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# 1354 - Argentine Model 1891 Bayonet
6/30/98
John Berkeley, Calif.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was wondering if you can tell me about a bayonet I own and am considering selling. It is in near perfect condition (never sharpened or honed) with original scabbard. The bayonet is marked "Weyersberg Kirschbaum & Co. Solingen" on one side and "Modelo Argentino 1891" on the other, below which is stamped "D 4348". The handle is brass inlayed into the steel, and has a curling guard on the lower side. Is this a collectible item? Would a collector have interest in it? Is 1891 the production year? Was it an Argentine army issue produced by a German company or German issue produced in Argentina? Anything you can tell me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

Answer:
John - You have a bayonet for the Argentine Model 1891 rifle. These were made in Solingen, Germany, under contract for Argentina, either directly or for Loewe or DWM to ship with the M1891 Mausers. They are found with aluminum or silver alloy grips most of the time. The brass grips are much less common, and believed to be for Navy or police issue. Usually the Argentine crest (with liberty cap on a pole) has been defaced. Collectors like these because they are old and fancy. However, they are pretty common, usually in excellent condition, and are usually in the $50 or less range retail. The rifles are also fairly common and inexpensive. In fact, a collector could have a good time putting together a collection of just South American rifles, or even just South American Mausers. Argentina alone had several versions of the 1891 rifle and carbine, and several more of the 1909 series. Add Brazil and Chile and you have many more. Include Mexico and you get another big bunch. Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador and some of the other countries also had their own versions. Having twice worked with the armed forces of nearly every South American country, I have great respect for some nations' military prowess, sympathy for many, and contempt for a few. In retrospect, the condition of their surplus arms seems closely related to my relative esteem... John Spangler


# 1351 - Pomeroy
6/30/98
Joe,Stony Pt,NY

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
L. Pomeroy Rifled Musket? 69 ? Nickle NONE

On right side plate - 1828 US ; on Cap housing - initials JTHOn receiver - 1862 I am just starting at collecting and saw this at a small gun store. The rifle is in fair to good condition. All parts are there, barrelis discolored and turning brown. Stock has small crack (1/2") behind the receiver. No major damage just minor pits and scratches. I beleive this may have Civil War history due to clear date on receiver. Dealer has gun on consignment and is asking $500. Is this price OK? I need to act soonplease respond as soon as possible. Any books to read on this subject? Thanks - Joe

Answer:
Joe- Pomeroy made about 21,600 Model 1816 muskets between 1817 and 1831. These were originally flintlock with 42 inch barrels and three bands. They were .69 caliber smoothbores. Parts were originally finished "bright" (just plain polished steel) or sometimes with a brown lacquer finish, depending on the contract requirements at the time. Many .69 caliber muskets were converted to percussion and some of those were also rifled, and a smaller number had rear sights installed. Some of this work was done as early as 1856, but most in the early days of the Civil War, so the 1862 date is reasonable. Any version of the .69 muskets (assuming it is still full length, not cut down) would be a nice addition to a collection to show a type of weapon used during the Civil War that had changed very little (except for ignition system) from those used in the Revolution. Collectors can probably convince themselves that it would be nice to have one made by Springfield, another by Harpers Ferry, and one from each of the 12 contractors. Of course you also need/want/would like a smoothbore example converted to percussion, one converted and rifled, and another converted, rifled and sighted. Don't forget the patent ignition conversions- a Butterfield, a Ward, and a couple of Maynards. Before investing in any of these you need to do your homework, or be prepared to pay for a potentially costly education. Check your local bookstore and get a copy of "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their Values" (7th edition is out now, but even the earlier ones are quite useful). Read the opening chapters carefully for excellent advice to beginning collectors, and then the chapter on U.S. Martial longarms (or whatever other area sounds interesting). Further information on Civil War era arms can be found in Robert Reilly's "U.S. Military Small Arms 1816-1865", and William Edwards' "Civil War Guns" Get all three before you buy a second gun, and preferably before you get the first. If you know someone else interested in these, ask them to go along with you and take a look at the gun. "Nickel finish" scares me, but it may just be bright finish (which will have some rust spots, but not any bubbling underneath it or layers of plating peeling off. $500 sounds like a reasonable price for a decent percussion conversion. Good luck. Welcome to the collecting world. It can be a lot of fun, but there are crooks and creeps hiding around some corners, just like anywhere else you go, so be careful... John Spangler


# 1326 - Springfield 87A
6/30/98
John Ohio

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 87A 22 short, long, or long rifle Unknown Blue none

I recently purchased a .22 semi-auto. It says Springfield Model 87A. Also: J. Stevens Arms company, Chicopee Falls, Mass. USA. On the right side below the rear sight is says: patent 2094577 others pending. No serial #'s found including in the interior. Tube fed magazine, capacity unknown. Blued barrel. On the left side below the rear sight it says: .22 short, long, or long rifled, Long rifle only as automatic. Any info you can give me on this gun would be appreciated. Thanks. John

Answer:
John, My records indicate that 200,000 model 87 rifles were manufactured by Stevens between 1938 and 1945, values are in the $50.00 range... Marc


# 1276 - Shotgun- Unidentified
6/26/98
Daryl Plano, Texas USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Double Barrel Shotgun Flint Lock Hammer Type Unknown 12 Gage ? 32 1/4 Damascus ? Unknown

Stamped on right side plate curved under hammer (ANDR:AHL) Stamped on left side plate curved under hammer (IN. AREND SEE) Stamped on inside (plates removed) of both plates (ST. C) Stamped on bottom side of right barrel (R 32 NAL) Stamped on bottom side of left barrel (*16* N) This guns quality seems to be OUTSTANDING all metal except barrel has very detailed etching on it even the screw heads and butt plate. My question is Who makes the gun? What year was it made? Does it have any collector value or is it just a wall hanger ?

Answer:
Daryl- We are guessing yours is truly a fintlock (with little clamps on the top of the hammers to hold pieces of flint, not an upside down cup in the end or a flat end that pushes down pins in the back of the barrel). If so, it is probably a very nice piece as only the better makers produced double guns in flintlock for their wealthier customers. I am not familiar with the markings, but they sound French, or perhaps one of the German states (as German was not yet a single country) or maybe even Netherlands (Holland). Engraving on guns from 1750 to about 1900 ran the gamut from horrible to excellent quality, and the amount of coverage is not a good indicator of quality of the gun.. This is one that should be examined by someone who knows more about these, or at least we would need some good pictures to do any more for you. Could be a klunker or a treasure... John Spangler


# 1273 - Webley "British Bulldog" .44
6/26/98
John

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley British Bull Dog 44 2 And 1/4" Nickel Unknown

I have a 5 shot .44 British bull dog. Nickel plated, round ivory grips, 2 and 1/4 inch barrel. Marked "P. Webley & Son London & Birmingham." The holster appears to be pig skin made with a full flap. I have found examples of the Webley British Bull Dog made for the Irish police force but the grips and plating don't match with any description I can find. I don't have any idea of the value or the history of this revolver. If you have any information or interest please let me know. Thanks John

Answer:
John- I hate Webleys! They all look alike and it is a real pain to figure them out, even when you can see the gun. These had some popularity in the American West (believe even Gen. Custer had one!) as well as in British colonies. Beside numerous factory variations, retailer could have had them nickeled, or made other changes to suit individual customer desires. Nice to find one with a holster. There are about three Webley books out, the most recent being the easiest to use. I have seen these priced from dirt cheap to outrageous, so your guess is as good as mine. Good luck... John Spangler


# 1268 - Pepperbox "Arendt"
6/26/98
Brian, Timonium, MD, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Arendt Six-shot Pepperbox Revolver Unknown; Probably .22 Two Inches Unknown 183

Wooden handle, screw in handle for lanyard, "Capt. Curry" etched in handle, folding trigger and no trigger guard I recently inherited this pepperbox from my Grandmother and have been attempting to find out about the maker-- Arendt. I believe they are a Belgium firearm company. Can you tell me anything about Arendt? Should I send you a photo of my firearm? Please excuse my layman's description. Thanks, Brian Rheinhardt

Answer:
Brian- Francis Arendt made percussion arms in Kingston, New York circa 1856-1859. I did not find a listing for a foreign maker by that name, but that does not prove that there were none. If a Belgian piece it should have Belgian proof marks (usually the letters ELG in an oval, and/or something that looks like the Washington Monument). We are not sure if your gun is percussion, or if it takes regular cartridges, If cartridge it is most likely European with the folding trigger. Sorry we cannot tell you more. Take it to one of the gunshows at the Timonium Fairgrounds and see what the dealers there can tell you... John Spangler


# 1267 - Bayonet- French M1842?
6/26/98
Andy, Gainesville, FL

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Bayonet: Inscription in cursive: M(re) Imp(ale) de Gulle, Dec(bre)1864. () denote superscripts. On hand protector: In one orientation, R 36815; in opposite orientation, 57.11.11.2.19. On scabbard: R 13924. On hilt: C.G.K. On opposite side of hilt: S encircled. I'm very curious as to what the origin is of this bayonet. It is rather long (2 ft 4 inches, including handgrip), is narrow and curved. Appears to be combinations bayonet/short sword. I'd appreciate any help with this! Thanks, Andy

Answer:
Andy- As a UF Gator (1977) hopelessly addicted to Sonny's BBQ, I am always glad to help folks from "Latch-o-way" county. Your Sabre bayonet is French, and either Model 1842 or 1842/1859. From 1840 through 1886 the French marked their sabre bayonets on the top of the blade, in nicely engraved script with the date at the end. It makes it easy for use to identify them. The 1842 had a long flat spring on the side of the grip to operate the catch, while the M1842/59 used a coil spring hidden inside the grip. The numbers starting with "R" are serial numbers and originally would have been the same for both bayonet and scabbard. The other number is a unit identification mark of some sort, but the meaning is unknown to us. These sabre bayonets were originally intended as an indicator of rank (NCOs mostly) but later received more widespread distribution. Their ferocious but fancy appearance quickly caught on around the world and were copied in various forms by many nations, including the U.S. Despite their great looks, these were of limited usefulness as wither a sword or a bayonet, and the weight finally overcame vanity and they passed out of style in the 1880s as rifle designs advanced rapidly to smaller bores, bolt actions, and magazine repeaters. While the French bayonets have little collector value (closer to $50 than top $100) some of the U.S. blades can run into the several hundred dollar range... John Spangler


# 1265 - Percussion Shotgun-
6/23/98
Roger, Tucson, AZ, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
JUKAR SPAIN Unknown Slightly Under 1/2 9 3/4 Inch Unknown 0005131

Markings: Only markings are on the hammer and the plate below the hammer. The hammer has v shapes starting at the pivot moving toward the hammer. The visages are inside a outline. The v shapes could be a leaf pattern. The plate below the hammer has several patters. Below where the hammer hits are 11lines radiating outward. There are three patterns behind the hammer attachment. The closest has 6 curved lines that go toward the hammer attachment. Behind that are a grid of points that are 9 wide and 7 high. Defaulters back is something that looks like a clump of grass. General: I believe that this would describe the gun. I am not expert so take it for what it is worth. The gun is a single action percussion style. It has a bird head grip. The breach of the gun has two brass holders for the rod. The end of the gun below the barrel has a brass piece. The trigger guard is brass. The trigger is rolled back at the bottom. The plate opposite the hammer is brass. It has an octagonal barrel. Do you think that this is original or reproduction? Tell me what you can about the gun?

Answer:
Jukar Roger- Having a serial number and marked with the maker's name and country, I would place this as being made in the last 50 years. I am not a shotgun fan (except for ugly trench and military riot guns) so don't pay much attention to this sort of stuff at shows. These seem to be attractive and reasonably well made guns, but on the real inexpensive side... John Spangler


# 1261 - German Combination Gun (Drilling)
6/23/98
buddy Webster, Norfolk, VA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Fluss Stahl Double Barrel 12 GA W/30/30 Below Unknown Unknown Blue 4690/5419

Elaborate engravings of deer, elk, jack rabbits. My father-in-law's father took this gun from a German farmer after his platoon crossed the Rhine River. It will shoot 12 gage and 30/30 shells however I don't know what the real calibers are. The gun also has numerous text on it such as prima krupp'scher, fluss-stahl, E. BEYER, IN CELLE, KRUPP STAHA. Any idea on any reference material that might shed some light on the interesting firearm? I am a 12 year supporter of NRA. Thanks for any help you can provide. Buddy Webster

Answer:
Buddy- Thanks for your support of the NRA. There is not good reference on these fine old German guns brought back by GIs at the end of WW2. The chambers are usually made to European specifications and while US ammunition may work, it may not be safe. Have it examined by a competent gunsmith to make sure that the shotgun chambers are the correct length for 2 _ inch ammo, and find out what the rifle barrel should be fed. They may have to make a chamber cast, or might be able to measure a case that you have fired in it. Bob's Gun shop in Norfolk might be able to do this, or check with my friends Robert House and Sean McDonald at Classic Firearms/Tidewater Military Traders,124 S. First Colonial Rd., Va Beach, VA 23454. Good luck... John Spangler


# 1260 - Krag Carbine Eric
6/23/98
Eric, Brea Ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield armory` Krag carbine 30-40 20 inches 20% blue 154xxx

Stamped cartouche dated 1902 I have a 30-40 Krag carbine. 1898 dated receiver. Metal mostly brown. Stock dated 1902, doesn't appear to have a filled in bayonet groove. Stock and barrel appears original carbine (no evidence of either being cut down). "p" stamp in underside of hand grip. Gun has no upper hand guard and 1902 type rear sight. Could this gun have been arsenal rebuilt without upper hand guard? Wood and metal is very good less blueing. Any info and ballpark value would be appreciated.

Answer:
Without seeing it, we cannot be sure. It was made in early 1899, and falls outside the accepted ranges of Model 1898 or Model 1899 carbines. It could be an arsenal conversion of a rifle for sale (the so-called NRA model), or someone's parts project. Dated cartouches were not normally used except during original manufacture, therefore I am pretty sure that your stock and action did not start out together. Even if it is an arsenal conversion, or in the unlikely chance it is a real carbine, it would have had a handguard. These are fragile, and since you don't need one for deer hunting, have seldom been replaced when broken by civilian users. For many years Mr. Ben Rice of New Jersey made superb reproduction handguards, but he had been out of production for several years. Too bad, he really filled a desperate need. In my opinion, your gun is a $150 shooter, with little collector interest. It may have some good parts which would make it worth a little more, but again, it needs to be examined by an expert... John Spangler


# 1239 - Savage 99 Disassembly
6/23/98
vjc@in.on.ca

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage 99 250/3000 22" Blued UNKNOWN

How do I strip this rifle for cleaning?

Answer:
Sir- First thing you do is buy the NRA Firearms Disassembly book that covers rifles. (see NRA.org website) I have never messed with one, so don't know myself... John Spangler


# 1217 - Revolvers- Single/Double Action & Cylinders
6/20/98
Roger, Duxbury, MA, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

This is a general question about revolvers. Why is it that only double action revolvers have a swing out cylinder for loading and single actions have a loading gate with a fixed cylinder? What do these two seemingly unrelated characteristics have to do with the double or single action trigger pull?

Answer:
Roger- Sure seems that way, right? Well, I am very careful about "always" or "never" type statements. If you look carefully, you will find both single and double actions revolvers in the percussion days before swing out cylinders (e.g. the Starr used during the Civil War). Perhaps a better explanation might be that cartridges increased the rate of fire, so it was natural to look for ways to speed up reloading. The Colt Single Action Army of 1873 with its ejector to poke out one empty case at a time was sure an improvement over percussion arms. However, the S&W "Schofield" with a "top break" action popped out all the cases from the cylinder when it was opened and left six empty chambers readily accessible for new cartridges. Neater than going from a DOS computer to Windows 95 or a Mac. S&W then dominated the top-break and double action market until about 1890. Meanwhile Colt came up with Double action models in 1877 and 1877 (Lightning and Frontier respectively) but stuck with the old single ejector rod system. In 1889 Colt introduced the New Army & Navy model with a swing out sylinder where a single push on the ejector rod will dump all the empty cases and leave the cylinder exposed ready for loading. The swing out cylinder uses a solid frame, eliminating the weak hinge feature of the top break models. By 1900 S&W had their own "hand ejector models" which have been little changed in nearly 100 years. All the extra parts for double action and swing out cylinders meant higher costs, and more things with the potential to break if not made well. People willing to spend the money chose higher quality revolvers with the added features. Those with less money or willing to sacrifice features got the cheaper revolvers most often lacking swing out cylinders, and often single action. Then you factor in the unpredictable factor of personal taste. Some folks just like single actions. How long did it take the incredibly talented and innovative inventor Bill Ruger to add a double action to his line? Does anyone doubt that Dick Casull could design a successful double action monster? Why no single actions from Taurus or Charter? While designers can combine just about any combination of features, they must appeal to buyers in order to make money. Guess that tells us that the customers just like single actions with pinned cylinders and loading gates, and double actions with swing our cylinders. Gotta listen to those customers!... John Spangler


# 1186 - Colt London Model 1851 Navy
6/20/98
Ed Victoria Australia

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt London Made Navy .36 Unknown Nickel 959

V over crown on each of the 6 chambers crown over V under wedge Colt patent left side of cylinder ADDRESS COL. COLT LONDON on barrel I am sending this for a mate who has no net access. This Colt is in fair to good condition with 50% varnish on grips and 20% nickel on the brass frame and all matching except for the wedge s/no 267. We have been told that London made colts with s/no below 1000 are different from latter made ones. Is this true? Can you give an approx. date of manufacture? Also any other info you may have about London Colt Navy's i.e. colt web sites, value in the USA etc. regards from down under Ed

Answer:
Ed- Your pistol was made in 1853. Linguists may quibble about use of the word "made" as Colt's London factory essentially just assembled the first 500 or so Navy model pistols from parts supplied by the Hartford plant. By the time serial numbers reached 2000, all parts were being made in London. In between a mix of London and Hartford made parts were used, and apparently some parts obsolete by Hartford standards were shipped to London and used during this period. Most collectors would term all the first 2000 pistols as "first model". Some excellent specialized books are the" '51 Colt Navy" by Swayze and another on London pistols, and of course, Larry Wilson's monumental "Book of Colt Firearms." Members of the Colt Collectors' Association or those who specialize in collecting just the Navy model would probably find numerous variations among the first models. The new "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their values " places London Navies (regardless of model) at $1,600 in NRA antique "good" and $9,500 in NRA antique fine... John Spangler


# 1184 - U.S. M1903 Springfield Markings
6/20/98
Ron NJ

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield "03 30-'06 Unknown Parkerized Unknown

I've been restoring a low numbered '03 with a lot of missing parts. I just found a bolt Assy. with a 4 digit number and the letters "B & S" stamped on the handle. Could you please tell me something about it ?Could this be some kind of after market part ? I am and have been a member of the NRA for many years. Thank you for a fine net site.

Answer:
Ron- Although your "low numbered" Springfield (under 800,000 if by Springfield, 285,506 if by Rock Island) was made prior to adoption of the better heat treatment used after mid-1918, these rifles continued in service during WW2. Many were rebuilt at various times during their career, and Springfield continued to make spare parts during WW2. Remington and Smith Corona also made spare parts during WW2, and contract were let to various other firms as well. One was the well-known tool making firm of Brown & Sharpe. Hence the B&S marking. The 4 digit number is probably to indicate the type of steel used, as there were a number of substitutions authorized during the war for various reasons. These were made to military specifications and should be okay to use. (We cannot vouch for the safety of your gun. Have it examined by a competent gunsmith). Most collectors recognize guns with these as being the legitimate result of overhauls, but not as desirable as guns with all matching original parts... John Spangler


# 1178 - Sharps 1874 .45-90 Sharps Rifle
6/16/98
David

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sharps 1874 (I Believe) Appears To Be 40-90 Sharps Necked Cut To 18" Case Color Receiver, Blue Barrel NONE

Absolutely no markings on receiver, barrel is marked p. bergersen This gun is in good fireable condition. The action works excellent, the barrel has sharp, good rifling, with some typical black powder pitting, especially in the throat area. The top tang is broken, and shows where it was repaired by light brazing once. The wood is chipped and cracked slightly. About 20% blue and case coloring remains. The rear sight has been moved and replaced, and a new front sight has been silver soldered on. Both sights appear to be homemade. This rifle has been handled and used allot, as evidenced by the tang sight blind screws being worn down almost to the bottom of the slots. Also, the forend wood is considerably worn down. This rifle appears to be a Sharps 1874 buffalo Rifle that has been butchered by somebody (P. Bergersen?) The barrel shortening is professionally done, with good crowning and filleting of the end. The bluing on the barrel appears to be original, and the case color appears to be original. No evidence of metal refinishing is apparent. My identification as a 1874 sharps is from comparing it to pictures in several books. The distinguishing features that identify it to me as a 1874 is the shape of the lever release and the thin lock plate. Why would this rifle not show any makers marks or serial number, considering the unaltered condition of the finish? Is P. Bergersen a known gunsmith? Is this rifle worth anything in the condition it is in or should I consider it an action for new wood and a better barrel? Thanks for your help.

Answer:
David- While your rifle certainly has changed a lot since it left the Sharps factory, it now has acquired a 100 year history and lots of "character." There is a lot of serious collector interest in old Sharps rifles. (They have an annual meeting in conjunction with the Colorado Gun Collectors Association show in Denver every May). They may just be tickled to death to get a rifle like that, or they may be able to tell you to break it up for parts. My hunch is that it is pretty collectable. Peder [sic] Bergersen (1848-1930) was in Chicago circa 1870, and in Cheyenne, Wyoming, 1876-1915. He held a patent on a magazine gun and "did custom work on breechloaders" according to Frank Sellers "American Gunsmiths." Better get an expert opinion. If you had told us where you live, we might be able to make a recommendation of a reputable person to examine it. Good luck... John Spangler


# 1174 - German Belt Buckle pistol
6/16/98
April

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Belt Buckle Pistol by Louis Marquis (?) 22, 9mm 1/2" steel and blue color ??

German marking/emblems. Several Belt buckles, they open and spring forth small caliber 22 or 9mm barrels. While station in Europe my husband pickup some interesting belt buckle pistols. He has had them for some time and has been asking around for some information. Can you guide us to some books or history about such belt buckles pistols and the inventor Louis Marquis. My husband is a NRA member. Thank you.

Answer:
April- I have seen pictures of these (or something similar) in an old American Rifleman from the 50s or 60s. The only reference I can find right now is in Lewis Winant's "Firearms Curiosa" pages 151-154. He shows photos of an example with four barrels (in a single block) that spring erect on the right side when the face of the buckle (embellished with a large eagle and swastika) opens on a hinge at the top. Triggers are exposed along the left side. It is about 2"x4" and shoots something similar to the .32 ACP. I have no information to link these with Louis Marquis, so they may be quite different. I am sure that these would be of great interest to some collectors of oddball or German WW2 items. I am not sure what the BATF thinks of these or if there are any peculiar laws concerning their ownership or sale. If the barrels are smooth instead of rifled, they may classify these as sawed off shotguns, or something, so you might want to have a friend check on that. Let us know if you ever decide to sell them... John Spangler


# 1173 - Stocks- Replacement For Krags
6/16/98
CRAIG, NORFOLK VA. U.S.A.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
U.S. Springfield 1898 30-40 Krag 22 To 24 Inches Blue 199733

Where can I find a replacement stock for this rifle ? I understand that practically none of the originals exist and a few companies do sell rough cut replacements. Any info would be helpful and appreciated.

Answer:
Craig- I occasionally buy junky Krags just to get usable stocks. There are several people who advertise replacement stocks, but I have only seen some of the stuff from Great American Gun Stock Company that advertises in the trade publications. Their stuff sounds good on paper but is the worst garbage I have ever seen. Another unhappy purchaser echoed my sentiments, so I strongly urge everyone not to waste time or money with that outfit. You would be better off starting with a piece of scrap wood from the dump that a dog had chewed on. Dunlap Wood carving in the Washington DC area does excellent work.. While their line is mainly related to muzzle loaders or muskets, I think they planned to add Krags. If they have, they will be good quality, and probably run about $135-150 for 98-99% finished work... John


# 1157 - Rifle- William Wingert, Detroit
6/16/98
Phil, Russellville, AR US

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
William Wingert Half-stock, plains-style rifle about .40 cal. Unknown blue Unknown

I have a plains-style percussion rifle of about .40cal. marked on the barrel and lock "Wm. Wingert, Detroit." Under the barrel is "Remington." I understand that Remington sold only barrels for the first twenty-some-odd years of their existence. My question: do you have any information on Wingert the gunmaker? When did he operate? Was he just a small, local gunsmith? Any information. The rifle is German-silvered fitted and is in spectacular condition. It has never been refinished and retains practically 100% of its original blue. It also has a nice patchbox and on the cheek-piece an American eagle and shield. Any info will be appreciated.

Answer:
Phil- While it is true that Remington sold only barrels in their early years, they continued to sell barrels long after they began to make complete rifles. Frank Sellers "American Gunsmiths" states that William Wingert worked in Detroit circa 1837-1867, making percussion rifles and pistols with his brother John A. Wingert. They sold out to Fisher & Long in 1867. Frank got this info from the June 1961 issue of Muzzle Blasts magazine if you want to dig deeper. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 1336 - Why XXX In Serial Numbers ?
6/13/98

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I feel really stupid asking this but why do people say the serial number is 785xxxx why not the full serial no. ?? what is the xxxx? is ti 785 and four zeroes ? thanks , dumb satch

Answer:
Satch- We replace the last digits of firearm serial numbers as a courtesy. The world is full of strange and paranoid people, Some, when not speaking with Elvis or being abducted by UFOs, have an interest in firearms. But, with Ken Starr, the New World Order, and black helicopters all busy watching us, they are afraid big brother (and his sister Janet) are copying down all the info in gun ads, and will be able to link their name with the serial number of a gun. Then the jack-booted thugs will break down the door and haul them and their guns away. Perhaps the guys in white coats will get there first. Knowing the serial number of a gun is important for research purposes, or when buying one. Would you like to own the M1 carbine carried by Audie Murphy, or just any old import? Is that old Colt Single Action one that was made before 1898 (thus an antique exempt from most paperwork); One made prior to the Native American's victory over that long-haired guy; or maybe one carried by Col. Roosevelt's 1st Volunteer Cavalry up San Juan hill? While a partial serial number might help with the age of a gun, serious collectors need the full number to check it out. I just hope folks whose attention span is too short to write out the full serial number accurately don't bother asking questions about their gun... John Spangler


# 1309 - Savage Mod. 220A
6/13/98
Robert

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Savage Arms Corporation 220A 20 Gauge unknown unknown unknown

2 3/4" chamber What year was this gun produced and what is it's current value?

Answer:
Robert, The Savage model 220 is a hammerless single barrel shotgun that originally was furnished with a plain pistol grip stock. Savage manufactured the model 220 from 1938 to 1965 in 12, 16, 20, 28 and 410 gauges, barrel lengths ranged from 26 to 32 inches. I could find no mention of a model 220A but there is a model 220 AC that came equipped with a Savage adjustable choke. There is no collector interest in the Savage model 220 or 220AC, values are in the $50.00 range... Marc


# 1308 - Stevens Model 235
6/13/98
furline

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 235 Double Barrel Shotgun Unknown Blue 95537

My grandfather left this shotgun to me. how old is it? is it worth anything? any help is appreciated.

Answer:
furline, Stevens manufactured a wide verity of inexpensive shotguns that have little or no collectors interest. Stevens manufactured 61500 No. 235's From 1912 to 1932, values for these shotguns are in the $50.00 range... Marc


# 1307 - P.38 Identification
6/13/98
Will

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther P.38 9mm Unknown Unknown 134632

Markings: 1. Under barrel: Two eagle over 165 stamps and a 3mm circle with a dot in the center. 2. Left side of slide: The Walther banner and "Carl Walther Waffenfabrik ULM/Do." Also, "P 38 Cal. 9MM." 3. Forward end of left side of slide: a four-pointed star, another eagle over 165 stamp, and another 3mm circle with dot in it. 4. In front of safety: Last three digits of SN, ie, "632". 5. Left side of frame: Serial Number "134632", and slightly forward of the trigger pin, another circle with dot. 6. Right side of slide toward the rear: Eagle over 165 acceptance stamp. 7. Right side of frame above front end of trigger guard: two eagle over 86 stamps. These eagles are slightly larger than the eagles over 165 stamps. 8. Slightly up and forward from the eagle over 86 stamps: A gouged "X" obliterates what I think might have been a military proof mark or initials of some kind. Initially, I thought I had a typical P.38 produced from German parts by the French during the May, 1945-46 postwar period. But then I found on the right of the slide, a rather weak impression "5/61." Does this indicate a production date of May l961? If so, what are all of those other markings which look like WW-II stamps? I will appreciate any information you can provide me on this. Thanks. Will

Answer:
Will, you did not indicate whether your frame is steel or alloy, an alloy frame is always a dead giveaway that a P.38 is not military. The P.38 in question is a commercial model made in l961 as you guessed. The eagle is not the Nazi eagle, but the down-swept wing of the Weimar and the West German production period. If the frame is steel, it could easily be parts and the eagle and swastika would have been ground out. This sounds like a normal, aluminum alloy framed P.38 with the import mark on the frame. The alloy frame does not hold up well when shooting military ammo... Marc & John J.


# 1306 - Browning Trombone Model 22
6/9/98
Garry, Vancouver, BC

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning Pump .22 ? Blue 40***

I got this .22 pump with a tube magazine from my Dad many years ago This was the gun I learned to shoot with but with our law makers bringing in very restrictive ownership rules I am considering selling this. It is made in Herstal, Belgium by Fabrique National under a Browning patent (1915 I believe). It is a take down model and a very sweet gun to shoot. My questions are: Roughly when was it made and roughly how much is it worth? Thank you very much in advance. I enjoy reading these question and answer pages and am amazed at the variety of questions that you guys can answer. Keep up the great work!

Answer:
Garry, I am sorry and distressed when I hear about gun control in other countries. If the citizens of the USA do nothing, it is just a matter of time before our guns in the USA are taken from us also. It will be a shame that you are not able to hand this Browning down to your children or grandchildren. From your description, it sounds like you have what is called the Browning "Trombone Model". The Trombone Model is a hammerless slide action takedown rifle similar to the Winchester Model 61. The Trombone Model is chambered for .22 LR only and comes with a tubular magazine fixed sights and a 24 inch round barrel. Over 150,00 Browning Trombone Models were manufactured by Fabrique National from 1922 to 1974, blue book values range from $225.00 to $695.00 depending on condition... Marc


# 1304 - American Bull Dog
6/9/98
tom, Dennison, Oh, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Iver Johnson? American Bull Dog .32 2" Nickel 54**

6 1/2" overall length, black plastic grips with eagle clutching arrows and olive branches, octagon barrel, 5 shot, brass blade front sight slot rear, what I'm guessing is the serial number is on the frame under the grips and on the trigger housing, Can you tell me anything for sure about it? There seems to be more than one maker that put out a revolver very similar in design.

Answer:
Tom, American Bull Dog is a name given to a line of inexpensive revolvers manufactured by Johnson & Bye and then Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works of Worcester, Massachusetts, between 1882 and 1891. American Bull Dog revolvers all had short octagonal barrels, solid frames, double-action lock work, and nickel plating. The grips were usually marked with a dog's head motif. The American Bull Dogs were available in .22, .32, .38 and .41 calibres, all calibers had five shot cylinders except for the .22 which had a seven shot cylinder... Marc


# 1303 - Stevens 44 & 1/2
6/9/98
Soeren Goteborg, Sweden

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Stevens 44 1/2 32-20 26 Blue Unknown

On top of the barrel is following mark : J.STEVENS A .&T. CO.CHICOPEE FALLS MASS. U.S.A. PAT.APR.17.94. My question is, is this rifle made for smokeless powder. There are no signs showing this. I have Marlin 1892 made ca 1905 that has "Only Black Powder" marks stamped on the side of the barrel but not this Stevens. The only serial numbers are under barrel in front of the forearm and the under tang: 1905. I am knowing there is not easy with info about this rifle but I try this. Do you know the year it is made and is it for smokeless powder. I am a shooter, collector of American weapons and a hunter. Please let me here from you again. Regards Soeren Goteborg, Sweden

Answer:
Soeren, thanks for contacting us, I always enjoy getting questions from outside of the USA. The Stevens Model 44 & 1/2 was manufactured from 1903 to 1916 in the following calibers: 22, 25 and 32 rimfire, 25/20, 32/20, 32/40, 38/40, 38/55, 44/40 centerfire. Special order calibers 22 short, 22/7/45 WRF 22/15/60, Stevens 25/21, 25/25, 28/30/120, 32/20 and 32 ideal were also available. The model 44 & 1/2 differed from the 44 in that it was also offered in 30/30 and 30/40 US. There were many types of sights and barrel lengths (up to 34 inches) available. Model 44 & 1/2 standard configuration was case hardened frame with blued barrel and oil finished walnut stock with shotgun or Swiss but. Sorry but due to liability concerns I can not advise you on the ability of your Stevens to use smokeless powder... Marc


# 1345 - 30-06 Ammo Identification
6/6/98
Brian

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 30-06 Ball Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have found some 30-06 ball ammo with a head stamp of DM 4 in a red stripe box of 20 from the Des Moines ordnance plant lot 20952 is this corrosive and is it a collectable?

Answer:
Brian- Just about anything is collectible by someone. I know one gentleman who collects, guns, knives, cap guns, matchbooks, motel room keys, and who know what else. There are a lot of ammo collectors, some just want a single round or a box to match up with each of the guns they own. Others collect by maker, or by caliber, or some other category that appeals to them. (I like anything that is U.S. military, preferably full sealed boxes. I can read the labels and that way don't have to think too hard about what a loose round might be.)

WW2 era ammunition containers were color coded, with red indicating ball ammo. The headstamp marking indicate who made it and when. DM was the Des Moines Ammunition Plant. In the 1944 and 1955 use of a single digit 4 or 5 respectively was authorized to indicate date, otherwise it was two digits such as 44 or 55. From about 1880 to 1910 both the month and year were used. .45-70 ammo could be marked F 6 81 R indicating Frankford Arsenal, June 1881, Rifle (to distinguish from carbine ammo with same weight bullet but 55 instead of 70 grains of powder. WOW! Cool, huh? Makes you want to become an ammo collector too!

Most US military ammo made before 1953 was corrosive primed, and should not be shot UNLESS YOU CLEAN THE GUN THE SAME DAY and for a couple more days to get all the nasty stuff out. Otherwise the bore will rust and pit and collectors of the future will curse your soul for eternity. Exceptions to the corrosive primer use included ALL US military .30 carbine ammo, and various other small arms ammo as they started switching from about 1947. There is a neat Army chart that gives the date and lot number when the final shift to non-corrosive primers took place for .30-06 and .45 ACP for people who are interested. (Send Stamped self addressed envelope and $2.00 check payable to NRA-PVF and we will send you a copy. Send to: Ammo Chart, Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171)

We sell WW2 ammo in clean, sealed boxes at $15 a box. I see open boxes with dirty ammo selling for about $3-5 per box for shooters. Heck, when I started going to gun shows about 1960 you could buy boxes of surplus 45-70 ammo for $4.00, but that was pretty expensive when minty trapdoors were selling for $35.00. I fell in love with a beautiful Officer's Model that was for sale at $800.00, but unaffordable to a kid with a $1.00 per hour job scrubbing bottoms of yachts at a boat yard. John Spangler


# 1341 - Flobert Pistol
6/6/98
Bud

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Flobert Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am searching for information relating to a specific type of target pistol. It is called a Flobert BB cap salon or parlor pistol. In the 1969 GUN DIGEST (23rd Edition), page 13, bottom of page is a photo of the very gun except that mine has an octagonal barrel with a hooded front sight, and finely adjustable rear sight. My gun is chambered for .22 cal long or long rifle. Apparently a book was written about Louis Nicholas Flobert by Joseph Vorisek called 'History of Flobert and His Gun'. However, I cannot find out anything about the book or the author or when it was published. The craftsmanship in this fine target pistol is top quality, with flat checkering on the butt, a metal butt cap and fineal. The action is similar to the Remington rolling block which is locked in place when the hammer falls on the block. I would appreciate any help you could give me in researching this rare article which was found in an antique shop some years back. I really would like to find a good home for the gun but want to know more about it to determine its value. Appreciate your help. Thanks, Bud

Answer:
Bud- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectible Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. I checked and Rutgers Book Center (the largest gun book dealers I know of) does not have this book listed in their current listing. Vorisek wrote a number of other books in the early 90s on various less popular arms. I think they were paperback, and probably rather slim. Your library can probably get a copy on interlibrary loan for a very small fee. They love the challenge of finding obscure books. I know little about Floberts other than their reputation as an early design or marginal strength and low cost to produce. While some were of high quality, this is very much the exception rather than the rule. Your gun was probably a trophy brought home by a returning GI after WW2. Like many of the other fine target guns and drillings (three barrel combination rifles/shotguns) they do not have much collector interest or value on the market today. Usually superb workmanship and too costly to produce today. Nice to own and enjoy, but difficult to sell. Wish we could tell you more... John Spangler


# 1302 - Remington Model 12 .22 Pump
6/6/98
Victor Rockville, Maryland

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 12 22 22" Blue Unknown

I just wanted to know a little history of this gun. Is it rare? I remember only a very few things my grandfather said about hunting small game with this gun. My grandmother wanted to know if it was worth anything but I must admit I have never even heard of a Pump Action .22before she showed it to me. He died last Nov. so I can't ask him about it. I've only handled Mossberg .22 rifles at summer camp when I was young and the occasional bolt action Remington Field Rifle. It was probably purchased some time in the late 20s or early 30s and it has no specific markings I can recall right away except that it says on the left side that it will fire .22 short, .22 long, .22 LR.

Answer:
Victor, the Remington Model 12 which was later designated the 12A, was manufactured from 1909 to 1936. The Model 12 was a hammerless slide action .22 rifle that came with a 22 inch barrel, open sights, tubular magazine and a plain grip walnut stock. Remington also offered the Model 12B which was a gallery model with an octagon barrel chambered in .22 short, the 12C which had a 24 inch octagon barrel and came in grades D,E and F, the 12C NRA target, and the 12CS which was chambered in .22 Remington Special. The Remington Model 12 is one of my favorite 22's, my father had one when I was young and I spent many happy hours target practicing and hunting varmints with it. Although Remington pump 22 rifles are every bit as well made, or even better made than the old Winchester .22 pumps, there is not as much collector interest in them. Remington model 12 values range from $100.00 to $300 depending upon condition... Marc


# 1343 -
6/3/98
Marcy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Dreyse Unknown 7.65mm Unknown Unknown 165803

Looking for info on the following gun: Dreyse 7.65mm. Markings are as follows: On the left side of gun are the letters RMF in fancy script like a monogram on the grip, above that are the words Rhienische Mettalwarren & Maschinenfabik, under the monogram are the words Abt. Sommerda, on the barrel is the word Dreyse. On the right side of the gun is A CROWN with an N over it about 1/8" in size. inside the slide compartment on the top of the gun are the numbers 165803. Protruding from the bottom of the grip is a small metal ring that looks as if something clipped onto it or it hung from something. It is a slide load with a clip. The gun is completely metal. Have been told this particular gun was only manufactured for one year. Am interested in knowing the age, history and possible value. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Marcy, from your description it sounds like you are the proud owner of a Dreyse model 1907. The Dreyse Model 1907 was designed by Louis Schmeisser in 1905-06, and was manufactured from 1907 to 1914. The Model 1907 is generally marked "Dreyse Rheinmetall Abt Sommerda" on the left side of the frame, with a monogram "RMF" on the grips. Early models may be found with the inscription "Dreyse Rheinische Metallwaaren und Maschinenfabrik Abt Sommerda" while models made in 1914 may not have the word "Dreyse" on them at all. Many Model 1907 Dreyse pistols were purchased for police use. The Crown over N proof mark that you describe is a German commercial proof mark set forth in the National Proof Law of May 19, 1891, which became effective April 1, 1893 and was replaced in 1940. There is little or no collector interest in Model 1907 Dreyse pistols and values fall in the $100.00 range... Marc


# 1301 - Economy Mod .70
6/2/98
John KS, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 670 30-06 22" from end of bolt Unknown 134***

What year is the gun? And is an owner's manual available?

Answer:
John, the Winchester Model 670 is an economy version of the popular model 70. The Model 670 was manufactured between 1967 and 1973 and came with a hardwood pistol grip stock, 22 inch barrel, open sights and a non-hinged floorplate. Values for the Model 670 are in the $150.00 range. To obtain an owners manual contact: U.S. Repeating Arms Co. (Winchester), 275 Winchester Ave., P.O. Box 30-300, New Haven, CT 06511-1970... Marc


# 1316 - Colt Revolver Carbine Forearm
6/2/98
Rick

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Revolver Carbine Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a Colt Revolver Carbine that is missing it's forearm. I know there were several types back then and have had little success in finding any good illustrations so that I can reproduce something that is correct for the model. The distance from barrel tip to the base of the forearm insert cavity is 17 1/4" It is 21 3/4" to the breech. I have had this in the shop for some time and really need to get it moving. I am more than willing to pay for your time if you can help with CORRECT information. The firearm is worth too much to just eyeball a probable replacement. Better yet I would love to find an original (good luck!) but as I know that's near impossible I need help in making one. Any help would be very much appreciated, I maintain an arsenal of over 1500 civil war and revolutionary war pieces for a local collector. He also has the largest authentic cannon and Gatling gun collection in the country but this particular job has had me sorta stumped. Thanx ahead of time. Rick

Answer:
Rick- Jeez, you get PAID to do that sort of stuff? Great work if you can get it. Best source of illustrations on the various Colt Revolving rifles is in R.L. Wilson's absolutely superb "Book of Colt Firearms". Lots of different views in there that I think will give you enough to go by. These sell at about $150 a copy but well worth it. If you need to examine originals (hey at least this is a good excuse, so why not!). Check with Virginia Military Institute. Lexington VA. They have Henry M. Stewart's collection, and he had one of the best collections ever assembled, including Colt revolving rifles. Of course, the Colt Collection at the Conn. State Library might be able to help, and also the Cody Firearms Museum, Cody WY. Hope this helps. Sure would like to know who the owner of that collection is. I grew up in PA and knew (or at least knew of) some of the big collectors... John Spangler


# 1300 - Marlin M1 .22cal Carbine
6/2/98
steve, Louisa Virginia,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Marlin Marlin M1 .22 Cal Carbine .22 Rifle Blue Unknown

I found an old Marlin rifle designated Marlin M1 .22cal Carbine. It looks like a miniature M1 carbine possibly marketed to young boys after WWII. Can you give me any info on this rifle and possibly an approximation of it's value? I have a real M1 and complimenting it with this 'mini' would make an attractive addition to my collection.

Answer:
Steve, Marlin has manufactured many well made inexpensive .22 semi automatic rifles over the years. The model 99M1 was manufactured from 1964 to 1978, values are in the $100.00 range... Marc


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