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# 2109 - Remington Rifle 1917??
5/29/99
Jim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Remington Rifle 1917?? Ammo that came with it is made by the REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE > COMPANY...UMC BRIDGEPORT WORKS. MARKED 7.62 RUSSIAN 190 GRAINS SOFT POINT > BULLET. > > THANKS,JIM WALSH

Answer:
Jim- If the ammo fits the rifle, it is probably a Model 1891 Mosin-Nagant. The rifle should be well marked including Remington Armory 1917, No. and a serial number. A serial number should be on the bolt also, but this seldom matches. Above the Remington on the barrel and also on the receiver and the stock should be an eagle with two heads and something close to a Roman numeral II. This is the crest of the Russian Czar Nicholas the Second, murdered by the Bolsheviks after the Russian Revolution in 1917. The Bolsheviks made peace with Germany, and cancelled the Czarist contracts for millions of dollars of arms from the U.S. This nearly forced Remington into bankruptcy. Fortunately the U.S. government decided to purchase 280,000 of the Russian rifles on hand from Remington and New England Westinghouse (also making them for the Czar) and issue them as training arms. Most of the U.S. troops sent to fight the "Red" Russians in the almost forgotten 1918-1921 Northern Russia and Siberian campaigns were issued these to ensure ammunition compatibility with the "White" Russians whom we were aiding. Some of the surplus U.S. Mosin Nagant rifles were sold to NRA members through the Director of Civilian Marksmanship (DCM) program in the 1930s. Others reached the market after dealers converted them to .30-06. This involved cutting a small amount off the rear of the barrel and setting it back about 1/2 inch before rechambering. This eliminated the section where the serial number appeared. Most authorities consider these conversions to .30-06 to be unsafe to shoot. In any case, if it is a Mosin Nagant, you may have the start of something interesting to collect. These were also made in Russia (of course) as well as Switzerland and France in the early days. Later they were made in China, Poland, and probably other Communist bloc countries as late as the 1950s. They came in long and short and medium length versions with many different bayonets. Most are very inexpensive. Some of the Russian examples were selling a few years ago to dealers for under $40, and even original sniper versions (not the ubiquitous recent put together jobs which are cheap) can still be found for under $1000. Although pretty ugly looking rifles, the Mosin-Nagants reportedly are very durable and fairly accurate. The Finnish conversion are especially accurate. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2106 - Information On An Antique Firearm
5/29/99
Tom

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

My father owns several firearms. One antique military style rifle is missing a part. It appears there is to be a clip for it but there is none. Could you let me know if you can assist him in locating a clip for his rifle and any other information you may have regarding his rifle. I will include all of the markings I could find. L'Elienne MLE 1907 15 64082 1916 There are all of the etchings I could find on the receiver and barrel. Thank you for your assistance and I look forward to hearing from you.

Answer:
Tom- Your rifle is a Model 1907as modified in 1915 (Mle 07/15) "Mannlicher Berthier" rifle which fires 8mm Lebel ammunition. The ammunition was usually issued in clips holding 3 round prior to 1915 then afterwards 5 round for the Mle 07/15 rifles. The clips are very hard to find any more, but when found will probably only cost $5-10. You are welcome to post this on our free "wanted" page if you like. You might also try our links page for Ye Olde Western Scrounger who specializes in obsolete ammo. John Spangler


# 2107 - Swedish Mauser Rifle Book
5/29/99
Stanley

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Swedish Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm looking for a maintenance manual for M96 Swedish Mauser. Do you have one for sale or know of a good source?

Answer:
Stanley- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. There is a paperback book on Swedish Mausers by Doug Bowser that is pretty good, but aimed more at collectors than maintenance. The rifles are pretty basic Mauser type actions and disassembly and maintenance should be pretty obvious. Check the NRA.org site and look for their books for sale. The NRA Firearms Disassembly Guide dealing with rifles would probably be a good investment and have info on most of the rifles you are likely to encounter. In my opinion, the Swedish Mauser rifles are the best bargain on the surplus market today in terms of quality of workmanship, condition, price and desirable caliber. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2070 - Marlin 1893
5/25/99
Chip

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin 1893 32-40 Unknown Unknown 319367

"Special Smokeless Steel" etched on the barrel. This level-action rifle was given to me many, many years ago by my Grandfather. It is quite used but still sound. I'd like to know when it might have been manufactured, if it is a collector's item that should be appraised, or if it should be retained in my family for sentimental reasons. Thanks for your time!

Answer:
Chip, the Marlin Model 1893 Sporting Rifle was introduced in August of 1893, to compete with Winchester's models of 1886 and 1892. The 1893 incorporated a new locking-bolt system, a two-piece firing pin and an improved elevator. About 69,000 1893 rifles were manufactured from 1893 to 1915, when production was discontinued to concentrate on the war effort. My records indicate that your Marlin (serial number 319367) was manufactured in 1905. Marlin offered the Model 1893 in several different chamberings including: 25-36 Marlin, 30-30 Winchester, 32 Winchester Special, 32-40 Ballard and 38-55 Ballard. Typical 1893 configuration was: overall length 44.25 inches, weigh 7.5 pounds, 6 groove 25 inch barrel with a right hand twist, ten round magazine and spring leaf elevator rear sight. Round, half round, or full-octagon barrels of 20 to 32 inches, pistol grip buttstocks and fancy engraving were factory options. Values for model 1893 rifles range form $100 to $1700 depending upon condition and configuration. My advise is to retain your rifle for sentimental reasons, it has been in your family for a long time. If the condition is good enough it would probably be wise to have it appraised and insured. If you want to be allowed to keep your rifle and to some day hand it down to your heirs, make sure to support the NRA. Gun grabbing politicians have been successful in the UK, Australia and Canada among other places, if we set back and do nothing it will happen here in the U.S. Marc


# 2104 - German Scope Info
5/25/99
Ian

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi: I am restoring a 1943 Mauser as a sniper set up. At a recent gun show I purchased an Ajack scope and a sliding dovetail mount which the seller, an old German told was the correct setup. Could you tell me where I could find out more information on the Ajack scope. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Ian- As a history major I was never required to actually know anything, but had to know where to find lots of stuff. Try Peter Senich's The German Sniper, and Richard D. Law's "Backbone of the Wehrmacht: K98k Rifle Sniper Variations" and you will find solidly researched information and many useful illustrations. John Spangler


# 2103 - Daisy BB Gun Ad
5/25/99
Dave

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi, As part of the world's largest trivia contest, we need to identify the attached picture. We're guessing that the gun is a Sears & Roebuck Ranger BB-Gun. Have you seen this picture before?

Answer:
Dave- Your picture is of George Rockford, of Detroit, MI. He was the model for Daisy brand BB gun advertising for about 20 years He is holding a Daisy Model 25 BB gun and that exact pose was used in Daisy ads shortly after WW1. I cannot confirm if Sears sold these under the Daisy name, or under a house brand or used the imagery. Reference: Cass S. Hough, "It's A Daisy!" privately published by Daisy Division, Victor Comptometer Corp. Rogers, Arkansas, 1976. The photos are between pages 64 and 65. Do we know our guns, or what! John Spangler


# 2042 - "G.D." Unit Markings
5/22/99
Bill, Croydon, Pa. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger P-08 9m/m 4.0" Rust Blue 9104 c

Chamber dated 1910. Front of Grip Strap stamped 2.G.D.2.20 Hi Marc, Just read that you received new books on German markings and I cannot find in my one (1) book the information on the G.D. stamping on the Front Grip Strap. Is it possible that your books might have this information? I read your site continuously and I have got plenty of information from it as I know it is documented by you. Thanking you in advance for any requested information.

Answer:
Bill, Glad that you enjoy our site and I hope that you continue to visit often. I am no expert on these German unit markings, I just look through the books and report what I have found. " The Imperial German Regimental Marking" by Jeff Noll identifies the marking "G.D." as "Garde-Dragoner-Regiment" , my interoperation of your markings (offered as usual with a full money back guarantee) is Garde Dragoner Regiment 2, Kompagnie 2, Waffe Nr. 20. Hope that this helps. Marc


# 2102 - Grenade Launcher Blank
5/22/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello. I read your ad for the 3086 Grenade Launcher for the M1903. You said that cartridges could be sent with it on request. Could you tell me the name of the cartridges and if possible send a picture of one to me?

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. These are the "Cartridge, Grenade launching, M3" which look like a regular .30-06 case but instead of a bullet, the mouth of the case is closed with a deep crimp sometimes called a rose petal crimp. The 5.56mm blanks for the M16 have a similar crimp. Regular .30-06 blanks have the mouth rolled over slightly and a ring a short distance below that. Regular blanks use a very rapid burning type of powder while grenade blanks use a much slower burning powder. Use of a regular blank to launch a grenade will blow up a rifle. Most GI manuals show the proper grenade launching blanks. Hackley, Woodin & Scranton's two volume set "History of U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition 1880-1945" has all the details on all these and about every other U.S. military cartridge .60 caliber or smaller that was ever made or even experimented with. Fantastic set of books. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2054 - Civil War Whitworth Rifle
5/22/99
Eric

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was recently at a Civil War re-enactment and after the skirmish was over I went looking at muzzle-loaders. So, I am looking to purchase in the next year a rifle that I don't know the model of, so I need your help. It remember the gentlemen said it was a Parker Hale muzzle loader or Civil War origins. It had six-sided rifling, and a six-sided 530 grain bullet to match, and a very long brass optical scope. Can you help me with the info I'm lacking? Model, Current Price, Where to Purchase, etc?

Answer:
Eric- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. You are looking for a Parker Hale reproduction of the "Whitworth" rifle which has a .451 caliber hexagonal bore. These could be shot with special six sided bullets or cylindrical bullets. They are superb quality pieces and all Parker-Hales have excellent reputations. I seem to recall that these sold in the $1,000-1,500 range when introduced a few years ago. I think the importer and main seller was Navy Arms Corporation with headquarters in West Virginia, formerly of New Jersey until they got tired of their ridiculous anti-gun laws. While an interesting example of an exotic Civil War arm, I think you may find it a lot cheaper as well as more fun to get one of the Parker Hale .577 rifle musket copies that shoot the minie ball. The .577 muskets were the second most popular arm of the Civil War and are pretty accurate at 100 yards and even out to 400-500 yards. These are made in the "3 band" version with 39 or 40 inch barrel as used by the infantry, and two shorter "2 band" versions with 24 or 33 inch barrels used by specialized troops. There are various other reproductions available, such as "Zouave" rifles or M1861 or 1863 Springfield .58 muskets. These are made by many makers in various levels of quality, and sold under many names. However, in my opinion, all are inferior to the Parker Hales, and some (Dixie Gun Works especially) may be disappointing in quality. Check our links page and find some of the Civil War Reenactment or North-South Skirmish folks who can tell you a lot more. There were a couple of fascinating articles in the American Rifleman many years back which detailed the results of firing examples of nearly all the Civil War infantry arms from .69 caliber smoothbore flintlocks to the Whitworth under standard test conditions. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2053 - Antique Percussion Pistol
5/17/99
Jack

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Percussion Pistol Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a small, old percussion pistol, brass barrel, wood handle, not in the best of condition. There are two marks I can find: one is a circle with "L," top, "E" left and "G" right and a small star at the bottom. The other is a crown over an "N." Might you enlighten me as to what this is? Or tell me where to go...(?) Thanks, Jack

Answer:
Jack- The ELG in an oval is proof mark applied to all arms made in Belgium (with various other types used at different times). Belgian makers were the primary source of inexpensive arms during most of the 19th and early 20th century. They made pistols, revolvers, shotguns, rifles, muskets, whatever a buyer wanted, sometimes using Belgian designs, but often copies of better known patterns from elsewhere. In general they are cheaply made, inferior quality, and made strictly for export. Of course some Belgian makers made high quality pieces, and the Fabrique National (FN) folks in the 20th century made first rate pieces. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2041 - Broomhandle Prices
5/17/99
randy bal .md.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Broom Handle 30 Cal / 9mm Unknown Unknown N/A

I have always liked broom handled Mausers I would like a decent price range for a decent shooter I'm not real concerned with military history etc. I have looked at some with poor bores etc any info you can give me will be a real help. by the way I am a on and off member of the NRA as finances allow {i.e..} I HAVE 2 KIDS TO SUPPORT. thanks for your help on what I think is a neat design randy

Answer:
Randy, I am glad to hear that you support the NRA. At this time when unscrupulous, dishonest and cowardly politicians are making use of the tragedies in Colorado and other places around the country to further their own agenda and careers, it is especially important to make sure that our opinions supporting second amendment rights are made known.

Broomhandle pistols are notorious for having bad bores because of the diet of corrosive ammunition that most of them have been fed over the years. My experience has been that even expensive old Broomhandle pistols in original condition with good exteriors often have bad bores. I think that the best choice for a moderately priced Broomhandle in decent shooting condition, would be one of the commercially re-worked pistols that have been on the market. Most of these re-worked pistols have a new 9MM barrel inserted or have been re-bored to 9MM. I saw a nice looking Broomhandle that had been re-worked by Fed-Ord sell at the last gunshow that I attended for $450. Marc


# 1922 - Rifle- Mauser .22
5/17/99
Adrian Puyallup, WA.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Gustav Genschow Geco-Sportbuchse Mod 23 .22 Long Rifle 5.4mm 25.5 Inches Blue Unknown

1592 There are two small crowns each has a letter under it the top crown has B the bottom crown has U.

Answer:
These fall into the general category of sporting versions of the Mauser made in .22 caliber. These were popular in German in pre-WW2 years, some were made with military style stocks and used as military trainers in WW2, and in post war years some have been made as sporters, often with grooved receivers for mounting scopes. The crown/U proof marks probably indicates that this is a pre-war piece. John Spangler


# 2027 - Hi-Power And Radom Values.
5/15/99
Bruce, Coldwater, Ontario

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning Hi-Power 9mm Unknown Parkerized 56161A

Nazi insignia. All matching numbers. Also, Polish Radom Vis35, 9mm, Parkerized, A6524, Nazi insignia, All matching numbers. What would be the collector value of these firearms, given the Nazi insignia? I am not sure how to describe the condition, given that they are both service pistols. Thank You, for your reply.

Answer:
Bruce, sorry, but without more information about the condition and the configuration of your pistols, it is impossible to pin down a specific value. Both Radom and Hi-Power pistols came in several different configurations including variations that were slotted for shoulder stocks and had tangent rear sights. The more elaborate and rarer configurations of these pistols will command a much higher value than those without all of the bells and whistles. Depending upon configuration and condition, Radom values can range form $100 to over $1000, and Hi-Power values can range form $200 to over $3000. Marc


# 1919 - Remington Rolling Block Rifle- Argentine
5/15/99
PSaylorsburg, Pa. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington & Sons Military Rollingblock not sure: 43 Rem. (Spanish) 34.5" appears blue n/a

The stock runs the entire length of the barrel except for 4.75". A bayonet lug is located on the right side of the barrel. 3 barrel bands with a "u" stamped on the left side, attach the forend to the barrel. Forend is slotted to hold the cleaning rod (included). Their are (2) shoulder strap swivels. The barrel has tangential type military sights about 2.25" from receiver. The barrel from the receiver to the sight is octagonal and has a "B" stamped on the left side. The metal buttplate is screwed to the back and top of the tail stock and a "R" is stamped in the wood on the top of the tailstock. I think it is a 43 Remington (Spanish)and am sure that a 45-70 will NOT chamber. This rifle is new, has never been shot and is still in cosmoline. I need to know more details about it so I may request you folks to appraise it for a $25.00 fee. I would appreciate any help you can provide.

Answer:
Sir- Blue finish and a short octagonal section at the breech are nearly always signs that the rifle is the 1879 Modelo Argentino in .43 Spanish caliber. These are also about the only model routinely encountered in excellent condition, although most appear to have been refinished prior to being imported back into the U.S. about 10 years ago. While the condition really helps, these are a fairly common model and in an undesirable caliber, and being refinished turns off a lot of people, so value is probably somewhere around $500. John Spangler


# 1917 - Rifle- Japanese Murata
5/15/99
Dan. Milwaukee, WI

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Japanese type 18 ? 11 mm 32" blued 113397

"mum" many Asian characters on left side of receiver. Single shot bolt action. a vet bring back, came with a type 99/7.7 jap rifle. Please help me confirm it's identity. Could you direct me to a reference book or web site? Thank you. I'm an NRA member and an NRA/ILA contributor.

Answer:
Dan- Thanks for your support of the NRA. We get a lot of freeloaders who want info on their guns but won't lift a finger or spend a dollar to protect their right to keep them. Your rifle is one of the Murata models, probably the Type 18, but perhaps a type 13. Both used a 11x60mm rimmed cartridge. The Type 18 was adopted in 1885, while its predecessor was adopted in 1880. Fred Honeycutt's "Military Rifles of Japan" and Larry Johnson's "Japanese Bayonets" both have info on rifles that you may find interesting. There is a group of Japanese collectors who have a newsletter "BANZAI!" that has a lot of info. (Sorry, my wife won't let me collect Japanese stuff in addition to everything else, so I do not have more info on them). There is a website I visited recently with some good info on foreign military rifles, but I am not sure if it was one of our links or one we will add soon. John Spangler


# 2055 - M1941 Johnson Rifle
5/11/99
Don

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
JOHNSON 1941 30-06 Unknown Unknown B3459

What is it? Where can I get some books or information on the weapon, and approximate sale value in fair condition.

Answer:
Don- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Captain Melvin M. Johnson, USMCR, developed this rifle in hopes of getting it adopted by the US military. However, the already adopted M1 Garand was found to be superior in Army trials, and again in USMC trials. Johnson was able to get a large order from the Dutch government for rifles in .30-06 to be used to arm their colonial troops, and something like 10,000-30,000 were delivered. A small number were also sold to Chile (in 7mm) in the post-WW2 period. Johnson also had a fairly successful light machine gun design which looked similar to the rifle. The U.S, Marine Corps purchased a small number of the light machine guns shortly after we entered WW2, and apparently some of the rifles were diverted from the Dutch contract and issued to some Marines. The light machine gun was also used by the joint US/Canadian First Special Service Force. Records on the US used Johnsons are practically non-existent, although several hundred were noted as being at Springfield Armory in the late 1940s. An American surplus dealer bought the Johnson rifles from the Dutch order about 1960 and I think he also got the Chilean rifles about the same time. Most had been well used and by cannibalization he was able to assemble a fair number of complete rifles plus a number with replacement barrels in various calibers and sporter style sights and stocks. As a result, most rifles have mixed serial numbers Many US military collectors want an example of a Johnson rifle to complete a collection of US WW2 rifles. I have seen Johnson rifles offered between $600 and $2,900 depending on condition Value of your rifle will depend on condition, any alterations or damage. We would be glad to help you sell this on consignment, or to buy it outright for resale. We have some information on various selling options at Oldguns.net/ that may be helpful. If you want to work with us, it would probably be easiest to let us know and we will give you an address for shipping the rifle. When we get it we can give you a better idea of retail value. Just guessing, I would think it may retail in the $1000-1500 range but without seeing it or a very detailed description or photos that is based on being in "fair" condition. "Fair" means a lot of different things to different people. Looking forward to hearing from you. John Spangler


# 2056 - Hickocks Revolvers
5/11/99
Matt

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Where are "Wild Bill's Colt Revolvers?

Answer:
Matt- We regret that we do not know the answer to this. I am sure they are in a museum or major collection somewhere. Reproductions have been offered recently, and I am sure they had access to the originals to copy them. If someone is graciously offering to sell the originals to you, I would be very skeptical and suspicious. Good luck. John Spangler


# 2057 - Shotshell Reloading
5/11/99
JVCSLC

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm either looking for a shotshell load for 3 lbs. of Alcan #5 powder I have or I'm looking to sell it. Ideally, I'd like to reload Federal 12 gauge casings with this powder and 1-1/4 ounces of shot. Can you help with primer, powder charge, and wad?

Answer:
JVCSLC - We don't know nothing about birthing no babies nor reloading shotshells. Even if we did, our lawyers tell us not to provide information like that because someone may blow their head off and then try to sue us. There are a number of excellent reloading manuals available, and most powder makers will provide reloading data for their products. Sorry we cannot help. John Spangler


# 2019 - Remington Model of 1934 Military Rifle
5/8/99
mguner@amaonline.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 1934 7mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

Where can I find one and what is one worth? This variant of the model of 1917 has a different sight configuration and other small differences besides the 7mm calibre.

Answer:
By the end of 1918 Remington was turning out M1917 Enfields at a rate of about 4000 per day. When the contracts for these rifles were canceled, the facilities that Remington had for making 1917 rifles were left idle and Remington was also left holding a huge inventory of parts. To save something from their vast operation, Remington decided to produce new models based on the 1917 Enfield action.

In 1921 Remington introduced the Model 30 high powered sporting rifle. The Model 30 was a 1917 barrel and action assembly modified for sporting use and then fit a conventional lightweight sporter stock.

In 1933 Remington designers fabricated a prototype rifle in 7x57mm Mauser caliber utilizing an Enfield Model 1917 action and other 1917 parts which they called the Remington Model of 1934 Military Rifle. Remington received a contract, to make 3,000 Model of 1934 Military Rifles chambered in 7x57mm Mauser centerfire for Honduras. About 500 Model of 1934 Military Rifles were manufactured in 1934, and 2,500 were made in 1935, each fitted for the standard Springfield-pattern bayonet and utilizing the same receivers as those in Remington Model 30 rifles. Nicaragua placed a large order for 1934 Military rifles chambered in .30-06 Springfield, but the contract was never consummated. Remington Model of 1934 Military Rifles were referred to in the factory as Model 40 rifles. In mid-1934 Remington made up ten prototype Model 40 military-style rifles in different calibers including .30-06, 7x57mm Mauser, 7.65 Bolivian, 7.65 Brazilian, 7.92mm Mauser, 8mm (7.99 Mauser Special), 8mm (7.9 Mauser), and 8mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer with various different barrel lengths, hoping to interest buyers in Central and South America. Some rifles were stamped "Model of 1934 Military Rifle" while others were marked "Model of 1935 Military Rifle". Remington attempted to sell these 1934/5 Military Rifles to Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, and the Republic of Haiti, but no contracts were ever received.

The M1917 action also served as the basis for several later Remington commercial rifles, including the model 721 in .30-06, several hundred of which were bought by the US government in 1941-42 and are still being issued as prizes in some military matches.

I have checked the major gun value books (Fjestad and Flayderman) and several of the smaller ones, and have been unable to find a listing for the Remington Model of 1934 Military Rifle or The Remington Model 40. These are rare rifles, but I do not know how much collector demand that there is for them, finding a buyer willing to pay a lot of money may be difficult. I estimate that values would be in the $350 to $650 range depending upon condition. Maybe one of our visitors will see this answer and send in their thoughts, I will post any good information that I receive. Marc


# 2058 - " Trench Art " Shell Casings
5/8/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have recently been giving two shell casings that had been in my Grandfathers collection since the early thirties. They have been intricately carved with designs and a name which I can only assume is the carvers. I would like to find out what type of shells these are and where they were made. On the bottom of one of the shells are the following markings. PATRONENFBRIK KARLSRUHE, JULI 1915, St169, HL81. There are also two tiny designs stamped in between the first two words which encircle the primer. The other casing has GESP 358 and SEPT 1914. Any information you could give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.

Answer:
Sandy- Intricately carved brass shell casings are a mainly WW1 era for of folk art, usually called "trench art" where bored soldiers could divert their attention from such unpleasantness as being shot at, eating cold food, sleeping in mud, wearing stinking wool clothing shared with "cooties" and annoyances by officers. Much the same sort of things that will befall our troops if we foolishly send them into a ground war in the Balkans. Anyway fired shell casings were the main media in which trench art was executed. After WW1 the French locals had q profitable business turning things out for Doughboys to send home or to sell to visitors. The artistic qualities range from very primitive and tentative to amazing feats by truly gifted sculptors. The markings on your shells indicate they were made in 1914 and 1915, and Karsruhe is one of the more prolific German ammunition plants, including a lot of Naval ammunition. Other markings probably indicate the type of gun they were made for, or the lot number or material used or similar technical information. You do not state the size, but 75mm (3 inch diameter) seems to be a popular size, and they range up to about 150-155mm (about 6 inch diameter). Often the shells were shortened from their original length. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2060 - Forehand & Wadsworth 7shot .22 Short Revolver
5/8/99
Jerry

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Forehand & Wadsworth Unknown 22 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a Forehand & Wadsworth 7shot .22 short revolver with 2 3/8" barrel produced in 1806, would like to get some information regarding its history as I can not find it in any books. Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Jerry- Ethan Allen is a famous name in the U.S. One, leading his "Green Mountain Boys" called upon the commander of Fort Ticonderoga to "Surrender in the name of the Continental Congress and the great Jehova!" thereby securing both colonial control of the southern end of Lake Champlain, and much of the artillery used by General Washington in the early months of the Revolution. More familiar to most Americans (unfortunately due to lousy schools in recent years) is the furniture chain using the Ethan Allen name. From 1837 to 1871 Ethan Allen, no relation to the Revolutionary War hero, and probably not the one honored by the furniture company either, was a gun maker operating primarily in Worcester, Massachusetts. He made a variety of single shot pistols, pepperbox revolvers and single shot rifles. Most were towards the inexpensive end of the quality scale, and some shotguns used surplus or condemned musket barrels, and many used cast iron frames or other components. Allen's firm went through several name changes including Allen & Thirber and Allen and Wheelock. Besides a healthy gun business, Ethan Allen also produced two healthy daughters. One married Sullivan Forehand, a clerk at the Allen firm, and the other married Henry Wadsworth, a Union Army officer who joined the company after the war ended in 1865. Upon Allen's death in 1871 the sons-in-law inherited control of the company and the name was changed to Forehand & Wadsworth, and they continued to produce much the same line of products but with the new name. Their offerings included a cute little .22 revolver with an outside hammer. The superb "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their values" states that about 1000 were made in the 1870s, and that they can be found with blue or nickel finish, and barrels from 2.25 to 4 inches long. He shows an engraved example, and we are offering an engraved one on our catalog page with an 1875 presentation date. These were not high quality pieces, but generally are considered to fall into the collector category of "suicide specials", so called as a tribute to their probable accurate range and durability. The whole field of Allen firearms has very little reference material besides what is in Flayderman and tow other books (H. Thomas "The Story of Allen & Wheelock Firearms" and H. Mouillesseaux "Ethan Allen, Gunmaker: his Patents and Firearms". This could be a very interesting collecting field with a wide variety of arms at generally reasonable prices. John Spangler


# 2015 - Polish VIS-35 (Radom) Pistol
5/4/99
Thomas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
F B Model 35 F8211 Has 9mm Shells In The Clip Unknown Blue PATENT#155678 IP .35 (P)

F B logo on the grip This gun has been passed down, no paper work, a clip w/ 9mm in it. Who is the mfr., is it shootable, can you get parts, how old is it, is it worth keeping, what cal is it? Thank you very much, will join and support NRA.

Answer:
Thomas, your description sounds like you have a Polish VIS-35 (Radom) Pistol. Fabryka Broni w Radomu, Radom, Poland. (The Radom arms factory) was founded shortly after the end of the First World War. Manufacture there was principally concerned with rifles, but in 1930, a quantity of revolvers were made, and in 1936, production of the VIS-35 automatic pistol began.

The VIS-35 is a modified Browning design, using locking lugs on the barrel that mate with grooves in the slide, and a shaped cam, similar to that used on the Browning GP-35. The VIS-35 pistol weighs 37 ounces empty, and, because of its bulk and weight, is one of the most comfortable 9mm Parabellum models to fire that has ever been made. The VIS-35 is equipped with a grip safety, but there is no manual safety catch, instead a unique hammer release lever is located on the left rear of the slide, that retracts the firing pin into its housing and drops the hammer safely on a loaded chamber. At the rear of the frame is a stripping catch which resembles a safety, but does nothing except lock the slide in the rear position for dismantling of the pistol.

Original Radom pistols produced for the Polish Army were extremely well made and finished and they can be recognized by the engraved Polish eagle on the 1eft of the slide, together with the inscription `FB Radom VIS wz 35', plus the year of manufacture and the Patent Number 15567. Some early pistols also were grooved to accept a holster / shoulder stock.

The Radom plant was taken over by the German occupying forces in 1939, and it continued to manufacture the VIS-35 pistol as well as other arms. Pistols manufactured produced under German control are of a lower quality and, as demand became more pressing, the hammer release lever and the stripping catch was omitted. Originally, VIS-35 grips were of black plastic with `FB' molded into the left side and `VIS' into the right, these grips were abandoned in 1943 and plain wooden grips were used thereafter. Pistols produced under German control were not marked with the Polish eagle and the German Fremdengerat Number 'P35(p)' was added to the inscription on the slide, Waffenamt Inspector's mark, 'WaA77', and the Wehrmacht eagle over '823', the acceptance mark, were also stamped onto barrel lug, slide and frame. VIS-35 production came to an end in 1944 when the Soviet Army took Radom, and the factory was wrecked in the battle.

As with any pistol that is this old, I would advise you to have your Radom checked by a competent gunsmith before attempting to fire it. Radom VIS-35 values range for $100 to over $650 depending condition and markings, let us know if you are interested in selling. Marc


# 1914 - M1903 Remington Rifle
5/4/99
Bill, White Salmon, WA, U.S.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington M1903 30-06 24 Parkerized 318xxxx

Stock-( flat side) On left side "circle crossed cannon" to rear of this FJA in square box. under stock-circled P with small G behind it. flaming bomb on muzzle end of stock. Barrel RA 7-42. flaming bomb with punch mark in center. Receiver has punch mark on flat to right of serial #. Bolt (marked "B2" on top flat- no other markings). stamped trigger guard and middle band -marked "R" Milled buttplate,upperband-marked"R".Sling-westco1944. Bayonet U.S.#544*** SA 1912,(long)green plastic fiber scabbard marked U.S. w/flaming bomb w/large S under. what do the markings mean on the bolt(b2) with no Remington markings. Also did Remington mix milled with stamped parts with no rime or reason, or was there a structured documentation to this. The rifle is in 95% condition, the bayonet has 90%blue with no rust. can you tell me anything about this rifle. Thank you.

Answer:
Bill- We cannot tell much about your rifle. You must think it is stolen or be paranoid that the BATF will bust down your door looking for it by serial number. You probably just don't realize that failure to give complete serial numbers is one of the little things that gets me agitated. (Staples in the carpet and left over bits of tape on the walls are others....) All markings are typical of the Remington Model 1903 (Modified) rifles. In 1942 and early 1943 Remington was constantly adopting changes to cut the cost, length of time, or tooling required to produce rifles, which ultimately ended up with the M1903A3 design. The best information on the details involved and the sequence is found in Clark Campbell's excellent "The '03 Era" and in a series of letters and short pieces in Springfield Research Service's U.S. Martial Arms Collector newsletter. While there were general trends, there seem to have been no hard and fast rules, and anyone who makes absolute statements about something happening at a precise point and never before or after that is badly misinformed. Yes, you will find a mix of stamped and milled parts on these. The B2 is probably a "heat lot" indicating what batch of steel was used in making the bolt. The lack of a "R" marking indicates that one of the ladies working there missed marking a part, or perhaps it is one made by another maker and switched at a later date. After all, while these rifles were in US service (or in service in allied forces since many were shipped as lend lease supplies) parts were parts and probably nobody realized what the little marks meant, and they sure didn't care about what a bunch of collectors might worry about 50 years later. Bayonets left over from WW1 were issued with any of the M1903 series rifles and M1 rifles during WW2 until mid 1943 when the shorter M1 bayonet was authorized and earlier long-bladed bayonets began to be shortened to the new specifications. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1861 - Revolver- French, Berger
5/4/99
Chip, Ashford, CT, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Fs BERGER BREVETE St ETIENNE Unknown 45 ??? 6 inch I think it's blued unknown

The information I listed under MAKE is one of two things written on the revolver. This information is along the top of the barrel and is in gold print. The s in Fs is underlined and the t in St is underlined. The second bit of info is a stamped M on the underside of the octagon barrel at the base of the barrel. Also all the metal on this revolver has etched leaves and similar designs. They even etched the trigger guard as well as the end of the butt. The butt also has a ring on it. The gun has it's own wooden carrying case which has the gun powder container / measurer. Bullet mold, a little ladle, and a compartment for the bullets. On the outside top center of the carrying case it has a brass plate that says"A. Bavoual / Les A!mis". I have brought this gun to many local dealer without any of them being able to give me any info. at all. I hope that you can give some idea what I have here. Can you give me any back ground on this revolver.

Answer:
Chip- You have a high quality presentation piece. It is especially nice with the case and all the accessories, and any time you get gold inlaid decorations, that is a sign of a pretty good item. Without photos we cannot do much to identify the design of the gun, but we will see what we can figure out from the information provided.

It is a revolver, and since a bullet mold and powder flask are in the case, it must be percussion rather than cartridge, so that pretty well dates it as 1870 or earlier, but probably no earlier than about 1855-60. Robert Gardner's "Small Arms Makers" has two Bergers listed in St. Etienne, home of many fine French gun makers. F. Berger is listed as working 1844-1851. Jean M. Berger as 1874-1881, and he was granted a U.S. patent on magazine firearms in 1880. I confess I know nothing about French, but will translate anyway. "Fs" is probably the abbreviation for the French "Freres" or "Fils" which would translate to Berger brothers or sons, so it may be related to either of these makers or some kinfolk in between. Brevette means patent, so perhaps there is some feature patented by Berger, although it may actually have been made by someone else to sell under his name and markings.

The most interesting part is the engraving and gold inlay work. While nice by itself, the brass plate on the case adds even more interest. A. Bavoual is probably the recipient of the gun and "Les Amis" represents "his friends" who presented it. Someone who knows French and French history could probably do some research to figure out who Bavoual was, and maybe the reason for the presentation. A military figure, a businessman, or a scoundrel with multiple mistresses fleeing the country ahead of jealous husbands? Sure would be nice to know. In any case a gun of this quality with case and everything is probably a fairly valuable item. As a wild guess, maybe $1200-2500, but there is little interest in French arms in the US so it may be difficult to sell. If research turned up some more details, it may be worth more. Let us know if you decide to sell it.

While we were able to figure out a little on this one, we really need pictures to do much for most people, so we hope others will send pictures. John Spangler


# 1977 - Colt 1903 Hammerless .32 Pocket Automatic Pistol
5/1/99
Daniel, Allentown, Pa, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Model M 32 ACP 4" Blue 27832

Deluxe Ivory Grips with Colt medallions, overall good condition, good shooter Range in value, how many in the marketplace, history

Answer:
Daniel, The Colt (Model M) 1903 Hammerless .32 Pocket Automatic Pistol is a recoil operated concealed hammer, pocket pistol with an eight round cartridge capacity that was designed by John M Browning. Colt manufactured approximately 772,215 Model 1903 pistols between 1903 and 1945, 200,000 of which were a special run for the U.S. Army for use by the OSS and General officers among others. The 1903 is a well designed pistol with nicely rounded contours, and proportions of barrel and butt that are a nice match for each other. The 1903 is a comfortable pistol to shoot, it fits the hand well, and balances easily, the .32 cartridge is not particularly powerful, so recoil is relatively light. With an overall weight of only 23 ounces the 1903 is easy to carry. A special new feature of the Model 1903 was the slide locking catch on the left hand side. The slide locking catch was incorporated into the Model 1908 which was a .380 version of the Model 1903. Values for standard Colt 1903 pistols range from $150 to $550 depending upon condition, values for 1903 examples with US property markings can go as high as $2500. Marc


# 2052 - Derringer Pistols
5/1/99
Gina

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Derringer Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hello, I am one of the "doesn't know much about guns" subjects. I hope you can help me. My Dad recently gave me a pistol his grandpa had (he was a sheriff). I can't find any serial numbers so I can only give you the name of the gun. It is a Derringer Philadel with German silver on it. Do you know the year of issue and value of this gun? Thank you for your time. Gina

Answer:
Gina- Glad to help NRA supporters. Give a few dollars more to NRA-ILA or NRA PVF next time they send a begging letter. Henry Derringer made about 15,000 or so of his tiny pocket pistols from about the late 1830s to 1868. They were very popular then, and gave birth to the word "derringer" (note two "r" spelling) meaning any small pistol. Their polarity caused them to be copied by many other makers, often to the point of including Derringer or Derringer markings. Flayderman's Guide gives values for the real ones in NRA antique good condition and $1500-1750 in NRA antique fine. Copies run $350-600 in good and fine. Send us some good photos (left right, top and bottom and measurements of the bore and barrel length and maybe we can tell you more. (Send to Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171). Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2051 - M1 Garand Accessory
5/1/99
Frank

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have rubberized pouch 4.5"x8.5" with rounded bottom and snap flap. Supposed to be M 1 related. Marked inside flap "D39347", "D 2998", "G 4834" . Snap stud marked "liberty Gripper". What is it ? Thanks, Frank

Answer:
Frank- Our page has a write up on the early "Gas Trap" Garand rifle. In it you will note that these rifles do not have a trap in the butt to hold cleaning gear. The pouch you describe was issued to hold the necessary cleaning gear for storage in the backpack. It would have been filled with a small can of bore cleaner, the nickel plated brass "oiler and thong case" as previously used with M1903 rifles, the early M3 combination tool, and probably some patches. The pouches were procured in large numbers, and can be found dated as late as 1944 although they became obsolete in mid 1940. John Spangler


# 2050 - Shotgun- J.B. Clement
5/1/99
Aaron

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J.B. Clement Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have had a antique black powder shotgun for some time now and would appreciate a little info on this gun. The name on the double barreled shotgun is "J.B. Clement." On top of the barrel is the words "laminated barrel." Can you give me info such as a book or web site so I may educate myself on what gun I possess?

Answer:
Aaron- Unfortunately there is nothing on the web about such guns, as much as we would like to pass people off to another site so we would not get flooded with questions about the tons of old shotguns with very little collector interest or value, but usually some sentimental value to the owners. Because we are nice guys we answer them all anyway. J.B. Clement was a large sporting goods dealer, probably from the Cincinnati, Ohio region. From the 1880s to 1908 Clement operated in partnership with a Cincinnati gun maker, P. Powell and operated as Powell and Clement. Clement also imported several designs of guns from England and Belgium which varied greatly in quality and price. Charles Carder's "Side by Sides of the World" is the source of this information. Hope it helps. John Spangler


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