present a united front to the Administration and to the almighty Media. As Ben Franklin, reportedly said, "We must all hang together or, assuredly, we will all hang separately." Jim Baldwin

Answer:
Jim, we are always happy to be of any assistance that we can to individuals who help to support our second amendment rights. Early Marlin serial numbers are a little different than those of most other firearms manufactures, in that there were not different serial number blocks for different models, as a result two different models of Marlin's could have sequential serial numbers. The model 1893 was manufactured from 1893 to 1936, serial numbers in 1893 started at about 80,000 and went to over 450,000 in 1906, I have no serial number information on Marlin firearms manufactured between 1906 and 1962. Because your Model 93 has a four digit serial number I would estimate that it was manufactured sometime between 1922 (when the New Marlin Fireamrs Corp. resumed production after WWI) and 1936 when Model 93 production ceased. Model 93 values range from $300.00 to over $1700.00 depending on configuration and condition. I am sorry to have to tell you that the fact that your Marlin has been drilled and taped for a scope will greatly reduce it's value... Marc


# 1256 - Detonics Pocket Nine ?
5/4/98
Gerry, Nhamp, MA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Detonics Compact Nine Nine MM 2.5? SS Unknown

Where can I find information on these guns?

Answer:
Gerry, Detonics Firearms Industries of Bellevue, Washington manufactured pistols based on the Colt M191A1 design for combat or practical pistol shooting. Detonics pistols have throated barrels with polished feed ramps, beveled and polished magazine apertures in the butts, carefully tuned triggers and sears, slide backs sloped to facilitate rapid thumb - cocking of the hammer; and frames that have been reshaped to prevent the traditional bite of the hammer tang on the web of the thumb during firing. Each Detonics barrel is carefully fitted, being located by a V-block instead of the conventional muzzle bush. I can find no mention of a Compact Nine in my books, could yours be a Pocket Nine? The Pocket Nine, introduced in 1985, was a small 9mm Parabellum double-action delayed blowback pistol that was intended as a personal defense pistol. The Pocket Nine was discontinued by 1986... Marc


# 1253 - Type 38 With No "Mum"
5/1/98
Gary

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Arisaka Type 38, Nagoya Arsenal Unknown 31" High Polish Blue 46XX

Receiver bridge does not have the typical Mum. It is not ground or defaced. Above the Katana "Type 38" is a stylized "M" or "W". This same mark is present on the underside of the barrel and in the stock channel. Any idea who issued this?

Answer:
Gary, I was unable to find the markings that you are asking about in any of my reference books, so I sent your question over to John Jensen at Jon's Swords http://jons-swords.com/, here is his response:

Look around the joint between the bbl and the receiver for a small anchor. Usually the squashed M is indicative of a naval issue. If the receiver is unusually large, you may have one of the cast issue which is indeed hard to find and in the $500 range.

The only reference that I could find to type 38 rifles without the chrysanthemum (other than naval models) was in Honneycutt and Anthony's book "Military Rifles of Japan". Honneycutt and Anthony list an example of a type 38 that has two concentric circles (like a bullseye) on the receiver where the chrysanthemum is normally stamped with a "1/X " character (which is commonly used to indicate a school) stamped beneath. These rifles are normally stamped with a second class arms stamp (two horizontal lines inside a circle) underneath the barrel and underneath the receiver. Honneycutt and Anthony state that these markings separate the rifle from military use, and that the rifles were most likely intended for evaluation and assembly line debugging. These rifles were probably turned over to a school after evaluation and rejection. Maybe one of our visitors will be able to help answer your question... Marc


# 1245 - Riverside Shotgun Yard Sale Gun?
5/1/98
Tony, In, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Riverside Arms Unknown 20 Gauge 28" Blue UNKNOWN

Pat date Aug. 12, 1913 Single shot Is this gun worth keeping around due to value of I put it in my next yard sale?

Answer:
Tony, Riverside Arms CO. is a trade name used by Stevens Arms & Tool Company Established in 1864 in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts. Stevens made a wide variety of inexpensive shotguns that have little or no collector interest. If you decide to put this shotgun in your next yard sale, my advise would be to comply with all local, state and federal laws, make sure that you get a signed and dated receipt that releases you from any liability, and finally, accept any offer over $35.00... Marc


# 1244 - Replacement Stock For A Savage 99F
5/1/98
Steve De

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage 99f Unknown Unknown Unknown 1020***

I have 2 questions for you. First is the age of the gun and what year was it manufactured in. Second is I broke the shoulder stock on it. A piece about 3 inches by 2 inches broke out of it. This is on the guns left side above the lever where the stock meets the receiver. I am looking for a replacement stock for it. Where would be the best place to find one. Some people say that I can get an original stock from savage either bare wood or already finished. Is this true? I looked in the savage arms web site but could not find any information about parts or for that matter any information about the mod.99. Where would be my best source for finding a stock. I would like to find an original stock to keep the gun as original as possible. Would the guns value go down if I put a new stock on it? I have glued the old piece back in place but its not a perfect fit anymore. Any help you can offer would be fantastic. Thanks again .

Answer:
Steve, Here is the easy part, records indicate that your Model 99F was manufactured after 1940, finding a replacement stock gets a little more complicated. Savage started business in Utica, NY in 1895, the company was renamed Savage Arms Co. in 1899. After WWI, the name was changed to the Savage Arms Corporation. In the mid-1960s Savage became The Savage Arms Division of American Hardware Corp., which later became The Emhart Corporation. This division was sold in September 1981, and became Savage Industries Incorporated. On November 1, 1989, Savage Arms Incorporated acquired the majority of assets of Savage Industries, Incorporated. Savage Arms, Incorporated will offer service and parts on their current line of firearms only (those manufactured after Nov.1, 1989). Warranty and repair claims for products not manufactured by Savage Arms, Incorporated are the responsibility of Savage Industries. Parts for pre-1981 Savage Industries firearms may be obtained by contacting the Gun Parts Corporation located in West Hurley, NY. My out of date Gun Parts Corp. catalog (18th edition) lists plain walnut stocks for the Model 99 Savage on page 485 for $75.00. Savage Model 99F rifles are quite common, examples in less than 90% condition do not have much interest to collectors and usually sell as shooters in the $250 - $275 range. If your 99F is in less than 90% condition, replacement of the stock will have little affect on its value... Marc


# 1172 - Early Model 94 Winchester
5/1/98
Trent, Minot, ND, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1894 30-30 20"(from Breach To End)-8 Shot Mag-Octagon Nickel Steel 40***

On top of barrel by breach "30 W C.F."Also on top down a ways "Manufactured By The Winchester Repeating Arms Co, New Haven, Conn,USA"On metal plate top of forward end of stock "MODEL 1894 WINCHESTER PAT AUG 21 1894" I have a Winchester 1894 model in very good condition just given to me from my Granddad. I don't know anything about it so please fill me in! How much (a range) do you believe this could be worth. It has everything original, never retouched and the action is great! It is a beauty and I just fired it the other day, ACCURATE to say the least! I hit a crow at 150 yards first shot! Also what type of ammo should I buy for it. Any other info on the gun or how to find out about it would be greatly appreciated. I am thinking about putting it on display and would like to get a Winchester manual for it. Where would I look? Trent

Answer:
Trent , it sounds like your grandfather gave you a very fine rifle, you would be well advised to take good care of it and not to modify it in any way. Let us hope that the gun grabbers and left wing liberals efforts will be ineffectual and that you will some day be able to pass your Model 94 down to your own grandson. The Model 1894 Winchester was based on a John M. Browning patent, it was the first Winchester developed especially for smokeless powder and is the most successful centerfire rifle ever produced. Over five million Model 94 Winchesters have been manufactured and production continues to this day. Our Winchester Dates of Manufacture Page at http://oldguns.net/snpgm/WinMods.htm tells me that your Model 94 was manufactured in 1895. Values for your Model 94 could range from $300.00 to well over $3000.00 depending upon condition and configuration.. Marc


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