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# 13273 - Can Anyone Give Me Info?
9/30/2008
Steve, Columbia, Missouri

Revolver - Smith And Wesson - 32 - Blue - 12179 -

Can anyone give me an idea on how old this revolver is? It belonged to my father's (now 75 years old) grandfather which would make it at least over a hundred years old. Is it rare etc? Any info would be appreciated.

Answer:
Steve, Jim Supica and Richard Nahas can tell you can tell you all about your Smith & Wesson. Their excellent book, "The Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson" is available on Amazon for under $40.00. "The Gun Digest Book of Smith & Wesson" by Patrick Sweeney is another good reference, it is available on Amazon for under $30.00. Marc


# 13185 - Mind - Reading Test?
9/30/2008
Larry

Blue -

I recently purchased an antique pistol at a flea market. It appears to be a flintlock converted to percussion cap. It has the following markings: C.15.2 (I have been told this is the Regiment number). GM ( I have been told this is the proof?, and 1655 which I don't know. It is smooth bore above a 50 cal.

Answer:
Larry- I agree that the markings on the butt consisting of letters and numbers are indeed unit markings of some sort. My guess is that they are French, but they may be German. As a total wild guess, after consulting my crystal ball, I declare it to be a French Model 1822 (Mle 1822). Or, maybe not. John Spangler


# 13159 - Winchester 1892 In .218 Bee Caliber
9/27/2008
Roger, Houston, Texas

Winchester - 1982 - .218 Bee - Blue - 725510 -

What is the approximate value of this rifle? It is in very good condition, by the way.

Answer:
Roger- Too many unknowns to give an accurate answer. First we need to confirm (preferably with a factory letter) that it was actually delivered s a .218 Bee and is not some shooter's basement gunsmithing project or a factory spare barrel installed later. Then we get into the problem of how your "good condition" matches up against other definitions. Just as a wild guess, something like $500 might be a good starting number to work up or down from. John Spangler


# 13155 - Musket And Trapdoor Bayonet Mortise
9/27/2008
Jim

1873 Bayonet - Blue -

Is there a difference in the mortise dimensions between the 1873 bayonet made from the 1855 bayonet, and the 'new' 1873 bayonet? If so, what are the dimensions? TY Jim

Answer:
Jim- As you already know, but perhaps other people do not, most of the socket bayonets made for the M1873 "Trapdoor" Springfields were actually made from surplus Civil War era bayonets made for the M1855 and later .58 caliber muskets and later used on the .50- 70 rifles. The conversion involved altering the socket to a smaller diameter. Although references state that this was done by a cold pressing or squeezing operation, that just does not sound feasible to me. I have seen a number of CW era M1855 bayonets that have been slit along the bottom of the socket and unsuccessfully pressed back into a finished socket, perhaps cold, perhaps after being heated to welding temperature. IN any case, I think this is a more correct description of the actual process used.

I believe the actual dimensions of the mortise (the zig-zag slot that the front sight slides in while the bayonet is being attached on the rifle) are the same for both types. Some M1873 bayonets were newly made from scratch, but in the very austere funding climate of the post-Civil War era, and when hundreds of thousands of surplus M1855 bayonets were at hand, this practice was stopped as a waste of money needed for other purposes, and they turned to converting the old ones to fit the trapdoors, saving a few cents per bayonet.

I believe the actual dimensions of the mortise (the zig-zag slot that the front sight slides in while the bayonet is being attached on the rifle) are the same for both types. The M1855-1870 rifle muskets and breechloading rifles all had a solid one piece front sight. The same sight was used on the early M1873 .45-70 trapdoors. Later trapdoors used a base piece of the same size with a pin and a removable blade, although the sight height remained the same as with the old solid front sight. The "battle zero" for the trapdoor rifle was 200 yards, and the high trajectory will make the rifle shoot at least a foot high at 100 yards. This has caused many people to replace the original front sight blade with a higher one for shooting at the shorter ranges over the years. (Very easy to do with the separate blade and pin type, but less easy if it has the solid sight.) That would create problems attaching either type bayonet.

The mortise on the very similar looking bayonets made for the Remington Rolling Block rifles is noticeable wider as they use a front sight base that is nearly square in footprint, while the trapdoor is longer than it is wide. The socket on the M1855 and M1873 is 3 inches long, while the Remington sockets are only 2.5 inches long. John Spangler


# 13267 - Maine Sesquicentennial Colt Value
9/27/2008
Mike, Bangor, Maine

Colt - Revolver - .22 - Other -

Maine Sesquicentennial Colt produced a series of these commemorative revolvers, each boxed with some little doo-dad to go along with the gun. The Maine revolver had a small cast lobster. The guns themselves were often (always?) gold plated or at least gold colored. What is the collector interest in these guns today? How much would the Maine gun be worth, assuming in like-new condition with all the appropriate stuff (box, lobster, etc.)?

Answer:
Mike, Colt produced 3000 Maine Sesquicentennial Scout revolvers in 1970, the serial number range for the line was 1MES-3000MES. The blue book indicates that issue price in 1970 was $120 and that now value is $495. If your revolver has been fired or if is not in flat new condition with no line on the cylinder from being turned and all of the original packaging, value will be less than 1/2 of what it is listed at in the book. Marc


# 13268 - Experimental Plainfield M1?
9/23/2008
Orlando

Plainfield - M1 - .30 - Blue - X911 -

x911 looking for history on Plainfield machine m-1's. There is a gun I located locally that is stamped m-1 but has most of the parts for an m-2. From the information I can find it has been indicated to me that the ''X'' in front of the 911(strage by it self)(s/nx911) is for a experimental model. any information would be great!!

Answer:
Orlando, the Plainfield Machine Company of Dunellen and then Middlesex, New Jersey, assembled an array of M1 Carbine replicas from assorted GI and commercial parts with varying stock features and finishes starting in the late 1960s (around 1967). Plainfield carbines were available in both 22 and 30 M1 Carbine calibers and over the years that Plainfield was in business, they marketed many different M1 Carbine configurations. Some had ventilated sheet-steel handguards and lacked the bayonet-lug assembly beneath the barrel. The Commando or Paratrooper Model had a forward pistol grip and a sliding skeletal butt. The M1 Sporter had a military-style butt without the sling bar, and the M1 Deluxe Sporter (later known as the 'Plainfielder') had a special half-stock with a Monte Carlo comb and a checkered pistol grip. Plainfield was acquired by Iver Johnson in 1975 and carbine production continued thereafter under the Iver Johnson name.

I think that the M2 parts you mention are probably just surplus GI parts that Plainfield used when they put the carbine together. Another possibility is that some previous owner tried to do an M2 conversion. Doing something like converting an M1 to an M2 is highly illegal and should never be tried if you want to stay out of jail.

Sorry to say that there is little or no collector interest in non-GI carbines like your Plainfield so even if it were an experimental model, value would not be much more than two or three hundred dollars. Marc


# 13261 - Pedersoli Derringer
9/23/2008
Richard, Newville, pa

Pedersoli - Derringer Rider - Italy Caliber 4.3 - 2-3 Inches - Stainless Steel - H9307 -

none I can not seem to find any information on this handgun. I am told it is a replica made in 1972 500 made. I would like to know if you may have any info on this gun other then the original back in 1800's, like how much it is worth or anything. I paid 100 bucks for it.

Answer:
Richard, I have never paid much attention to replica guns like the Pedersoli, maybe a look at their website would be helpful, try the following link:

http://www.shooterschoice.com/pedersoli/pedersoli.htm

Marc


# 13154 - Browning Brothers Marked M1892 Winchester
9/23/2008
Tim,Ralston,NE

Winchester - 92 Rifle - 25-20 - 20 In.(shortened) - Blue - 139238 -

Normal Winchester pat. on tang, New Haven, Conn, and cal. on barrel etc. But ahead of rear sight it states- BROWNING BROS. CO., SALT LAKE, U. This rifle has seen much use and has character abound, from the notches on the stock to the shortened barrel and half-tube. What is the significance of the Browning markings? Is this rare or important to history? Do they add value? Any information to my research would be helpful. Thank-you

Answer:
Tim- John M. Browning received Winchester firearms from Winchester as part payment of the royalties for his invention of numerous Winchester guns (such as the model 1885 single shot, 1886, 1892 and 1894 lever actions and 1893 and 1897 pump shotguns to name a few). It is believed that all of those, and perhaps others bought as regular inventory to stock their stores in Ogden and Salt Lake City, Utah, were marked with the company name. Markings are usually located on the top of the barrel near the rear sight. The company name went through several variations in name, address and Utah or Utah Territory abbreviation. Mike Carrick, writing in the Gun Report, had a brief study of these variations a few months ago. I believe he is working on an expanded analysis of these Browning markings which will appear in the future.

In my opinion the Browning markings are quite interesting and should add a premium to collectors. However, in the well used condition of your gun, I am not sure how much that would be. Obviously a "condition collector" would be turned off, but someone who likes representative hunting arms may find this one fascinating. It obviously entered the field somewhere in the Utah/Rocky Mountain region, and has seen hard use. John M. Browning would have been glad to see his guns used, and enjoyed, rather than locked up and never used. John Spangler


# 13183 - Hopkins & Allen Shotgun
9/20/2008
Bill

By way of purchasing a High Wall Winchester, I came across a Hopkins & Allen 20 guage double barrel shotgun. It seems to be in good working order. The bores are bright and smooth but the exterior finish is a bit rough. No deep pitting but hazed over with corrosion. The asking price is $200.00. I am interested in purchasing the gun but only if it can be refinished. Your thoughts? Thanks.

Answer:
Bill- H&A went out of business in 1918, and many of their guns were for black powder only, so I would never shoot this one myself. H&A quality was sort of mediocre, and I think $200 would be extreme top dollar for the gun you describe. Add another $100 or more to refinish it and you have a lot of money invested in a gun that few people would buy at any price. I would save my money and go find a double made by Stevens or L.C. Smith, or Fulton instead. John Spangler


# 13266 - Rusty Jukar Revolver Value
9/20/2008
Doreen

Jukar - Black Powder - Revolver - Don't Know - Rusty - 090601 -

I did see your answer to Dannie, but not sure if the price would be the same or less, with different serial numbers. I have had this gun since about 1972. Thank you for your time

Answer:
Doreen, we appreciate you taking the time to check previous answers before submitting your question. With this in mind, I am sorry that I am not able to tell you that you have a real treasure. If anything your Junkar may be worth less than Dannie's revolver is because of the rusty condition that you mention. Marc


# 13264 - Old Chattanooga Shotgun
9/16/2008
Bill

Not Sure - ''Model 1885'' - 12 Gauge - Blue -

I can make out: Chattanooga, Tennessee'' maybe the manufacturers name is ''Van Nuys'' or Van Hoys. The markings are really faded. I am trying to identify the manufacturer of a 12 gauge shotgun that I inherited. The markings are very worn, and I can make out the words ''Chattanooga, Tennessee'' and I think it says ''Van Nuys and co.'' Or Van Hoys??????Any information on shotgun manufacturers in the late 1880's in Chattanooga, Tennessee would be greatly appreciated!!!

Answer:
Bill, I do not have any information on this firearm, and since I can not examine it in person, I do not know hat kind of quality it was manufactured with. My guess is that it is probably one of a huge number made in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and sold through various retail outlets. This type of firearm falls into the category of "old guns" that no one seems to be interested in as shooters, but collectors do not want them either. Generally these were basic inexpensive simple guns which sold at modest prices and still have little interest or value on market today. On the retail market they usually sell in the $25-125 range depending on condition and general appearance for use as a "wall hanger" over a fireplace. Where there is any family history, we encourage people to keep these old guns for sentimental value. Please be warned that most of these are not considered safe to shoot. Marc


# 13249 - M1 Carbine Value
9/16/2008
Wendy, Fresno, CA

QUALITY H.M.C. - M1 Carbine - .30 - Don't Know - 1572562 -

A ''P'' on the bottom of the stock. ''AA'' above ''AS'' on the left side of the stock. ''ROCK-OLA'' on the barrel behind the front sight. ''JM'' on the side of the metal clamp(?) near the front of the gun. ''W'' on the top near the rear screw. Sorry that I'm not using correct terminology. This was my Dad's--he bought it for $17.50 + $2.50 shipping--I have the receipt. All I know about guns is don't point them at someone unless you intend to shoot them. Basically, what is it worth--do I need to get it insured?

Answer:
Wendy, setting the value of an M1 Carbine can get a little complicated, especially in circumstances like this when I do not have the opportunity to examine the carbine in person. There are many factors that can affect the value of an M1 Carbine, a few of them are the type of sights that it has, weather it has a bayonet lug or not, the type of stock that it has, the markings on the stock and whether or not it has all of the proper correct parts. The receiver of your carbine was manufactured by Quality Hardware and Machine Corporation but the barrel was manufactured by the Rock-Ola jukebox company. The two different manufacturers will put some collectors off, but not others since Rock-Ola did supply barrels to Quality Hardware during W.W.II. With this in mind, the best that I can tell you is that value is probably between $600 and about $1200. To get a better estimate than I am able to give, you should have someone who knows M1 Carbines examine yours in person. Make sure to hang on to the receipt that you mentioned and any shining papers or material that you have because they will add to your carbine's value. Marc


# 13181 - M1911 With Collector For Fired Cases
9/14/2008
Dennis

Looking for information on a 1911 colt 45 that had a shell reflector on it so the shell would not it the pilot. Any information or pictures would help thank you.

Answer:
Dennis- I think I saw a photo of one once, perhaps in Clawson's "Colt .45 Service Pistols", but maybe somewhere else.

As I recall it was sort of a wire basket arrangement that fit over the right side, leaving access to get the hand in for firing. I guess in theory the ejected cases would plop into the basket and be kept out of moving airplane parts.

I doubt if it ever reached the production stage, as is the case with many other theoretically "good ideas".

In reality, the usefulness of firing a .45 ACP round at an air or ground target from an aircraft is almost zero. At about 750 fps, simply hitting a target while moving would be difficult enough, and with only 7 rounds available, the chances of doing anything harmful to an enemy are very low. Perhaps the pilot would be better off sticking to flying his plane and leaving the pistol for survival use if he gets shot down. John Spangler


# 13147 - Springfield Armory .69 Caliber 1826 Pistol
9/14/2008
Keith, Farmington Hills, MI

T. Davidson & CO. - Ciincinnatti, Oh. - 44-50 ? - 34'' Octagon - Blue - NONE FOUND -

Jos. Legg stamped on top of barrel. Can you tell me anything about this old muzzleloader.

Answer:
Ron- I am pretty sure that you have a cut down musket. Springfield did make three pistols over the years, the M1911 .45 automatic, the Model 1855 .58 caliber Pistol-Carbine and the Model 187 .69 caliber flintlock pistol. However, the latter had a barrel a little more than 10 inches long, so that rules that one out. My guess is that this is a period alteration for a “sawed off shotgun” type approach to a gun to be used for self defense, carrying under the buggy or wagon seat, or kept by the bed. Or, perhaps by the local thug to stick up the livery stable and local bank or stagecoach. I am sure it has collector value, but probably not nearly as much as if it were still a full length musket, maybe a few hundred dollars if it is really neat and old looking. John Spangler


# 13259 - Check The Link.
9/14/2008
Scott, Kilgore, Tx 75662

Winchester - 1894 Wcf - 30-30 - 19.25 Inches - Blue - 558511 -

What is the age of this rifle?

Answer:
Scott, we have provided a link so that visitors to OldGuns.net can look up Winchester dates of manufacture for themselves, you must have missed it. I used our link to ckeck your serial number for you, and I come up with 1911. Marc


# 13247 - Wild Guess
9/9/2008
David, Columbia, SC

Westwood - Blue -

Westwood 320 EE on one barrel Awisted stubs JS on the other barrel There design stamps on each barrel 2 on each Wanting to know the date of the gun and it's estimated value, gun is in excellent condition

Answer:
David, you did not send much information but since you mention two barrels so I will guess that we are talking about a double barreled shotgun. The Westwood brand name is not listed in my blue book or any of the other references that I checked. Westwood sounds a lot to me like a store brand trade name, or a name that was used to market firearms under that were actually manufactured by other companies. This practice is sort of like Sears selling power tools under the Craftsman brand name that may have actually been made by someone like Skill or Black and Decker . With this in mind, I checked my trade name cross-reference but was unable to find anything there either. My best guess is that you probably have one of a huge number of shotgunsmade in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and sold through various retail outlets. If this is what you have, it falls into the category of "old guns" that no one seems to be interested in as shooters, but collectors do not want them either. Generally these were basic inexpensive simple guns which sold at modest prices and still have little interest or value on market today. On the retail market they usually sell in the $25-125 range depending on condition and general appearance for use as a "wall hanger" over a fireplace. Where there is any family history, we encourage people to keep these old guns for sentimental value. Please be warned that most of these are not considered safe to shoot.

As always all of our free answers to questions (in this case free guesses) come with a full money back guarantee. Marc


# 13184 - John Rigby Rifle
9/9/2008
Rob

John Rigby - Magazine Rifle - .416 - 25 In. - Blue -

I would like to know the approximate date of manufacture, and total .416 made and the value of the rifle.

Answer:
Rob, you have an exceptionally nice rifle, Rigby is one of the world's premiere weapons manufacturers. The John Rigby firm was first established in Dublin, Ireland in 1735. The first London Branch was opened in 1865 and current manufacturing facilities have been located in Paso Robles, CA since 1997.

During the percussion era, Rigby was well-known for their dueling pistols. More recently a good portion of the Rigby firearms business has been building custom rifles. Many rifles were chambered for the large black powder express cartridges that were used for dangerous game in Africa and Asia.

At one point, John Rigby was superintendent of the small arms factory at Enfield where he was in charge of development for the famous .303 caliber rifle. He was also responsible for many large caliber innovations in both rifles and ammunition.

The African (Heavy) Express Magazine Rifle came with a 3-5 shot magazine, 20-28 inch barrel and an exhibition grade checkered walnut stock with full pistol grip. Rifles were offered in various calibers including .300 H&H, .375 H&H, .458 Winchester Magnum, .500 Jeffrey (new in 2003), .505 Gibbs (discontinued in 2002), .416 Rigby (which was first available in 1911) and various other calibers that were offered upon request. Rifles could be ordered with many options including wood upgrades, engraving, express sights, telescopic sights and color case hardened finish.

I was unable to find any serial number information to date your rifle but references indicate that post 1939 models have a newer type Mauser double square bridge receiver.

Blue book values for the African (Heavy) Express Magazine Rifles are quite high, they start out at around $7,500 for rifles in 60% condition and go all the way up to $25,000 for rifles in perfect 100% condition. The blue book indicates that manufacturers suggested retail for new rifles is $28,500. Marc


# 13146 - Springfield Armory .69 Caliber 1826 Pistol
9/9/2008
Ron, Greenville, Michigan

Springfield (Armory) - Approx .69 Or.70 - 16 +/- Inches - Don't Know - NONE VISIBLE -

I can't see any other marking other than what I list below This musket was converted from flintlock to percussion and has the year 1826 stamped on the side. From what I have gleaned from other answers on your web site this is probably and 1816 musket. Am I right? Do you have any guess as to it's value. The gun is in reasonable condition.

Answer:
Ron-   I am pretty sure that you have a cut down musket.  Springfield did make three pistols over the years, the M1911 .45 automatic, the Model 1855 .58 caliber Pistol-Carbine and the Model 187 .69 caliber flintlock pistol.  However, the latter had a barrel a little more than 10 inches long, so that rules that one out.  My guess is that this is a period alteration for a “sawed off shotgun” type approach to a gun to be used for self defense, carrying under the buggy or wagon seat, or kept by the bed.  Or, perhaps by the local thug to stick up the livery stable and local bank or stagecoach.  I am sure it has collector value, but probably not nearly as much as if it were still a full length musket, maybe a few hundred dollars if it is really neat and old looking.  John Spangler


# 13144 - Modified Winchester Model 1917 Rifle
9/6/2008
Chuch, Grants Pass, OR

Winchester - Model OF 1917 - 30-06 - 27' - Blue - 69613 -

Fixed front site, steal butt plate, wood stock, thumb safety All the 1917 I have seen have a full length stock, bayonet fixture and front site guards. My 1917 stock only goes half way up the stock and I have bayonet fixture or front site guards. Was this modified or is the another version of the 1917

Answer:
Chuck-  Sorry to disappoint you, but this is strictly an unofficial alteration of the M1917 rifle.  John Spangler


# 13145 - Remington Rolling Block Military Rifle
9/6/2008
Bob, Cotter, AR

Remington - Rolling Block - Unknown, 50-70? - 33.5 - Rusty - NONE -

REMINGTONS ILION, NY USA PAT MAY 3D NOV 15TH 1864 APRIL 17, 1866 Letter ''B'' stamped on left side plate between top screw and wood forearm. Three barrel rings all have ''B'' stamped on them on left side. Rolling block is center fire and channeled. Patent date on front sling swivel but is unreadable. Bayonet lug on right side of barrel. Steel but plate. Left side of sight has numbers 1, 2, and 3 stamped. Bottom side of flip up sight has stamped numbers 5 through 10. Bore appears to be excellent. Finish is silver with substantial surface rust. No S/N. No markings hidden by wood. 50/70? Can you determine country of manufacture, approximate date, and value? I have perused every web site imaginable and have found no Remington rolling blocks with a ''B'', none without a S/N or markings of crowns, etc. Any help would be appreciated.

Answer:
Bob-  I regret I cannot help on that one.  Remington made hundreds of thousands of their Rolling Block rifles, basically for sale all over the world, and whatever the customer wanted, they would make.  Right now there is no good guide for sorting out all the different models, but I understand that Remington expert Roy Marcot is working on a multi-volume set on all types of the Remington Rolling Blocks, so when that is finished we will probably be able to tell you for sure.  Until then, I am 99% sure it was for a foreign purchaser, not a U.S. contract (state or federal) as they seldom had a side mounted bayonet lug.  Serial numbers are not found on a lot of them, and on some the number will be stamped on the sides of the receiver tangs, where you have to pull the stock off to see it. The Swedes did use some in a caliber nearly identical to the .50-70, and they had some side mounted bayonets, but that is just a guess at this point.   John Spangler


# 12861 - Clement Revolver Value
9/6/2008
Denmark

Clement - 38 - 4 In - Nickel - 7225 -

It has the Belgium proof marks but I can't find any inf about this cal 38 revolver. It's a top break model with ejector.. Is this a rare type of revolver made by Clement ?? and what is the price for a gun like this in good condition ?? Morten

Answer:
The Clement Revolver was manufactured by Neumann Freres from 1912 to 1914, they are identifiable by the Clement 'CC' monogram molded into the grips. Clement Revolvers were close copies of the .38 Special Colt Police Positive. There is no Clement listing in the blue book but my guess is that value would be somewhat than a comparable Colt. Probably in the $150 to $200 range. Marc


# 12856 - Remington Mod 510
9/2/2008
Keith, Plant City Fl.

Rem. - Model 510 Target Master - 22 - Blue -

I know it's old, also had a lot of rounds put through it, And it still refuses to give on squirrel head shots. Please tell me what you can. Thanks.

Answer:
Keith, the Model 510 Targetmaster rifle was a replacement for the earlier Model 41, it had a special re-designed loading platform, a streamlined self-cocking bolt, and a radial safety lever which was located behind the bolt. Model 510 rifles were not serial numbered until 1954 and Remington manufactured 545,000 between 1939 when they were introduced and 1962 when the model was discontinued. Marc


# 12850 - Model B DOM
9/2/2008
Tom

HI-STANDARD Model B - .22 - Unknown - Don't Know - 66171 -

Inherited Grandfather's HI-STANDARD .22 with serial # shown. Would like specifically to know year of production. I am at work and so do not have weapon here to provide barrel length, finish type. although nickel sounds closest or special markings.

Answer:
Tom, approximately 65,000 High Standard Model B pistols were manufactured between when they were first introduced in 1932 and 1942 when the model was discontinued. Records indicate that your pistol (serial number 66171) was manufactured in 1940. Model B pistols had fixed-partridge type front and rear sights, checkered hard rubber grips with or without the H.S. monogram and 10 shot magazines. Both 4½ and 6¾ inch barrel lengths were available on this model. Marc


# 13142 - M1861 Springfield Musket Cut Down
9/2/2008
Bruce, Jefferson Ma

Springfield 1863 - .54? - 23inches Aprox. Cut Down - Don't Know - T35? V/P LEFT SIDE OF BARREL -

1863 Back of hammer, Spread Eagle Above Springfield front of hammer T35 VP left side of barrel, ELH initials script on left side of stock another block stamp above it is unreadable . Small block W on stock left side. Clean out screw by percussion cap. no sights, possible barrel number etched off. Where was it made? Trenton? Was it cut down after production or was it a Bannermann production made from surplus stock

Answer:
Bruce-  Sure sounds like a cut down to me.  The clean out screw confirms it is a Model 1861 barrel.  If the lock says Springfield, then the lock was made at Springfield Armory (unless it is a reproduction- made in Japan or Italy).  The 23 inch barrel length is not even close to any regulation model.  There are muskets with 33 inch barrels that SOME people believe are quasi-official “artillery muskets” but I remain skeptical.  This could have been made by Bannerman, or even Bubba, as long as they had a pile of parts to cobble together to end u p with a cheap shooter (in their opinion) or a decorator.  We have a local vet who has a “Kid’s brigade” he outfits with muskets and powder and percussion caps for patriotic parades every year.  He has some of this sort of “parts gun” for that use, and some have been loaned out for theatrical prop use as well.  Not much for a collector, but still fun for someone, or a potential source of a few salvageable parts.  John Spangler.


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