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# 723 - Ruin a Perfectly Good Webley?
7/29/97
Art, San Leandro, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Webley Mk VI .455, Ground To .45 6" Blue 356XXX BARREL & FRAME, 203XX CYLINDER

1918, and mysterious British stamps and arrows all over the place.

Hi, This gun groups so good (I use Federal 185 gr semi wadcutter) that now I want to have adjustable sights put on without messing up the latch. Do you know who I might contact? Thanks Art

Answer:
Sorry Art, even though your Webley has been modified to shoot .45, and the cylinder number doesn't match the rest of the gun (is it possible that the original cylinder is out there somewhere in unmodified condition)? I just can not bring myself to help you ruin your fine old revolver by adding an adjustable sight. A Webley like yours in very good condition is worth $200 to $250 (with the original cylinder $300 to $350), after the modifications that you propose your Webley will be worth $50 or less. My advice would be to leave your Webley as is, if you want a gun to "fix up" go out and buy a (Geneseo) Springfield .45... Marc


# 732 - The Following helpful hint from Dr. Lynn Lyon
7/29/97

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Answer:
A man from Canada asked about the getting the bolt back into his Steyr model 1895 rifle. If you'll have him email me I can shared my limited wisdom on that bolt system. The trick is to pull the rotating bolt head to its full open position. Then hold the head in that position while inserting the bolt into the bolt way. Then push it gently forward until it's past the sear. If the bolt head is bumped before its past the sear it will rotate to the closed position and you have to start over. The Austrians may have discharged from their army all who could not manage to get the bolt back into the rifle. The only other piece of advice is to avoid disassembling the bolt head from the bolt body at all costs. If it's necessary to do so send me an Email and I can describe how to disassemble the bolt.


# 706 - Swiss .41 Vettrelli Model 1878
7/29/97
Brooke, San Jose, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown About 0.425 Inches 32.5 Inches Blue 190XXX

+WAFFENFABRIK BERN 190010 M.78(above all on left side of receiver) 10 (on several other parts)

What is this assault rifle and what is its value? What ammunition does it use? The bore land diameter is roughly 0.425", with 4 lands and 4 groves of about equal width. It has a straight stock; tilt-up adjustable rear sight; formed steel wrap-around steel buttplate; and a 19 inch bayonet with fearfully vicious double-cut teeth about 1/4 inch wide and apart on its top side - in a black leather and steel scabbard. I was given this rifle and bayonet in about 1956 by a friend of my father. I think he bought it from one of the surplus dealers advertising in National Rifleman at the time. When I was 14 years old I !could have bought any number of surplus military guns for less than $50 by mail order! Thanks, Brooke (USN honorable discharge 3 decades ago)

Answer:
Brooke- It must be a full moon again. Every so often we get a whole string of questions on these old Swiss rifles. (Either that or someone is having fun with us!) There were a couple different variations of these rifles, but all used a .41 rimfire cartridge. Forget about finding much ammo to shoot. If you just want a couple for show, follow our links page to the "Old Western Scrounger" who may have some. Many of these rifles were nearly mint unfired. A friend of mine got one, (actually, his Mom did, we were only about 12 then- see the kind of people I had for friends!) and it was all of $9.95. Your bayonet is one of the Engineer or Pioneer types with the sawback blade. Those are pretty nice items, and run close to $100 with scabbard. The rifle is probably in the $125-250 range, depending on condition and exact model. Nice old antique, and no paperwork required under Federal laws. However, California may decide that your wicked bayonet does make this an assault rifle. Heck, its a gun, so just ban it


# 705 - Shotgun- T. Parker 12 GA Hammer Type
7/26/97
Robert, Walhalla, SC, Oconee

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
T. Parker, New York 12 Ga. Double Barrel With Hammers. No Model 12 Ga. 28-30" Best Guess. I Did't Measure. Blue, "Genuine Laminated Steel" 18XXX

On rib of between barrels: "Genuine Laminated Steel" On left side of breach: "T. Parker, New York" On right side of breach: "Thomas Parkr" (not Parker)This appears to be hand stamped. Both sides of the breach have a lightly scrolled border, nothing remarkable. The serial number 18888 is stamped on the barrel on the side of the "hook" where it attaches to the stock. It has the same number stamped on the forearm and on the part of the stock where the barrels attach. No other marks were found. I want to know any info about this gun simply as a collector. No interest in selling. Also, Can it be fired safely or is this best as a "wall hanger"? It looks to !be in good condition. Sincerely: Robert

Can you tell me anything about this gun such as its age, etc. Is it safe to shoot? Does it have any particular value. I paid $300.00, I hope that wasn't too much. Is it a real Parker. I don't think it is. I have been told it was a "trade gun". What is that? Thanks.

Answer:
Listed Robert- We can't say for sure who made your shotgun. The only T. Parker listed in Frank Sellers' "American Gunsmiths" is a fellow in Oberlin, Ohio around 1853. The famous Parker Brothers of Meriden Conn. operated 1868-1934, but they knew geography pretty well, and wouldn't use a New York address. The brothers names were Charles, Wilbur, and Dexter, so Thomas is not one of them anyway. Sounds to me like the gun was marked with a Parker name in hopes of fooling people into thinking it was a very high grade piece of work and pretty valuable. That scheme worked nicely then, and a hundred years later it looks like it is still luring some buyers. H&D Folsom used the trade name "C. Parker & Co." on some of their imported guns, but that is another one that doesn't match up. I hate to tell you this, but: (a) I wouldn't shoot it because the "laminated" or "Damascus" barrels are generally considered unsafe with modern ammunition. It was probably made circa 1880-1910. The absence of other markings on


# 700 - Mauser .32 Auto
7/26/97
Don Blancher, Mobile, Al

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Auto 32 2 Blue 69XXX

"waffenfabrik Mauser a.g. Oberndorf a.n. Mausers patent" on left slide a small crown with U on right slide near front

History and information on gun. date of manufacture etc.

Answer:
Don- This does not compute. We don't know anything about any Mauser pistols in .32 ACP (7.65mm) with 2 inch barrels. ABout all we can tell you is that the crown/U proofmark is pre-Nazi era, so it was made prior to the mid 1930s... John


# 699 - H&R Shotgun No Model No S.N.
7/26/97
Brett, Labertouche, Victoria, Australia.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Harrington and Richardson Unknown 12 Gauge Approx. 30 Inch Unknown Unknown

Just wondering if you could find out how old this gun is, and the appoxiamate worth of it?

Answer:
Brett- Sorry, not enough information to do much research. Even if you had provided all the stuff we ask for, there still isn't much on H&R products. Value for H&R shotguns seems to be under US $50, with little demand even then. Best thing is to turn it in to be destroyed with all your other guns. I understand the Australian government is paying large amounts for most of the guns being confiscated and destroyed. The bad news is it is coming out of your health care funding and you'll have to pay more taxes to refill that pot. While your system of government is a little different from ours, it shows what can happen. By the way, are your criminals obeying this law any more than the ones against robbery and murder? Hmmm, just like American criminals, only the good guys obey any of the laws.


# 698 - Revolver Mle 1892, S.1894
7/26/97
Danko, Santiago de Chile

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mre.d'Armes St. Etienne Revolver Mle 1892, S.1894 8mm. Lebel Unknown Blued F43XXX

It has stamped a "B" and a "g" inside circles in the right side, a "D" stamped in a circle in the right side of the hammer, a number 2 and a "D" inside a diamond shape stamped in the trigger, on the right side of the barrel it bears the Chilean proof banc stamp and finally some kind of "F" inside a shield stamped in front of the castle, below of the barrel. The whole thing is in a great shape.

I understand this was the side arm of the French Army between 1894 and 1918 (aprox.) I would appreciate if you can tell me if this revolver serial number and markings, belonged in particular to a French Army issued one, or a private purchase. Do you know its collection value? Also I would like to know if the 8mm. Lebel is actually in production, by who, and if it can be fired instead with 0.32in S&W long safely. Thanks for your kindness and time, Danko.

Answer:
Danko, sorry to tell you that there is not much collector interest in most French military sidearms. The Chilean markings on your revolver would tend to make it even less desireable to most collectors. I would estimate the value of your revolver to be in the $100 range. A good place to look for ammunition would be the "Old Western Scrounger", there is a link to him on our links page... Marc


# 697 - Colt Python In .41 Caliber- Any Others.
7/26/97
vicky rogers tx.USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Python 41 Unknown Unknown Unknown

the gun was sent to colt to have this special caliber made

Are there any others

Answer:
Vicky- Nope, no others that I know of. Course I don't know much about these to start with. You really should write to Colt and get a "Factory letter" and see what they can tell you. There is also a Colt Collectors Association, and I am sure that a couple of them are interested in something other than $10,000 Colt single actions. Maybe they can tell you... John Spangler


# 720 - Czechoslovakian CZ Model 1927
7/23/97
Andrej Blazicek

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Andrej Blazicek visited our site and was kind enough to send is the following information about the Czechoslovakian CZ Model 1927.

Answer:
Marc, your Webpage for Collectors of Arms is very beautiful. I am very happy. It is one of the best Webpages that I found. I have a part Answer to question N645 - Czechoslovakian CZ Model 1927 from 7/1/97. CZ vzor 27 [vzor=model] was adopted for Police unit and Financial Guard and not for Army. Official Model for Army was CZ vzor 1924 in 9mm Browning Short. This model was replaced in 1938 with CZ vzor 1938, but only few pistols were made for Czechoslovakian Army. To SN 130XXX, date of production is from march 1939 until June 1941, while from this date was slide stamped with code "fnh" this is for Ceska Zbrojovka A.S.Praha, plant Strakonice . My opinion - year of production is 1940. With best wishes Andrej


# 694 - Maverick .45 Colt Derringer By Uberti
7/23/97
Robert, Wichita, KS

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Intercontinental Arms Inc. Maverick .45 Colt 3.25" Blue XXX

This is a Double barrel .45 Colt. On right side is: A. UBERTIC & C. GARDONE V.T. ITALY On left side on top barrel is a crest of some kind with a star in a circle over it. On the frame, under the serial number is the same crest with a star in a circle over it, XIX, and PFS with a star in a circle over it.

I found it listed in a gun guide from the mid 60s priced at $50. I can not find any current price for it. I have the original box and certificate (printed in Italian).

Answer:
Robert- I couldn't find anything on these. Uberti has a reputation of making pretty good quality stuff, usually faithful copies of classic old Civil War and Western guns. They must have been hard up for work when they took on this project. I don't think these have any collector value, and don't particularly care for them. They seem to appeal to motorcycle gang types. No idea what they would pay, but I wouldn't under any circumstances. I don't like pork chops either, but my wife does. Guess it is worth about what someone will pay for it. Sorry we can't do better for you... John Spangler


# 693 - Browning Shotgun- Steel Shot?
7/23/97
Robert, Wichita, KS

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Browning Superposed 12 Ga. 26.5" Blue 56XXX

On the right side of the barrel is: PATENTS Nr 2.203.378-2.233.861 MADE IN BELGIUM On left is: BROWNING ARMS COMPANY - ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI SPECIAL STEEL - 12 GA. - SHELLS 2 3/4"

Browning says the shotgun was manufactured in 1928. For more information they want a $40.00 fee. Does the 'special steel' refer to the barrel or that is can use steel shot?

Answer:
Robert- So Browning wants $40.00? Listen, we can split it, half for you and half for the NRA so they can help fight to protect your right to keep your Browning shotgun, and your Maverick Derringer! (Send check made out to NRA-ILA to us at Box 711282, Salt Lake City, UT 84171, okay?) Here's your answer- the "special steel" marking refers to the barrel steel. This is a carry over from the early 1900s when Damascus or "laminated" steel was used which had lots of little bits forged together. Well done, they really looked neat, but were not as strong as modern barrel steels. In 1928 no one worried about the birds and fishies chowing down on lead shot at the bottom of the ponds. Lead was heavier, and easy to make into shot, so steel shot was only used in air guns ("BB" guns). I am told that the older Brownings are not good choices for use with steel shot and I would advise you not to use steel shot in your Superposed, however I have no scientific data to prove or disprove that. Go find one of the lawyers filing


# 692 - Steyer-Mannlicher M95 Assembly
7/23/97
Robert Kelly,Ottawa,Ont.Can.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Steyr-Mannlicher M95/31 'Stutzen' 8x56R Short (19"?) Blue Unknown

12mm high 'S'denoting 8x56R

Essentially, I find it very difficult to replace the straight-pull bolt after removing it for cleaning. It seems to me that a military rifle should be easily field stripped and put back into action. Is there some trick to getting the bolt back into the receiver? The amount of twisting and pulling I go through wouldn't have been very good in the trenches. Thanks, R. Kelly

Answer:
Sir- Beat me! I never messed with one of those. I never knew too much anyhow. But I can usually look stuff up and fool a lot of people. Can't do it this time. Neither "Small Arms of the World" nor Smith's "Book of Rifles" share the secret with us. Throw it away (ammo's too hard to find anyway) and get a nifty little Swedish Mauser or reliable old SMLE. Well, on second thought, you and the rest of our Canadian neighbors probably won't be allowed to have any guns at all in another year or two. We might have 5-10 years left yet if people don't wake up!! Sorry we cannot help... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 690 - Shotgun- Daniel Boone 20 GA Double Barrel
7/23/97
james smith

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Daniel Boone Stagecoach Shotgun, Side By Side, 2 Triggers .20 Gauge 20 In. Originally (or Home Done) Blue, Now Worn To B48XX (HOUSING) B11XXX (BARRELS)

Besides the words Daniel Boone engraved(stamped?) in script on the left side, there's a faint image of a head and shoulders portrait of D.B.

It looks like a Remington model 1910 and has a serial number similar to a Rem., but has no Remington markings. Any idea of the age and mfr. history?

Answer:
Jim- The only Remington Model 10 I know of is the Model 1910 which was a pump gun. Earlier Remington double barrels were not made in 20 GA, so I think we can rule out blaming Remington for this one. (If you want to see an example of EVERY MODEL REMINGTON MADE you need to get to Cody, Wyoming to see the exhibit that just opened with all of them on display! There will be a book out in September, done by noted author Roy Marcot which will be the first really good coverage of Remington stuff. Watch for interest and values to climb in the near future as a result of this tremendous project initiated by the Remington Society of America. Contact us for info on how to join!) Anyway, Daniel Boone was a trade name used on rifles and shotguns sold by the Belknap Hardware Co. of Louisville, KY, but made by H.D. Folsom Arms Co. These were probably most popular in the 1890-1930 era. Yours is probably at the more recent end of that due to being 20 GA. Folsom made cheap double shotguns for many different dealers and


# 691 - US Marked Winchester M1885 "Winder Musket"
7/23/97
Gary- Dayton, Ohio

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1885 Winder Rifle .22 Short 26 Inchs Blue 135XXX

US marked with birds head

Knowing that this is a Browning design and this rifle was manufactured in 1918 .I can find nothing to confirm the US markings. Were these rifles used as trainers. It is also equipped with a special Lyman sight. It is not of the 48/57 types. The patent date is 07. Any information is appreciated. Gary

Answer:
Gary- The example in my collection is serial 135244, so I know exactly what you are asking about. Wish you would have given the full serial number. We ain't the gun police. With the full number, I would have checked to see if it is listed among those sold at San Antonio Arsenal, or listed in various ordnance department records examined by Frank Mallory of Springfield Research Service. (Nothing personal, but don't bother sending full number now, "XXX" serial numbers are one of my pet peeves, and I think this answer will be about all I can manage politely.) The "bird's head" is actually a "flaming bomb" symbol used by the Ordnance Department. Some 11,419 of these were purchased in 1918-19. Ours were among the 1919 group. They were probably intended for use as trainers, but issues seem to be mostly to NRA affiliated clubs until the 30s when M1922 series rifles began to be issued. The Lyman sight with a flat/sheet metal appearance mounted on the right hand side is standard for these rifles. These are


# 695 - Muzzleloader- Partier(?)
7/19/97
Keith, Richland Center, WI, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Is there an old muzzle loader by the name of "Partier"? There is a marking under this name but difficult to read; maybe it is "mtd". Is there a muzzle loader by this name? If the name is wrong, what is the correct spelling? In what country was it made? What might be the value of it?

Answer:
Keith- Sorry. We know about a Partello in Watertown NY 1879-1882, and Partet in Butte, Montana who died in 1898, and Partlow in Johnson, Vermont who died in 1883. We don't have much info to go on. However, I will go ahead and do my best for you. Your gun is a very rare fowling piece carried to Brazil by LT Wiles, USN as part of the expedition there in 1846. It was specially made for shooting parakeets at great distance with small shot so it wouldn't mess up the feathers when they stuffed them for display in the Smithsonian. Unfortunately, their canoe overturned the first time the gun was fired due to the fierce recoil. Lt. Wiles was attacked by a Piranha which resulted in his never fathering any children. He was so upset by this incident that he never fired the gun again, but never bothered to clean it. Hence the difficulty reading the markings. It is undoubtedly worth $10-15,000 to collectors of the special parakeet shotguns. The Clinton administration has decreed these to be assault weapons, so you better not try to sell it. Of course, I might have your gun confused with another one with a similar description. John Spangler


# 681 - Marble Game Getter
7/19/97
Anonymous

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
MARBLE Game Getter Gun .22 S, L, LR, NRA / .44 GG & .410 2 1/2" 12" Blue ???

Top Barrel - .22 S, L, LR, NRA Bottom Barrel - .44 GG & .410 2 1/2"

1.) Caliber markings, on the .22 barrel, is NRA old term for .22 Mag? On the .410 barrel, what round is .44 GG? Is this a special round made by the manufacturer (.44 Game Getter?)2.) I am interested to know more about the history of this gun, dates of production, volume produced, what happened to the manufacturer etc.3.) The gun is missing the shoulder stock, any ideas on how to acquire one?4.) Estimated value? This gun is and has been a "shooter", it is in average condition but is clean and functionally sound. Any help would be appreciated

Answer:
Hey Anonymous- We assume you have the necessary registration papers to legally own this item. If not it is worth $10,000 and/or 10 years of your money and time. Under federal law this is a "sawed off shotgun" and treated basically in the same way as machine guns. If you lost your paperwork, you can call the nearest BATF office, explain that you just found this thing, and turn it in to them for destruction. Or you might quickly and quietly destroy it yourself and dispose of the parts. The .44 GG is a "Game Getter" cartridge, basically just a .44 shot load. I don't know the significance of the "NRA" as part of the .22 caliber marking. Could it "WRA or "WRF" as there was a .22 Winchester rimfire popular before the .22 WRF Magnum came out. Hope this helps from an academic viewpoint, or can be filed away with your registration papers... John


# 682 -
7/19/97
Basil, Peabody MA ,US

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Model 1910/14 6.35mm auto 3.43in/87mm blue Unknown

Barrel is approximately 30-40% erroded and the chamber has seen better days. Is it possible to have the barrel relined?If so, can you provide me with a list of gunsmiths that could do the relining

Answer:
Basil, I do not know of anyone selling 6.35 MM barrel sleeves, so it probably would be very difficult to get your barrel relined, and also the cost of relining your barrel would probably exceed the value of the pistol. A better alternative may be to purchase a replacement barrel. Try following the gun parts link on our links page to locate a source for a new barrel... Marc


# 688 - Shotgun- Nitro Hunter Single Barrel
7/19/97
Trent, Bedford, TX, Tarrent,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Shotgun (maker Unknown) Nitro Hunter 12 Guage, Full Choke 30" Blue Unknown

Number 692 is stamped on the barrel and on the inside of the trigger guard. Number 76 is stamped just behind the trigger guard.A2 is stamped on the underside of the barrel. G is stamped on the underside ot the barrel (under the wood forearm).PANTENTED AUG, 11 1890 is stamped on the barrel. NITRO HUNTER in ornate lettering is on the breech. Single Shot, center hammer, center fire. Interesting 'latch/screw' that allows the gun to be broken down without the use of a screwdriver. Maker of the firearm is no longer visible.

This shotgun was handed down to me. According to the history, the gun was purchased around 1892 for my great grandfather's 12th birthday (in or near Lancaster KY). I am in hopes that you can provide me with some information as to who manufactured the firearm, value, and any other items of interest that I can add to the history of the shotgun.

Answer:
Trent- Your gun is another one made by H.D. Folsom Co. of New York for the Belknap Hardware Co. of Louisville, KY. (See question above for another example). You already know the most exciting parts of the history. About all we can add is that these can be priceless family heirlooms, but have little or no value on the collector market. People seem to think the double barrels are cute wall hangers for decoration, but the single barrel guns "don't get no respect." Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 689 - Colt M1911 Civilian Government Model
7/19/97
Scott Kreiamn Marysville Wa.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt 1911 .45 Unknown Blued C90XXX

Government Model above the serial # on the frame

I have inherited this pistol it is a 1911 civilian as denoted by the c in front of the serial # in researching the pistol reference books show the serial # to have been produced in 1917 the confusing thing is that this pistol is marked Government model. the same reference books that show the date the serial # as 1917, state that government model did not appear until 1940's on the 1911A This pistol is definitely blued not parkerized has the straight mainspring housing and definitely appears to be a 1911 not a 1911a1. Can you shed any light on my confusion

Answer:
Scott- That is a nice pistol you have there. Early commercial 1911s with lots of original finish are getting very hard to find, and pricy. I don't know what books you have been reading on these, but the library should put in the "Fiction" section. Colt marked their commercial production M1911s "GOVERNMENT MODEL" on the frame at least as early at serial number 50, and straight through until the end of 1911 production. This was true for the "C" prefix models made in .45 ACP and the .455 caliber examples (in the mid 90 thousands) sold to the British in WWI which used a "W" prefix. Charles Clawson's absolutely superb "Colt .45 Service Pistols" has some info on these, and his new book on the commercial models (which I don't have yet) undoubtedly has more. Goddard's the "Government Models" on the M1911 (another good book, but I think Clawson's is better) confirms this. Pistols in the 89,000 to 91,000 range were being shipped in January- March of 1917 to a variety of civilian and military customers. Hope this helps


# 680 -
7/15/97
Ray L. Miller Granbury TX rlmiller@hcnews.com

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser 1896 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I inherited a Model 1896 Mauser Military Pistol (Broom handle).It is in excellent condition. I need to find literature on how to field strip the weapon in order to properly care for it. I amalso interested in how much it is worth.

Answer:
Ray the Model 1896 Mauser has always been one of my favorite pistols, its design is unique because it only has one screw (the grip screw) and no pins. The first time that I ever dissembled a 96 Mauser I remember thinking that it reminded me of a Chinese puzzle. Before you try to dissemble your 96 I would strongly advise that you get a copy of Firearms Assembly / Disassembly Part 1: Automatic Pistols by J. B. Wood and become thoroughly acquainted with the instructions for the 96 Mauser. The book gives very clear instructions and has some good photographs, it also warns about pitfalls that might be encountered and gives specific reassembly tips. Values for 96 Mausers vary greatly ($200 to $20,000 or more) depending upon model and condition. We would be happy to provide you with an appraisal but we need more specific information and photographs, for information about getting an appraisal, take a look at our Appraisals page... Marc


# 679 - Colt M1911A1 British Proofed
7/15/97
Rusty

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt M1911A1 45 ACP 5 Inches Parkerized 932XXX

BNP proof markings (Birmingham England?) on slide. barrel & Frame Barrel has 45' 900" 7 tons. The gun is 80-90% condition.

When was it manufactured? Was it an English reproof? Why? Is it a Collectable or should I holster it and blaze away at the range?

Answer:
Rusty- (Hey, Marc- is that the guy's name or the condition?? Oh, the name, Okay) Your pistol was probably part of a 4,000 pistol shipment delivered from Colt to Springfield Armory on May 24, 1943. 1,515 were sent to Canada under "Lend-lease", including at least 7 in the same serial number range as your pistol. After the war they were sold as surplus to a dealer with warehouses in England. Before being shipped from England, they underwent proof firing in accordance with English law. A total of about 75,000 M1911/1911A1 .45s were given to various allies under lend lease. I think your gun is pretty collectable, but it probably wouldn't hurt to run a few more boxes of ammo through it. If you have a sudden urge to become a pistol shootin' fanatic, let us help you find a good collector home for this one and go get a target gun that will shoot a lot better... John Spangler


# 678 - U.S Pistol Company
7/15/97
John Martinez

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Looking for any information on a gun company name --- U.S Pistol Company Can you help ? Thanks John M Icant123@aol.com

Answer:
John, I looked through all of my reference books and could find no mention of a U.S Pistol Company, I did find U.S. Revolver Company and U.S. Arms Company. Arms made under the U.S. Revolver Co. name were cheaper versions of the Iver Johnson line. U.S. Revolver Co. paralleled the solid frame Iver Johnson Model 1900 and the Hinged Frame Safety Automatic models, but did not have the safety hammer feature, they also had some consequent minor changes in the lockwork and a lesser quality of finish. US revolvers were offered in .22, .32 and .38 calibres, and were sold at the same time as the main Iver Johnson line until the1940s. The pistols were marked 'U.S. Revolver Co.' on the barrel, and had 'US' molded into the grips.

US Arms company produced solid frame sheath trigger non-ejecting revolvers in New York form 1870 to 1880. A present day US Arms Company marketed single action revolvers in .357 and .44 magnum calibers from 1976 to 1983... Marc


# 677 - Shotgun, Double Barrel-Janssen
7/15/97
tom

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Janssen Sons Possibly 809 Stamped Next To The Makers Name 12 Gauge Dbl Barrel Shotgun 28 Inches Blue possibly 809 (only number on gun)

Gun has two hammers each mounted on what looks like a backwards c. The gun also has two triggers one positioned behind the other. On the metal between the two barrels it says Belgium laminated steel. The stock has plain but very fine carvings on it. The steel between the barrels run into a circle between the triggers where the gun breaks for loading. The circle has a flower, possibly a rose, engraved into it.

The gun is in excellent original condition. It has been in my family now for 5 generations and was rumored to have been used by my great grandfather in the civil war. I am mostly interested in learning how old the gun is. As stated, I can place an age of approximately 150 years. However, I can only trace it back to my great great grandfather. As he was a very poor farmer, I know he would not have been able to purchase the weapon new. This tells me it may be even older. I would also be interested in an approximate value for insurance. As the weapon has fed 4 generations of my family, I would not be interested in selling it. I would appreciate any information you can provide. I will continue to visit your site, but can be reached via email at ricketsn@bellsouth.nct thanks!!!!!!!!!tom

Answer:
Tom- I cannot find any specific information on Janssen sons. There was a Janssen firm operating in Belgium in the mid 1920s, but your gun is earlier, although the company may be the same one but started earlier than my sources indicate. From the description of your gun, it appears to be a typical inexpensive breech-loading shotgun of the type imported by the thousands and sold to farmers throughout the country to put food on the table. Sounds like it worked pretty good! The breech loading shotguns began after the Civil War, and got really cheap and popular in the 1880s, so I am pretty sure that it dates from that period. Often family traditions about "Uncle Bob who fought in the Revolution them moved to Ohio bought this gun for his grandson in 1830" get mixed up and that becomes known as the gun old Uncle Bob carried in the Revolution. Good idea to write stuff down before it gets mixed up. Value on these shotguns is pretty low, considering their age. While of great sentimental value, these sell on the


# 683 - Beretta Model 1934
7/15/97
John H

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
beretta 9- Corto 9mm kurtz 3" BLUE 866xxx

Stamped 1941 PSEGardone VT 1941 XIX

This hand gun was obtained from an Italian factory in 1945. I have the papers from the U.S. army that allowed the gun to be brought back to the U.S. It has the orginal leather holster. Is this a collectable?

Answer:
John, It sounds like you have a model 1934 Beretta. The model 1934 Beretta was produced from 1934 to the late 1960's and was Italy's military weapon in WWII. Your Beretta's date of manufacture is 1941 and XIX is the corresponding Fascist date (the Fascist date is a combination of the Julian date and the Fascist calendar date which commenced in 1922). Military 1934 Berettas were stamped RE if the issued to the army, RA if the issued to the air force and RM if the issued to the navy. The 1934 was offered commercially but most pistols were procured by the Italian military during WWII. There is some collector interest in wartime 1934 Berettas and values will be in the $100 to $350 range depending upon condition and type of finish... Marc


# 676 - M1A1 "paratroop" Inland Carbine
7/11/97
Andy-Greensboro,NC USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
General Motors-Inland Mfg. Div. M1 Carbine .30 Carbine About 17 1/4" Greenish (parkerized?) 133XXX

Inland Mfg. Div., General Motors,11-42 on top of barrel US Carbine, Cal .30 M1 on top of receiver Inland Mfg. Div., serial number back of receiver(top)EM-Q bottom of bayonet lugsquare stamp with R17?,EB on left side of stock(folding)P with circle around it on left side of pistol grip7160060 IRCC on side of back sight number on butt plate appears to be B267614,small star in circle

Can you tell me anything about this gun? Is it an original paratrooper model? Can you give me an approximate value if it is? If it isn't correct what is it's value? It has no import markings and is in very good condition. Thanks allot for any help.

Answer:
Andy- It sure sounds like you have a genuine one there. It originally would have had the flip sight and no bayonet lug, but the RIA markings indicate rebuild at Rock Island Arsenal, and these were standard upgrades done during rebuild. These are very collectable, and the value would probably be in the $700-$900 range in very good condition. We have a customer looking for one of these for their WW2 collection, if you are interested in selling... John Spangler


# 675 - Iver Johnson Single Action Revolver
7/11/97
Patti, Fallon, NV, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Iver Johnson Single Action Revolver Unknown .38 5 Or 6 Inches Unknown Unknown

My mother has an Iver Johnson .38 single action revolver that my father purchased for her some 30 years ago. My mother believes it dates back to just after the turn of the century. I've never heard of this manufacturer before. Do you know anything about this particular firearm and its approximate value? Eventually, my mother would like to have it appraised so she can sell it. I'm proud to say my family contributes to the NRA on a regular basis. Thanks!

Answer:
Patti, thanks for your question, glad to hear that you and your family support the NRA and our right to keep and bear firearms. Iver Johnson started out in 1871 as Johnson Bye & Co., in 1883 the name of the company was changed to Iver Johnson & Co. and in 1891 the name was changed again to Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works. Iver Johnson produced firearms under various names and owners form 1871 until 1993. In 1993 when operations ceased, Iver Johnson was owned by American Military Arms Corp. (AMAC). Iver Johnson gained a reputation over the years for producing low cost, sturdy, reliable firearms. Unfortunately Iver Johnson revolver values probably would not warrant the cost of an appraisal, there is little or no collector interest in Iver Johnson firearms and values for most of their revolvers are in the $75.00 to $125.00 range... Marc


# 671 - Care Of Historical Firearms
7/11/97
Keith, ARL Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Hi my name is Keith Millman and I am from ARL in the Aberdeen Proving Grounds Maryland. I am working on a project which requires me to clean the wooden parts of some antique guns and rifles. We have quite a large quantity and want to clean them of everyday dirt, grime, and fingerprints. We do not want to destroy the antique finish!!! We also need the product to be relatively environmentally safe. I would appreciate any suggestions you have.

Answer:
In care of historical firearms- "First, do no harm," and then do only the minimum work necessary. The objectives are to preserve the item, remove harmful accumulations, and if possible retain/restore original appearance. Sometimes you can do all three, sometimes not. Simple preservation can be accomplished by periodic application of paste wax (Renaissance brand best, others like Minwax okay) to both wood and metal. Great for items not frequently handled. WD-40 seems to be popular for items in storage. Most military pieces were simply dipped in linseed oil a couple of times when made, and occasionally treated with linseed oil while in the hands of troops, and rarely polished to high gloss. Commercial items often had a varnish finish. The crud built up on gunstocks is usually a mixture of dirt and various oils, sometimes only on the surface, other times strongly adhered or even penetrating into the wood. Carbon deposits from gas-operated firearms can usually be removed with bore cleaning solutions. My suggestions for stock cleaning in increasing order of aggressiveness: (a) scrubbing with rag (damp, not runny) with a little hot water/dishwashing detergent, then wipe with a damp rag. Finish by rubbing on some linseed oil thinned with lacquer thinner or turpentine. It is best to have the gun is disassembled to keep water away from metal parts to prevent rusting. This is also an opportunity to get lots of linseed oil into the end grain under the buttplate and in other areas to minimize moisture loss, and consequent shrinkage. (b)As above, but use some superfine steel wool (0000 grade) instead of a rag for scrubbing, and little more detergent, and wipe more with damp rag to remove when done scrubbing. (c) Use a solvent instead of detergent. This cuts oils better, but risks damaging the original finish. Lacquer thinner, turpentine or even a thinned mixture of linseed oil and a solvent will work well. Various grades of steel wool can be tried, but use the finest that will do the job. Wear gloves. (Disposable surgical latex type are fine for light use, but don't last long. Heavier rubber ones last longer but you lose "feel" of your work.) (d) For extremely heavy accumulations, try lightly scraping with a razor blade held at 90 degree angle. Use light pressure (always with the grain!) This will remove some original finish, but often get through the crud and restore wood color underneath. (e) For exceptionally oil soaked grungy items only: Gently heat in sun for a while, scrub off oil that will ooze out, repeat. Then soak with soapy water and scrub vigorously. Some advocate taking in shower, or soaking in bathtub with solution of Tri-sodium phosphate(TSP- available in paint departments). Spray-on oven cleaner works nicely too. Another option is to use a sloppy wet washcloth on the stock heated by a steam iron held on it. This will both help remove oil and raise dents. Will also mess up iron, so consult divorce lawyer or find an iron the spouse doesn't care about. For any of the soaking methods you may have to lightly sand the wood afterward to get rid of raised grain. (100/120/150/220 grits seem to work well, but will often clog. Use finest grade that will do the job.) If staining is needed to restore color, Birchwood-Casey walnut stain is water based and can be thinned for light color or used straight for dark color. Finish with application of linseed or tung oil... John Spangler


# 669 - DWM Luger Markings
7/11/97
William W. DuBose

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
DWM P-08 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am trying to gather information about the markings on my pistol. Can you determine a production date by the markings I have supplied? What can you tell me about the markings? Is the S.M. an abbreviation for a unit name and the 342 a inventory number? Any information you can send me about the markings on my pistol will be greatly appreciated. Below is the details of my pistol Unit marking of S.M.342. is stamped in the metal on the front bottom of the grip. 'N' with a crown on top. One is on the bottom of barrel above the serial number and the other is on the left side of the pistol between the side plate and the barrel. There is another marking that looks like an italic 'y' with wing tips on it. One appears below the serial number on the bottom of the barrel and the other is on the front of the receiver between the trigger guard and the barrel. The initials DWM are on top of the toggle. The word Geladen is on the load indicator (not sure the correct term for this part).The word Gesichert is beside the safety lever. I have disassembled the gun and each part except the clip has the number 78 stamped on them. I assume this is the last two numbers of the serial.

Answer:
William, your Luger was manufactured by Deutsche Waffen u. Munitionswerke, Berlin-Borsigwalde, Germany (DWM). The S.M. 342 stamping that you describe sounds like a post WWI Prussian State Police unit marking. Post WWI Prussian State Police unit markings consist of a series of two to four letters sometimes followed by Roman numerals, lastly followed by Arabic numbers. The capital letters S., K. or L. form the first portion of the police unit marking and they stand for the following:
K. Kriminalpolizei (detective police force)
S. Schutzpoliezi (municipal police force)
L. Landjagerei (rural constabulary)
The next portion of the police unit marking consists of one to three letters representing an administrative district, in your case, the "M." stands for Munster. Sometimes Roman numerals will appear after the district indicating the number of the police unit. Lastly the Arabic numerals indicate the individual weapon number. The "Crown N" stampings that you describe sound like German Nitro proof marks that were used from 1911/12 to 1939. Based on the preceding data, I would guess that your Luger was manufactured between the end of WWI and 1939. The italic letter "y" is the suffix of your serial number. The 78 that is stamped on some parts is a number used to match those parts to the pistol. The stampings Gesichert and Geladen mean safe and loaded. I hope that this helps you, if you ever want to sell your Luger let us know... Marc


# 670 - Refinished Mauser P-38
7/11/97
Herb

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
???? P.38 9 Mm 4 3/4" Nickle xxx q

byf 44 There are 3 parallel lines about 1/8th inch long superposed on the number 135 just above the trigger.

Can you identify the manufacturer, date of manufacture, and country of manufacture? This gun is identical to the Walther P.38, but does not carry the Walther trademark.

Answer:
Herb, you have a German WWII vintage P-38. The P-38 was adopted by Germany as it's standard service pistol in 1938. P-38's were manufactured for the German military by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerke. Your P-38 was manufactured by Mauser (byf is the WW-II German ordnance code that was assigned to Mauser-Werke, Oberndorf am Neckar, Germany). The 44 stamping on your P-38 is the year it was manufactured (1944). 135 is a German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark assigned to arms produced at Mauser Werke AG, Oberndorf am Neckar. As far as I have been able to determine no Mauser P-38's were manufactured with an original factory nickel finish so your P-38 has probably been refinished. Values for refinished P-38's are in the $150 to $200 range... Marc


# 668 - Remington Model 1903 (modified) Rifle
7/9/97
Dick ,Cedar Springs,MI

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 1903 30/06 24" (no Markings) Blue (bolt Handle Is Squarish And Turned Down 3124XXX

U.S. on top of receiver REMINGTON "MODEL 1903 "3124633 "R proof on side of receiver (below stock line)11 (in a circle) " 23 " oval inside a square (ordinance mark?) On bottom of receiver R and B proofs on bolt Rifle has lever safety on bolt, ON/OFF "block safety" acts as bolt release.

When was this rifle manufactured? Is it a sporterized Springfield or something else by Remington? Other than the ser.# On the receiver there are no numbers on any parts but small uppercase Rs are on most receiver and bolt parts----thank you---any info will be appreciated. Dick Capek

Answer:
Dick- We can't be sure what you have now, but it started off as a Model 1903 rifle made by Remington in 1942, "modified" by the elimination of some machining operations, and perhaps use of some stamped parts instead of all milled parts. Several hundred thousand of these were made by Remington using the old machinery from Rock Island Arsenal which got out of the rifle making business after WWI. The finish was originally parkerize, sometimes with blued bolts or other small parts. The barrel originally would have had the maker initials/ordnance bomb/month-year stamped near the front sight. Absence of barrel markings and a blued finish indicates someone has worked on this. Your stock should go to within about 4 inches of the muzzle and include a wooden "handguard" on the top of the barrel. If not, the stock has been altered or replaced. Remington marked all the parts for its M1903s with a "R" marking, similar to the practice during WWI when M1917 parts were marked "E" "R" or "W" to


# 667 - Remington Model 11 Shotguns
7/9/97
Randy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington 11 12 Gauge Unknown Blue Unknown

solid rib

I own 2 Remington model 11's, one is a 12ga. and one is a 20 Ga. I'm trying to find out how old the 12 ga. is. On the barrel the dates October 9, 1900 to December 17,1901 appear followed directly by the dates September 30, 1902 to June 16,1903. What do these dates mean? I know the gun is copied off of the Browning pattern, so do these dates pertain to pattern restrictions or are they an indication of the date the gun was made. The gun has been passed down through inheritance from my great-great grandfather so it was probably purchased around the turn of the century. Please help me know more about my most cherished gun. Thanks!

Answer:
Randy- About 300,000 Model 11s were made between 1911 and 1948. These were based on the John M. Browning patents granted on the dates marked on the barrel. Very similar to the Browning shotguns, Remington made these for U.S. sales under license from FN. I can't help much on the dates, but the shape of the pistol grip might tell you something. These had a rounded shape until the 1920s, and by WW2 had a flat bottom like pistol grips today. Sorry we can't tell you more... John Spangler


# 665 - Remington: Russian Mosin-Nagant Rifle
7/9/97
Randy, Colville, WA, USA,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Armory 1918 Unknown Approx. 28-30 Inches Blue 70XXX

A crest looking like a bird (with 2 heads) and the roman numeral II below what. A flip up rear sight. A "trap door" type of magazine. Slots in the stock for a sling.

What IS this rifle? What caliber should it be? Is it common?

Answer:
Randy- You have one of about 650,000 Model 1891 Mosin Nagant rifles made by Remington under contracts from Czar Nicholas II beginning in 1916. The double headed eagle is the crest of the old imperial Russian government. In October 1917, the "Red" Russians murdered the Czar and his family, the Communists took over. Russia withdrew from the War, and the contracts made by the Czar were canceled. The U.S. government ended up purchasing 280,000 of these rifles (from both Remington and New England Westinghouse). Some were issued to U.S. troops sent to fight in Russia on the side of the "White" Russians against the "Reds" until 1921. There were near-mutinies when '03 Springfields were taken away and the Mosin Nagants issued to the U.S. troops. These rifles fire the 7.62 x54R cartridge. Variations of the Mosin-Nagant rifles have been flooding the surplus market for several years, with prices as low as $39 and seldom over $100. Neat old piece of history, and a collecting field where you can get


# 666 - Colt Revolving Carbine- British Model?
7/9/97
Gil Ostend - Belgium (eruop)

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt revolving percussion carabine 5 shot cylinder .50 (?) Unknown parkerized 11xxx

S.Colt Hartford CT. USA

Any info about this gun. When was it made? Collectability? number of it made?

Answer:
Gil- We would need more information to be certain about our identification. Colt's revolving rifles and carbines used a very strange serial number sequence, with many duplicates. It appears that many of those in the 10,000-12,000 range were the "British Carbine model" made near the end of production perhaps 1864. These have a saddle ring on the left side, crescent shaped brass buttplates and brass oval trigger guards. Barrels 21-30 inches, usually .56 caliber. British proofmarks are usually present. The top of the frame should be marked "COL. COLT HARTFORD CT. U.S.A." The "S.COLT" marking on yours may indicate that this is a copy made in Belgium (or elsewhere). These are very collectable, with value in NRA antique "Good" condition (see link) listed as US$2500.00. We would need good photos of the gun to tell you much more... John Spangler


# 664 - Japanese Rifle Type 99
7/9/97
Robert Lewis Martinsville VA USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Approximately 30 Cal. 25 1/4 Inches, Approx. Blue 26XXX

Japanese WWII rifle, apparently sniper rifle. Bullets are almost identical to .30-06, but 4-5 mm shorter, same width of casing, tapered the same way. The gun itself is bolt action. Within the trigger guard is a release for a spring-loaded plate in front of the trigger guard, which would otherwise appear to be a cover for a magazine opening. However, when the release is pulled, the whole spring mech. pops out. Opening the bolt, five bullets fit within the breach at the bottom, feeding in as the bolt is slid forward. Caliber markings on the bullets vary from TW54, WCC56, MATCH LC57, and others. Immediately forward of the breach are three Japanese symbols. The stock is almost a straight stock, with a minimal pistol grip. The front sight protrudes upward about 3/4 inch and has an inverted "V" sight. The rear sight folds upward from front to rear and reveals distance markers from 3 to 15 (which I assume are meters to target). The serial number is located on the left side beneath the opening of the breach. Immediately preceding the 5 digit serial number is a small Japanese character, enclosed in a circle. Immediately following the serial number is a larger circle with what appears to be an upside-down 8 in it (the upper half being much larger than the bottom half). Immediately in front of the forward sight, the barrel tapers inward at a right angle about 3 mm, and extends forward to the muzzle about 1 1/2 inch. I know nothing about this gun, as it was sent er tedly, it obtained p out ow has sma hildren ike to know whatever

Answer:
Robert, Your rifle is a Japanese Type 99 adopted about 1939 and one of the two main infantry rifles used by Japan in WW2. They are quite common. These originally had the Imperial "Chrysanthemum" marked on the top of the receiver, but most were defaced by grinding or chisel cuts before being brought home by US troops as souvenirs. Rifles with the "mum" intact are worth a little more. The circle with an "8" in it is the mark of Nagoya Arsenal where it was made. It was made in 7.7mm, and ammunition is extremely hard to find. Some have been converted to .30-06 (including many thousand under US supervision in Japan in 1950 for issue to South Korean rear area troops/support personnel. These are marked US on the left side and have the magazine box extended and receiver ramp altered for the longer .30-06 cartridge. A little known US secondary martial arm). The ammunition you have may be 7.7 made up from US .30-06 cases, but I cannot be sure without examining it. The hinged floorplate on the magazine is standard for this rifle. Values are not high on these, as little as $50 for rough ones, and seldom over $175 even in excellent condition. Probably $50-75 would be a fair retail value in the condition you describe. If you decide you don't need it, I know a dealer from NC who specializes in foreign military rifles who might be interested. Hope this helps... John Spangler


# 663 - M1 Bayonets
7/4/97
Dan, APO, AE

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

What kind of bayonets were used with the M1 rifle? My historical instinct says I want representative samples of what is available.

Answer:
a. When adopted, M1 rifle was designed to use M1905 Bayonets which had been used with M1903 Springfields. Production of bayonets had stopped in 1922. These are the 16 inch model, and had variously the very early leather scabbard M1905 which had been modified with hooks to use on the M1910 web gear; or the M1910 scabbard which had the canvas cover and leather tip. In September 1941 the M3 plastic scabbard was adopted and eventually the earlier versions became obsolete.
b. In October 1941 contract were made for manufacture of more M1905 bayonets. Deliveries started in 1942, and ran into 1943 with about 1.5 million made by six companies (American Fork & Hoe, Union Fork & Hoe, Pal Blade & Tool, Utica Cutlery, Oneida. Ltd., and Wilde Drop Forge & Tool.). The specs called for plastic grips on these, and quality standards were lowered to omit some steps, leaving the grooved portion of the blade in a rough forged condition instead of the neatly ground and polished finish found on 1922 and early armory products. Collectors sometimes call these "Bayonet M1942", but this was never an official designation.
c. In February 1943, the Bayonet, M1, with a 10 inch blade was adopted, largely due to widespread use of mechanized transport, and shift to carrying bayonet on the belt instead of the M1910 pack. Manufacture began in April 1943, by the same contractors who had contracts for the M1905 bayonets. Obviously, it took a while to fill the logistics pipeline and reach troops in the field. A total of 2,948,649 Bayonets, M1, were made by August 1945. These used a plastic scabbard. M7. A small additional quantity of bayonets, M1, were procured early in the Korean War, but I lack specific details.
d. In the summer of 1943, alteration of M1905 bayonets by shortening the blade to 10 inches, refinishing (and usually fitting of plastic instead of wood grips) was approved, with the prototype designated as "Bayonet M1905E1". Alterations began in September 1943. When altered, they became "Bayonet, M1" and were mixed in the supply system with those originally made with the 10 inch blades. While many conversions were done by contractors (usually marked in some fashion), some were done in the field. Conversions mostly used a "spear point" same as used on the M1905 and M1 bayonets. Some conversions used a "Bowie Point", for reasons unknown. The M7 scabbards were often shortened as well, with the metal throat piece crimped in place instead of using the metal tab on the side of the throat piece. Between September 1943 and August 1945 slightly more than 1 million M1905 bayonets were shortened, both 1906-22 production and 1942-43 production.
e. Around 1954 the Bayonet, M5 was adopted, using the same 6.75 inch blade which had been used on the "Trench" Knife M3, and Bayonet, M4 for the M1 carbine. (The same blade form was later used on the M6 bayonet for the M14, the M7 bayonet for the M16 rifle, and a later "trench knife".) After a short period the M5A1 bayonet was adopted. This introduced an elliptical hole in the latching device which allowed some movement on firing, dramatically improving the accuracy when firing with fixed bayonets. The M5 and M5A1 were made by five contractors (Aerial, J&D Tool, Imperial, Utica, and MILPAR Columbus. These all used the scabbard M8A1, which was used with all the other knives and bayonets with the same blade form.
f. One variation used with the M1 rifle, BUT NOT BY U.S. FORCES, is the M1905 or M1 bayonet having the blade cut and ground down to the dimensions of the M5 bayonet. This alteration was done by the Koreans,


# 662 - US Mod. 1917 .30-06 Rifles By Eddystone Etc.
7/4/97
Wayne, Sharon, PA USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Eddystone/Remington Bolt Action (WWI) P-17 30-06 Unknown Appears To Be Blue Unknown

Our organization(a veteran's org) has acquired 5 of these old military rifles and want to tear them down for cleaning and repair. We need information on the dis-assembly of these weapons and the best way to clean and refurbish them to at least fire blank ammo safely. Some do fire now. Would appreciate the help. Thanks.

Answer:
Wayne- Glad to help a fellow vet. Instead of sending money to help the NRA, please keep it to buy blanks to salute our fallen comrades. General cleaning of these rifles is about the same as any other modern rifle. Disassembly can be a little tricky. Send us your mail address and I will send a free copy of the Army's "Base Shop Data" which show how to take the whole thing apart (probably much farther apart than you need to go). A little oven cleaner will take a lot of grease out of the stocks, sand 'em down then a couple coats of tung oil (I like the Minwax bran, but Formbys is OK too) will seal them. Finish up with slight rubbing with steel wool to blend the wood finish. A very fine wire brush, or a razor blade (single edge like in window scrapers, not the "trac-two" kind) held at an angle and lubricated with oil or WD-40 can be sued to scrape off even medium amounts of surface rust. If the finish is really ugly, a cheap and easy solution is a can of black spray paint. Semi-gloss is best, but gloss or flat is okay too. Make sure all the grease and oil are off first. I wouldn't paint the bolt assembly, but the rest of the stuff can be painted. Easy to touch up later, weatherproof, and wont rub off on clothes. Clean the bores every once in a while after use and you should be good to go as long as you only fire blanks. Let me know if you need any spare parts, I have a good supply... John Spangler, USN (ret)


# 660 - Shotgun, Doublel, Hammer Type, Eclipse Brand
7/4/97
Peter,Tunica,Ms USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Eclipse ?? 12 Gauge Shotgun Double Barrell Double Hammer Approx. 26" Blue Unknown

This Shotgun was owned by a man in NW Mississippi back in the early 1900sIt was carried by a Sheriff in Tunica Co. It has no unusual markings on it. None around here has ever heard of it or heard of Eclipse Co. The Barrel was made in Belgium.

Where and When was this Shotgun made and how rare is it?

Answer:
Peter- You already have a pretty good feel for the gun based on its history- early 1900s, carried by the Sheriff, maybe others in a rural area. Not just the barrels, but the whole gun was made in Belgium. The "Eclipse" brand name was used on shotguns imported by the E.C. Meacham Co. They operated in St. Louis from about 1871 to about 1900, dealing mainly in imported shotguns. The Eclipse brand is a little less common than some others, but noe of these old imported hammer shotguns seem to have much collector interest or value. Most are in the $50-150 range as wallhangers. Nice old family heirlooms, but most are unsafe to shoot due to damascus barrels and short chambers... John Spangler


# 659 - Allen & Wheelock Sidehammer Percussion Revolver
7/4/97
martin - england -

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Allen & Wheelock Side Hammer Pocket Pistol .28 2.75" Blued XXX

On the left hand side of the barrel it say in capital letters, ALLEN & WHEELOCK WORCESTER MASS. US.ALLENS PT'S. JAN 13. DEC 15. 1957. SEPT 7. 1858 its not a typing error - it really does say 1957 on the side of the barrel. Side plate on the left hand side of the gun is held on with one screw. Cylinder is engraved with a picture of deer, 2 ducks, a house and trees. Its a 5 shot percussion cylinder. This pistol seems to be an exact likeness to the one in my copy of flaydermans, 6th edition page 52. But after buying the gun my girlfriend noticed the 1957 on the side and I wondered is it just a mistake when they stamped it or have I been done? The gun looks perfectly authentic and has slight pitting in one minute area but is otherwise in fine condition - I just wondered if I had been ripped off? And if I haven't what is the history and value of the gun ? Thanking you in advance - from a country where only black powder is legal :( Martin.

Answer:
Martin- So blackpowder is still legal in England? How long before your politicians correct this heinous oversight and force you to turn in that evil little revolver that might kill someone? You probably don't think of this as impossible now. However, 5 years ago you probably thought it impossible that all cartridge handguns would be banned, just like most Americans do today! WE MUST WAKE UP!!! Anyway, I believe your pistol to be authentic. The dies used to mark firearms took a lot of abuse and it is not unusual to see examples where part of a letter or number is missing from a chipped or broken stamp. A defective "8" would look just like a "9". No one is faking these (as far as I know) since there is a lot more to be made faking Colts and other high demand-high dollar guns. (Harold Peterson, head of the U.S. National Park Service firearms operations once said "I don't worry about the fakes I recognize, but I worry a lot about the ones I don't recognize.") Value would be about as indicated in your Flayderman's. Assuming you have the second type, in fine condition about US$575... John Spangler


# 657 - Colt Navy Certification By Colt?
7/4/97
Alpo

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Navy Unknown Unknown Unknown 152XXX

I have an 1851 Navy model #152XXX in about 10% original condition according to the Blue Book Gun Values and other antique dealers. I want to know about getting it certified by Colt and its value.

Answer:
Alpo- Your Colt was made in 1863. We do not know anything about "certified by Colt" but if you are referring to a factory letter, it is probably not justified by the condition and relatively common nature of the gun. You already looked up the value in Blue Book. Flayderman lists this model at $600 in NRA antique good and $2750 in NRA antique fine. Of course there are subtle variations in the Navy model that may influence value as well, but they are too hard to explain without seeing the gun. Hope this helps... John


# 652 - FEG (Fegyvergyan) PMK .380
7/4/97
Cesar, Aransas Pass, TX. USA, mariam@sat.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
FEG PMK .380 .380 4" Blue HC6XXX

I'm told this is a very reliable Walther replica. Upon close inspection ofthe barrel it doesn't seem very thick. Will this gun handle +P+ ammunition?Or will it bend, warp, and blow up in my hand??? Thanx a million. :)

Answer:
Cesar, FEG is a manufacturer located in Hungry (FEG stands for Fegyvergyan). FEG has manufactured firearms since the turn of the century. The model PMK (patterned after the Walther PP) was imported in 1992 and 1993. FEG is currently being imported by KBI Inc. located in St. Albans, Vt. Unfortunately, due to liability concerns we cannot answer your question. Try having a competent gunsmith in your area check out your PMK or contact KBI directly... Marc


# 654 - German Combination Gun
7/4/97
Max Arriola,Guatemala,Guatemala, arriola@gua.net

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
HCG Stein Nachf,Hanburg.- I think,660 rifle 118/35, shotgun 16/1 27.5'', 698.5mm. was blue I think 16xxx

2g Sch,P./27gbl on left barrel, under each barrel it has the numbers 118/35 and 16/1,I think are the calibers. On the butt plate it has the number 660, exposed hammers, double trigger.

I would like to know, what caliber is the bullet that the rifle use?, and if it's possible to find bullets for it ,and where. Thank's. Max.-

Answer:
Max- Sorry we cannot help much with this one. I don't understand the German proof marking system. You did not tell us if this is a two barrel or three barrel gun. Both were popular in Germany, and 16 GA seems to be the most common for the shotgun barrel. However, these were usually for the short European shells, not the 2 3/4 inch length made today. The chambers can usually be recut to take the longer shells, but it is not safe to fire the long shells in the short chambers. Rifle barrels were just about anything the customer wanted, but 9.3x72R and 9.3x74R were among the most popular, but there were dozens of others. Best way to tell is to have a gunsmith make a chamber casting and measure it. While finely made old guns, the exposed hammers make them unpopular with most U.S. shooters. Sorry we cannot do more for you... John Spangler & Marc Wade


# 653 - Telescope- J.W. Fecker
7/4/97
Monty, Fayetteville Ar., USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
???? Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I have an older target scope that someone has disassembled at some time and put back together wrong. One of the lenses is reversed or something. The only markings on the tube are J.W. FECKER serial # 4175. the scope is in good shape otherwise and I would like to salvage it, however, I need an assembly drawing. I was wondering If you guys might know something about this. Any help would be much appreciated.

Answer:
Monty- Even I have never been dumb enough to take a scope all the way apart. (Well, okay, I did poke out the crosshairs in a Weaver 330.) Fecker was one of the great scope makers of the 1940s, and I believe operated out of Pittsburgh, PA. His scopes compared favorably with those of John Unertl, also of Pgh. I think they might even have worked together for a short time, perhaps in the 1930s. There is a guy in New Jersey (Les Kraft) who repairs US M84 scopes, and Carpenter Optical in Virginia Beach, VA does superb work on binoculars. Weaver Scope Repair in El Paso, TX (915)593-1005 still works on old Weavers, and Leupold has a good reputation for repairing their product in the rare case when it is needed. However, target scopes are another story. Unertl is still working on their products, and I would suggest you call them to see if they can help you. Their address is- John Unertl Optical Co., 308-310 Clay Ave, Mars, PA 16406 (412)625-3810. If they won't fix it, I bet they know who can. Good luck. Let us know how you make out... John Spangler


# 651 - Shotgun- Crescent F.A.
7/1/97
sherman, clarion.pa.usa

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
crescent f a side - by - side .410 28" either blue or brown most worn off 17661 or at least it is on a lot of the parts

It is hammered. and is chambered for 2%BC" shells. choked appears to be mod. & full

About how old, and where can one get .410 in 2%BC" Thank you for your help. I do support the NRA.

Answer:
Sherman- For a NRA supporter from my native state of PA, sure would like to give you a great answer. However, about the best we can do is say that Crescent Firearms of Norwich, CT "Made revolvers, cheap rifles and shotguns under many names. Controlled by H.D. Folsom Arms Co. from 1893-1931" Frank Sellers' excellent "American Gunsmiths" is the source of that info. (He also wrote the definitive book on Sharps rifles, both before he reached 45 years old! Us collectors sure owe him thanks for his research and efforts to share it with others.) For oddball shotshells, try the "Old Western Scrounger" on our links page. You might find some at a gun show in your area. They have some good ones in the Pittsburgh area... John Spangler


# 649 - M1A1 Carbines
7/1/97
Randy

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Inland Mfg. Div. - General Motors M1A1 Paratrooper Model W/folding Stock 30 Unknown Blue 442,XXX

6-43 I suspect this is the date of mfg. How rare is this firearm and what would be an aprox. value? The gun is in excellent condition and is complete with sling and field oiler.

Answer:
Randy- The first M1A1 carbines with the folding stock were shipped on June 17, 1942. Subsequent deliveries were made by Inland (ONLY) through December 1944, for a total of 140,000 M1A1 carbines. Your serial number is appropriate for the barrel date, with actual manufacture probably around July-August 1943, during which 11,200 M1A1 carbines were made, along with over 150,000 standard M1 carbines. (Larry Ruth's "War Baby" book is the source for this info.) Depending on condition, an ORIGINAL M1A1 carbine would probably sell to a collector in the $700-1200 range. However, oodles of replacement or reproduction (sometimes described as FAKE) folding stocks have been made since WW2. Many collectors have been fooled by them, and values for a carbine with a fake folding stock is about the same as for a regular M1 carbine. The fake stocks sell for about $90, but an original will bring several hundred dollars. Originals should have circle P proof marks, usually at the rear of the pistol grip, sometimes on the side. Small makers code markings are usually found also, and sometimes arsenal rebuild marks. Fakes usually look too new, have shiny brass rivets and new brown leather on the cheek pad. The flat sling swivel on the bottom of the pistol grip is usually a cast unit on the fakes, where the originals sandwiched several stamped parts together, and the round washer like part on the outside had notches stamped in to assist in assembly. On originals, most buttplates had a part number B256714 cast on the inside, along with a number from 1-12 indicating position in the mold where they were cast. I have a customer looking for a nice original M1A1 if you want to sell. (By the way, because of the Folding stock, protruding pistol grip and bayonet lug the M1A1 is officially an evil assault rifle. Obviously anyone who is interested enough to read this far must be a lower life form than whale droppings on the bottom of the ocean. Excuses about historical significance won't change the minds of the politicians who decreed this. I suggest you check carefully to see how your politicians voted. If you don't like what you find out, get active NOW in supporting and contributing to candidates who think differently. England is passing laws now outlawing ALL CARTRIDGE HANDGUNS! American anti-gunners will not be far behind, and they want all your guns, not just assault rifles, or pistols, or Saturday Night specials, but ALL. Frogs dropped in boiling water will jump out. Those placed in cool water will just stay there as it is heated up until they boil to death. Some of you have not checked the water temperature lately. Support NRA NOW! That is why we request a small contribution from everyone who asks for our help answering questions. Some folks don't think it is important enough to contribute. We thank those who do, and are ashamed of those who don't.).. John Spangler


# 646 - S&W .38 Calibre Safety Revolver aka New Departure
7/1/97
Ray, Anaconda, MT, Deer Lodge

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Smith & Wesson 5-shot, Top-break, Hammerless, Sqz Grip 38 S&W 3 1/4" Nickle 21XXXX

"Smith & Wesson Springfield Mass. USA" on top of barrel. S & W trademark stamped on right side between grip and cylinder."38 S & W C T G" stamped on left side of barrel. Black grips with S & W trademark. This firearm came into my family about 1935 and was already old then. Can it be determined when it was manufactured? Is this revolver valuable enough to warrant an appraisal?

Answer:
Safety Ray, you have a Smith and Wesson .38 Calibre Safety Revolver also known as the New Departure or the "Lemon Squeezer". You didn't give me your whole serial number so I can not determine weather yours is a fourth or fifth model but it is probably a fourth. Your Lemon Squeezer was probably manufactured between 1898 and 1907. The S&W .38 Calibre Safety Revolver is Still highly regarded as being one of the safest guns of its type. Although The hammerless revolver design was not new, (it had been employed on a few cap and ball revolvers), the Smith & Wesson version was the first successful one to be made in more than experimental quantities. The Lemon Squeezer had an entirely new safety feature, a grip safety lever which projected through the back tang of the but and ran for most of the length of the tang. The safety lever fitted into the palm of the shooter's hand and was directly linked to a safety latch, which prevented any cocking action by the hammer until the lever was squeezed. When the safety lever was squeezed, the safety latch then moved out of the way and the hammer could be cocked by pulling the trigger. The hammer was a small internal one, and it fired the cartridge by striking a small firing pin. An ingenious arrangement of the sear angles allowed a short hesitation just before the hammer fell, so that the hammer could be practically fully cocked by a strong pull on the trigger, and when the dwell point was reached, the firer could correct his aim and complete the pull. This last part of the motion required a markedly lower pull, and allowed a reasonably accurate shot to be made. The barrel, cylinder and ejector were all but identical with the .38 DA models, and the same ammunition was used. Barrel lengths were 3 1/4, 4 and 5 inches. The U.S. Cavalry carried out tests to see if the New Departure was suitable for them, but concluded that it was too fragile and complicated, and chose the Colt instead. Lemon Squeezer values range from approx.. $100 to $350 depending on condition... Marc


# 645 - Czechoslovakian CZ Model 1927
7/1/97
Jim, Sheffield Lake, Ohio -- Dale, Ann Arbor, Mi

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bohmische Waffenfabrik Pistole Modell 27 7.65 Unknown Blue 130XXX

I have just recently acquired a WWII era handgun that, according to my grandfather, was taken from a German(?) officer. On the top strap is written "Bohmische Waffenfabrik A.G. in Prag". The grips have a "C" with a heart in the top middle and a smaller "z" in the center. I was wondering what you could tell me about this weapon. I will be grateful for any information. Thanks in advance. (Dale, from Ann Arbor, Mi also had the following question about the CZ 27, I will try to answer them both). This gun belongs to a friend. He would like to know, year made, number made, any history about it, who would have used it, and worth. It is in good operating condition. Thank you.

Answer:
Jim and Dale, you both have Czechoslovakian CZ Model 1927's. The CZ 27 was adopted by the Czechoslovakian armed forces in 1927 and was due to be replaced by the Model 1938 in October of 1938. On October 1, 1938 German forces entered the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia and most of the remaining Czech territory was occupied in March of 1939. The CZ factory was taken over by the Germans and Model 27 production was continued under German supervision for the German armed forces. Approx. 475,000 CZ Model 27pistols were produced under German supervision before hostilities in Europe ceased in May of 1945. The German name for the CZ factory was Boehmische Waffenfabrik A.G. (Bohemian Weapons Factory Inc.) Early CZ 27's were marked "Bohmische Waffenfabrik A.G. in Prag " this marking was dropped on later models. Values for the CZ 27's are not high, I think that I sold the last one that I had with a holster and an extra magazine to a friend for $175.00, he is of course trying to sell it now for$275.00 but has had no offers... Marc


# 641 - Books, Essential References For U.S. Military Coll
7/1/97
Skip, Moscow, ID

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Your book catalog lists Scott Meadows' "U.S. Military Holsters and Pistol Cartridge Boxes" as one of about 12 absolutely esential references for the serious U.S> military collectors. I'm curious, what are the others?

Answer:
Skip- Never wrote them down, but here goes:
1. "Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Arms and thier Values"
2. James Hicks "US Military Firearms" Fantastic detailed line drawings, including internals, of nearly all US arms 1795-1956. (Out of print)
3. William Brophy "Springfield 1903 Rifles" Covers the rifles and everything remotely related to them in detail. Clark Campbell's "The 03 Era..." is also excellent.
4. Al Frasca & Robert Hill ".45-70 Springfield" (out of print). M.D. Waite & B.D. Ernst "Trapdoor Springfield" also recommended.
5. William Brophy "The Krag Rifle" or Frank Mallory's "Krag Rifle Story" (out of print)
6. Charles Clawson "Colt .45 Service Pistols" the definitive work on M1911 series pistols and a heck of a lot more. recent book but out of print and selling for hefty premium.)
7. M.H. Cole "US Military Knives, Bayonets & Machetes- Book 3" Covers most of the sharp and pointy stuff usually found. Book 4 has even more, but basics are all in Book 3.
8. Peter Senich "Complete Book of US Sniping" His other sniping related works are excellent, but this one hits the basics.
9. Larry Ruth "War Baby" volumes I and II. Definitive history of M1 carbines and everything related to them.
10. Scott Duff- "M1 Garand: WW2" and "M1 Garand: Post WW2" Definitive work on the M1 Rifle, but omits NM and some other exotic variations.
11. William Brophy "Arsenal of Freedon: Springfield Armory 1890-1948" Dull as dirt collection of all the annual reports from Springfield, but a gold mine of factual data.
11(and 1/2) Eugene Hackley, Woodin & Scranton "History of U.S. Military Small Arms Ammunition, 1880-1939 and 1940-45 (2 vols) Loads of info on standard and oddball ammo; the rest of the story of what made US arms effective. (Vol. 1 out of print) Neat collecting field.
11 (and 3/4) Bruce Canfield- "US Infantry Weapons of WW2" Excellent summary of handguns to small crew served weapons. Good photos, production numbers, collector tips. As with all my free opinions, these recommendations come with a full money back guarantee!
... John Spangler


# 639 - M1 Carbine by Inland- troubleshooting
7/1/97
Don R. Kensington, Ct USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Inland Steel M1 Carbine 30 Standard Carbine Parkerized Unknown

Dated on the barrel 12/42 Inland mfg. Seems all original.

Got slide stop and spring and stop seems too long and I cannot figure out how this goes in with the spring. Gun works fine without stop. Were there other sizes of stops in later models ? Can you tell me how the spring is in relationship to the stop ?

Answer:
Don- I think this might be easier than you think. It is real obvious where the slide stop goes. But, the spring goes in the hole on the side so it is perpendicular to, and presses against the stop to keep it from moving up and down freely. There are two types of slide stop, but either will work pretty well, and both used the same spring. You may have to use a sharp instrument to pull the spring back away from the stop to get it to slide up all the way. If you become a real carbine fanatic, I'd be glad to send you info on the "Carbine Club" with a great monthly newsletter packed with tidbits, trivia and wisdom on this very popular gun... John Spangler


# 633 - Springfield .45-70 Rifle
7/1/97
Ger,Venlo,Netherlands

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield Trapdoor 45-70 Blackpowder Standard Blue 510XXX

I'm curious to know in what year my rifle possibly or perhaps exactly was produced. And if there is or are magazines or books about the trapdoor rifle. And if they can be ordered via Internet.

Answer:
Ger- Your rifle was probably made in 1891. These had inspector markings on the left side of the stock with inspector's initials (SWP for Samuel W. Porter) and the date of inspection. If your rifle has 32.6 inch barrel (measure by putting something down the barrel) and a sliding ramrod-bayonet, we would call it a "Model 1888". If the barrel is 29.5 inches, it is a Model 1884 Cadet rifle. A good book on these is "Trapdoor Springfield" by M.D. Waite and B.D. Ernst, which costs about US $40.00, I don't know if this can be ordered over the internet... John Spangler


# 658 - Australian Gun Confiscation- US next?????
7/1/97
Anonymous-

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I thought Australians were pretty great people, but I heard they have just passed some crazy gun laws. What happened? Are their ideas really that bad? Should I be worried?

Answer:
Anonymous- You better bet your sweet bippy and your Sweet Sixteen shotgun you should be plenty worried. I hope you are also "...mad as hell and not going to take it any more!!" Follow this link to the Washington Arms Collectors feature article where one of their members describes what he was on a trip there. After you finish reading it, and calm down a little, come on back and see the rest of the neat stuff on our page. As us Navy guys say "This is NOT a drill!!" Dig deep and write that check to the NRA-ILA and/or NRA-PVF and get busy contacting your politicians by letter, phone and fax. Be polite, be specific about what bills you oppose (or support). http://www.halcyon.com/wac/article.html ... John Spangler


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This page was last updated 8/1/97 7:05:59 AM