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# 632 - Remington Rolling Block- Mexican Model
6/28/97
mike n. ft. myers fl.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Rolling Block #1 45-70 28 Blue Unknown

republica mexicana across top of receiver. remington patent dates on tang ending with 1874 date.

please cane you give me a brief history of this gun. i believe this gun was chambered in 40 spanish but not sure. also could you tell me if this type of action will hold up to 25000 cup ok. i have been shooting light loads with good results. also this gun has been rebarreled with a numrich arms full octagon barrel measuring app. one inch across the flats. ome more thing i need a tang screw for this gun ,could you tell me who i could contact to get this part. sincerely robert michael phillips or I

Answer:
Mike- Afraid we can't help much here. I know some of the Mexican models were originally made in 7mm Mauser, but earlier ones may have been in an older blackpowder caliber. There is an out of print book "Mexican Military Arms" by Hughes that might tell us. I don't have a clue how strong these are, and even if I did, I wouldn't tell you. Wouldn't want to risk supporting some lawyer who doesn't know squat about guns, but would be glad to sue someone else if they turned out to be wrong. Rolling block parts are tough to find. You can probably make a tang screw without too much trouble, even if you have to rethread the hole to a modern thread size. John Spangler


# 640 - Ammunition- 10 Ga brass shells for blackpowder loads
6/28/97
Don R. Kensington, Ct USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 10 Ga Cannon 10 Ga Blank Cannon 10 Ga Unknown Unknown Unknown

Would like to reload shells with black powder. Have tried this and the plastic shells are badly burnt after one or two reloads. Can you tell me where I might get some solid brass shells ?

Answer:
Don- Don't have a clue. I think some of the "cowboy action shooters" might be into 10 GA stuff for the old Winchester lever action shotguns. Track down those fellas and ask them. Check the Century Arms web site (see our links) They have a ammunition page as one of their message centers. It doesn't get much action, but someone there might know. Try a posting on our "Wanted" page. Free, easy...may even find some! Good luck... John Spangler


# 638 - Springfield M1903A3 by National Ordnance
6/28/97
Warren

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Nath. Ord. 1903-A3 30-6 24in. Blue 503XXXX

Barrel Date RA (ORD. Stamp) 12-43Steel Butt Plate with spring door for cleaning kit

I am looking for background info. on this rifle, like what branch of the armed forces it was assigned to, type of duty, and any other historical tid-bits that might surface. Thank You, Warren A. Means Veteran (U.S. Army S.F.) N.R.A. Life Member

Answer:
Warren- Glad to help out fellow NRA Life member! Your rifle was never used by any part of the U.S. military. From the late 1950s through the mid 1960s, Springfields were in high demand, and low supply. Surplus parts for everything but the receiver were plentiful and cheap. Golden State Arms, and then National Ordnance had some receivers made. These were investment castings made in Yugoslavia and/or Spain (depending on which sources you believe). Although somewhat crudely finished, and lacking the slots for use of stripper clips, they are reportedly quite strong and sturdy shooters. Value is quite low compared to the M1903A3 rifles made for the US military by Remington or Smith-Carona. Probably not what you wanted to hear, but I swear its the truth... John Spangler (veteran, USN)


# 637 - Telescope, Herter's brand
6/28/97
Ben

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Herter's 8X Rifle Scope....1963 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Scope is in very good condition, purchased by me in 1963, with little use after original antelope hunt.

Is there a market for this scope, and do you have any idea of its approximate value and who might buy it? I'd be interested in a trade also, for a target scope. Thanks Ben 267@aol.com

Answer:
Ben- There are a few folks who collect Herters stuff. (I always thought it would be a neat idea. They sold everything from reload gear, stocks, decoys, canoes, to pistols and rifles. Everything was the 'world's best, famous family secret recipes, etc.'. Most was made by various other makers and sold under the Herters name. At one time I had about 4 different catalogs from them over about a 10 year period. I had to get rid of them because I don't know how to cook. I would have starved after my wife left me if I started to collect Herter's stuff too.) I'd recommend an ad in Shotgun News or Gunlist in the scopes section. You might try Gary Fellers in Texas who buys and sells just scopes and sights. Fine gentleman, but think he is more into the name brand stuff. Good Luck- somebody would like that, but it may be tough to find them... John Spangler


# 635 - Remington 1100 Shotgun 20 GA Mag
6/28/97
Dale Washington, PA USA seeright@nb.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 1100 20G Magnum Unknown Blue Unknown

full choke

Just purchased above for 375.00. Good or bad price? Appears 100% with no marks My question: Can regular shotshells be fired in a gun marker 20 G magnum 3 inch or must I use magnum 3 inchers? Thank you Dale

Answer:
Dale- Sorta out of our line- not really an antique or collector item. You can check the prices at WALMART or the local sporting goods store to see how good a deal you got. I have heard that you can shoot the shorter, weaker loads in magnums, but there may be some adjustments necessary to ensure semi-automatic operation. You should write to Remington for an instruction manual to find out for sure... John Spangler


# 634 - Shotgun, Syracuse New Twist, Hammerless
6/28/97
Garry, Vancouver, BC

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Syracuse Arms Co. ? 12 Guage 30" ? 22XXX

Double barrel, side by side, hammerless, stamped "NEW TWIST"

I got this old hammerless side by side double barreled shotgun from my Dad and while I don't think it is worth much (not in working order, firing pin springs broken) I would like some info about it. Roughly how old is it? Does the stamping "NEW TWIST" mean this is a Damascus barrel? There appears to be a spiral pattern on the barrels but I am not sure if this is due to the finish or the construction. All the rest is in fair condition. Thank you. Garry Gruenke

Answer:
Garry- Syracuse Arms Co operated at Syracuse, NY, from 1888 to 1908. The "New Twist" marking may indicate damascus construction, or more likely in my opinion, steel barrels given a fake damascus appearance. Possibly review of old sporting magazines of the period might clarify this if you can find an ad for this company. Value- probably about US $50 as a wall hanger... John Spangler


# 630 - Enfield Logo
6/28/97
Robert

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lee - Enfield N. A. N. A. Unknown Unknown Unknown

Simply put-What kind of emblem or insignia was there for the Enfield? I have T-shirts and patches with S&W, Ruger, etc., even Mauser's stylized name. I'd like to make up a "T" or something for Enfield, having a couple of rifles and a handgun, but I can't find any real insignia. Any ideas?

Answer:
Robert- Beats the gunpowder out of me! Better check our link page for "Research Page for Collectors of Lee-Enfield Rifles" where all the Enfield experts hang out. I think the "Iron Shirt Co." already has a tee shirt with SMLE and a Crown over VR on it, but could be wrong. Mine just have paint and grease stains... John Spangler


# 629 - Civil War "Quaker" Musket
6/21/97
Jim Strang, Avon, OH

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mostly Springfield, Mods. Of 1816 And 1864 Toy? Drill? Muzzle .69; Lock And Bolster, .58 27 3/4 Paint & Patina Unknown

Stock stamped "F.N. HOSSACK on both side a bout 2 inches in front of butt plate. "J.W." stamped immediately to rear of trigger guard.

Today I was given this "toy" rifle, a replica of a C.W. short musket. Ithas an 1864 Springfield lock and a bolster 2 1/8 inches long, ancient nipple corroded in place. But the barrel is a wooden dowel -- very real-istic looking, which is fitted into about six inches of the muzzle of an1816 U.S. musket. The nose cap - upper barrel band is that of the 1816Musket, but nicely fitted to the stock. There are no provisions for sling swivels. My guess is this was made up as a drill rifle for a military school after the C.W. -- it's a nice-looking job, although the stock is split at the wrist and it does look its age. You ever heard of such a thing?

Answer:
Jim- (Hey, I've been to Avon, OH!) After the Civil War there were mounds of surplus guns and parts. Military schools were popular, even for real young kids. Bannerman and other surplus dealers put together toy guns for these kids/schools. Often called "Quaker Guns" because they would not shoot (The Quakers are pacifists.) Most often these are seen with M1861-63 type upper bands and barrel stubs, but a few had the .69 caliber style upper bands. Choice was probably driven by they type of surplus bayonets they had available for sale. The breech sections were cast iron. Sometimes the locks used various internal parts stuck together which would just barely function. Interesting old items, but not worth a heck of a lot (despite the prices I've seen some people asking!) You can sometimes find M1903, M1917 rifles and M1 carbines, or parts of them, made into similar toy guns. I can probably repair the wrist for you, let me know and we can discuss prices... John Spangler


# 624 - Norwegian(?) Hagen .22 Target Pistol
6/21/97
E.James

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
L.H. Hagen & Co. - Christianina Target Pistol 22 Cal. 9.625 Octagon Blue none

On the side of the barrel and on the trigger mechanisim the is a Z with a star above it. Also on the side of the barrel is a circle with the letters E L G with a star below them in the following configuration. E L G *

I am trying to determine the approximate year of manufacture and as much history about the weapon as possible. The name Chrisiania, which appears on the barrel, was the name of the city now known as Oslo, Norway and the was known by that name until 1925. Can you suggest any materials that I reference to obtain information on the weapon? Thank You!

Answer:
Sir- The ELG and star is a Belgian proofmark, so I suspect the pistol was made in Belgium. It's only about 600 miles from Belgium to Oslo, so it is possible that L. Hagen is a retailer instead of the maker. Robert Gardner's "Small Arms Makers" lists "L.H. Hagan & Co.- Christiania (now Oslo) Norway, 1875-95. Exhibited rifles at the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893." I don't know much about European arms, especially target pistols, and don't even have any good references to look in to help conceal this ignorance. Maybe you should try our wanted page- "Want info on Hagan Co. In Oslo, Norway?" Sorry we can't do more... John Spangler


# 628 - Swords "Knights Templar"
6/21/97
nick, lancaster ,ca, usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Sir, I am looking for information on two swords I have, I do not know there value to sell them both are identical with the exception on name engraving. The swords have a metal cap on the hilt of the type you see in knights armor. The handles are ivory with a cross with a triangle over the base, the hilt is in a t shape with a shield crossed swords other unidentifiable items engraved on them there is a chain that goes from the helmet on the hilt to the t. the scabbards have multiple engraved metal items attached to them with crosses and eagles on them, the scabbard has Seattle commandery, no 2 k. t. engraved on them and in hoc signo vinces. The blades are engraved with pictures on knights jousting Arabian looking castles and an eagle with a shield among other items. On the blades hilt is engraved m.c. lilley & co, columbus ohio. The blades are about 3 foot long if you could help me or point me in the right direction I would appreciate it.

Answer:
Nick- Your swords were made for use by the "Knights Templar" a fraternal organization very active from about the 1880s on. These swords have very little collector interest or value. They seem to sell in the $50-100 range, although some better or worse quality ones may be above or below that. M.C. Lilley was a big supplier of such things, as well as swords for military use. I don't know the significance of all the symbols on them, that is deep secret stuff only the lodge members are supposed to know... John Spangler


# 626 - Mauser 6.5x57mm Sporting Rifle
6/21/97
roger melrose ma usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser - Werke Obendorf It Has A Set Trigger And A Scope 6.5 X57 Unknown Blue 125XXX

On the bolt lever is a bird with outstretched wings on the barrel there is also a bird with wings

Is this W.W.II or earlier and what is it worth . My father got this in combat in W.W.II in Germany.

Answer:
Roger- Mauser made about 125,000 commercial sporting rifles between 1898 and 1946, in various styles and with different features. One price guide says they run between $1000 and $4000, and another has them running $575 to $4000. (Note these are for sporters made by Mauser, not gunsmith conversions of military actions.---A warning to keep everyone else from getting excited.) As with all guns, condition is very important, and caliber is too. Your caliber is an oddball one, so that hurts. If you have 95% plus finish, and scope is perfect, sounds like you have a very collectable item. Little finish, rust and pits, boogered scope, and you have a not very collectable rifle that was probably once the prize of some rich German hunter. If you live in Massachusetts, take it to the big gun show at the "Big E" in West Springfield and you can probably find someone who knows a lot more about these... John Spangler


# 625 - English Pepperbox Pistol
6/21/97
nick, lancaster, ca. usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Cap And Ball 2-1/2 Blue With Sterling Silver Housing And But none

The pistol has six barrels in a circle with no rifling, there is a hammer on top of the pistol that is about 2 inches long and falls on round holes that look like a primer of some type goes on. There is numerous swirling engravings in the sterling silver and some enraging on the barrels. the grip is made of a dark wood and the strap is also sterling silver with this engraved on the top of the strap. (G & J. DEANE , LONDON BRIDGE). The trigger is enclosed in a guard. There are no serial numbers of other identifying markings on the pistol.

What do i have, how old is it.

Answer:
Nick- (Our friend with the swords above!) This is a good item. George and John Deane made six barrel "pepperbox" pistols at 30 King William Street, London around 1856-58. The firm changed names over about 20 years as various brothers died and new partners joined. Pepperbox revolvers became obsolete as pistols with revolving cylinders became popular. Many were made and carried in the United States from the 1840s until around the end of the Civil War. Deane usually made good quality items, and if in good condition, there would be a fair amount of collector interest in your gun. Perhaps the frame and backstrap are silver plated, but more likely just polished steel, not sterling silver. Let us know if we can help you sell it. Depending on condition, it would probably go in the $250-450 range... John Spangler


# 627 - Heym Mauser Rifle
6/18/97
Bruce, Chino Hills, CA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
F W Heym Converted Mauser 98 30-06 24" Blue 60XXX

FR. WILH HEYM on barrel Engraved butterknife bolt handle. 2-leaf lightly engraved rear sight, ramp front, sling swivel attached to barrel in front of stock. Floorplate ornately engraved with initials (not mine). This rifle is ultralight, with thin barrel. The stock is "beech" with some checkering and a cheek piece (not monte carlo). Unfortunately somewhere along the line the stock was broken at the pistolgrip and repaired, leaving an 1/8" gap between the two pieces. Where the crest would be is an oval stipples and surrounded by stamped floral engraving.

I know Heym now makes expensive shotguns and combination firearms. Is this one of his earlier attempts? There is no caliber designation, I had to cast the chamber. Is it worth trying to restore the stock? It is an interesting rifle but the light weight makes it kick worse than my .300. Also, because of the bolt, there is no way to mount a scope, and to be honest, the leaf sight is not the best. Anyway, thanks for the help. I bought it from a pawn shop in LA just prior to the riots, and their records turned to ashes.

Answer:
Bruce- Friedrich Wilhelm Heym got started in 1934, and resumed manufacture shortly after WW2, and is still in operation. Sounds like a classic European sporter rifle. Due to the caliber and relatively high serial number, I would guess made for sale to Americans after WW2. Its classic features are not popular with modern American hunters, so I guess it isn't a high dollar item in its present condition. I doubt if any of the locals in the LA riot area owned things like this, and suspect they obtained it elsewhere, perhaps under dubious circumstances. I'd recommend you take it to a gun show and see who wants to buy a project. Masuer 98 stock blanks are easy to get and this could be a great opportunity for a young stockmaker to salvage a fine old gun. Maybe redo the bolt handle, etc. Great possibilities... John Spangler


# 620 - Russian Mosin-Nagant M1910 Carbine
6/18/97
Gary ics

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have acquired a mod 1910 Mosion Nagant carbine, it is dated 1913..It is from an old collection from the fifties. I can find no information on it other than physical characteristics. How rare is this piece? Thank you Gary ics

Answer:
Another Mystery person- (as long as they don't call us names or breathe heavy, I guess we can still listen). I don't have any production figures, but Smith's "Book of Rifles" and "Small Arms of the World" says they are "comparatively rare". I don't think I've ever seen one, although there are lots of the later Model 1938 and 1944 carbines on the market. A friend collects Czarist era guns, so let us know if you decide to sell this. There is also a scarce M1891 Dragoon rifle with a 29 inch barrel (shorter than the 1891 rifle, but same as the later 1891/30). Lots of variations in these Mosin-Nagants, and most are inexpensive. A great collecting field... John Spangler


# 622 - Brown Bess Identification-
6/18/97

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I bought a musket at an auction and think it is a Brown Bess. It has three markings near the base of the barrel. The first is the letter "P" under a crown. The second (middle) marking is a circle with 8 lines that come from the edge of the circle towards, but not to, the center with eith the number "10" or "I0" under it, the last is an English mark of the letter "V" under a crown. The musket resembles photos of Brown Bess's in books. I date the gun to 1750-1780 but would like to know what the first two markings are.

Answer:
Mr. Mystery Man- We would need photos to confirm identity as a Brown Bess. The markings sound English, however we need to see them to be sure. There is a good way to copy markings: hold the marked item over a candle to get soot over the marked area. (Be careful if near wood, you don't want to burn the wood!) Then take a piece of Scotch tape (the "invisible" kind seems to work best) and put it on the marked area, lift it off and put it on a piece of white paper, or 3x5 card. Send it to us at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171 and we will try to identify the markings for you... John Spangler


# 621 - Italian Mannlicher-Carcano 6.5mm Rifle
6/18/97
Steve Clarks Summit, Pa. Lackawanna Steve21656

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Beretta Gardone 1936 XIV Faet R5906 Unknown 18" Blue Unknown

On the stock it also has the # 5906 stamp in the wood and a arrow

Could you tell me was this a rifle from WW2. Also the stock was cut shorter and does that decrease it value if it has any value.. also any other information on the rifle

Answer:
Steve- You have an Italian military carbine made in 1936. It could have started as either of two models. The Model 1891 has a permanently attached folding bayonet, and the stock on these look like it has been cut down, but has a groove in the bottom where the bayonet rested when folded. The later Model 1891 TS had a stock going almost to the muzzle, like most other military rifles, and used a conventional knife bayonet. These fire 6.5mm ammo that is not easy to find. Many of these were imported in the 1950s and early 60s, and often sporterized to make them easier to sell. Price with a scope mounted was $9.95-$14.95. Lee Harvey Oswald used one of these when he murdered President Kennedy. There is some macabre interest in the "Kennedy" versions, but the others seem to sell for very little, usually about $50.00, or less if cut down. Just like the M1 Garand, these need a special clip to load the magazine, and without the clip, will only fire as a single shot rifle... John Spangler


# 631 - U.S. Model 1816, .69 Caliber Smoothbore
6/18/97
John

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I would like to inquire about a flint lock rifle cal. around .70 it is in very good cond. with bayonet and scabbard. The weapon has the date 1828 U.S. near the stock, it also has an eagle engraved near the trigger and the word "POMEROY" marked on it. Any info on the value or history would be very helpful. THANK-YOU

Answer:
John- Your musket is a U.S. Model 1816, .69 caliber smoothbore, one of about 21,600 made by Lemuel Pomeroy of Pittsfield, Mass under federal contract between 1817 and 1836. In case you are not be real familiar with older guns, let's confirm it is flintlock, not one of the more common examples converted to percussion. Percussion conversion- hammer hits a small tube sticking up from the top of the barrel, or from a projection on the side of the barrel. Fllintlock- hammer has large flat spot to hold flint, hole at rear of it for screw which holds another flat piece to clamp on top of flint. Hammer hits a hinged piece which pivots on side of lockplate, and uncovers a brass pan as it opens. Small hole in side of barrel for flash from pan to reach into main powder charge. If an original flintlock, Flayderman indicates a value of $800.00 in NRA Antique good (see our links for definitions) or $1750.00 in NRA antique fine. Bayonet is $50-125 item. Scabbard, depending on if early model or common Civil War type would be another $50-150. A very nice collectable item with pretty good value if in flint. Less desirable if converted to percussion, but still with moderate demand but at lower prices. Let us know if you are interested in selling, we can help you find it a good home... John Spangler


# 619 - British Pattern 1914 .303 Rifle By Eddystone
6/14/97
ken, miami, fl, usa, ruthl@fla.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Eddystone .3030? 26 Inches Blue Unknown Unknown

ERA 2083, EY, crossed swords with GR over and F under, PATT.14 on stock, IE inside circle on stock, regular sights, additional adjustable side sniper sights

I can't determine if this is an Enfield 1917 .30 caliber, or if this is a .303caliber British No. 3 Mark 1 (P-14)?

Answer:
Ken- You have the .303 version, not the US .30-06. These were made by Eddystone (a Remington subsidiary located near Philadelphia) with the ERA marking, Remington's Ilion plant marked with RE in an oval, and by Winchester (marked WRA). Originally designated as "Rifle, Magazine, .303 inch, Pattern 1914, they were redesigned as "Rifle No. 3 Mark I" in 1926. This was about the same time that the US changed from using the year as a model number and started M1, M2, etc. The US model 1917 rifles were all clearly marked "U.S./ Model of 1917/[manufacturer's name]and serial number" (except very early Winchesters which were only marked "U.S./W/serial number"). The "sniper sights" on the left side are actually called "volley sights." They were used for extreme long range firing, a legacy from colonial wars where the enemy might be seen at long distances in the mountains of Afghanistan, or on the plains of Africa. The sling swivels on the Pattern 1914 were offset to the right, to keep the sling from getting in the way when using the volley sights. The "EY" marking denotes that the rifle was considered substandard for some reason (perhaps bore wear or other minor defects) and was limited to "Emergency use" only. Pattern 14 rifles with the volley sights intact, legible stock markings, and all matching parts are hard to find... John Spangler


# 618 - Allen .22 Derringer
6/14/97
Bret, Poway, CA. USA, bduff@qualcomm.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stamped With "Allen Makers" On Barrel 1800's Small Single Shot Derrenger???? .22 Short Or Long 1 1/2 In Bare Metal W/brass Frame & Wood Grips none

As I said: It's a small pocket Gun with what appears to be the name "Allen Makers" across the top of the barrel. Looks to be something out of the late 1800's To load: you need to put the hammer at half cock and swing the barrel out to the side to remove & rechmber each round.

Well this little pocket pistol was given to me by my grandmother about 15 years ago and I have yet to have any luck figuring out where it came from. She said it was given to her by an old friend when (as tourists) the traveled the Pony Express trail back in the 1950's. Rumor has it that he found it in a old ghost town in the 1920's. True or not it makes a good story. Anyway do you have any ideas?!???

Answer:
Bret- Ethan Allen was a well-known name in the gun business until 1871. Later some furniture company hijacked the name, but has no connection with the gunmakers. Several variations of pivoting barrel single shot derringers were made by the company between the early 1860s and the company's demise in 1871. These included .22, .32 and .41 rimfires with various barrel lengths. Yours sounds like the "Vest pocket derringer" although Flayderman's usually precise information indicates that these had 2 inch barrels, and were marked "E. ALLEN & Co. MAKERS" and several hundred were made circa 1869-71, with a value of $175.00 in NRA antique good, or $340.00 in NRA antique fine. (See link for definitions) I guess you can believe any story you want to, just so it is set after 1869 and starts "Once upon a time..." John Spangler


# 623 - M1911 Springfield .45 Pistol And M1912 Holster
6/14/97
Rob, Spartanburg, SC, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY U.S.A. (Sp'fld Army Model OF 1911.U.S.Army. W/HOLSTER 45 ACP 5 Inches Original Blue - About 75 - 80% 744XX

HOLSTER (WHAT I REALLY WANT TO LEARN ABOUT!!!!!!!!!!!) MARKED ON BACK: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL 1914. K.?.K. (may be K.C.K. or K.O.K) PISTOL THAT CAME IN HOLSTER Slide RHS: "eagle" Model OF 1911.U.S.Army. Frame RHS: No 744xxSlide RHS: PATENTED APR.20,1987 SPRINGFIELD ARMORY SEPT.9,1902, DEC.19, 1905, FEB. 14, 1911 U.S.A. COLT'S PT. F.A. MFG. CO. "flaming bomb" fwd of hammer ! Frame LHS: UNITED STATES PROPERTY (fwd of trigger guard) "flaming bomb" behind trigger Grips have large diamonds around screws, flat non-serrated mainspring housing Barrel bushing, slide lever, safety, etc. have "s" marked on them. Pistol seems to be correct SAA made M1911, complete and original. Mfg. late 1914.Nice shape with honest holster wear and about 75% - 80% dull Springfield blue. Holster is brown russet leather similar to M1916 with US in oval on the flap. Inside the flap "COLONEL" is printed in ink on one line and "744xx" (pistol's serial number) below it. Flap edges are smoothly burnished with detail line. The flap is held closed with round brass ball on post just like the M1916 WWII holsters mfg. by Boyt. Holster and pistol have been together for a long time, possibly since they were manufactured and issued in 1914. The holster obviously adds to an otherwise desirable pistol but is the holster itself merely interesting, unusual, or rare by itself? No matter what, it must stay with the pistol! I have never seen one like it and or found references to this style. I have found a several articles and pictures of WWII versions of the M1916 holster, but little on WWI or earlier. The different details about the holster are described below. [Lengthy description of holster omitted.] My questions are: 1. What model holster is this? Experimental?2. What kind of unit was it issued to?3. What is the purpose of Part C described

Answer:
Rob- That is a great outfit you have. Glad to see you insist on keeping them together. As a Springfield addict (but I can quit anytime I want to....) I especially like the pistol. Your holster is the Model 1912, usually called a "swivel holster". They use a leather strap about 3/8 inch wide with a buckle (passing through strips on the back of the holster) to secure the holster to the leg, unlike the later version which just used a leather thong. These were standard for all mounted troops until the familiar Model 1916 was introduced to overcome problems with the swivel mechanism. The swivel holsters continued in use well into WWI. About 200,000 of the M1912 holsters were made at Rock Island Arsenal between 1911 and 1916, and many more by commercial firms for sale to officers who were required to purchase their own accouterments. The "swivel holsters" are hard to find, and even real rough ones bring close to $100.00, so I would guess that a good one matched to the gun would add a couple hundred to the value. There was a Model 1912 "dismounted" holster similar to yours, but the hanger was a solid piece instead of using the swivel arrangement. These were intended troops other than mounted folks. Everything you could ever want to know about "US Military Holsters and Pistol Cartridge Boxes" can be found in a superb book of that title by Dr. Edward Scott Meadows. It is out of print, but we are fortunate to be able to offer a copy in our book catalog. I most highly recommend this book to all U.S. military collectors. Buy from us, or someone else, but please add one to your library... John Spangler


# 616 - Winchester Model 1886 Rifle
6/14/97
david

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Model 1880 40-82 W.C.F. 20" Appears To Be Gun Metal Without Finnish Unknown

patent Oct.14,1884/jan.20,1885

Gun is in good condition, fires accurately, with some pitting in barrel, has original stock/forearm in serviceable condition, with initials carved(presumable original owner). Were would a serial Number be located? Ammunition sources? Approximate Value?

Answer:
David- Interesting old gun you have there. The 1884 and 1885 patent dates confirm this is a model 1886 (not 1880- guess your typing is no better than mine), and a "later" one at that. The serial number should be on the lower tang, so you have to open the lever to see it. Standard barrel length for the rifle was 26 inches, while extra light rifles and carbines had 22 inch barrels. Your 20 inch barrel could be result of a special order (can be verified by a "factory letter") or someone who once owned a hacksaw and wanted a shorter barrel. Finding .40-82 ammo will be hard, although I have a few rounds available at $4.00 each. There are several variations of the Model 1886 in sights, takedown/solid frame, etc. that influence value. With no finish, some pitting and carved initials it would probably be much less than the $800.00 listed by Flayderman for a standard rifle in NRA Antique very good. However, special features may add to the value, and some folks are willing to spend a lot for old western guns with "character." If you decide to sell this, we would be glad to take it on consignment, tell you what it will sell for, and find a good home for it... John Spangler


# 614 - Shotgun- Crescent .410 With Short Barrels
6/14/97
mark, phoenix, az, usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Crescent Davis Arms Corps Crescent Certified Shotgun 410 Approx:15" Blue Unknown

This pistol grip shotgun is marked 'crescent davis arms corp, norwich, conn. usa' / it also has '410' followed by a 'g' in a 'diamond' / '.227' is marked along the barrel along with 'made in USA'.

This gun belonged to my grandfather who recently passed away. The gun was left to my father who remembered firing the weapon when he was a kid. We don't know where my grandfather acquired the weapon, so we would appreciate any information regarding the era this gun was made and the rarity of such a weapon as well as the legality of owning one in the state of Arizona.

Answer:
Mark- A shotgun with barrel less than 18 inches long, or a total length of less than 25 inches is illegal in all 50 states, under federal law. The only exception is if it is already registered. Some states may have even more restrictive laws, but I can't tell you for sure. It was probably made in the early 1900s, and cut down by an owner many years ago, before such guns were outlawed during the 1930s. You should destroy the gun immediately with a cutting torch, or saw it in pieces. Or, you could turn it in to your local law enforcement authorities for destruction. This is an example of an old family gun you definitely don't want to keep!... John Spangler


# 613 - Hamilton No. 7 "Boys Rifle"
6/11/97
Donald Conroe TX USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Hamilton Rifle Company Plymouth Michigan NO. 7 22 12" Nickle Plated Extruded Wire Unknown

All metal rifle, made by the Hamilton Rifle Co. of Plymouth Michigan Patent Pend. 22cal No7 all written on the rifle butt. Have been told11 of these rifles were made, mine is No7. I was told the year of manufacture was 1896. Very primitive, in my opinion,.

Have you ever heard of the Hamilton Rifle Company, and if I were to order an appraisal, can I transmit a digital picture?

Answer:
Donald- Jim Perkins' "American Boys Rifles" is loaded with info on the Hamilton Rifle Co. They operated in Plymouth, Michigan from late 1898 until 1945. The founder/inventor, Coello Hamilton, learned tool and die making in the emerging automobile industry, worked with Daisy in their early days before branching off on his own. Your charitable description of the rifle as "very primitive" is accurate, but much of the other information is incorrect. A total of 44,712 Model 7 rifles were made between November 4, 1899 and June 29, 1901. By mid 1911, they had made around 800,000 rifles of various models, and many more after that. There are many collectors of "boys' rifles" and a Model 7 in good condition is pretty tough to find, as unruly kids mistreated most in addition to using a lot of old blackpowder ammo with corrosive primers. One price guide lists a value of $350 in good condition, and $150 even in "poor"... John Spangler.


# 612 - Remington-Lee Carbine
6/11/97
Danko , Santiago de Chile

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Lee/Remington Bolt Magazine Carabine 1879? 45-70 ? Blued ?

I would appreciate any information you can tell me about it, specially about the dates of manufacturing according to serial numbers. thanks and sorry for my English.

Answer:
Danko- Your English is better than my Spanish. Remington Lee .45-70 rifles were made between 1880 and 1907 with 32 inch barrels. Carbines had 24 inch barrels and are very scarce. These rifles and carbines are called model 1882 or 1885. Model 1899 Remington Lee rifles were made for smokeless powder cartridges (.30-40, .303, 6mm, 7mm and 7.65mm). No serial number/date information is available, but the carbines probably fall in the 1885-1899 period... John Spangler


# 608 - Springfield .58 Musket By Bridesburg
6/11/97
peter deerfield nh usa,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Musket/ Contractor/ Bridesburg 1862 .58 Unknown Unknown Unknown

Typical contractor markings for civil war musket

Musket has normal front stud and rear ladder sight for that period. also have carved out area on stock that friend of mine says fits a craymore(not sure of spelling)sight. was the sight a later period add on or are we looking at an atypical example of customizing the gun for that soldiers use during the war.

Answer:
Peter- ALfred Jenks of Philadelphia made 98,464 Model 1861 muskets at plants in Philadelphia and Bridesburg (near Philadelphia). Your friend probably is talking about "Creedmore" sights (named after a rifle range in New York famous for long range shooting) popular in the 1880s-1900 period. I am certain this was added after the musket left military service, and it detracts rather than adds to the value of the gun. The military sights had "peeps" set for 100,300 and 500 yards and were sufficient for infantry tactics of the period. Shooting these muskets is quite popular with members of the North-South Skirmish Association at their range in Winchester, VA (and at others). Great fun to watch, and gives a good understanding of how effective these muskets really were. (In college I took a couple of history professors out to shoot Civil War era guns to better understand what they had been teaching about for decades. They had fun, learned a lot, and I must have gotten smarter because my grades got better.)... John Spangler


# 606 - Shotgun, Ithaca Double Barrel
6/11/97
Walter, Yorkton, Ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ithaca Side By Side Double 12 Ga 30 Inches Blue 352XXX

- Marked "smokeless powder steel" on top of the right barrel.- Marked "made in usa" on top of the left barrel.- Has a pointing setter and the words " ITHACA GUN CO. ITHACA N.Y. " engraved on each side of the frame.- Has four matching serial # stamped the frame, the barrels, the fore stock, and the fore stock fastening clip.

I recently acquired this gun which was owned by my great grandfather. Can anyone tell me the age of this gun? Also is it rare? And lastly, what is it's value. ( the gun is in very good original condition. )Any information is appreciated. Thanks Walter V.

Answer:
Walter- Your Ithaca was probably made in 1921, and is sometimes called the "Flues" model after they guy who designed it in 1908. These were made in various grades with higher ones having very fancy engraving etc. Yours sounds like the plain vanilla variety, one of about 50,000 made from 1908 to 1926. Value is probably in the $300-500 range assuming it does not have any exotic features... John


# 602 - Springfield M1903 Rifle Ser. No. 1426xxx
6/11/97
dennis, galt, calif. usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Armory 1903 30-06 24" Parkerized Dark 1426XXX

Barrel is marked SA 1-33 stock is marked on left side with ordnance wheel and RA-P barrel is not star gauged as for as I can tell. Stock is different from other '03 rifles that I've seen in the sense that it is rougher and not heavily impregnated with oils. Barrel is in beautiful condition and there is no markings on the bolt face to indicate firing. I bought is from an elderly fellow who said he had it since the '60s I read in the NRA reproduction article that the 1903 was produced only until 1929 in the standard model and rifles produced after that year were national match rifles with star gauge barrels. I've also been shown a serial number chart that didn't go high enough to show this rifle's serial number. Is this possibly a rebuilt rifle from leftover parts or maybe a national match reject? I've been offered $400 by the shops in the area, is this a fair value?

Answer:
Dennis- Your rifle was probably made in 1933. In Fiscal Year 1933 Springfield made about 1100 NM rifles plus 39,828 service grade spare barrels and 19,364 receivers. These could have been assembled into complete rifles any time after that. Your rifle is not listed in any of my references as either a DCM sale or specific military usage. Both service grade rifles and National Match rifles are found with numbers close to yours. The star gauge markings look like a small turtle stamped on the muzzle at 6 o'clock. There is also a tiny letter/number stamped on the barrel somewhere in the rear band to rear sight area- usually a letter over 3 or 4 numbers (example F over 3247). NM rifles also had the inside of the receiver where the bolt slides polished bright, not just from wear, but carefully and thoroughly. The RA-P indicates rebuild, or at least inspection, at Raritan Arsenal, Metuchen, NJ. Your rifle has the desirable nickel steel action, and if the bore is nice, it is probably worth at least $400. If star gauged, it is worth at least double that, and probably more, depending on the type of stock. Many NM and service grade rifles were rebuilt in military facilities and by private parties over the years for various purposes. Without seeing the gun it is impossible to tell exactly happened to yours. Even if we saw it, it still might defy accurate interpretation. This might be a collectors prize worth a premium, or just some great parts that a traditional bolt action rifle shooter would love to have for shooting... John Spangler


# 600 - Winchester Model 1873 Rifle
6/8/97
Bobby, Winchester, TN, US

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Rifle/Lever Action 1873 38 Cal. Unknown Blue 719XXXB

None

How many of this model of rifles were made?

Answer:
Bobby- A total of about 720,609 1873 rifles were made between 1873 and 1923. Yours was in the last year of manufacture. Octagon barrels (count 'em you'll find eight sides, while a hexagon has only six) outnumbered round barrels about 6 to 1. .44 and .32 caliber were both more popular than .38 caliber... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 596 - Webley & Scott Revolver, Mark III .38 Caliber
6/8/97
Dave; Florence, AL, USA;

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley & Scott ? .38 S&W 3" Normal Polished Blue (not Military Finish) 187XXX

(Located on top of barrel:)Army & Navy .C.S.L London(on right side of frame, lower, front:)Webley Patent(on left side of frame, lower, front:)W&S above what appears to be a bullet with wings(on left side of frame, very top:)Mark " III" .38

This revolver looks like my run of the mill Mark IV military Webley, but is smaller, shinier, and has a stubby grip -- more like a Smith & Wesson J-frame than a Webley. What is it? What's the C.S.L and London stuff about?

Answer:
Dave- The Webley Mark III was introduced in 1896-97, for police and civilian use, and as commercial sale guns had a better finish.. They were similar to the larger models in .455 caliber being made for the government, but the Mark III name is a commercial, not a military designation. Officially these used the .38 Webley cartridge, but the .38 S&W (.38-200 in British terminology) or .38 Colt New Police were considered to be usable in these guns. (Just historical info, not a recommendation that you try anything like this.) The grip shape varied somewhat over the years, and was not required to conform to military pattern. Production of this model continued until at least 1927 when the Mark IV was introduced, and perhaps even longer. The Army & Navy Cooperative Society, LTD, was located in London. This was a place where military officers purchased arms and uniform items, probably at reduced prices (sorta like going to Sam's Club nowadays.) At one point there was also a "Junior Army & Navy Stores" where junior officers did there shopping. William C. Dowell's "The Webley Story" is the source for all this info, although I hope everyone just assumes that I already knew all this stuff... John Spangler


# 595 - Shotgun- Western Arms Co. 16 GA
6/8/97
Bill, Elko, Nevada, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Western Arms Co None 16 Gauge 30 Inch Rusted Blue UX3XX

.Just trying to locate history on shotgun. I know it's not worth a dime but it was my great great great grandfathers and I would like to find out a little about it. If you can steer me in the right direction that would be fantastic.

Answer:
Bill- Western Arms Co. was a trade name used by different folks at various times, but on shotguns, it is believed to be on shotguns made by Ithaca for sale by Montgomery Ward, a competitor to Sears for mail order sales after about 1890. Later Montomgery Ward guns seem to have used the "Ward's Western Field" name. Nice old family piece that probably put a lot of food on the table, but not one collectors have much interest in... John Spangler


# 594 - STEN 9mm Machine Carbine MK III
6/8/97
Peter, Monmouth,GwentUK.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Enfield Mark III Sten 1943 Vintage 9 m.m.?? 7.5 Inches Matt Black NONE

STEN MC MKIII

Wher can I get hold of a manual on the above weapon?

Answer:
Peter- Reprints of Sten manuals were available in the US in recent years, but I have not seen any lately. Information based on the manual should be readily available in reference books such as Smith's Small Arms of the World, or others. Book dealer John Denner (Box 122, R.R. 1, North Lancaster, Ontario, Canada KOC 1Z0 phone (603)525-3840) lists two titles on the Sten- Sten Mk II SMG background and history, 60pp soft bound, 1985, $18.00 ($US or CDN???) and Sten Submachine Gun by Rolland Huff, operational manual, 34pp 1986, $11.00. You might try the Imperial War Museum, of the Tower Armories (recently moved, I believe) to see if they can make you a copy from one in their files. Look for a listing for "Machine Gun News" web site where experts in such things hang out. I am sure you want this for study purposes as everything but water guns have already been outlawed in the UK, right? Oh, water guns are next- sorry. Us Americans better wake up and get busy convincing our [#X@!@!] politicians we need not do likewise... John Spangler


# 592 - MG 08/15
6/8/97
Doug,GreenCoveSprings,Fl,US,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Maxim? Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 37XX?

On the top of the gun there are the markings 3748,N.G. MG08-15,Rh.M.&M.S. ,SOMMERDA1918. It is a single barrel light machine gun with a wood stock and has been described as being in fair-good condition. It is belt fed and can be mounted on a tripod. And can be switched from automatic to semiautomatic.

I had the gun appraised 7 years ago and was offered $33,000 dollars for it. How much is it worth today and can you provide me with any info on it. I cannot find it in any of the gun books to find out how much it is worth and no one seems to know anything about it. However I have found a little info with a picture that might help you out. It is at (www.nzonline.co.nz/bmartens/lmg.html)Thank you for any help you can provide!!! Doug

Answer:
Doug- If you don't have registration papers, a machine gun is worth $10,000 and/or 10 years in jail. The MG 08/15 Maxim machine gun was a light machine gun (at the time) even though it is water cooled with a heavy barrel jacket to hold the water, for a weight of about 36 pounds. I think there was an air cooled version for aircraft use, but lack the interest to look for info on that. (Chinn's 4 volume set "The Machine Gun" would be where I would start.) While I don't follow MG prices, I think that a $33,000 offer is extremely generous for a ground version. It might be reasonable for an aircraft version. Shotgun News has a machine gun category where some of the licensed class 3 dealers advertise. They can tell you more about this item. A guy restoring a WWI German fighter probably has the motive, opportunity, and bucks to give this a good home... John Spangler


# 582 - Swedish Mauser Rifle 6.5x55mm
6/5/97
Steve, Phila, PA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Husqvarna Vapenfabriks Artiebolag 1942 M38 (Mauser Type?) 6.5x55 Original Worn Blue 660XXX

The proof markings resemble the crown worn by the male actors in those Chiffon Margarine commercials on TV some years ago... its one of those puffy velvet crowns with a cross on top... I could not find an exact match in the 1996 Blue Book. On the barrel, near the flash suppresser I could barely discern the following letters... CAI ST ALB VT and under that... M38 Sweden The stock has been stripped of its original finish. All numbers on metal pieces match. I can't find this rifle in any of my reference books. It is obviously of the Mauser type, but I'm not that well educated in this area. The shop where this gun sits now has a $120 tag on it. The bolt has been turned down and about 75% of the original bluing remains with no significant rust. The action is slick and tight, but some of the metal checkering no longer sharp. Is this action strong enough to (and worthy of) being used to build custom gun in 7mm-08 caliber? What books can you recommend to help me identify this rifle?

Answer:
Steve- Ludwig Olson's "Mauser Bolt Rifles" is the best reference on this subject. Sounds like a fair price on such a rifle. They are well made and the cartridge is an excellent one, although not well known or fully appreciated. The "CAI ST ALB VT" markings indicate the importer (Century Arms, St. Albans, VT) who specialize in surplus arms (Follow our link to their page if you are interested.) The "flash hiders" are recent additions to cover the muzzle section threaded by the Swedes for some purpose I don't fully understand. We are not experts on action strengths, and won't make recommendations related to shooting safety. However, I understand that most custom rifle makers like the Model 1909 Argentine Mausers, and the 98 parts are easier to get, the magazine floorplate is already hinged, and the actions are supposedly stronger. The ones by DWM seem more popular, but the Argentine made ones are nearly as good. You should be able to find a complete rifle or just the action for less than $200... Have fun! John Spangler


# 580 - Remington M1891 Russian Mosin Nagant Rifle
6/5/97
Mike, Fairport, New York -

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Moisin-Nagant 7.62x54 Overall Length 51" Blue 723XXX

Remington Armory over 1917, Crest of Nicky II on receiver, Russian proof "K" in circle, An "R" in a circle on several pieces of hardware. Walnut one piece stock w/no markings. I have been collecting antique firearms for a number of years, and have recently become interested in the longarms from WWI. Can you provide any information on the collectibility of firearms such as the Remington, Moisin Nagant, resources for determining what types are most typical for the period, what appropriate price ranges may be, and general historical information. Also, what are typical grades of these pieces. I know they certainly saw a great deal of use, but despite the quantities that were produced, it seems difficult to find a good clean example that isn't mixed.

Answer:
Mike- WWI rifles can be an interesting and not terribly expensive collecting field. "Small Arms of the World" and Smith's "Book of Rifles" are two good references that will get you started. Remington made several hundred thousand of these for the Russians, but most were undeliverd when the contract was canceled after the Russian Revolution in October 1917. The U.S had just entered the war, was desperate for arms, and purchased about 280,000 of these from Remington and New England Westinghouse. Some were issued to US troops who were sent to Murmansk and Archangel Russia to fight with the "White Russians" against the "Red Russian Bolsheviks." Most late went to Finland, and many were later rebuilt or modified. Prices are dirt cheap, as little as $50 for a mismatched well used example up to maybe $250 for a minty one all matching with US/Ordnance bomb markings. Stay away from the .30-06 conversions as they are absolutely unsafe to fire. Lots of other good pieces out there, so get started now. Those old bolt actions probably won't be on the gun grabber's confiscation lists for a couple more years. They got to get the awesome semi-automatics and evil "sniper rifles (anything with a telescope) and cheap (under $2,500) handguns first, plus devastating sawed off shotguns that have not yet been sawed off but might be..... John Spangler


# 578 - Mannlicher Rifle by Steyr- Repair?
6/5/97
Kris, Calgary, Alberta, Can,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
manlicher-unsure of spelling Styer-Daimler-Puch A.G.,Styer 30_06 unsure blue 28xxx

This gun was hand engraved on both the metal and wood. The butt has a bear engraved on the right side, as well as various other intricate engravings. The metal has also been engraved. This piece was left unprotected in a bank vault for close to 20 years and has had some rust and loss of color in the wood. Considering that this gun was in mint condition prior to being improperly prepared for storage. The feeling is not only devastation, but anger. This was left to my wife as a inheritance from her father. The family story is that is this the last of three that were originally carved by a ?Austrian? The other two were apparently injured and/or destroyed. Would the gun be worth more restored or left in its less than perfect state? and -If it is to be restored do you have a name of a gunsmith/restorer in my area that you would recommend? To transport a firearm to the US to repair is far too costly, not to mention the paper work involved!

Answer:
Kris- Sorry to hear that bank vault storage ruined your fine rifle. I recently saw several guns from another bank vault that also rusted badly. Hope our guests learn from this note and check their guns in bank vaults periodically, or find different storage locations. Regardless of the exact date of manufacture of your rifle, your basic problem is what to do to salvage the gun. Steyr rifles are prized mainly for their usefulness and also for their artistic merits (original or added later, as with yours.) While nothing will bring it back to full original condition, here are some options: (a) soak the rusted areas with WD-40 or a good gun oil for a few days. Depending on how bad the rust is, you might be able to get it off with some fine steel wool (grade 0000) or gentle scraping with a "pallet knife" as used by artists with oil paints. Sometimes a surprising amount of original finish can be found underneath the rust. However if pitting has started you may be out of luck. (b) The faded stock may respond to an application of appropriate oil (linseed oil or tung oil) applied in a thin coat and gently rubbed in and the excess removed. If the original finish was an oil finish, this will do no harm. (c) If pitted metal is in blued areas, a good refinisher may be able to work it down and reblue it, or a bad one may butcher it badly. Look at their other work carefully, but expert service will not be cheap. If the pitted areas are in case hardened or engraved areas, it becomes more difficult. Check our links for Thierry Duget, who is a world-class engraver, and may know of some good men (or women) in Canada to help you. (d) Worst case- clean the rust off, get a mediocre local refinish job and enjoy the family connection while using it as a shooter instead of a carefully stored art piece. Unless there are some details I don't understand, I don't think that being the last of three guns done by the artist is an especially big concern. Restore it to the appearance level you desire and can afford. We suggest you post a "want" in our wanted section "Looking for recommendations for refinishing/engraving restoration services in Canada." Maybe someone will help there. Good luck... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 576 - Stevens Model .49 .22 Rifle
6/5/97
Jim, Union City, PA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens Mod. 49 .22 S, L, LR 24 Inches Blue 34XXXK

Marked "Stevens Model 49" on left side of receiver. All serial numbers match. The rifle is 40 1/2 inches long, weighs 5 1/2 pounds, it has a knurled screw on the left side of the receiver for take-down. The rear sight is a Dockendorff with an elevation wheel.

I can find no information on this gun, but the Savage Mod. 29, 29A, and 29B look to be identical. I would like to know the introduction date, the designer, and the approximate sale date and price of the serial number range. Are there any notable differences between this rifle and the Savage Mod 29 series ? Is this rifle the predecessor of the Savage ? I am an NRA Life member, also NMLRA member and a supporter of the 2nd Amendment Task Force and the NRA/ILA. ! I appreciate your stand as evidenced in the introduction, and will also appreciate any information on this little gun.

Answer:
Jim- Is this a trick question suggested by my brother-in-law who lives down the road from you in Townville? I can find the Savage Model 29 and 29S, which are pump action rifles made from 1929-1967. I can find a Stevens Model 49, but it is a single shot target rifle made on the No. 44 or 44 1/2 action, also known as the "Walnut Hill" made from 1896 to the 1930s, and worth big bucks; but it is not even remotely similar. Guess we can't help much at all on this one. Sure wish we could do better for a guy who is so active supporting legitimate gun ownership causes. Maybe next time!... John Spangler


# 617 - WAMO .22 Caliber Cartridge Pistol
6/5/97
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Wamo Powermaster Target .22 S,L,LR 3" + - Blue/black 002XXX

Dave in Florence, AL was kind enough to provide a good answer for the following question so we are re-posting it.

I picked this "wonder" up at a gun show in San Antonio several years ago. I have asked all the "experts" in Houston, San Antonio, Dallas and Ft. Worth NO ONE seems to know anything about this pistol. I have called the Wamo Corp. and was told by the person who answered the phone that, "I have been with the company for 25 years and we have NEVER made a cartridge pistol!: It is obvious by the condition of the box and the style of the printing that this pistol was made sometime in the late 40's or through the 50's which rules out the employee with 25 years at Wamo knowing anything about said gun. It is in approximately 90%+ condition as the only wear is from being in the box and the gun rubbing against the cardboard. My question is do you or any one that you might know have any information regarding this pistol? I'm sure this is NOT the million dollar home run we all wish we could hit, however, it would be nice to know just what I have here. thank you for your time and attention. Mike Fritz

Answer:
These guns were available for a time in the 1950's for $14.95 mail order (I never saw one in a store). I sent away for mine as a teenager in 1957 and had it delivered Railway Express. The gun was styled to look like an automatic, but was a single shot -- the bolt was retracted by a lever on the right side (similar to loading a .22 semi-auto rifle) and the single cartridge inserted into the chamber. The bolt was a non-locking blow-back design so that the empty cartridge automatically ejected upon firing. It was a very dangerous gun: it had no safety, and on more than one occasion it fired upon closing the bolt. Collector's Guide to American Cartridge Handguns by Dewitt E. Sell, Ph.d. (1963) has the following entry: "WAMO MANUFACTURING COMPANY, San Gabriel, Calif. Powermaster Match Pistol. .22 RF; bolt action; automatic ejection accomplished via the blow-back principle which frees a flat spring under tension beneath the bolt when the bolt is forward in firing position. There is a knob on the left side of the bolt for manual operation. No safety when striker is cocked and bolt fully forward."


# 593 - Schutzen Rifle 8.15x46R
6/3/97
Mike

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Shuetzen (1878) Target Rifle Made By F.W. Kessler 8.15 mm 46R Rimmed Unknown Unknown

Where can I get the rear sight repaired/made? I live near Philadelphia, PA How rare is this rifle? It was an inheritance.

Answer:
Mike- These fine old German target rifles were often custom made and of very high quality. Most reached this country after WW2 as souvenirs obtained by our "conquering heros" (or "lousy American looters who stole grossvater's gewehr" from the German perspective). Many were built on the "System Ayedt" action. Many had the sights stored separately and came here without them, or have been lost over the last 50 years. As most were custom made, they are nearly impossible to replace, and as a result the value of the gun drops by perhaps 10-30%. Try our "want" page and see if anyone responds. You might also try two of the better gun shows in the country: The Pennsylvania Antique Gun Collectors show at the Sunnybroook Ballroom in Pottstown, or the Forks of the Delaware show in Allentown. (Hey- someone from those two clubs send us the info on our gun show schedule page below so people will know when they are!) Value on something like this can run from as little as $100 to as much as $1500 depending on style, condition (missing sights doesn't help!) and finding the collector who likes such things. Good luck... John Spangler


# 590 - Emperor No. 3 .38RF Revolver
6/3/97
Steve

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Emperor No.3 .38 Cal Rimfire 2'' Nickle NONE

a small single action revolver marked "EMPEROR No.3" on the backstap, and .38cal on the left side of the frame.

When, where, and by who was this gun made?

Answer:
Steve- This fine little piece of, uh, "workmanship" is part of a category known as "suicide specials" The nickname was based on their apparent effective range and durability. However, they were marketed under much more positive names, including Tramp's Terror, Swamp Angel, Blue Jacket, and many other imaginative labels. The true makers were not easily (ashamed to be?) connected with them, as they were made as cheaply as possible. Many were made by Hopkins & Allen and some of the other smaller makers during the lean years of the 1870s-1890s. There is an excellent book on these, "Suicide Specials" but I cannot find my copy now to dig further for you. Value is quite low, and the only folks seeming to have much luck selling them mount them on a plaque with some old photos, granny glasses, and other trinkets for decoration, and sell the whole thing for $50 or so (if they can)... John Spangler


# 586 - Japanese Matchlock Rifle
6/3/97
Lee

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown 39 Inches Unknown Unknown

The gun has a lot of art carved into brass on it, it has a Asian looking head with some sort of headdress where the stock and barrel meet, it has many flowers and leaves of various sizes and shapes all over it , it also has some sort of animal around the hole where the trigger goes into the body, and a bird around each end of the trigger guard, as well as many other unidentifiable brass objects. It is a match lock rifle with a "pistol like" stock . it is aprox. 50&1/2 inches long. the end of the barrel flares out a little larger than the rest of the barrel, the outside of the barrel is an octagon shape and the bore of the barrel is approx.9/16of an inch across.

I am trying to find out anything about this rifle, no one in my area has been able to tell me anything about it. where its from, how old it might be, value ect. any info at all would be helpful.

Answer:
Lee- (Ah so, very Oriental sounding name, perhaps is important clue to identifying this gun!) This sure sounds like a typical Japanese Matchlock. Most were made after the evil Westerners "opened" Japan in 1853 (Courtesy of Commodore Matthew C. Perry, USN and his crews.) but some were made well into the mid 20th century as tourist items. If you send us some photos (a couple overall and then some close ups showing as much detail as possible) we can probably tell you more. (Send to us at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171). While we are not experts, a friend is a specialist in these things, and we can all learn a little more. I have seen them offered at prices ranging from under $500 to over $3500 based on factors that I don't understand (and the sellers may not have known either). Not sure what they really sell for, but send us photos and maybe our expert will know... John Spangler & Marc Wade.


# 585 - Shotgun, Double Barrel, T.E. Barker
6/3/97
R.E. Stanley Memphis Tn

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
T.E.Barker Double Rabbit Ear 12 Ga Unknown Blue Unknown

Does this gun have any value? Also, is it safe to fire standard shells? When was it made?

Answer:
R.E. - Short and sweet: Almost none; absolutely not, and about 100 years ago. Long version- T. Barker and Thomas barker were trade names used by H.D. Folsom on shotguns made by Crescent Arms Co. or from foreign makers. T.E. Barker is probably just another variation of these. Typical inexpensive shotguns were imported by the tens of thousands in the 1890-1910 period. The are not safe to fire with modern ammunition because most had damascus barrels, and were chambered for shorter shells (2 5/8 inch instead of modern 2 3/4 inch length) and after years of abuse and neglect have very questionable strength or hidden flaws. They are $50-150 wallhangers, although they may have sentimental value to the family... John Spangler.


# 579 - Mauser Kar 98 Erfurt 1917
6/3/97
Tim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
ERFURT (German) 1917 ?????? 24 Inches Blue 25XX

On the right side of the breech there are 3 fancy symbols in a row. -Above the name ERFURT there is a crown symbol. -On the left side of the breech beside the magazine it reads (KAR 98.). -The rear sight ramp is marked 3 to 20 staggered odd numbers on the left even on the right. -It has a full wood stock, bayonet attach point, and a cut out in the stock for a sling. -Bolt has the number 87 at the safety and 20340 at the base of the bolt knob. My Grandfather was in WWII under Patton. During a battle his unit was cut off and they were behind enemy lines for seven days. In their attempts to re-join the battalion they were involved in several fire fights. Ammo was low so the group grabbed up weapons they came across on the battle field as back-up fire power. The above described gun is! the weapon he found as his reserve gun. He mailed it home to my Grandmother and has recently given it to me. I would like to know what ammunition this gun uses and can it still be purchased. Also, do you know an approximate value on the rifle for insurance reasons. It is in fair condition. Some rust pitting here and there. Thank you in advance for your response.

Answer:
Tim- Not quite certain what Grandpa brought home. Erfurt was one of the main German rifle works in WWI, and most of their production was the standard Mauser Gewher (rifle) model 1898 with a 29 inch barrel. The original Mauser Karabiner (Carbine) Model 1898 was made in very small numbers and is highly valued by collectors. These had a 17 inch barrel that had a strange looking sight protector nose cap and a very thin wooden forend leading back to the familiar Mauser style "H" shaped band and grooved square bayonet lug assembly. These had bent bolts and the slot in the stock for rear sling attachment. Stick a cleaning rod down the barrel against the closed bolt and measure the length of the barrel again. Hope it reads 17 inches. If it is in fact 24 inches, then we are looking at a KAR 98a which originally had a funny looking bar near the muzzle for use in stacking arms. The later Karabiner 98 kurz (K98k) short rifle was produced starting in the 1930s with a 24 inch barrel and standard throughout WW2. Many have lingered in use in various other armies until the present day. It is possible some WWI surplus Kar 98s were rebuilt to K98k configuration, but without seeing the gun, we cannot confirm this, but the mismatched numbers point in this direction. 8mm Mauser ammo is common, (sometimes called 8x57mm because the bullet is 8mm diameter and the case 57mm long) or also called 7.92x57mm. We cannot evaluate the safety of this gun for shooting purposes- take it to a competent gunsmith for that. Sentimental value must be considerable, but collector value is probably in the $125-250 range. Quite often these war souvenir Mausers have had the stock cut underneath the rear band. If this was done, a GI could take the rifle apart, and the barreled action and stock pieces were then short enough to fit in their duffel bag ("Seabag" to Marines and Sailors) to be smuggled home... John Spangler


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This page was last updated 7/1/97 10:11:42 PM