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# 2158 - Danish M1 Scabbard
6/29/99
Karl

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently got an M1 bayonet with scabbard. The Bayonet is marked Utica Cutlery, and scabbard is brown wooden looking but fiberglas feeling, with a small crown under which is stamped "FKF". Any idea where it came from? Thanks, Karl

Answer:
Karl, Your scabbard is of Danish manufacture, probably made during the 1950's. A lot of surplus 10 inch M1 Garand bayonets have recently been imported from Denmark. I have seen Danish scabbards that are marked with a crown over "FKF" and a crown over "HTK". FKF stands for " Forsvarets Krigsmaterial Forvalning " (Defense War Material Administration), HTK for "Haerens Tekniske Korps" (Army Technical Corps).The scabbard body is made of wood grained plastic. Marc


# 2115 - Flintlock Blunderbuss
6/29/99
Boston ,Mass

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I was hoping you might be able to assist me in identifying two items in my possession. # 1 is a flintlock musket, It is 30 inches long, The diameter of the barrel up front is 2 1/2 inches round. It appears to be a pewter barrel, with a very rough engraving of flowers in front and a turkey closer to the stock, The stock appears to be a reddish (walnut?) hard wood,. The trigger looks to be steel with a brass trigger guard. The flintlock system is rusty and looks like steel. The numbers 1875 are die stamped just behind this set up. The musket looks well worn from use. The second Musket is an almost twin to the first but the barrel appears oval. The carvings are the same but no turkey, instead it has a floral pattern. Also there is no date stamped, but there are some light markings on the side that may be letters. I hope you can enlighten me with information or a place where I can turn. Boston ,Mass THANK YOU

Answer:
Sir- Boston is near Plymouth Rock where the Pilgrims landed, right? First Thanksgiving with the Indians, er, Indigenous people or Native Peoples, or whatever we are supposed to call them other than Redskins. Lots of history, and lots of tourists in that area. The Turkey may be a very appealing decorative item for them. My initial reaction is that you probably have some items made for the tourist trade sometime in the last 200 years, but more likely in the last 50-100 years. Another possibility is that they were made for theatrical use. We would need to see some good photos to give a better informed opinion. You can email them, or send by snail mail to Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171. We may be able to tell immediately, or might have to call in a friend who is an expert and has about a dozen blunderbusses (or is the plural blunderbi?) in his collection. As a quick check, I would drop a tiny little flashlight down the barrel and see what the inside looks like. If made as a functional firearm, the bore would be pretty even, while a tourist trinket would probably show seams from molds/patterns if a casting, or obvious joints if welded. Hope this helps. Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. John Spangler


# 2114 - Garand Stock Cartouche
6/29/99
Paul

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Garand 30-06 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a walnut Garand stock with a cartouche on the left side that is an eagle with 3 stars on top. What does this mean? Where is it from?

Answer:
Paul- Prior to 1947 there were two cabinet level military departments in the U.S. Government- the War Department and the Navy Department. (The Marine Corps belongs to the Navy Department, even though they may hallucinate otherwise.) In 1947 the Army Air Force was separated to become the U.S. Air Force, and they, along with the Department of the Navy and renamed Department of the Army were all placed under a newly established "Department of Defense" or DoD Procurement and inspection matters were supposed to move under DoD probably as an attempt to eliminate duplicate efforts and thereby cut costs. Thus inspectors were outfitted with new DoD acceptance stamps (DoDAS or DAS) to be used when items passed inspection. These stamps have the eagle and the three stars (probably signifying the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force). The DoDAS markings are found on M1 Garands made post 1947 at Springfield Armory, Harrington and Richardson and International Harvester. They are also found on vehicles, aircraft, communications gear, and M14, M16 and other small arms. The stamps were made in large numbers for lots of inspectors to use, and a few slimy people with no more ethics or shame than the present Commander in Chief have acquired original stamps, or made copies and are busy making old stocks look like new. There are subtle differences on M1 stocks from the different makers and an expert can probably tell you who made yours, even though all have similar looking DoDAS markings. Prior to 1947 on M1 rifles made at Springfield or Winchester the stocks were stamped with the ordnance escutcheon (crossed cannons with flaming bomb above, surrounded by a belt) the initial of the maker (SA or WRA) and initials of the officer responsible for the inspection (SPG, GAW, RS, WB, for S.P. Gibbs, George A. Woody, Robert Sears, and Waldemar Broberg respectively plus a few others). It is nice to imagine Col. Woody et. al. waiting at the end of the line to inspect each rifle, and then take a hammer and smack the stamp into the stock. However, they did not do this. Some lesser flunky did all that, but it was Col. Wood's butt if bad rifles got out. Heard enough? If not, get Scott Duff's excellent books on M1 Garands, join the Garand Collectors Association, and also subscribe to Billy Pile's "Garand Stand Newsletter." We will be glad to provide info, but we have links to the first two on the links page. John Spangler


# 2157 - WWI Luger?
6/26/99
Bill

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Luger 9MM 4" Blue Unknown

Luger has five numbers on the bottom of the barrel. Same numbers on the front of the trigger assembly. Block letters that say "Germany" on the butt of the chamber. There is an 'N' along the side, with a 'crown' over the N. Where there are a series of five numbers there is an "N" with a crown over the "N". No numbers found on the top of the chamber, but instead, there seem to be three initials in script. They are hard to read, not that they are 'worn', just the old type of script. The Luger belonged to my father in law, he fought in WWI and he always said it belonged to an Officer. What do you think? Thanks, Bill

Answer:
Bill, The "DWM" stamping on the toggle of your Luger is the manufactures trademark, it stands for Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionswerke of Berlin-Borsigwalde. The crown over N markings are German commercial nitro proofs. "Germany" was stamped on Lugers that were imported into the U.S. for commercial sales, the German military did not stamp Germany (in English) on any of their weapons. The absence of a chamber date, the commercial proof mark and the Germany stamping on your Luger all lead me to believe that you have a WWI military Luger that was reworked after the war for commercial sales in the U.S. Your father in law is correct that many German officers carried Lugers, but most would have had different markings. I suspect that this was a pistol that he obtained after WW1, not a souvenir brought home from the battlefield. Marc


# 2113 - J Stevens Arms Co. 410 Pistol, 12 1/4 Inch BBL.
6/26/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J Stevens Arms Co. 410 Pistol, 410 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have a J Stevens Arms Co. 410 pistol, 12 1/4 inch BBL. Single shot, in very good condition. I would like to know what it is worth, when it was made, how many made. I would like to sell it for top dollar. Thank you

Answer:
Dear Anonymous- Your pistol is worth up to $10,000 and/or 10 years. (Unless you have registration papers from the ATF) The boys at BATF consider these to be horrible awful sawed off shotguns that only criminals would want. They won't listen if you tell them that J. Stevens made them like this and that people might think they are neat and would want to collect them. The only options I can think of are (a) call BATF (look in blue pages under US Treasury Dept) and make arrangement to turn it in to them for destruction. (b) destroy it yourself (cut frame in half with saw or torch) and dispose of the parts. (c) we would not recommend this last step as it probably is not legal, but others might- A gunsmith could install a rifled barrel essentially sleeving the smoothbore barrel, so that it might be considered a pistol instead of a shotgun. I am not sure what the BATF boys would think about that idea, but you are welcome to ask. We would recommend plan (a). No charge for our bad news. Hope it helps. John Spangler


# 2112 - MP40
6/26/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Germany MP40 9MM Unknown Unknown Unknown

Please tell me more about a mp40.

Answer:
Sir- MP40 is a German Ww2 era Machine Pistol (European term) or submachine gun (American term) These were also called "Schmeissers" as most were made by that company. They were very well designed, made use of many stamped parts, and fired the 9mm Luger cartridge. Many were brought home by GIs at the end of WW2 as souvenirs. In 1964 someone offered to give me one, but it had not been registered in accordance with the 1934 National Firearms Act. As a soon-to-be college graduate I wanted to do something other than spend up to 10 years in a federal prison so I politely declined the offer. IF you have one, or know someone who does, and it has not been registered with the BATF, you have a very nice, but totally illegal weapon. Your choices are to turn it into the BATF for destruction, or destroy it yourself and get rid of the parts. John Spangler


# 2132 - Officers Model Special
6/22/99
George, Tacoma, WA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Officers .38 6" Blue 417177

What date was this manufactured. Any comments on this gun.

Answer:
George, Colt introduced the Officers model in 1904, and they were still selling a revolver of different configuration but with the same name, into the early 1970s. The Colt Officer's Model was a six-shot solid frame double action revolver of generous proportions and good workmanship, it was designed more for target shooting than general use. My records indicate that Officers Model serial numbers with no "J" prefix ended around 88843, the range for Officers Model Special revolvers with no "J" prefix was approximately 60001-938520. Your serial number fits into the Officers Model Special range. If your revolver is an Officers Model Special, it was manufactured in 1949 which was the first year of production for this model. The Officers Model Special was offered in .22 and .38 calibers only. Oddly enough, the .22 version weighed more than the .38 because of the extra metal in the cylinder. Marc


# 2111 - VZ24/G24(t)?
6/22/99
Andreas

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Czech VZ24 8mm 23.23 Blue (Bolt Is Not Blued) H5 262

Czech Model: VZ24 Caliber: 8mm Barrel length: 23.23" Type finish: Blue (Bolt is not blued) Serial #: H5 262 Markings: On receiver -- Left side CESKOSLOVENSKA ZBROJOVKA, A.S., BRNO VZ24, then on the left side there is a stamp F4 AND 39, with Czech rampant lion crest symbol between the F4 and 39 (very small though). Serial # H5 262 in on the left side. Czech crest has been ground off of the top of the receiver. On the right side their is another rampant lion crest. Also on the left side of the receiver is a waffenamt of the nazi bird carrying the swastika. I know the rifle is a Czech VZ24. What I wanted to know was if it was the German Model 24(t). After the take over of Czech in 1938, Germany continued production on the VZ24 rifle. It doesn't have the factory code, or any other alterations that happened latter to the VZ24 in 1941. Did they just stamp the bird on them at first? Everything says that it is a plain VZ24, except the nazi bird. What classification does the rifle fall under, either Vz24 or Mode 24(t)? What story does it have?

Answer:
Andreas- I cannot give you a documented answer to your questions, but will give my opinion. As usual, all our free advice comes with a full money back guarantee. The presence of waffenamts, or if that is not the totally correct term, at least German military markings, shows that this was indeed one of the rifles used by the Germans in WW2. The Germans adopted numerous pieces of foreign military equipment for issue to German or other friendly (to them) nations. Besides small arms, this extended to armored vehicles, artillery, and I even vaguely recollect a few aircraft perhaps. Most of these items were captured as they conquered ever wider expanses of Europe. To keep track of these goodies for reporting and support purposes, they were given official designations consisting of a general category (Tank, rifle, pistol, etc) with a model number either based on the former owner's nomenclature or something that made sense to the Germans, and a letter code in parentheses indicating the country which originally made the items. Many items came from Czechoslovakia, and apparently the German spelling is as bad as mine and they thought it might be spelled Tseckoslovakia or something, and ended up using the letter "t" to designate that country. (Czechoslovakia, according to Marc). All the VZ24 rifles were nearly the same as the standard German Karabiner98 kurz (K98k) Mauser except for the straight bolt handle and differences in stock fittings. All of those that were captured would have been referred to as Gewehr 24 (t). I think they switched the Czech plants over to making K98k rifles, but any VZ24s turned out under German control would still have been called G24(t), but probably had minimal Czech markings and more waffenamts as parts were subjected to inspection during manufacture. Hope this helps. A collection of captured weapons used by the Germans would be pretty interesting. John Spangler


# 2110 - African Pistol
6/22/99
Ray

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have found your interesting page. Perhaps you can help me. I have an old African pistol. It may have been a flintlock in the past. It is very old with distinctive hand made screws. It completely hand made and does not have a single number or any markings It is very crude indeed. If I sent pictures could you help me. I am an older man and I have many things that I need to sell. Thanks.

Answer:
Ray- African arms are a confusing lot. Those along the North African coast seem to fall into more of an Arab or Spanish influenced design with many using surplus parts salvaged from earlier European guns. These are often called "Camel guns" by collectors and have bizarre shaped buttstocks. The value on these is rather modest- in the $200-500 range unless something special catches the eye of a buyer. The rest of Africa seems to have had little in the way of locally made arms. I have only seen a few, and those appeared to have been influenced by the French (these were from a former French colony). Until near the start of the 20th century only flintlocks were allowed in native hands (thus reducing the risk to the Colonial governments). The flintlock tradition remained strong, and apparently some were made locally until fairly recently. These seem to have been very primitive pieces, and were probably intended more for ceremonial use than as weapons for repeated firing. Due to their crude construction and poor care, they often have the appearance of great age, but may only be a few dozen years old. Values on these run in the very modest range, maybe $50-250 depending on size, condition, and known history. Neither type seems to have much collector interest, and they seem to be more in demand as decorative pieces or tourist souvenirs. This sort of thing might sell well on E bay or at a local general antique dealer, but we would not be very interested unless as part of a larger collection of gun/militaria items. Hope this helps. We would be glad to see pictures (Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171). Please include a copy of this email if you send any, otherwise we will be confused. Will be glad to help with any other guns. John Spangler


# 2101 - Israeli Lee Enfield Rifle Use
6/19/99
William, Israel

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lee Enfield ? ? ? ? ?

I have a question which is less technical and more knowledge.. Do you know, maybe, what Lee Enfield rifles were used in Israeli wars (1948/1956) ? And if you do, maybe you can give me tech info on them(no too much - production date, length, caliber, range, any special applications).Thanks in advance.

Answer:
William- As a history major, I was taught to look for information from the participants in an event (primary sources) before resorting to secondary sources (.i.e.- someone who was not there). Anyway, since you live in Israel you will probably find better information somewhere closer to home. But, since I have read a couple of books on Enfields and saw the movie "Exodus" on TV many years ago, I will be happy to help, but I urge you to carefully judge the qualifications of your sources before accepting their comments as accurate. I believe the "Zionist terrorists" or "Jewish Freedom fighters" depending on perspective used whatever they could beg, borrow or steal. After WW2 the Mideast was awash with left over Lee Enfield rifles used by British Commonwealth nations, and given or sold to various staunch allies, semi-friendly despots, or not outwardly hostile nations who might be helpful some day. My guess is that the majority were No. 1 Mark III rifles usually considered to be the WW1 version. Some were undoubtedly the WW2 produced No. 4 Mark 1 variety. I suspect that some Pattern 1914 Enfield rifles (but Mauser type action rather than the Lee Enfield type) were also used. The No. 5 Mark I "Jungle Carbines" were just barely into British service by 1947, and probably did not reach foreign nations until sold off as surplus in the 1960s. The Lee Enfields used to win Israeli independence and then kick Arab butt in subsequent wars were all .303 British caliber. Weight was about 9 pounds and length runs about 45 inches without the bayonet. They have 10 round box magazines, and the bolt action is simple and reliable. Well trained troops can fire almost as fast as a semi-auto. Range is much better than the average soldier can shoot, but figure about 500 yards for practical purposes, 1000 yards with luck, and 1500-2000 yards (over a mile) with good light, clear targets, careful aim and Divine intervention. I suspect the Israeli Defense Force has a museum or historical section that has better information and exhibits of the actual arms used. John Spangler


# 2097 - German Pre-WW2 Sporting Rifle
6/19/99
Clay, Portland, OR, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
German Pre-WWII Sporting Rifle 8mm Unknown Blue NONE

O.K gun pros, I need help identifying an old German rifle. No, its not for sale. :)Dad brought this one home from Germany in '45. It is a small (36"overall) break action single shot sporting rifle. It has dual inline triggers; the front trigger cocks, the rear trigger fires. The break release curves to the bottom of the trigger guard. It appears to be8mm. Stamped on the left side of the barrel are the numbers 15 x 46. Opposite on the right is a very small eagle over a star. The barrel itself is octagonal. On the top are stamped the words "Bernhard Paatz Waffenfabrik Zella-Mehlis/Thur." There are two small dots over the "u"in Thur. Anyone with a clue as to its origins? Thanks in advance - Clay

Answer:
Clay- As always, we are loaded with information, some useful, some not. The two dots over the "u" are called umlauts, and sometimes non-German type will just substitute the letter "e" after the "u" to indicate the proper long "U" pronunciation. The .15x46 marking probably indicates that the rifle is chambered for the 8.15 x 46mm cartridge which was very popular among German target shooters in the period about 1900-1936. The double set trigger is appropriate for a fine target rifle. I have no information on the maker, and there does not seem to be any source available on the hordes of talented German gunmakers who made beautiful target rifles and shotguns and combination guns prior to WW2. That is about all we can tell you. Hope some of it was useful. John Spangler


# 2094 -
6/19/99
Mike USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Ruger ? revolver 357 maximum unknown unknown unknown

I am trying to find one. I know you can get that caliber in a T\C but I want to be different. An old gunsmith told me that when the maximum was first introduced Ruger came out with one. I have tried to contact Ruger with no results. My question is did they really make one. Thanks

Answer:
Mike, In 1984 Ruger did manufacture a single action revolver chambered in .357 Maximum, it was called the Blackhawk-SRM. Ruger produced a total of 11,500 Blackhawk-SRM revolvers which came with adjustable target sights and were available with either 7.5 or 10.5 inch barrels. Production of the Blackhawk-SRM revolver was suspended after 1984 because of throat erosion problems which Ruger was unable to resolve. Marc


# 2096 - Shiloh Sharps Rifle
6/15/99
Tim Trowbridge Berryville ,AR

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Shiloh Sharps Long Range Express (old Reliable?) .50 Cal 34" Blue 4835

"Old Reliable" "on barrel and buttplate We are having trouble finding information on this particular rifle. We would like have answers to some specific questions such as: When was this gun manufactured, what is the current value, etc. The fact that it is a 50 cal. seems to set it apart from most that we have found information on.... If anyone could help out with some answers or direct us to a source for the answers we would really appreciate it.

Answer:
Tim- Shiloh has a reputation of being the best of the modern makers of copies of the classic old Sharps rifles as used by the Buffalo hunters. Prices seem to start at about $1500-2000 and go up, and the waiting list is about a year for one of their guns. I am not familiar with the various models and custom features they offer, but think you have one of the classier examples. These are very popular with serious black powder shooters, and demand is obvious good even for well used examples. Early arms were sold with a Farmingdale, New York (Neww YORRK???) but they later moved to a more desirable location in Big Timber, Montana. I think they started production in the late 1970s or early 1980s, so these are certainly not to be confused with the rifles made 100 years ago by the Sharps Rifle Company, even though they use similar model names and calibers. John Spangler


# 2090 - F I E Titan .25
6/15/99
Claudio , NYC USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
F.I.E TITAN 25 Unknown Blue 304449

All or any information you can give me on this weapon , I would like to know if it's a cheap import and the value of the weapon.

Answer:
Claudio, I strongly recommend that a .25 auto should never be used for self defense. If you need a pistol to save your life, a .25 may only irritate an attacker. FIE (Firearms Import & Export) filed bankruptcy in 1990, they imported and marketed inexpensive firearms in the USA. To answer your question, your Titan is cheap, but it is not an import, Titan pistols were manufactured in the USA in .32, .25 and .22 calibers. Values for .25 caliber Titan pistols are in the $50 to $75 range depending on condition. Marc


# 2073 - Rifle- J.Stevens
6/15/99
Mr. black

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
J.S. Evans Unknown Small Unknown Nickel Unknown

J.S. Evans & Co. Chicopee Falls, MAP at Sept 6, 1884 This single-shot, small caliber rifle has recently come into my possession. I have never heard of this manufacturer. Is there anything you can tell me about this manufacturer or this rifle in particular?? Thanks.

Answer:
Mr. Black- Fist thing I can tell you is that some of their markings may have been tough to read. Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts was the home of Joshua Stevens who got into the gun making business about 1864, and the company has continued in business to this day under various names. They were "J. Stevens & Co." from 1864 to 1888 when they became J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., and in 1916 they dropped the Tool part of the name. That pretty well pins down the date of your gun. The exact model cannot be identified from the information provided. Jay Kimmel has an excellent book "Savage & Stevens Arms: A Collector's History" which is the best on the subject. Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their Values will be your best bet to identify the model you have and the value. Hope this helps.


# 2122 - Winchester For Llama Trade Is It A Good Deal?
6/12/99
Ty

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester Modle-94 30 -30 19 1/2 In. Blue 3735608

This Gun is in the 95% to 99% range. I would like to know if it has any value. I traded a llama 9-mm pistol for it it was worth 150-200 dollars. any info will help. Thank You. Ty

Answer:
Ty, I am not a big Llama fan, so in my opinion, any Llama for Winchester trade is a good deal for the individual who ends up with the Winchester. The Winchester Model 94 was designed by John Browning and is one of the most popular rifles that has ever been manufactured, more than seven million have been produced since they were first introduced. My records indicate that your rifle (number 3735608) was manufactured in 1972. Values for post 1964 manufacture Winchester Model 94 carbines in 95% condition are in the $200 to $250 range. Here in Utah where I live, model 94 values usually increase as it gets closer to deer season. Marc


# 2063 - Derringer- .32RF
6/12/99
Wade Mintz, Henderson, NV

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Victor ? ? 32 Rimfire Derringer UNK 3

I'm trying to find any information on this weapon, it's manufacturer and it's possible worth. 20It's stamped either 1851 or 1871 and I'm told it's known as a "gamblers boot gun..."

Answer:
Wade- The .32 rimfire cartridge was introduced about 1860 or so, and was sometimes used in privately purchased pistols during the Civil War, notably early Smith & Wessons. The "Victor" brand name was used on guns made by three firms. Crescent used it on shotguns; Marlin used it on derringers, and Harrington and Richardson used it on "suicide special" pistols. Yours is probably one of the Marlin made pieces if a single shot, but H&R if a revolver. The H&R has little value, but the Marlin would probably be worth several hundred dollars. As for being a "gambler's boot gun" that sounds pretty good if you are planning to sell it to tourists from California. Just hope they forget that Las Vegas was a dusty nothing up until the mid 20th century. However, most will be convinced that some gold miner dropped it at a Blackjack table in the Luxor on the way to California, and decide it will be a great souvenir. I think P.T. Barnum used to talk about their high birth rate or something. John Spangler


# 2039 - Burnside Civil War Carbine
6/12/99
Dick Toledo, OH

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Burnside Carbine Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Can you buy cartridges for this carbine ? Can you shoot it today using these cartridges?

Answer:
Dick- Yes to both, but with some caveats. Original cartridges at $20 and up are a bit scarce to shoot, and the powder my be bad. Fortunately S&S Firearms of Glendale NY (see our links page) has reproduction cases you can use for only about $2.85 each. These are inexpensive and can be used many times. They also have bullet molds of the correct style. I have dealt with S&S for years and highly recommend them. Remember that although these used brass cartridges, the Burnsides still needed a percussion cap on a nipple to ignite the powder charge, so they are not "self contained metallic cartridges" like we usually think of today. Hundreds of original Civil War carbines are fired many times each year at the North-South Skirmish Association matches. Back in the 1960s I fired my Civil War musket a lot, and they were still cheap ($125.00 for mint unfired Colt M1861 specials, about $30-50 for a nice .58 Springfield. Mine had a broken stock, so it only cost $12.50). Carbines were only a little more expensive and nobody thought much about harming collector value. However, many people have second thoughts about doing that anymore and now use reproductions that are as good as, or better than the originals but a lot cheaper. My lawyer says to tell you to have it checked by a competent gunsmith before shooting this or any other old gun. Make sure the gunsmith is rich first, so you can sue him instead of me. (See or links page for more info on them and their matches, including summer camps for kids.) Besides inventing the carbine that bears his name, Ambrose E. Burnside was also a prominent General in the Civil War achieving fame at Antietam and suffering the agony of defeat at Fredericksburg. He went on to become the Governor of Rhode Island (or was it Massachusetts, one of them Yankee places.) And of course, his luxurious face whiskers have been credited with inspiring the term "sideburns". Aren't you glad you asked? John Spangler


# 2036 - Colt .22 Ace
6/8/99
William Leechburg Pa USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911 22 Cal Conv From 45 5 Inch Blue 9306

Clemens--- Colt Ace-- Engraving on barrel " Won by Capt. Cloyde P SCHROEDER 127 th Infantry Wis.N.G.1935 Would this be worth keeping as a collectors item or should I look for a buyer?

Answer:
William- I can usually find some excuse to keep almost any gun for my collection. I am easily fascinated by the history, amazed by the artistry, baffled by the technology, or blinded by greed. I am sure you can find one of these that will work for you, but if not we will be glad to help find it a good home. Presentation pieces are always interesting, and the pre-WW2 "Ace" .22 long rifle versions of the .45 ACP M1911A1 pistol are not common. The later "service model Ace" versions with serial numbers starting with SM are a little more common. The .22 conversion kit which can be installed on any of the M1911 series .45 frames is very common, but these were sold as kits only, not as completely assembled pistols. Collector interest in your pistol would probably depend mostly on condition. John Spangler


# 2033 - Colt SAA Date
6/8/99
Joan CA. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Single Action Army Revolver 45 7 1/2 Inches Blue SA43592

Fixed rear sight. My father has given me this gun to sell for him. He thinks this gun comes from one of the final production runs (1970s) of this particular model. It has never been fired. He has told me that it is a collectors item but because it is relatively "new" I'm not sure it is as valuable as he would lead me to believe. Can you give me an idea of its value? Thanks.

Answer:
Joan- You have a very nice gun, made by Colt sometime after 1979. Several makers have become famous and rich copying this venerable design. (Ever heard of Ruger or Uberti?) The .45 caliber and 7.5" barrel are fairly desirable. There is a tiny bit of collector interest in these, but most often these are sold for shooters. I think I see these offered in the $950-1250 range. Compared to the $300-450 range for the copies that is pretty good value. We would be happy to help you sell it. John Spangler


# 2032 - Martel- National Firearms Co.
6/8/99
Larry, El Dorado, AR. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
National Firearms Co. MARTEL .22 Pump Unknown Blue NONE ON GUN

2 stars placed on either side of the word MARTEL like quotation marks. No other markings are noted on the gun. Have been unable to locate anything about this gun. Would like any and all information, such as date of mfg., where mfg., why is there no other markings on the gun. Also if at all possible please advise an approximate value. Thanks in advance Larry

Answer:
Larry- National Firearms Company is a name that has been used at least twice by U.S. makers. Crescent Arms Co. used it on inexpensive double barrel shotguns probably about 1900, and more recently it has been used by Marlin for .22 rifles and pump shotguns. You can probably look up old marlin ads, or check out Bill Brophy's magnifice1nt book Marlin Firearms to identify the comparable model sold under their own name. Serial numbers were not required until 1968, so your rifle was made earlier than that. Marlins are a neglected collecting field, and values for the Marlin version of your gun are probably modest, and for a house brand version, probably even lower. My guess is that you would be lucky to get much over about $50 for it. However, when in a room full of horse manure, look around- there may be a pony there. You may have the start of a fascinating collection trying to assemble one of every variation of that Marlin model sold under different names. Sears, Montgomery Ward, and other retailers often had such guns made with their brand names, and maybe some small cosmetic change. The Gun Parts Corporation catalog has an extensive listing matching house brands with the original maker and model number that could be a good guide. Brophy's book would have more info. Good luck. John Spangler


# 2078 - M1917 Bayonet Markings
6/5/99
Larry Corsicana, Texas USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bayonet ? 1917 Unknown Blade Length Greenish/Gray NONE

Double stamped ordnance canon, with x and what appears to be small marks of part of another x beside it, U.S. under neath ordnance mark. To the left of ordnance mark is what appears to be a small eagle head outline, cannot be seen with naked eye. Underneath the 1917 date is outline of a half circle, and to the top left of the no.1 of the date is another small 1. Wooden handles has two grooves cut on each side of handle. I would like to know who the maker may be, since it is not a Springfield. Picked this Item up at a flea market for $15.00 Bayonet appears to have never been used

Answer:
Larry, it is hard to say without seeing your bayonet, but since I need to give you some sort of answer, I will go out on a limb and make a guess. My guess is that you have a Winchester manufactured 1917 bayonet with a very lightly or crookedly struck maker stamping. These bayonets were originally designed for the British P-14 rifle, which was being manufactured in the US. The first 545,000 bayonets manufactured were sent to the British whose designation for them was Pattern 1913 (P-13). The P-13 bayonet looks much like an earlier British bayonet, the P-1907 except that the muzzle ring is higher. The two grooves on the grips of your bayonet were used by the British to be able to quickly identify a P-13 bayonet from a P-1907. Bayonets used by the British will have British marks stamped on the ricasso and those used by the United States will have US markings. I have seen bayonets that were sent to Britain and then back to the United States, these bayonets have British markings which are crossed out and US markings. M1917 bayonets were manufactured by two companies, Winchester Repeating Arms CO. of New Haven Connect. and Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge CO. of Bridgeport Connect. On 1917 bayonets, Manufacturers logos are stamped just below the "1917" designation on the reverse ricasso. Bayonets manufactured by Remington will be marked with the word "Remington" inside a circle with the word "Remington" following the top inside perimeter of the circle. Bayonets manufactured by Winchester will be marked with a big letter "W" sometimes inside a circle and sometimes without a circle. According to Gary M. Cunningham's excellent book "American Military Bayonets Of The 20Th Century" One rare variation of the 1917 bayonet was manufactured for an experimental Winchester Automatic Rifle, it had a bore diameter of 0.645 inches, another rare 1917 variation was manufactured for a bayonet adapter for the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR), it had a bore diameter of 0.922 inches. Neither of these bayonets had a maker mark but it is believed that they were manufactured by Winchester. I hope that this helps, let me know if you want to sell your bayonet. Marc


# 2025 - Barrels Made With "Pressed Wire"
6/5/99
Eric, Fairfield, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
L.C. Smith The L.C. Smith Trap Gun 12ga. 28in Blue #108 767 0

It is a double barrel and has The L.C. Smith Trap Gun on the butt plate and what I was told was pressed wire barrels. The barrels have fine lines like carving on them but it's not been engraved it looks like wire zig-zagged all up and down both barrels. I have never heard of pressed wire barrels and have been unsuccessful in finding out much about this shotgun. Is it rare or were a million of them made? I would also like a ballpark price on it also. I only paid $100 for it and would like a little help identifying it please.

Answer:
Eric- L.C. Smith offered at least seven grades of "Damascus" shotgun barrels up until about the end of WW1 (1918 for anyone who slept thru history class.) Damascus steel is made by taking several layers of steel arranged in various shapes and then forging them together, resulting in patterns that show up on the finished surface. Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values has an excellent description with pictures of the process in the introduction to the shotgun chapter. (See, another good reason to buy this most valuable reference book.) A lot of custom knife makers are making Damascus blades today. Besides being beautiful, the layering of the steel was supposed to add strength, although I doubt this is actually the case. In some cases, actual wire cable (wire rope) has been used to make Damascus, and results in an identifiable pattern. Up until about 1900, Damascus (or "laminated") barrels were considered the best quality and perhaps were if well made by the best makers. However, solid steel barrels, made by casting (fluid steel, or "fulss stahl" as often seen on German arms) or forging from a solid billet became the standard method of manufacture and resulted in a uniformly strong material. From about 1890-1920 makers of inexpensive guns still used some Damascus barrels, but more often used imitation Damascus where a pattern was acid etched onto the barrel to give the appearance of Damascus. Most people agree that it is unsafe to shoot Damascus barrel guns, so collector values are generally less than for comparable models with solid steel barrels. Most Damascus barrel guns have very little collector value (perhaps $50-150) as wallhangers. However, L.C. Smith is a popular maker and one of their may be more valuable and sell faster if in nice condition. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 1975 - Sharps Carbine Serial No. Info.
6/5/99
Ken, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sharps Carbine .50? Unknown Unknown 21352W

There are three dates on the action: 1848; 1852; and 1869(?)behind hammer and more difficult to read. The number 47 is marked under the forearm in front of the serial number. There is no patch box on the stock. When answering a 1997 question about another Sharps carbine, John mentioned that Frank Mallory has published several volumes about US military firearms which occasionally include information about the allocation and use of blocks of serial numbers or even specific serial numbers. Could you give me a name for the volume I need for this Sharps or tell me whether any volume contains information about this particular serial number or other close serial numbers? Thanks.

Answer:
Ken- The patent dates visible on the outside should be those of Christian Sharps in 1848 and 1852 relating to the basic action. The 1859 date is for R. S. Lawrence's patent for the automatic pellet priming mechanism behind the hammer. With these three dates, we are pretty sure you have a New Model 1859, 1863 or 1865 carbine. These were all very similar, and used .52 caliber paper cartridges inserted into the breech and ignited by either the Lawrence primer or a standard percussion cap. If still in percussion, there should be another patent date marked on the breechblock for H. Conant's 1856 patent. I am not familiar with any Sharps serial numbers ending with a letter suffix. They often have a "C" in front, which is their way of indicating the number is over 100,000. The 1859-63-65 series started at about serial number 30,000, so I cannot confirm exactly what you have. Without knowing the model, we cannot do much research. We recommend that every collector purchase all 4 (soon to be 5) volumes of Springfield Research Service "U.S. Martial Serial Numbers" books. John Spangler


# 2077 - IHC M1 Garand Barrel Channel Numbers
6/1/99
E.J., Crystal River Fl. USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
International Harvester M1 Garand 30.06 Unknown Parkerized 5168650

Stock has number "2165" in barrel channel. What does this number mean? should it match the serial number?

Answer:
EJ, after reviewing two books about the M1 Garand, "The M1 Garand: Post World War II" by Scott A Duff and "M1 Garand 1936 To 1957" by Joe Poyer and Craig Riesch, I was only able to come up with a partial answer to your question. International Harvester M1 Garand stocks were stamped with a number in the barrel channel. Early stocks had one or two letters followed by a four digit number, while later stocks had only a four digit number. Poyer and Riesch state that stock barrel channel numbers are 0.220 inches in height and the stamps used were convex so that the number would be complete when stamped in a rounded barrel channel. John questions the accuracy of many of Poyer and Riesch's pronouncements, he bet me that he can make decent marks in M1 stocks with his flat faced stamps. The barrel channel numbers were not matched to the serial number of the rifle, and I was unable to find any information as their meaning in either of the books. Current thinking among members of the Garand Collectors Association is that the 4 digit numbers are Julian date codes. The first digit is the last digit of the year, the remainder being the day of the year (2165 would translate to June 14, 1952). The barrel date may be within a couple months of the stock Julian date if the stock and barrel and rest of the rifle all have remained unchanged over the last 47 years. Remember, parts with dates reflect the date the part was made, not when it was assembled. Marc


# 2108 - Ammo And Ammo Box Dates
6/1/99
Troy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I saw your Antique Ammunition Web Ring and was hoping you could help me. I'm trying to find info on ammo and boxes of ammunition, more specifically dating the boxes, where they were made and such. Any info would be helpful.

Answer:
Troy- Thanks for contacting us. Dating ammo and ammo boxes can be tricky. There are a few specialized books on specific makers or types, but no good general reference. Winchester quite often included a date code for the printing of the labels (3-11 meaning March 1911, etc.). Military ammo usually includes the last two digits of the date in the headstamp, but you have to open the box to read that. Company names or logos changed over the years due to mergers, etc. which were reflected on the boxes. (Example- Union Metallic Cartridge operated independently but in 1911 merged with Remington to form Remington-UMC and used a red circle logo. Later they used a "dog bone shape logo" Winchester, Western, and Olin are all related over the years. ) "Cartridges of the World" by Barnes give a lot of information on dates specific calibers were introduced, and sometimes discontinued, so that narrows your choices a little. The best source of info would be members of the International Ammunition Association who are fascinated with such things and love to share info with others. I know a fair amount about US military ammo (but only a tiny fraction of what some of the IAA members know- I read the books they write!). Will be glad to send you a membership application if this sounds interesting. John Spangler


# 2105 - Colt .45 Revolvers
6/1/99
Jennifer

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Revolver 45 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have two 1909 Colt .45 revolvers that are in excellent condition. I am rather confused, though, because I have gotten quotes (gun unseen) anywhere from $350.00 to $35,000. Just what are these revolvers really worth. I would really appreciate some feedback. Thanks.

Answer:
Jennifer- We appreciate your contacting us to get honest answers to your question. Since we have not seen the guns either, our free information comes with the usual full money back guarantee. First, if someone offered $35,000 for one or both 1909 Colt Revolvers, invite them over with a briefcase full of cash before they change their mind. This assumes, of course, that they are not fancy engraved gold plated jobs or anything like that. "1909 Colt Revolvers" might be interpreted many ways, leading to the wide range of values you were quoted. First, we want to be sure you have a revolver. This has a round thing in the center where you put six cartridges one at a time. An automatic has a clip or magazine for the ammo and then fits into the handle. There is a Model 1909 .45 caliber Colt AUTOMATIC that was a very rare experimental predecessor of the "45 Automatic" that served the U.S. Army from 1912 to the 1980s. They are probably worth $35,000 give or take a little depending on how "excellent" your excellent condition is. On the other end, in 1909 Colt was making "New Service" revolvers chambered in .45 Colt caliber and .455 caliber. Value on these is about $350 or so for the standard civilian version. A few thousand New Service revolvers were purchased as "Model 1909" by the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps. These are worth more than the civilian guns. These are listed in "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their values" in NRA antique Good as worth $325, $425, and $950 respectively. In NRA antique excellent the values are $850, $1,250, and $3,000 respectively. How do you tell them apart- look at the bottom of the handle, they conveniently marked them there, with only a serial number on the civilian version. However, it seems that many have had the markings removed, which seriously lowers the value. Another possibility is that you are talking about Colt Single Action Army revolvers (think "cowboy gun") made in 1909 and values for those will be in the $1200- 7500 depending on exact model, caliber, and lots of other stuff in addition to condition. If you want to send us some pictures we can tell you a lot more. (Email them as an attachment if you have a scanner or digital camera. For snail mail- send them to John Spangler, Box 711282, Salt Lake City UT 84171.) We will be glad to sell these for you. If they are worth $350 we will try to get that so we are fair to you and to the buyer., If worth $35,000 we will try to get that. We will not sell $350 guns for $35,000, and we darn sure hope we don't sell any $35,000 guns for $350. For more information on different ways to sell your guns, go to www.oldguns.net/. Hope this helps. Now you have our curiosity up. Wonder what they really are! John Spangler


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