Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters OldGuns.net FineOldGuns.com

 

 

Questions And Answers Page

If you have a question about firearms and you want it posted on this page click here.

Return to Collectors Headquarters.

Click here to go to the question and answer monthly index.

Click here to go to the question and answer subject index.


# 2299 - Wallther P.38 Markings
9/28/99
Barry, USA, New York, NY

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Walther P38 9mm 5" Blued, Come Parkerized 5171I

"ac" over "43". Eagle over "359". And a separate eagle stamp on right side of body, wings outstretched. The eagle sits on a tiny circle with either a swastika or an "X" in it. I figure this was made in 1943. What does the "eagle over 359" designate. Do you know what and eagle, on the "x" and/or swastika designates? Also, what did the original holsters for this weapon look like? Thanks for your time.

Answer:
Berry, you are correct, you have a Walther P.38 (ac is the WW-II German ordnance code assigned to Carl Walther, Zella-Mehlis, Germany) that was manufactured in 1943. The eagle over WaA 359 is the German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's mark on arms from Walther, Zella-Mehlis, Germany. It should be stamped twice on the right side of the slide, once on the left side of the frame above the trigger, on the left side of the barrel group, on the right side of the barrel locking block and on the upper rear of the magazine. Early P.38 pistols were also stamped with Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks on the left side of the hammer, on the cartridge indicator pin cover plate, on the left side of the slide stop, on the left side of the trigger and on the right side of the barrel group( instead of the left). The eagle over swastika in a circle marking is the military test proof, it should be located on the right side of the slide between the two Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks, on the left side of the barrel group and on the left side of the barrel locking block. There are two common types of holster for the P.38. The first type holster is made of stiff molded leather with a pocket for an extra magazine on the forward edge. The second type holster is made of softer leather and the extra magazine pocket is located on the side. Both types of holster should be marked "P.38" and should have German WW-II Heerswaffenamt inspector's marks. Marc


# 2272 - H. W. Mortimer Pistol
9/28/99
Tim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H. W. Mortimer-London Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Gentlemen, I recently came across an old pistol that my Great Uncle gave me about 12 years ago. He obtained the pistol in 1947 in Iran The weapon is an over and under, double barreled, smooth-bore, percussion cap pistol, that has the name "H. W. Mortimer-London" Inscribed on the top of the barrel. There is no serial number on the gun. There are what I think are proof marks on the barrels. The gun is brown finish, is finely engraved, and has a beautifully checkered handle that appears to be made of walnut. The screws appear to be hand made. There are no gross wear marks on the gun, either on the barrel or the handle. The only imperfections appear to be are that one of the main springs is broken, one of the hammers Hs broken and been rather crudely pinned back together, and a medallion or crest that was pinned to the handle has fallen off. Could you perhaps tell me the approximate age and a history of the pistol, along with a ball park value?

Answer:
Tim- H.W. Mortimer could be Harvey Westlake Mortimer Senior (1780-1802 or Junior 1800-1820, but more likely the latter. Both operated at 98 Fleet Street. It is possible that there was another generation of H.W. Mortimers as the over under double barrel percussion pistol is generally a later (1840-1870) style. These were usually in large caliber (maybe .50 and larger). This is probably what is sometimes called a "Howdah" pistol, and seemed to have been more popular further to the east in India. Jeeps not yet being invented, elephants were a popular (and pricey) mode of transportation. Tromping through the jungle with a passenger in a wicker basket on top they tended to stir up other forms of wildlife, such as tigers. Tigers were appreciative of the elephants bringing them lunch and were known to attack the people and/or elephants. Fashionable travelers adopted the "Howdah" pistols to give them a second chance to fend off attack by tigers, and probably in the case of unfriendly natives as well. Of course, some unscrupulous makers marked their products with the names of famous English makers, so we cannot be sure that a Mortimer actually made you gun in London. With the condition problems, I do not thing there will be a strong demand for it, unless the quality is really good and makes restoration worthwhile. I would guess at might bring somewhere in the $250-650 range. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2269 - Identification Of A CSA Lefaucheux Revolver
9/28/99
Corinne

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Lefaucheux Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am living in Belgium and I am the owner of a Lefaucheux revolver manufactured in Liege (Belgium). On the butt plate I can read this letters and numbers: C.S.A. 4 Alb. Brig.786 What does that mean? can you help me? Thanks. Corinne

Answer:
Corinne- I would first look for a European explanation of the C.S.A. marking. Not many Lefaucheaux revolvers made it to America during the Civil War, and I would assume that very few of those made the trip back to Europe. In my opinion at least half of all "Confederate" items being sold today have no usage by the Confederates during the Civil War. Some items are from that period, but not Confederate used, and only have fake markings. Many are more recent fakes. I do not claim to be a Confederate arms expert, but know enough to be VERY suspicious of anything offered as Confederate. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2298 - 1920 DWM Luger Markings
9/25/99
Barry, New York, NY, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Luger P-08 9mm Approx. 4" Blued & Parkerized 4173

Stamped 1920, "three eagle" proof marks. "DMW" production. All serial numbers match. Grips are not original, but all the rest is. I've tried to find out who manufactured this and when, but the stories are inconsistent. I cannot identify the "three eagle" marking. Three eagles with wings spread, very small, with some scribbles underneath each one. The middle eagle is dropped slightly below the other two. What does this proof mark mean?

Answer:
Barry, your Luger was manufactured or reworked in 1920 by DWM (Deutsche Waffen u. Munitionswerke, Berlin-orsigwalde, Germany), the markings are obvious and I can see no reason for any ambiguity. This Luger should have a blued finish with no parkerizing. The three eagles are probably 1920 police / military proofs. 1920 police / military proofs are found on Lugers manufactured by DWM and Erfurt alone or sometimes with commercial proof marks. Marc


# 2268 - 1914 Furgetter ?
9/25/99
Susan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Furgetter 1914 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Would like to get information on a 1914 Furgetter. For example, value, parts, manufacturer information, etc... Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:
Susan- I am not familiar with any "Fur Getter". There were Marble's Mfg. Co. "Game Getter" guns, short barreled over/under shotgun rifle combinations. I think that Stevens or other makers may also have made similar guns intended for use by trappers. You need to know that if it has a smoothbore shotgun barrel less than 18 inches long, it is considered to be a "sawed off shotgun." Janet Reno and her BATF enforcers take very dim view of such guns and the penalty if 10 years and/or $10,000 fine. Unfortunately they do not seem to spend a lot of time arresting convicted felons who try to buy guns, so have plenty of time to harass innocent people who find something illegal and have no intentions of doing anything bad with it and probably do not realize it is illegal. If barrel is over 18" you are okay. If it is a rifled barrel but it is a pistol you are okay regardless of length. If it is a rifle (as opposed to a pistol) and has a rifled barrel, then they only get unhappy if barrel is less than 16" long. length is measured from the front of the closed breech to the end of the barrel. Hope this helps and keeps you out of trouble. Stupid laws, but if we cannot stop them or change them, we have to obey them. John Spangler


# 2266 - London Colt In Case
9/25/99
Bret Acworth, GA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt Unknown 32 Unknown Unknown Unknown

I recently came across a London colt, believed to be a 32 cal.. it is a five shot with a four inch barrel (from cylinder to end of barrel), with wooden grips. barrel is marked with "address col. colt London. on the left side under the cylinder is marked "colt's patent". on the cylinder is a crown marking, and every other crown marking is stamped with a "v" over it, the crown marking is also on the left side under the barrel twice, once with the "v" stamped over it. the cylinder is also marked with "colts patent", and under that is "no. 3565". additionally, the cylinder is etched with scene showing a horse and carriage with the horse rearing, a man standing next to the carriage (possibly a policeman) pointing forward, and in front of the horse 2 people, one appears to have a rifle over his shoulder. the number "3565" is stamped on all parts visible, visible 3 times when looking at the gun from the bottom. the case is wooden and felt lined and holds the revolver; gun mold which can be used for either ball or cartridge; a brass or copper powder horn still with powder, marked with the American eagle holding shield and arrows with 2 crossed guns under it. below that is "e pluribus unum". above the eagle is 9 stars, 4 above 5, with 2 stars on each side of the eagle. the powder horn also has a brass "open/close" apparatus on the tip which is spring loaded. in the case is a sealed tin of percussion caps marked "------- lined percussion caps for colt's ----- and pocket pistols, u.m.c. co. bridgeport, conn., u.s.a." some of the tape around it has deteriorated and can't be read. lastly, it appears to steel or nickel, unsure of what type of metal it is...... I am looking for any info. concerning this gun that you may provide, including model; date of origin; authenticity; current value; and any other info. you can provide. thanks, and I really enjoy your website!

Answer:
Bret- Sounds like a very nice gun. Colt's London factory made several models, including the Model 1849 pocket revolver. These are .31 caliber ad were made with 4,5, or 6 inch barrels, with the longer barrels slightly more popular than the 4 inch. About 11,000 were made in London between 1853 and 1857, compared to about 325,000 made at Hartford, Conn. between 1850 and 1873. Your gun was made in mid 1855, and all markings are correct for the London production. The cylinder scene has been described many different ways, but apparently was intended to show a stage coach being held up, but successfully defended by a gentleman with a Colt revolver. In NRA antique fine condition (see our links page for definition) these are valued at about $900. However a cased gun will be worth more, and they are usually in better condition. The percussion caps are probably circa 1870-1900 and the copper flask may be an old flask of the period, or a recent replacement. However, an American eagle motif probably was not used in the English cases. Without more information on the condition we cannot put an accurate value on it, but believe it is in the $1500-2300 range. Last week I saw two Colt pocket models for sale at a large show. Both were in excellent condition, in cases with the proper accessories, and one was heavily engraved. Prices were marked at about $3,000-3,500 but I do not know what the owner would have actually been willing to take. If you decide to sell this, we would be happy to handle it on a consignment basis on a 15% commission. Will be glad to provide further details or references if you would like to consider this route. Thanks for asking.. John Spangler


# 2265 - Sauer 8x48mmR Rifle
9/25/99
Adam

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sauer Unknown 8x48mm R Unknown Blue Unknown

Sauer blackpowder single shot rifle double set triggers with Oct. barrel markings: has the letters N, B, and U with crowns under them. Each crown is a pentagram with a cross on top. These markings are on the lower receiver. On the barrel there is an N same as the other with the word Nitro next to it. Finish: blued, good shape and engraving on the lower receiver and the trigger

Answer:
Adam- I am afraid we cannot tell you anything other than the obvious. It was made by Sauer, one of the better German makers. From the proofmarks is definitely pre-WW2, and probably pre-WW1. The "Nitro" indicates it was proof tested to smokeless powder standards, but in any case it should be checked by a competent gunsmith prior to shooting with any ammunition. You do not mention an action type, so I am not sure if it is a single shot on a falling block action, or a break open, or one of the many guns made from 1888 Mauser actions. In any case, we would only be able to guess at a value, but there is not a lot of interest in the old European single shot sporting arms, except for the very finest target guns. Even then there are few collectors in that field and they have very definite tastes. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2287 - Bergmann Destroyer?
9/21/99
J., Miami, Florida, U.S.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Bergmann Destroyer 9 MM Unknown Unknown Unknown

Where can I get detailed information on this firearm? I believe it was manufactured by Thedor Waffenfabrik Bergmann around 1902.

Answer:
J, the name "Bergmann Destroyer" sounds very familiar, but I was unable to find a reference to it in any of several books including "Pistols of the World" by Hogg and Weeks, "Smiths Book of Pistols and Revolvers" and Fjestad's "Blue Book of Gun Values". Isidaro Gaztanaga of Eibar Spain used the name "Destroyer" for several automatic pistol designs including a 7.65 MM model that was used by the French military. Maybe one of our visitors will read this and be able to help. Marc

Regarding the "Destroyer" query; are you sure the gun in question was a pistol? "Destroyer" was the name of a light rifle firing a pistol cartridge, the 9mm Bayard, used by Spanish police early in the century. I found a picture of one in a 40-year old Golden State Arms catalog, and I seem to remember that they were imported and sold in the 50's and 60's. Homer


# 2263 - Did You Say Dinner Plate ?
9/21/99
M. B.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

This doesn't concern guns, although my husband has several. I am hoping you know someone I may contact concerning a child's dinner plate I have I am about to give up on finding any information about this plate. If I didn't own the thing I would swear I was imaging it. Thank You. M. B.

Answer:
MB- I hope I am only imagining this. I don't know much about children's dinner plates except that I probably used one long ago. Probably should use a smaller one now and lose some weight too. My son used a child's plate. You might get more informative responses if you included some information like size, markings, history as far as you know it, why you think it might be special, or other clues. We have done quite well with identifying guns when people give us a few clues, but do not expect to establish our plate reputation unless we have more to work with. By the way, a lot of shooters like to use old dinner plates as targets. They break when you hit them and some people find that exciting. Just thought you might like to know that. Good luck. John Spangler


# 2262 - Sharps Gun Company
9/21/99
Donna

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Sharps Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am trying to get some information on the Sharps Gun Company. Could you please tell me if Sharps was sold to another gun company or just went out of business. Thanks for your help. Donna

Answer:
Donna- The Sharps name was involved in several companies. Christian Sharps was the inventor, and was associated with C. Sharps & Co. circa 1857-1863; Sharps & Hankins 1863-1872; Sharps Rifle Mfg. Co, Hartford Conn, 1851-1876. Following his death the Sharps Rifle Co of Bridgeport Conn operated 1874-about 1880 or 1881 when they failed. I am unable to locate specific details, but am pretty sure that all their assets were sold off piecemeal, and the company ceased to exist. The production of Lee (bolt action magazine .45-70) rifles at Sharps factory halted and that project was completed by Remington. No one made Sharps rifles until about 1960 or so when Frank Garrett in Virginia started making copies of Sharps carbines for Civil War enthusiasts to shoot. Several Italian firms began producing them and later Shiloh Sharps began producing them in the US and there are several other makers producing superb quality copies of Sharps rifles today, both percussion and cartridge types. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2283 - National Ordnance 1903A3
9/18/99
Darrell, San Bernardino, CA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Nat. Ord. Inc. 1903A3 30 Unknown parkerized 5000196

I have a like new 1903A3 with serial# 5000196. I was hoping someone could tell me if this is the 196th built or 5000196th?

Answer:
Darrell, from 1965 to 1974, National Ordnance assembled 1903A3 rifles from surplus military parts on somewhat crudely finished, receivers that were manufactured in Yugoslavia and/or Spain. Serial numbering started at 5,000,000, and several thousand were put together. These were made strictly for commercial sale and have no collector interest or value. Whether yours was the first or last rifle put together, the value is still the same, $150 or less. Marc


# 2261 - J & S Revolver Company
9/18/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Do you know of or have any info on the J & S Revolver Company? I would like to know what city they were in; when they were in operation and when they closed down/sold?; I did a brief search on the net and came up blank. Any info you may have would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for you time.

Answer:
Sir- Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. Sorry, this is not one listed in any of my references. "U.S. Revolver Co." was a trade name used by Iver Johnson around 1900-1925. Perhaps that is it. This are neither rare nor valuable. A few guns imported from England during the Civil War were stamped with a JS/anchor marking (Letters J and S with an anchor in between). These are quite rare and valuable. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2260 - Sharps & Hankins 4 Barrel Derringer
9/18/99
Stan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I'm looking for a schematic for a Sharps & Hankins Derringer Model 3 C with shell extractor.

Answer:
Stan- I am not sure I know a good source. I know that Dixie Gun Works has some poor quality parts for some of the Sharps 4 barrel derringers. Gun Parts Corp may also. Frank Seller's book "Sharps Firearms" may have some useful information. One of the top 5 displays at the prestigious Colorado Gun Collectors' Association show in May was Sharps & Hankins firearms. Absolutely magnificent, and it had one or two pistols in their original cardboard boxes with the original boxes of ammo. Hope this helps. John Spangler.


# 2259 - Flintlock
9/18/99
Alan

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

This is an old flintlock I recently acquired. This does not appear to be a reproduction and is in great condition. The length is 49" and barrel is 33". The bore diameter is 5/8". On the side plate there is a Bee with the initials G on one wing and L on the other. Maybe by this description and the photos you could tell me more about this rifle. Thanks Alan

Answer:
Alan- Your rifle (actually musket) was made in the 20th century in Belgium. They had been making similar guns for sale to natives in Africa, forbidden to own cartridge guns, and eventually made them to supply the emerging American market for muzzle loaders which grew after WW2. Many of the parts they used were old stock on hand, and while pretty decent quality, they have little collector interest. Values tend to be modest at best. I have seen the specific meaning the Bee LG logo, but do not recall where. Hope this helps. Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. John Spangler


# 2249 - Remington Slide Action Model 572A Fieldmaster
9/14/99
Matt, Lansing, MI, U.S.A.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Fieldmaster 572 .22 Unknown Unknown NO SERIAL NUMBER

Remington Arms Co. Inc. Ilion, N.Y. Model 572Made in USA Patent Pending 22 S. L., I'm looking for information regarding a recently inherited firearm. I would like any available information regarding when it might have been manufactured. Also, I am interested in researching the history of the firearm and would appreciate any suggestions regarding which resources are available to do so.

Answer:
Matt, the Remington slide action model 572A Fieldmaster was introduced in 1955, it was a modernized version of the Model 121. The 572A had a slab-side receiver that was shorter and deeper than the Model 121 with a small ejection port on the front right side and a safety bolt that ran laterally through the rear web of the trigger guard. The Model 572A featured a tubular magazine that held twenty .22 Short, seventeen .22 Long, or fifteen .22 Long Rifle rimfire cartridges. The rifle could fire any of these cartridge lengths interchangeably and could be single-loaded through the side ejection port. Sights were step adjustable rear with a bead front, and the receiver was grooved for tip-off scope mounts. The plain straight-comb buttstock had a pistol grip, and the slide handle was finely grooved. Standard rifles had 23in barrels and weighed 5.51b. In 1958 Remington experimented non-traditional, colored metal surfaces on three special, lightweight versions of the Model 572. The reduced weight of these guns was due to the use of anodized and specially colored aluminum receiver, trigger guard, buttplate, and jacket for a steel barrel liner. These rifles all had checkered, light-colored, "Sun-Grain" walnut stocks and were produced in three metal-color versions: Model 572 CWB Crow Wing Black (1958-1962); Model 572 BT Buckskin Tan (1958-1962); and Model 572 TWB Teal Wing Blue (1959-1960). In 1966 Remington introduced the Model 572 BDL "DeLuxe" rifle, the BDL featured a blade ramp front sight, a barrel-mounted rear sight which was adjustable for elevation and windage. The BDL had new checkering patterns on pistol grip and forend, and a mar-resistant stock finish.


# 2235 - Online Auction Sites
9/14/99

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I am interested in selling my revolver. Any online auction site(s) that you would recommend? Chuck

Answer:
Chuck- I dislike auction sites, and know the Ebay no longer allows guns. There are some others that specialize in guns, but I do not even know where they are. Some friends report that they do pretty sell selling stuff on them, which I guess is good for them, but also proves that PT Barnum was right about a sucker born every minute.


# 2234 - French Rim Fire Pistol???
9/14/99
Chuck

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

I purchased this gun recently and I can't find out any information about it. As good fortune has it I found you after surfing the web. I have a picture(s) of it at this web address if you would like to see it. The address is http://fresno.k12.ca.us/schools/s090/Forien_Lang/halstead/frenchpistol.jpg. I would like to learn more about it, Like....who made it? where it was made? what type of gun? when made? and reference sites or books to learn more about it. Thank you for offering this service!!! Sincerely, Chuck

Answer:
Chuck- Your pistol uses a "pinfire" cartridge. The had a small pin sticking out of the side of the cartridge case that lined up with the notch at the back of the cylinder to place it directly under the hammer when the cylinder rotated to the next position. The hammer blow is downward onto the pin which then ignites priming compound inside the cartridge and then everything proceeds as with regular cartridges. Pinfires were among the earliest successful self contained cartridges, and they were almost exclusively made and used in Europe, although some were imported and used during and shortly after the Civil War. In Europe, they were popular circa 1850-1900. They originated in France, and E. Lefaucheux (La-foo-shay) was the developer of the first successful pistols. As with most French arms, the Belgians soon began turning out copies, generally of lesser cost and quality, and intended for sale around the world. The Belgian made guns have Belgian proof marks (the most common form being the letters ELG in an oval) while the French arms may have a fleur d lis marking. Judging from the photo, your pistol is very small caliber probably 5,6, or 7mm (about .22 to .28 caliber), but most likely the 5mm caliber. These were less powerful than even the lowly .22 short rimfire. These would have been pocket pistols or carried in purses. The engraving n your pistol is above average. Even the cheapest usually had a little coarsely done engraving but yours is definitely better, and the checkered grips are pretty good workmanship. The folding trigger is common on the smaller size pistols, but larger versions used a regular trigger/trigger guard arrangement. There is only one book out that I am aware of on pinfires, and only a handful of collectors who are seriously interested in them. They are usually considered old, but not very interesting guns, and values tend to be pretty low. The book by Gene Smith and Chris Curtis "The Pinfire System" is out of print but you might be able to have your library get one on interlibrary loan. A fanatical pinfire collector needs a copy as it has everything on the subject that is known to mankind. A few of these were made to use either pinfire or rimfire ammunition, but I do not have any details. I do not know of any website with info on pinfires, but there may be one. Hope this helps. John Spangler


# 2306 -
9/11/99
Ed

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Remington Unknown .22 short,Long,Long Rifle Unknown Unknown Unknown

My granddad Gave me this Rifle years ago...Can you tell me a little about it?

Answer:
Ed, over the years, Remington has manufactured many different models of .22 rifles with several different types of actions. After I read your question, I sat down, closed my eyes, put my fingers to my temples, concentrated hard and tried to form an image in my mind of your rifle. I tried for over 30 minutes and still no image. I guess that my ESP is not working, I have no idea what model your rifle is, or even if it is a pump, semi-auto bolt or other type of action, all I have is a headache. Maybe, if my head has stopped hurting, I will try to get an image again closer to Halloween, they say that ESP works better that time of year. Marc


# 2281 - Another Psychic Question
9/11/99
Karl Vernon, CT U.S.A.

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. Unknown Unknown 3'' Nickel 021259

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co Worcester, Mass. U.S.A. PATD OCT 4'87 is stamped on the top of the barrel. Black plastic grips show a target with 5 bullet holes at the top of the grip. Break top revolver has a round barrel and a fluted five shot cylinder. I would like to know the model and caliber of this weapons well as an approximate date of manufacture.

Answer:
Sorry Karl, I got a headache when I used up all my ESP with the last question, you may want to contact the psychic hotline, you can get their telephone number by watching cable TV late at night. Wait! Something is coming to me! I am finally receiving a psychic impression! The value of your firearm is in the $50.00 - 75.00 range. It really doesnt matter much what the caliber or the model is on these old H&R pistols. Not much collector interest in them. They are best saved for when your city has a gun buy back program, and you can make some money off the anti-gun people. Marc


# 2233 - Assault Riffle Information
9/11/99
Kim

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

To whom it may concern: i am looking for information on an assult riffle. Here is the characteristics of this gun. i am doing a college paper and need some more information. I hope you can help I am look for information on a Russian or Soviet Bloc manufactured 7.62 x 54 mm, steel-jacketed, graphite-tipped, indicative by red-ring on bullet and primer. Can you help. i am also looking for information on an American .308 soft-tip or hollow point caliber round. Thank you for your time Kim

Answer:
Kim- I trust that your email reflects clumsy typing like mine, and does not reflect a need for some remedial English classes. [e.g- assault rifle spelling; "I am look for..."] "Assault rifle" denotes a fully automatic rifle, not a semi-automatic, as you might believe from inaccurate reports in the ignorant news media, or distorted definitions of some law makers. There is no weapon in 7.62x54mmR that is classified as an assault rifle as far as I know, and I have studied most modern military small arms as part of my 26 year career in the Navy. The use of color coding on bullet tips and bases varies with the nation manufacturing the ammunition. I am not aware of "graphite tipped steel jacketed ammunition" although such a thing may exist. However, the Geneva convention prohibits military use of expanding ("dum-dum") bullets, and any tip material other than the normal cupro-nickel or alloy clad steel jacket material may place it in that category. American ammunition in .308 caliber (.308 Winchester) is called 7.62x51mm in military terms. As discussed above, hollow point or soft point ammunition is prohibited from military use in assault rifles. Information on the civilian .308 soft point loads is available in numerous books like Gun Digest. Hope this helps. Thanks for contacting Antique and Collectable Firearms and Militaria Headquarters. John Spangler


# 2178 - Madsen Rifle
9/11/99
Danny

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Mauser Unknown .30-06 23-3/8" +/- Blued Unknown

FUERZAS ARMADAS DE COLOMBIA on top of receiver. MADSEN M.G/A. XXXX-XX Cal .30 on left side of receiver.

Other Notes:

1. Front 1" of barrel has series of small holes on each side and its bore is larger than main barrel. Is this a flash hider?

2. Bolt has turned-down handle but appears to have been modified (maybe from a straight handle?).

3. Bolt has two locking lugs behind the handle and a small knurled knob at rear.

4. Rear sight is a peep sight with elevation graduations and a large windage adjustment knob.

5. Stock appears to be original and in very good condition except for some inletting for a scope mount and the turned-down bolt handle. Exactly what kind of rifle is this and where can I find parts for it? I believe that there should be a spring steel leaf beneath the rear sight. If so, it is missing.

Answer:
Danny- The Madesen rifle was made in Denmark in about 1958 and marks the high point of bolt action military rifle design. Loaded with great ideas to make it cheap and simple to manufacture and a very efficient gun, it arrived on the scene just as the military demand for bolt action rifles ceased to exist. As far as I know only the Colombian Navy ordered any. Within a few years they had started to get surplus semi-autos and the Madsens were sold as surplus, apparently never having been issued. I have one from my collection that I will be selling. Parts may be available from Gun Parts Corp (on our links page) but they may be hard to find. If yours had a scope added that probably destroyed any collector interest, but it should still be a good hunting rifle. (After preparing this answer, the Sept. 1 Shotgun News arrived with a well done article on page 16 about the Madsen by Paul Scarlata reporting on an example of this rifle obtained from my old VA/NC friend Bob House. Great article- much better than I can do on the subject for you. John Spangler


# 2225 - S&W Model 1913
9/7/99
Tom

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
S&W 35 S.&W. AUTO. CTG 35 Unknown Unknown 6696

What can you tell me about this gun? How much might it be worth? Thanks

Answer:
Tom, I believe that you are referring to the S&W Model 1913. The S&W Model 1913 was first offered in early 1913, S&W advertised it as the .35 Automatic. The Model 1913 was available in blue or nickel and sold for $16.50. At first Model 1913 sales were strong, but in April of 1915, S&W had sufficient inventory on hand and so production was suspended. Model 1913 production commenced again in June of 1916 and continued until January 1918, when it was halted due to World War I. After the war manufacture of the Model 1913 was resumed, but sales were slow, and the model was discontinued in July of 1922 after a total of 8,350 pistols had been manufactured. Blue book values for the Model 1913 range form $350 to over $600 depending upon condition, but collector demand for these pistols is not high, I think that a more realistic value is in the $250 range. Marc


# 2156 - Artillery Ammunition
9/7/99
Mike Taunton, Ma

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown 37mm Unknown Unknown Unknown

Headstamped: 37-85 PDPs 2.48 .1.17 (flaming bomb) I have what I think is a French 1916 37mm round. It is 6.5" long overall with the brass case 3.7" and slightly bottlenecked about 1/2 inch from the mouth. The projectile is iron with two brass drive bands and a screw in fuse. What weapon fired this? Where can I find a photo? What is a good reference for identification of arty rounds?

Answer:
Mike- Ian Hogg, a prolific writer, has several good books on artillery and ammunition that are helpful starting points. There is no single good overall reference. Even a listing of contemporary U.S. artillery ammo would fill a massive volume and earlier variations would add several more volumes. Most of what I have learned is from my experience in the navy for the basic concepts, then bits and pieces from many different sources to adapt it to foreign ordnance. Sometimes small arms information helps with the big stuff, as the same bureaucrats were in charge of nomenclature and headstamps, and some of the same manufacturers made both big and little cartridges. For French ordnance, James E. Hicks has an excellent book (French Military Weapons that covers everything from swords to hand grenades and handguns to howitzers but not every model and variation. We may still have a copy of this available on our page with books for gun collectors. In many cases the same case or cartridge could be used by multiple types of guns, in service over many years. While the International Ammunition Association is primarily focused on small arms ammo, there are a significant number of really big bore collectors in the crowd, so their Journal has some interesting tidbits. Let me know if you would like membership information. John Spangler


# 2135 - Colt Single Action
9/7/99
Steven, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Colt SAA 1874 .45 4.5 Nickel 32674

Pat# Sept 19, 1871Pat# July 2, 1872 I found this revolver wrapped in gauze in my recently deceased grandfathers collection of things he had in a trunk. It looks to be in excellent condition, no rust at all, all serial numbers match and it has what appear to be carved staghorn grips, also in excellent condition. I'm wondering what its worth and what I can do to keep it in its current unmarred condition. Thanks.

Answer:
Steven- Sounds like a great gun. Glad to see you interested in preserving it. It was made in 1876 (Same year the Indians beat Custer. You can get a letter from the Colt factory specifying where your gun was shipped, the caliber, barrel length and finish (if other than standard.) A factory letter is nice, but the cost is getting higher all the time and it may not be worth it to you. I suspect that the stag grips are definitely a later replacement. Nickel finish and stag grips were really "cool" in the 1920s-50s era of cowboy movies, so everyone wanted their guns to look that way too. The value difference between original factory nickel and later refinish jobs is HUGE!. Assuming it is refinished, I would guess it might bring $1000-1500 depending on condition, but I do not consider myself an expert on the unfathomable trends of single action prices which also fluctuate wildly by geographic region. You might be able to get a lot more from a Colt collector who finds something neat about your gun. As far as taking care of it, protect it from moisture and storage in damp areas. Do not fire it with modern ammunition, as the early ones had weaker metal than the new ones. Do not use WD-40 and other aggressive lubricants on it as they can get under the nickel and contribute to flaking and peeling. I would use plain old gun oil, or even a good paste wax (just wax, no cleaners or improved anything.) Enjoy. John Spangler


# 2217 - Winchester Model 1902
9/4/99
Carl

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Winchester 1902 22 18" Blue none

Dear Sir, I am looking for a little info on a hand me down family "heirloom", a Winchester model 02A single shot, boys model 22 cal. the patent date looks like 1898, looking for approx. mfg. date , qty's, value range...... thanks for your consideration. Carl

Answer:
Carl, the Winchester Model 1902 was an improvement of a John M Browning design, the model 1900, which was Winchesters first low priced rimfire 22. The model 1900 was not very successful because it was too light and cheaply constructed to compete well with other single shot 22's of the day. Winchester modified the Model 1900 by adding a blued steel buttplate and a special shaped trigger guard that extended to the rear and could be used like a pistol grip, shortening the trigger pull, replacing the open rear sight with a peep sight, and making the barrel heavier. Because of the improvements and the low price, the Model 1902 sold well. Winchester manufactured approximately 640,299 Model 1902 rifles from 1902 to 1931, when Model 1902 production was discontinued. Winchester Model 1902 Values range from $100 to about $175 depending upon condition. Marc


# 2131 - Spanish Mauser
9/4/99
Ken, Las Vegas, Nevada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown .30-06 23" Blue 2S-298?

"2S-298" on the left side of the receiver and the bolt handle."298" and "98" on the magazine base plate. A + or X at the base of the bolt handle. On the forward top surface of the reciever:"FABRICA DE ARMAS" over a crest of an eagle with a crown and shield over"LA CARUNA 1958"Is a bolt action rifle. A rod extends from the stock for the last couple of inches below the barrel. Rod seems to unscrew, although I have not removed it. Condition is good, but not pretty. What is the history of this piece? Is the rod a cleaning rod and can it be removed and replaced without affecting the function of the rifle? What's this rifle worth, roughly ?

Answer:
Ken- La Caruna is a Spanish Arsenal, and they were in the Mauser bolt action rifle business until the late 1950s when they finally got into semi-autos like the CETME. Not much exciting Spanish military history since 1958, so your rifle probably just sat around some military base used by recruits or guard duty and parades. Later it got sold off as surplus, and perhaps used in some remote African despotcy until sold again as surplus. Eventually it found a good home with you and will live happily ever after, or until the government confiscates it and viciously shreds it to pieces to protect the children.

The rod under the barrel is a cleaning rod and should unscrew and then pull out. In theory several soldier would pool their rods to get one long enough to clean the entire barrel. You can fire the rifle with the rod removed (assuming that it is otherwise safe to shoot.). Value for a "good but not pretty" rifle is probably in the $125-225 range. John Spangler


# 2130 - M1903 Springfield "Low Number" Problems
9/4/99
Joel, Ca, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Springfield 1903 30.06 24" Parkerized 71 6,209

Barrel Marked SA, and dated 10-17 with normal bomb but not punched. Receiver ledge also not punched. bolt handle punched and stamped with an R. Finger groove stock proofed, but not cartouched. I read there may be a problem with rifles made before serial number 800,000 before 1918. More specifically with the case hardening. I read that double heat treating was done to receivers somewhere about 750,000 and 800,000 some time around Dec 1917 and Feb 1918. Is there any safety concerns with firing this rifle?

Answer:
Joel- Have your library get a copy of "Hatcher's Notebook" by Julian S. Hatcher. He has a whole chapter on this subject. Bottom line is that Springfields under serial number 800,000 and Rock Islands under 285507 had the receivers heat treated by a less than perfect process. This left them brittle and many have failed over the years, with Hatcher showing examples of lots of these. If your britches are still clean and dry after looking at his examples of what can go wrong, you can think about shooting yours. I would not recommend that anyone shoot these, although I have shot a lot of rounds through the low numbers myself. The Marine Corps never pulled them out of service, although the Army did in the pre-WW2 period. These are the numbers the Army ended up using, although they know that some lower than that actually got the improved treatment. Since no one knows which ones, you gotta feel real lucky. Of course, you can hold the receiver in a big vise, smack it real hard with a big hammer. If the receiver shatters, it was no good. If it only gets all bent up, then it was (repeat WAS) a good one. If you need a shooter go get a nice Ruger 77, and let some collector get his (or her) jollies fondling the old Springfield. John Spangler


# 2285 - Another FIE Question
9/1/99
Joel, Moke Hill, CA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
FIE Miami, Fla. Model E-15 22 LR 4 inches blue TA 94185

Made in Italy I have recently acquired this firearm and would like to know it's value, age, and if it is worth restoring? Thank you, Joel

Answer:
Joel, your revolver is one of the many cheap revolvers imported by FIE over the last several years. I would advise you to not waste your time or money trying to fix it. There is one that is in working condition listed for sale in our "Bargain Basement" catalog for $85.00. Marc


# 2284 - Another Junker
9/1/99
Joel, Moke Hill, CA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H.Schmidt Ostheim/Nhoen HS model 21s 22 LR 5 inches blue 541828

Made in West Germany Florida Firearms Corp. Miami I recently acquired is firearm and would like to know it's value, age, and if it's worth restoring?

Answer:
Joel, you must have an affinity for this type of firearm, I am glad that someone does, maybe there is still hope that the two listed in our "Bargain Basement" catalog will sell. This is another junky gun that it would be best not to waste your time or money on. Maybe you could purchase the two that we have for sale, put them together with your two and make a mobile or wind-chime out of them. Marc


# 2128 - M1 Garand Sight Problem
9/1/99
Don, Fairfax, VA, USA

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
M1 Garand Unknown 30-06 Unknown Unknown 3,1XX,XXX

I noticed a fair amount of looseness in the front sight of my M1. The sight can rotate on the barrel some, which moves the top of the sight blade about 1/32". Is this normal. Can it be corrected? Thanks.

Answer:
Don- M1 Garand front sights can be loose for two different reasons. Most common is lateral movement because the screw has loosened that clamps the sight to the top of the gas cylinder. A tweak with an allen wrench should fix that. The other looseness such as you describe is where the whole gas cylinder wiggles on the barrel. This is caused by a sloppy fit between the three ribs on the inside part of the gas cylinder that fit into the three splines or grooves in the barrel. Sloppy is good when you want to make sure that any one of the 6 million gas cylinders will fit on any one of the 6 million rifle barrels so GIs can switch parts in the field. However, this is not conducive to the best accuracy. When shooters "match condition" the M1, they usually peen the edges of the splines or grooves in the barrel a little bit to make them fit tighter. If you only pound the part that is hidden when the gas cylinder is in place no one will know why your scores suddenly got so much better. John Spangler


# 2127 - WW2 Hungarian Infantry Arms
9/1/99
Emanuele, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown

Which weapons were used by the Hungarian infantry in WW2?I.e., rifles, machineguns, light mortars and eventually anti-tank rifles.

Answer:
Emanuele- Sorry, we do not have any idea. Smith's Mall arms of the World (at least one of the very early editions) may have some info. You might also ask over on TMCX.com. They have a lot of people with expertise in European military matters and a question on their Q&A page might produce an answer. John Spangler


# 2124 - Golber? Or Golcher Muzzle Loading Rifle
9/1/99
ken, Sun City West, AZ,

Maker Model Caliber Barrel Length Finish Serial Number
H. Goleber Unknown Maybe 50. Cal 44 In. Unknown Unknown

I just inherited this muzzle loader rifle. It belonged to my ggguncle in Missouri. He was in the civil war so I assume it has to be from that time. Can you tell me anything about this rifle?

Answer:
Large caliber muzzle loading rifles were common from about the time of the Revolutionary War until shortly after the Civil War when breechloaders like the Sharps pretty well too over the market. During the post-Revolutionary period the rifles began to become smaller in caliber as their use shifted from fighting Indians for control of the wilderness to more of a meat on the table use. The evolution continued until the end of the percussion era when the calibers were very small (.36 or .41) and the rifles were often known as "squirrel rifles." In the wooded east the barrel lengths remained long (40-44 inches) probably due to stubborn tradition as much as any other reason.

However, in the 1830-1860 period as trappers and hunters moved across the great plains slaughtering buffalo and chasing the Indians further into inhospitable lands, a different style rifle gained popularity. The "plains rifle" had to be large enough to take care of the big dangerous critters, but short enough to be hauled around on horseback. Since Sam and Jake Hawken in St. Louis made a lot of these, they are often called Hawken rifles.

It is quite common for muzzle loaders to be marked on either the barrel, or the lock, or both, or neither. The markings may reflect the maker of the entire gun (sometimes) of the maker of only the lock (very often) or the maker of only the barrel (Remington commonly seen), or perhaps the owner.

Knowing all this, we can check Frank Sellers' American Gunsmiths book. He lists "H. Golber as an unlocated maker of a percussion over/under rifle, who may be the maker we are looking for, despite the slight difference in spelling. However, we find a whole host of folks named Golcher, mainly in the Philadelphia, PA area although a few migrated to Illinois, and one to California. It is important to note that Joseph Golcher was a prolific lockmaker. My hunch is that he is the culprit associated with your rifle. Based on the barrel length I would guess that this was probably made in the eastern states and probably in the pre-Civil War period, so it may well be his kinfolk George, or one of three Jameses , two Thomases, one Manuel or a Willliam who fled to California who are responsible. It is sometimes hard to make out old markings easily obscured by rust or abuse. Your rifle could have seen use in the Civil War, but more likely was merely "owned by someone who fought in the Civil War" and the details got lost over the years. Hope this helps. John Spangler


Return to Collectors Headquarters.