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Collectible Antique Longarms
(pre-1899)

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If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items liste by the BATFE as Curiios & Relics directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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Collectible Antique Longarms for sale (pre-1899)

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We have divided this catalog into several sections:
(new items are added at the top of each section)

U.S. Military Antique Longarms
Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)
Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)
Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

U.S. Military Antique Longarms

**NEW ADDITION** 20798 RARE U.S. MODEL 1882 CHAFFEE REECE BOLT ACTION MAGAZINE RIFLE (RESTORATION PROJECT) - (Serial number- none) One of only 753 made at Springfield in 1884 for one of the interminable trials seeking a suitable repeating rifle. This rifle was tested against the Remington Lee, and the Winchester Hotchkiss bolt action repeaters, and perhaps a few others. In any case, the field results were mixed, and provided sufficient excuses to adopt none of them and to remain with the trusty, economical, and thrifty on ammunition “trapdoor” design pending a major breakthrough in rifle or ammunition design. The 1884 field trials resulted in generally negative reviews for the Chaffee-Reece. 95 reports were received from the field, with only 14 ranking the Chaffee-Reece as superior to the current Trapdoor system or the other 2 magazine rifles then being tested. The rifles saw service with elements of US 8th, 9th, 14th, 15th , 19th, 23rd & 25th Infantry, as well as the 1st US Artillery. Although some of the reports lauded the magazine system of the rifle and some commended its accuracy, most reports were not positive. The primary complaint was that the butt magazine system weakened the stock significantly and made it susceptible to breakage. Other complaints revolved around the difficulty to keep the gun clean (making the bolt difficult to open and close), the heavy trigger pull (making accurate shooting difficult), the difficulty in performing the manual of arms with the rifle, and the poor performance with reloaded ammunition in the guns. By the end of the first quarter of 1886, the Chaffee-Reece rifles were replaced by M1884 Trapdoor rifles. Ultimately the Krag was adopted to bring the Army into the bolt action magazine rifle era, but the Chaffee-Reece were the FIRST bolt action repeating rifles to be completely made at Springfield. A very important milestone in U.S. military rifle evolution, and a scarce rifle missing from all but advanced collections. (Some of the Winchester Hotchkiss rifles were assembled at Springfield, using a mix of Winchester and Springfield parts.) The Chaffee-Reece did not use a coiled spring to advance cartridges, pushing the nose of the bullets against the primers of the next cartridge, thought to be a safety issue at the time. Instead, the buttstock magazine used two two sawtooth rails in the magazine track, with operation of the bolt advancing the cartridges one step each time the bolt is operated. A selector switch on the right side of the receiver ring engaged or disengaged the ratchet rails, acting as a magazine cutoff. These rails were the weak point of the design, and became broken and are missing in most of the these rifles today, including this one. I have only seen a handful of these for sale over the years. Excellent bore. This is a handsome example with about 98% blue finish remaining on the barrel with one scrape near the band. Blue has mostly worn off the trigger guard. The color case hardened finish on the receiver has faded, and that on the buttplate worn and now there is some rust on the heel. Walnut stock with old oil finish has never been sanded, and has sharp SWP/1884 cartouche near the buttplate (instead of near the action area where the stock was fragile). Good circle P. Barrel has sharp V/P/eagle head. Rear sight is the correct C-R marked with slotless screws. Top of the receiver rail is marked “U.S.- SPRINGFIELD.- 1884.” The walnut stock has assorted mostly very minor dings and bruises of a 140 year old martial arm, and a small chipped area by the selector lever on the right side of the receiver ring. Bubba chopped off the forend ahead of the lower band, and neatly filled the bandspring notch and cleaning rod hole. The forend on these is a bit different than a trapdoor, so you will need to make one from scratch. The upper band, ramrod stop and forend tip are standard trapdoor parts, and the cleaning rod is the same except just a bit shorter. The rarity of this model, and the high condition make this a restoration project that deserves to be finished up, even with the magazine track problem common to most of them. Waiting for an equally nice example with the magazine guts may mean a very long wait indeed. Antique, no FFL needed. $2495.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20131 U.S. MODEL 1863 .58 CALIBER “LINDSAY DOUBLE MUSKET” RESTORATION PROJECT - (Serial number- none) The Lindsay “double musket” is one of the most unusual U.S. military firearms ever made. It resembles a typical civil war .58 caliber rifle musket, but has TWO hammers at the breech with a central lock instead of a single hammer and side mounted lock. To load, you insert powder followed by a Minie ball and ram it home- then load another round on top of the first! Then with hammers at half cock, cap both the nipples. When both hammers are cocked, pulling the single trigger will cause the right hammer to fall striking the right nipple. The flash hole extends through the breech section and enters the barrel about 2 inches from the breech, so the flash from the right nipple will ignite the charge closest to the muzzle. The left hammer is supposed to stay cocked and when the trigger is pulled a second time, the left hammer falls, firing the rear charge. Theoretically, the rear charge could be kept in reserve, or the soldier could just achieve a greater volume of fire by loading both charges and firing both before reloading. The concept of superimposed charges was not new, and both Lindsay and Walch had been making sumperimposed charge handguns for a while before the Double Musket was adopted by the Army, to be made at Springfield Armory. The concept was technically sound, but the mechanics were problematic and if loading was not done carefully there was a danger of flash from the front charge leaking past the rear bullet and igniting the rear charge at the same time. Only 1,000 of these were made at Springfield, and some were issued for trials in the field and saw use at Cold Harbor with negative reports, so they were withdrawn and replaced by conventional muskets. One of the problem was that when both charges fired, it often cracked or broke the stocks at the wrist. Many were cut down by Bannerman to “cadet length” to make them salable to youth cadet groups, so full length original examples are scarce, and pricey. Hicks’ “U.S. Military Firearms” has excellent drawings showing the details of these scarce guns, and there is some good info and drawings on line, although some of the text was scanned from an image and not corrected, but close enough you can figure it out: https://www.bevfitchett.us/firearms-curiosa/fume-sjwfftiitg-gut-xms.html This rifle is a restoration project, with the potential to be a good representative example at a modest price. The stock is near excellent with good cartouched, and very few dings, but it has been cut ahead of the middle band, and the cracked wrist has been neatly repaired. The barrel was cut down at one point and restored to full length by welding a front section at the middle band location, and only detected if you look down the bore and see that the rifling does not line up at that point. The lock is missing the upper part of the right hammer, and has mechanical issues including broken sear(?) spring. A couple of screws are incorrect replacements. Steel parts cleaned to bright, except for the two barrel bands. The missing piece of the forend, stock tip and upper band, and ramrod are the same as the standard M1863 rifle musket. A complete M1863 Double Musket will run about $2,500-4,500. This one is a bargain at only $725.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 19207 U.S. MODEL 1861 .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET MADE BY NORWICH - (No serial number) Norwich Arms Company in Norwich, Connecticut, delivered 25,000 standard Model 1861 rifle muskets in 1863-64, and most were shipped off to equip units of the Union army as soon as they were received. This is a nice honest, all complete and original example, representative of the hundreds of thousands of Model 1861 Springfields (by numerous makers) which were the favored arm of U.S. troops. This one has a G-VG bore with strong rifling and only scattered roughness or pitting. Nipple is clear. While I would consider it to be shootable, we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing. Good mechanics. Metal parts mostly a dull steel gray mixed with staining and patina with scattered areas of light pitting. As usual, the area around the nipple has pitting from the mercury in early percussion caps, possibly while firing at rebels on the battlefield, or maybe not. Buttplate also has some pitting Walnut stock is solid, and unsanded, with a mellow old dark linseed oil type finish, and a faint inspector cartouche. Assorted dings and bruises of an issued martial arm, and one large ding on left side of forend between upper and middle bands. Two scuffs of white pain on eight side of butt by buttplate. If you like the 150 year old look, you don’t need to do anything but if you prefer the “original arsenal bright” look, you can spend some time cleaning to brighten it up a bit. A good, honest, unmolested Civil War .58 caliber rifle musket that undoubtedly fought to save the Union. $975.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 17989 U.S. MODEL 1795 (TYPE III) .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE AT SPRINGFIELD IN 1814- ORIGINAL FLINT! - (No serial number). The first U.S. military muskets made at Springfield Armory were copies of the French Model 1763 Charleville used during the American Revolution. Known as the Model 1795, collectors have divided these into three types, based on changes in markings or other minor construction details. The first “new model” to replace these was the Model 1816, adopted after the end of the War of 1812. Lock markings on this musket include 1814 on the tail, and script US ahead of the hammer over an illegible eagle over SPRINGFIELD in a horizontal arc. Barrel marks include P, a sunken eaglehead and script US. This is a good representative example of the classic Model 1795, not in high condition, but an honest example with the iron parts having a dark brown rust patina. The wood is untouched, showing its age with assorted dings and bruises accumulated in the last 200+ years, and just the original period oil finish. It is still in original flintlock, with only a couple of broken or missing parts replaced: the mainspring, frizzen spring, topjaw and their associated screws. Original ramrod is present, although slightly bent at the end. Bore in the 44.25” barrel is about the same as the outside. Again, this is ORIGINAL FLINT, not a percussion conversion, or a reconversion to flint. It is a good representative example of the first type of U.S. martial arms made at Springfield Armory, the starting point for most collectors. With the 1814 date, it almost certainly saw use during the War of 1812 when the British came very close to reconquering their former colonies. ANTIQUE, no FFL required. $1395.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** 16716 U.S. MILITARY FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET- CHEAP! - Made by Nippes & Company of Philadelphia circa 1808-1820. This is a decent looking 200+ year old flintlock musket, but close inspection will reveal some flaws that make it quite affordable. It is likely that the lock, stock and barrel did not all start off together, and that the lock is possibly from another musket, switched during its period of use, or maybe later. The stock was very badly broken through the lock area, but has been neatly repaired and blends in nicely. The lock is misaligned with the flash hole about 1/8” forward if where it should be, now covered by the forward edge of the pan. Missing the mainspring and its screw (accounting for the empty hole in the lockplate under the pan) and the ramrod. Hammer assembly and frizzen spring and screw are reproductions, but frizzen is original. Sling swivels and studs were removed during period of use. This has a mellow “old” look, with mostly smooth brown patina on the metal. The stock has a mellow dark patina consistent with the age. Several members of the Nippes family of Philadelphia were gun makers from about 1790 to 1858, with contracts to make martial arms. One of the federal 1808 musket contracts went to Winner, Nippes and Steinman of Philadelpha, for 9,000 muskets, with only about 4,126 actually delivered. During the War of 1812, with strong demand for muskets, it was common for contractors to sell to states or individual buyers for higher prices than the federal contracts would pay, especially if federal inspectors were being picky. This musket was probably made during that period. The lock is marked NIPPES/ & CO./ PHILA on the tail of the lock, and an eagle over an oval with US ahead of the hammer. The barrel is 42 inches long, instead of the 44 inches required by federal contracts, and has traces of V and P and a deeply struck rectangle with three balls in a row, probably over an eagle head, or the dreaded “C for condemnation.” Thousands of muskets like this were purchased for militia use, or by individuals (technically required to provide their own muskets for militia duty) during the War of 1812 and later. Being of marginal quality when new, they aged badly, and often ended up as farmers’ guns where they were sometimes cut down or otherwise altered before finally being disposed of as scrap. So, while it is not a great gun, it is an “old” looking example that is really 200+ years old and would be a great wall hanger, as a representative example of the type of flintlock muskets used from colonial times through the 1840s. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $695.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** 10103 U.S. MODEL 1877 TRAPDOOR .45-70 CARBINE- SOUTH CAROLINA MILITIA MARKED- CHEAP! - Serial number 75455(?) but last two digits are hard to make out. Pretty good ESA 1877 cartouche and legible circle P. Following Custer’s defeat by the Indians at Little Big Horn, partially blamed on extraction problems with copper cases and the lack of a rod for clearing stuck cases, the M1873 trapdoor carbine design was hastily changed. The comb of the stock was lengthened (or wrist shortened- take your pick) and a trap added in the buttplate for access to three holes for cleaning rod pieces and a headless shell extractor. This gun has the new style stock, but retains the high arch breechblock, barrel band with a stacking swivel, 1873 dated lockplate and 1873 carbine sight. Only about 4,500 of the Model 1877 carbines were made before they transitioned to the Model 1879 with the slightly wider receivers. The buttplate is stamped “S.C” indicating ownership by the state of South Carolina for its militia. Rearming the South Carolina militia after the Civil War is a lengthy and interesting story. (And, part of my M.A. in history degree thesis.) In 1869, the incredibly corrupt carpetbagger Governor convinced the War Department to issue 10,000 .58 caliber muskets which S.C. then had converted to Rolling Block or Roberts conversion breechloaders, keeping generous kickbacks in the process. In 1885, they resumed issue of arms under the Militia Act of 1808, and a total of 1,165 trapdoor carbines were received by 1903 when Krags were first issued to the state. This came out of the Charleston area, and suffered long abuse, and probably flooding during one or more hurricanes. It has been restored and looks okay as a representative example of a trapdoor carbine. Closer inspection will note that the bore is wretched, with a shadow indicating a slight ring or bulge just ahead of the rear sight which is just barely detectable with the fingers. The stock was badly broken through the lock area but after several surgeries and a lot of epoxy is back together again and blends nicely. The saddle ring is missing, and the upper part of the slide on the rear sight leaf is long gone, but everything is rusted nicely and you don’t really notice anything missing. Buttplate has the early “figure 8” opening, not the later oval hole. So, yes, it is pretty rough, but also pretty cheap, A good example of a classic U.S. military firearm, similar to Custer’s guns, with the bonus of identifiable usage by the South Carolina militia. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed $625.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 17187 U.S. Model 1879 .45-70 “Trapdoor” rifle- NICE! - Serial number 200422 made in 1882. The typical U.S. Infantry arm during the Indian War era, with the wider receiver and breech block than the Model 1873 and the improved 1879 “Buckhorn” rear sight. A really nice example with lots of bright case hardening colors on the breech block, and about 95% original blue finish, except the buttplate which has much less, typical for an issued arm. The unsanded stock has sharp SWP/1882 cartouche and circle P. One tiny chip at the front of the lock inletting, and a number of assorted dings, bruises and scrapes of a 125 year old military rifle. Wood has just the original oiled finish, and a bit more oil finish would blend in the few recent scratches which showup lighter. Nice bore, excellent mechanics. Buttplate has unitmark L over 109, so we know it was issued to soldier 109 of Company L, but not a clue as to what Regiment or even state. It was likely used in the Spanish American War, but there is no documented history for this serial number. While the stock dings may be a markdown factor if this were one of the later Model 1884 rifles which sat in crates instead of going to war, the condition of the metal and even of the stock overall makes it far above average for the Model 1879. It really is MUCH harder to find the Model 1879 rifles in nice condition as most of these were issued and used, while thousands of the later Model 1884 were never issued and minty examples are pretty common. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $1,195.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20478 U.S. MODEL 1884 .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLE- NICE! - Serial number 352327 made in 1887. A great representative example of the trapdoor rifle if you only plan on getting one. (Later you will realize the narrow-mindedness of such a decision and accept that you really need several more variations….but this is a good starting point.) This has the improved Buffington rear sight for long range use, and all the mechanical improvements found in trapdoors. It was the last version made before they went off on the rod-bayonet kick which eliminated the need to carry a separate bayonet (which was little used) and instead added a point and a latch so the cleaning rod served as a bayonet, which was also little used. This rifle was made in 1887 and has a faint SWP/1887 cartouche and legible circle P. The walnut stock has an old oil finish and only a few insignificant scratches or dings. The metal parts retain about 95% of the original arsenal rust blue finish with a bit more wear on the buttplate and some light pitting on the heel of the buttplate. Former vandal/owner marked his initials “L.R.S.” on the buttplate, however this is right next to the lightly pitted area and you would be forgiven if you lightly filed and polished those areas and touched them up. The breech block retains nearly all of its vivid color case hardening, and also the tang. Bore is sharp and excellent, bright on the top of the lands but a little rough in the grooves which is probably dried grease or crud and might clean out. Mechanically excellent. There are a bunch of scrapes, nicks and dings near the muzzle upon close inspection (see photos) we point out so you won't be surprised. There is no documented history for this rifle, but nearby numbers (+/- 1,000 or about the number of men in a regiment) have been documented as serving during the Spanish American War with volunteer units from CO, DC, DE, IA, OR, PA, TN and TX. This illustrates why it is impossible and silly to try to claim that a gun with a number nearby must have been used by the same unit. Still, it is likely that this gun did get issued for Spanish American War use. A very handsome example, either of the Model 1884 if you need one of those, or of the entire family if that is your goal. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1,095.00 (View Picture)

21634 RARE! U.S. MODEL 1884 EXPERIMENTAL ROUND ROD BAYONET .45-70 TRAPDOOR UPDATED TO M1888 CONFIGURATION- NICE - Serial number 320076. In 1884 Springfield made 1,000 .45-70 trapdoors with experimental round rod bayonets. Trials in 1881 with a triangular rod bayonet were a failure and this was a new attempt to come up with an alternative to the triangular socket bayonet and reduce the soldier’s load by the weight of the bayonet and scabbard. The latch is flat on the bottom, often called the "flat latch” model to distinguish it from the later 1888 which had a finger wrapped around at the ends of the latch to better grip the bayonet in the stowed or fixed position. The 1884 Flat Latch system was also a failure and after troop trials most were withdrawn from service, and rifles continued to be made with socket bayonets until the 1888 was adopted. Circa 1889-1891 many of the M1884 trials rifles were rebuilt to M1888 configuration, and as a result unmodified M1884 trials rifles are extremely scarce, and probably less than 50 survive. If one turns up the price starts about $5,000 or higher. This one is in the middle of the M1884 serial number range. It retains the two piece trigger guard, not the single piece used on the M1888. It has two distinct circle P firing proofs below the trigger guard tang. The left stock flat has a SWP/1891 cartouche located directly below the rear lock screw, and I have seen another one of the M1884/1888 updated rifles with an 1889 cartouche in the same location, and the double circle Ps. Normally, trapdoor cartouches are located towards the butt from the rear lock screw, not underneath it. The stock were arsenal modified to trim off the weak edges of the rod channel, and to fit the slightly longer cap on the bayonet base. It is likely that the stock was lightly scraped and refinished at the time of conversion, removing the 1884 cartouche, but leaving the first circle P. Metal parts retain about 80-90% thinning blue from time of conversion. About 95% color case hardening on the breechblock. Stock has original oil finish, and just a few assorted ding of an issued martial arm. Small chip along the left side the breech tang. Brass tack with number 9 just behind the trigger guard tang, but source or meaning unknown. Bore is excellent- sharp and bright. Since unmodified M1884 experimental bayonet rifles are out of reach for most collectors, this M1884/1889 updated will have to suffice, but is a lot more affordable. ANTIQUE, NO FFL needed. $2150.00 (View Picture)

17037 RARE BUT JUNKY AND CHEAP- U.S. MODEL 1884 EXPERIMENTAL ROUND ROD BAYONET RIFLE- RESTORATION PROJECT - Serial number 341516. Springfield made only 1,000 of these in 1884, and nearly all were later updated to Model 1888 configuration, making survivors almost impossible to find and priced in the $5,000 up range if you can find one. This could be restored into a representative example, or a bold sinner unfraid of Divine retribution might just cut it down into a cheap imitation carbine. What you see is what you get. Barreled action with rare M1884 experimental round rod bayonet base. A latch assembly is included, but not installed, as seen in the photos. The special front sight hood is included, but missing the sight blade. The stock is a standard rifle stock modified for this model. Bore is good, not great. Buttplate, bands and trigger guard included, but lock assembly is NOT included. Did we mention it was CHEAP? ANTIQUE, NO FFL needed. $350.00 (View Picture)

5976 U.S. MODEL 1884 .45-70 “TRAPDOOR” SPRINGFIELD RIFLE- PERFECT BORE! - Serial number 444232 made in 1889. Bore is perfect- mirror bright and sharp, as nice as you will find. Excellent mechanics. Exterior is pretty nice with 95% plus blue everywhere except the buttplate. Butt must have rested on damp carpet or in a basement corner and the top of the tang has some rust, but the butt portion had some heavy rust which has been cleaned to bare metal with some pitting. This could be worked on and the blue touched up to make it better. Some of the blue, mainly on the lockplate and scattered parts of the barrel have picked up some light rust/patina freckles which may or may not clean off. Color case hardened breech block and tang retain about 50% color with the balance toning brown, The stock appears to have been arsenal sanded at some point, probably when placed into war reserve stocks after the Spanish American War, as there is only the faintest hint of a cartouche and no traces of the circle P. Stock is nice mellow medium brown with old arsenal oil finish. This has the M1884 features- Buffington rear sight, 1884 marked breechblock although it has a smooth instead of serrated trigger. The top of the barrel has a dozen or so dings/dents through the finish where Bubba did something inexplicably stupid. These could be covered up with some cold blue to hide them. Still, a well above average trapdoor, with a few minor issues which keep it out of the truly spectacular (and pricey) “mint gun” category. A nice gun, but one you would not be afraid to shoot and maybe add a scratch to its history. (We sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $925.00 (View Picture)

21436 CUSTOM REPLICA FLINTLOCK .62 CALIBER JAEGER RIFLE CIRCA 1740-1770- NICE! - These were the arms favored by German immigrants to the colonies, especially those settling in central Pennsylvania, where they evolved to better meet local conditions and became the legendary Pennsylvania (or later Kentucky) longrifle. During the American Revolution, the British army included many mercenary Hessian regiments from the Germanic states, armed with rifles which were nearly identical, but lacking any embellishments. All featured relatively short barrels, roughly 24-30 inches (compared to the usual 42-44 inch muskets). They were rifled and very accurate to maybe 150-200 yards, while the muskets were wildly inaccurate at anything over 100 yards. These rifles usually had economical sliding wooden patch boxes for the patching material used with round balls. Many, especially private guns, had double set triggers. This superb quality replica has all the classic features of a high quality private purchase Jaeger rifle as made in Pennsylvania circa 1740-1770, or the Germanic states roughly the same period. The heavy .62 caliber octagon barrel is “swamped” meaning it tapers from about 1 1/4” at the breech to a bit under 1” at the waist or narrowest point (about 2/3 of the way to the muzzle) then reverse tapers to about 1 1/8” at the muzzle. It is rifled with 7 grooves, and most likely a 1in 66” twist. The flint lock is by R.E. Davis (their Jaeger style A- with fly in the tumbler) and also their set triggers. Source of the buttplate and trigger guard is uncertain, but they are one of the many types used on Jaeger rifles. All fittings- guard, buttplate, sideplate and ramrod pipes are iron, and all metal parts have a nice even browned finish. Traditional style front and rear sights (Well, the dab of fluorescent orange paint on the top of the front sight blade is not traditional, but easily removed.) The maple stock has a bit of figure to it, finished in a pleasing walnut shade. The stock has a fair amount of very tastefully designed traditional incised carving, very well executed. The sliding wooden patch box is the traditional style, less decorative, but more affordable in the early period than fancy brass. It is opened by squeezing the small button at the rear away from the buttplate and sliding the cover back. The forend tip is horn, probably elk. Overall condition is excellent plus. The only issues being the start of some chipping at the back of the barrel tang (which happens when you inlet exactly there instead of leaving a tiny bit of clearance for barrel set back) and I am not sure if the set triggers are properly adjusted. In any case this is an exceptionally handsome example of where the American longrifle story began, or an example of how the Hessian mercenaries were armed. It would probably make a great shooter (assuming a competent gunsmith approves it as safe- we sell all guns as collector items only). This came from the estate of an avid blackpowder shooter which had some very nice guns. No idea who the maker is, and the only markings are the number “2584” neatly stamped on the top flat at the breech, which may be a date. Priced at about the cost of a good quality Jaeger kit, but this is already fully assembled and beautifully finished. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $975.00 (View Picture)

21430D - U.S. MODEL 1873 .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLE MADE IN 1874- HARTLEY & GRAHAM REBUILD CIRCA 1895 -
Serial number 21048.   A great piece to fill that embarrassing empty spot in your collection looking for an early M1873.  Mostly correct early features except the screws for the rear sight are slotted instead of being slotless.   Correct 1873 dated lockplate; coarse hammer checkering; two click tumbler, high arch block MODEL/1873/eagle & arrows/US; no stacking swivel; solid front sight, and long-wrist stock. 
Remember, however, that in 1879 all .45-70 rifles below serial number 50,000 were recalled and most broken up for rebuilding new rifles with the wider receivers and breechblocks, recognizable by their “star” serial number suffix.  This rifle is one assembled around 1895 by the surplus firm Hartley & Graham using early M1873 parts plus whatever else they had accumulated or in some cases fabricated over the years.  Among their surplus inventory were several thousand barrels rejected by Springfield at some stage of manufacture, some still unrifled, other rifled with or without front sights mounted.    Rejection could have been for any number of reasons, but most likely failure to meet tolerances for sight alignment, barrel thread dimensions or timing, muzzle diameter for bayonets, etc.  In some cases these were rejected after proof testing the barrel in unrifled state, or after rifled and application of the usual P underneath and possibly the VP eagle head (but not yet the final P as a completed gun).  This barrel has the two barrel proof Ps underneath, and the VP eagle head on the left side, plus “C C C” stamped on the right side below where it is visible assembled.  The C is the “mark of condemnation” rejecting the part.  The barrel is rifled with FIVE grooves, as being done by Remington in 1895, not THREE grooves as Springfield used on all trapdoors (less a tiny number of long range rifles with SIX grooves.

Except for the ersatz barrel, this is a nice restoration to M1873 configuration and about as close as most people can get to a correct early Model 1873 as nearly all the rifles under 50,000 were recalled in 1879.  Finish is a mix with lots of blue on the lock, sight and bands, and mostly thin blue-gray traces on the barrel.  Stock is fine with no significant problems, just minor storage and handling dings.  Buttplate has deeply struck rack number 31.  Left side of stock has partial cartouche which looks like an oval with a lazy “S” which is some sort of H&G imitation cartouche, not a regular Springfield marking. 

Al Frasca’s great site has further details on these partway down the page athttp://trapdoorcollector.com/TDNews.html Yeah, it’s a “Frankenfield” but honestly described as a filler for a M1873 and fairly priced at only $749.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD**21430E  - U.S. MODEL 1840 SPRINGFIELD FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET – CONVERTED TO PERCUSSION
The Model 1840 was the last flintlock smoothbore musket model made for the U.S. Army, the direct descendant of the old French Charlevilles. The pattern arms were made in 1835 but production did not start until 1840, so sometimes you will see these referred to as Model 1835 or 1835/1840. Production quickly stopped at Springfield, after the Model 1842 percussion musket model was adopted. Production lingered on for a few more years as two civilian contractors finished up their production by 1848. Springfield Armory only made about 30,241 (circa 1840-43), Nippes made 5,100 (circa 1842-1848), and Pomeroy made another 7,000 (circa 1840-1846).

Starting in 1850 the Army systematically converted good flintlock muskets to percussion, sending the tooling necessary from one arsenal to the next over 2-3 years.  At least 95% of the M1840 muskets were converted and considered to be as good as the new production Model 1842.  M1840 conversions were among the first arms issued at the start of the Civil War, and used hard so surviving examples are far harder to find than the ubiquitous Model 1816s. This one was made at Springfield in 1842.  Barrel date is obscured by the usual pitting around the nipple from mercuric percussion caps. 

Overall condition is G-VG and it is a handsome gun.  Metal parts have a nice even bright finish, with some pitting around the breech end of the barrel, but little or no pitting elsewhere.  Bore is dirty but should clean up to be GV-fine.  The stock is nice looking and the professionally repaired break at the wrist is not obvious except on close inspection.  Missing both sling swivels.  A good representative example of an important Civil War arm at a reasonable price.  This has been in John’s collection for 30 years.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD**21430I - U.S. MODEL 1816 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER MUSKET MADE BY W.L. EVANS AT VALLEY FORGE IN 1826 (RECONVERSION) - The Model 1816 was the mainstay arm of the U.S. military from its adoption following the War of 1812 through the Indian campaigns, Mexican War and the Civil War, initially in flintlock and in the final decade as percussion conversions.  They are a direct descendent, little changed from the French Charleville muskets used in the Revolution.  Even with two National Armories, the need for militia arms was larger than they could provide, so additional contracts were awarded to numerous private firms who produced muskets.

This one was made by William L. Evans of Evansburg, PA which is only a few miles from Valley Forge, a small community on the banks of the Schuylkill river about a day’s march from downtown Philadelphia.  As every school child used to know, (but few do today with history lessons abandoned to allow more politically correct indoctrination) Valley Forge was where Washington’s Continental Army spent the miserable winter of 1777-1778.  Evans was the financier for the musket contract, partnered with John Rogers who handled the production, mostly done at the ironworking facilities in the town of Valley Forge.  While the exact site is uncertain due to being washed away in an 1844 flood, it is believed to be within the present boundaries of the Valley Forge National Historical Park. 
Previously, contracts had been awarded for Model 1808 and 1812 muskets to other members of the Evans family with Rogers or other men involved, so arms manufacturing was not a new enterprise for people in that area.  W.L. Evans delivered all 5,000 Model 1816 muskets on his contract in 1826-1828, fifty years after Washington’s troops had been in the area, although there was no park or historic markers at the time to honor those events.  (Much as there are no monuments to places connected with our troops in Vietnam about 50 years ago.)  An excellent account of arms making at Valley Forge is at https://tehistory.org/hqda/html/v40/v40n4p115.html

The Model 1816 muskets were made to “pattern” so they are more or less the same in size and shape, but nowhere near interchangeable parts, even within a single maker as all were totally handmade.  They are .69 caliber smoothbores with 42 inch barrels, secured by three iron bands.
Overall good condition, uncleaned so it looks “olde.”  This had been converted to percussion in the 1850s and probably saw service in the Civil War with one side or the other (or maybe changed hands and was used by both).  This was reconverted to flintlock with correct style repro parts many years ago, and would fool some people, but the weakened tension on the mainspring is a sure sign it had been percussion at one time.  Stock has never been sanded, no signs of a cartouche, and has a wonderful mellow patina to the wood.  Barrel does have inspection marks LS (Luther Sage) US and P.  Bore is good with some dirt and rust, but no major pitting.  Period addition of a crude rear sight on the barrel, and the normal brass front sight on the upper band, although sights on a smoothbore musket are wasted effort.  Couple of small ships alongside the breechplug tang.
A nice looking representative example of the classic Model 1816 flintlock musket, albeit a reconversion.  The historical connection with Valley Forge makes it more interesting than any other contract maker.  ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $1150.00 (View Picture)

7192 U.S. MODEL 1817 .54 CALIBER FLINTLOCK “COMMON RIFLE” BY SIMEON NORTH 1825 - Back then, infantry troops were armed with smoothbore muskets and engaged in linear tactics firing volleys at close range and then attacked with bayonets. Specially designated “Rifle Regiments” armed with rifles deployed as skirmishers, scouts, advance guards etc, and used individual aimed shots against officers, artillery crews and other high value targets and to detect any enemy advances. Their rifles were not equipped with bayonets. The Model 1817 marked the first really large procurement of rifles for the U.S. Army Previously, about 3,500 rifles similar to a Kentucky rifle were procured from several Pennsylvania makers in 1792-1794. Between 1803 and 1820 about 19,000 Model 1803 flintlock rifles were made at Harpers Ferry. This new pattern was adopted in 1817 and eventually about 18,000 were made by 5 contractors circa 1817-1840. In 1819 production began on Hall’s patent breech loading rifles with interchangeable parts, and to avoid confusion the Halls were generally called “Hall” or “patent” rifles while the traditional M1817 rifles were called “common rifles.” This is a nice example of the classic and important Model 1817 Common rifle, although it is a professionally done reconversion to flintlock. Bore has the original seven groove rifling, and while filthy should clean up to be VG. Former owner actually used this for some hunting and reports it was a good shooter. (We sell all guns as collector items only and must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) This is overall G-VG condition with full length stock with minimal dings and bruises, and one tiny age crack between the rear lock screw and the breech shoulder. Metal parts are a dull steel gray mixed with some staining and salt and pepper roughness and scattered light surface rust. It really need a good cleaning, of the metal parts and some linseed oil and wax on the stock which would improve the appearance quite a bit. Both of the fragile sling swivels are intact, a rarity for these. Patchbox functions properly. Ramrod is a correct style reproduction. Despite the large numbers made, they are not common on the collector market, and this was in John’s collection for a number of years. A nice gun to represent an important step in U.S. martial arms evolution. These make an especially interesting display when contrasted with one of the Hall rifles. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1595.00 (View Picture)

20873 U.S. LINE THROWING GUN- KILGORE MODEL GR-52 - Serial number 617 with USCG approval 160/040/4/0 as marked on the frame. Theoretically, the approval number should allow dating these to within a five year period corresponding with the date of USCG approval under section section 160.040 covering life saving appliances. However, no complete list has been found of all approvals, so with only a few scattered examples the best I can do is estimate that this was circa 1960s-1980s, but I believe the basic model dates to 1952. This is a “Schermuly” type life saving line throwing gun which uses a small pistol type launcher firing a stubby “impulse-ignition cartridge.” Before firing, a rocket motor with an attached wire frame sticking back for attachment of the “line” is inserted in the muzzle. When fired, the impulse ignition cartridge flash ignites the rocket motor and kicks the rocket out on its way. The basic concept was invented by Richard Schermuly, a British seaman and inventor around the beginning of the 20th century. However, despite its simplicity, low cost, and effectives (so easy a young child could use it) the concept was not adopted until 1929 by the International Conference for Saving of Life at Sea Treaty (SOLAS). Multiple types of line throwing devices have been invented over the years since 1807 when George Manby came up with a mortar for the purpose of line throwing, followed by David Lyle’s cannons in the 1870s and shoulder fired guns by Ingersoll, Coston and others in the 1880s and later. Ships still carry line throwers in various configuration, and they are also widely used by firefighters. Today most ships have switched to Schermuly type rockets, but fired from a single-use plastic canister which is not subject to regulation as a “firearm” by gun-phobic foreign governments. As life saving devices, with the bore obstructed by small projections to prevent firing of projectiles but not interfering with the launching of the line throwing rocket, the Kilgore GR-52 is not considered a firearm and no FFL is needed to purchase. Overall fine to excellent outside with most of the gloss black paint finish remaining. The bore has corrosion from firing and poor cleaning, or maybe just exposure to salt air for extended periods. I discovered that it is missing the extractor, but since no one has the impulse cartridges or rockets any more who cares. These have a handle on the top of the barrel to help hold it when firing, not so much for the very limited recoil, but because the gun with rocket inserted is heavy and you want it under good control when on a heaving deck of a ship in distress. I have done a lot of research on various line throwing guns, and would be happy to share a copy upon request, or will try to post it on our other site, ArmsCollectors.com, and it will eventually be posted at http://ASOAC.org for whom it was written and first published. Price for Kilgore GR-52 line throwing pistol and one fired case is $265.00 (View Picture)

22747 SHARPS & HANKINS MODEL 1862 CIVIL WAR NAVY CARBINE (WITH PARTIAL LEATHER COVER) - Serial number 6037. Nominally a .52 caliber gun, these were made for the “Number 56 Sharps & Hankins rimfire cartridge” although later production reportedly slightly altered the chambers to us Spencer ammunition. This ingenious design was from Christian Sharps, the inventor of the famous “Sharps” rifles. This carbine, patented in 1859 shares the same concept with the cute little four barrel derringers, with the barrel sliding forward on receiver rails to allow loading from the breech, then being slid back into position and locked for firing. The Navy ordered some 6,686 of these carbines in 1862 and they served throughout the Civil War and for a number of years after, until replaced by the Remington rolling blocks. The Navy version included a leather cover over the barrel, missing on about 80% of the guns we have seen. Theoretically, the leather would protect the barrel from salt water exposure, but in reality it seems to have collected the salt under the leather, rotting the leather and pitting the metal. The leather was sewn into a tube type shape to slip over the barrel, and then secured in place by a steel band around the barrel at the muzzle and two screws at the breech end of the barrel. Cover is in generally ratty condition, with about 60-70% remaining,but a section about 1” long missing at the muzzle end and about 5” from the rear (everything between the rear sight and the breech) and another palm size chunk near where you naturally grab the barrel. A clever design feature is the safety which is a flat strip along the left side of the frame by the hammer. When the hammer is at half cock, the safety can be pushed up, and will block the hammer from fully striking the firing pin. When the hammer is fully cocked it automatically disengages the safety. Firing pin is a floating design secured by a screw and either has the tip broke off or is missing, but should be a simple part to turn on a lather or even a drill. Bore is rifled with six grooves, dark and rough, but it’s not like anyone has any ammo to shoot in these anyway, and it may (or may not) clean up. Walnut buttstock with mellow old oil finish has some assorted dings and scars of an issued martial arm. Metal parts were case hardened when made and now are basically a dull steel gray mixed with thin patina in places and showing signs of a gentle cleaning long ago. No real rust or pitting anywhere. Good mechanics, including the often broken catch for the lever. A good representative example of a clever Civil War carbine, and one of Christian Sharps least known inventions. Wish the leather were nicer, but having even this much is better than most of these. Antique, no FFL needed. $1095.00 (View Picture)

10100 U.S. MODEL 1877- 1879 TRANSITION .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLE- SUPER NICE! - Serial number 99674 with sharp SWP/1878 in oval cartouche. Bore is about perfect, bright and sharp. About 90% brilliant color case hardening on the breechblock and barrel tang. About 90-95% original blue on remaining parts with most on the barrel and receiver, and less on the buttplate, the typical wear patterns. Unsanded stock with a few minor storage and handling blemishes and old oil finish. Springfield Armory never used the “Model 1877” designation for rifles, only carbines, but collectors have applied it to the guns made in 1877-78 as a series of changes were made from the original Model 1873 design. These include the long comb-short wrist stock, wider receiver with long gas escape cuts, rounded notch for the rounded nose of the wider low arch breech block and blade type front sight. Most of these were completed in 1878, and the next changes were changes to the rear sight to add a “buckhorn” on the sliding elevation bar with three minor variations made during 1879. As usual, military arms in service had such things as sights were frequently updated to the latest configuration and this rifle had the Model 1879 buckhorn sight (third type) installed during its period of service. Springfield never used a Model 1879 designation but collectors do for rifles with the M1879 rear sight installed. So, this rifle could be referred to as a Model 1877 with updated rear sight or 1877-1879 transition or a Model 1879. We will just call it a really great example of the trapdoor rifle and you can call it whatever you like. There is no documented history on this number, but it is representative example of the rifle used by the Regular Army in the Indian Wars and by the volunteer units during the Spanish American War and Philippine Insurrection. A previous owner very slightly rounded the edge of the stock shoulder behind the lower band, not a big deal, but we wanted to point that out so there will not be any surprises. This comes with a slightly later circa 1885-1890 leather sling for trapdoors with the thick claws which looks good. However, the leather on the sling has broken and cannot be used, but still looks okay for display. Someone clever with leather work can probably figure a way to stabilize or repair it. A really handsome example with fantastic bore! There are a lot of Model 1884 rifle in excellent condition but nice examples of the Model 1877 or 1879 rifles are much harder to find. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $1450.00 (View Picture)

16083 U.S. MODEL 1840 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE BY NIPPES- ORIGINAL FLINT! - The Model 1840 was the last flintlock smoothbore musket made for the U.S. Army, the direct descendant of the old French Charlevilles. The pattern arms were made in 1835 but production did not start until 1840, so sometimes you will see these referred to as Model 1835 or 1835/1840. Production quickly stopped at Springfield, after the Model 1842 percussion musket model was adopted. Production lingered on for a few more years and the two civilian contractors finished up their production by 1848. Original flintlock M1840 muskets are nearly impossible to find, and even the percussion conversions are scarce compared to the ubiquitous Model 1816s. Springfield Armory only made about 30,241 (circa 1840-43), Nippes made 5,100 (circa 1842-1848), and Pomeroy made another 7,000 (circa 1840-1846). See Flayderman 9A-258 through 9A-263. This one was made by Nippes in Philadephia in 1845 with matching dates on the lock and barrel. This is one of the very few that escaped conversion to percussion (but sadly did not escape other molestation). Most likely this was used in the Civil War by Union or Confederate soldiers and was possibly taken home by one (with or without permission to go home and/or take a musket), or maybe picked up off a battlefield. Or possibly it served honorably and ended up among the vast quantities of Civil War surplus arms later sold by Bannerman. At some point in civilian hands the mutilations began. The muzzle of the barrel was cut back an inch and a half, getting rid of the bayonet stud, and leaving the barrel 40.5 inches long instead of the original 42 inches. I suspect that the owner was an exceptionally tall man as they neatly added a walnut extension on the butt to make the butt about 1.5” longer and trimmed the nose of the comb down a bit. The stock was once cracked along the grain between the lock and lower band, but this was very neatly repaired and not noticeable from the outside, but when the barrel is removed you can see some of the epoxy material in the barrel channel. The barrel is original flint with only the flint flash hole, never any nipple added. The lockplate retains the original brass pan and frizzen spring and the screws for the hammer, frizzen and frizzen spring. The frizzen fits pretty well but is probably a replacement of some sort. The hammer is a U.S. M1816 hammer which is a loose fit on the tumbler but looks okay. The brass pan has some sort of iron filler piece installed secured by a rivet through the bottom of the pan but the reason for this is a mystery to me. The changes to the lock were probably done to keep the gun functioning for killing hogs, hunting critters or for protection against biped or quadraped predators. Since the barrel has been cut and the butt extended, the changes to the lock might be best to ignore and leave everything alone as part of the history of the gun. Good quality reproduction M1840 hammers and frizzens are available if you want to install them to get back closer to original. Overall condition is GOOD (as modified). Metal parts have a smooth mellow brown patina with some heavier rust or light pitting around the breech end of the barrel, but little or no pitting elsewhere except at the Nippes marking n the center of the lockplate. The metal parts could easily be cleaned bright again if you want to do that. A good machinist could take a piece of .69 musket barrel and make an extension with a slight overlapping or telescope braze joint to stretch the barrel back to the original length. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

**STOLEN BY PERSON IN PORTLAND, OR AREA, or possibly a long haul trucker. $500 reward for return of this item or information leading to arrest and conviction of the thief, who got several other antique arms from other dealers by credit card fraud... $100 reward if you are first to spot this on an auction site.** 12036 U.S. MODEL 1863 TYPE II .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET - Made at Springfield in 1864 and so marked on the lockplate. Barrel date not visible. Excellent bore. This is a good representative example of a .58 caliber Civil War musket, although not in the best condition. Basically a "brown gun" except for the trigger guard which has about 90-95% arsenal blue and must have been taken from a trapdoor (parts are identical except for being left bright on the M1855-1870 and blued on the M1873-1888 trapdoors. Otherwise all original and correct parts. Stock has been broken through he wrist and repaired long ago, but is not real tight and should be redone with epoxy which will make it stronger than the original wood. The stock has been sanded, but not badly. Metal parts (except trigger guard) mostly have a layer of brown patina/rust, with some light pitting under some areas, most notably around the nipple. Displays okay as is, or could be polished up with 320 emery cloth if you prefer the original bright look. The M1863 (type 2) which is sometimes called the M1864, was the highpoint in the development of the rifle musket for Infantry use, and the next year was replaced by the first of the Allin breechloding "trapdoors." The M1863 (Type 2) differed from the M1863 only in having the rounded bands retained by band springs instead of merely screw clamps. The M1863 differed from the M1861 which had flat bands retained by bandsprings, and the nipple bolster set out a bit further and having a clean out screw instead of an angled flash hole, and used a "swell" in the ramrod to hold it in place instead of a screw plate. All the .58 rifle muskets fired a 500 grain (little over 1 ounce) soft lead Minie ball with a hollow base. When the 60 grains of black powder was ignited by the flash from the percussion cap, the expanding gasses expanded the rear of the Minie ball to engage the rifling. Sights are provided for 100, 300 and 500 yards, but masses of troops could be engaged at ranges up to 1,000 yards. With a rate of fire of about 3 rounds per minute, and its long range, the .58 caliber rifle muskets forced dramatic changes in tactics from the massed formations used for the preceding several hundred years. Many collectors have a musket from the Civil War as a logical starting point for a collection of "modern" military rifles. This one comes with a good quality reproduction sling. Civil War muskets are getting more expensive but this one is affordable (due to the flaws) and has the potential to be much nicer after the stock has been repaired properly. $995.00 (View Picture)


Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)

21436 CUSTOM REPLICA FLINTLOCK .62 CALIBER JAEGER RIFLE CIRCA 1740-1770- NICE! - These were the arms favored by German immigrants to the colonies, especially those settling in central Pennsylvania, where they evolved to better meet local conditions and became the legendary Pennsylvania (or later Kentucky) longrifle. During the American Revolution, the British army included many mercenary Hessian regiments from the Germanic states, armed with rifles which were nearly identical, but lacking any embellishments. All featured relatively short barrels, roughly 24-30 inches (compared to the usual 42-44 inch muskets). They were rifled and very accurate to maybe 150-200 yards, while the muskets were wildly inaccurate at anything over 100 yards. These rifles usually had economical sliding wooden patch boxes for the patching material used with round balls. Many, especially private guns, had double set triggers. This superb quality replica has all the classic features of a high quality private purchase Jaeger rifle as made in Pennsylvania circa 1740-1770, or the Germanic states roughly the same period. The heavy .62 caliber octagon barrel is “swamped” meaning it tapers from about 1 1/4” at the breech to a bit under 1” at the waist or narrowest point (about 2/3 of the way to the muzzle) then reverse tapers to about 1 1/8” at the muzzle. It is rifled with 7 grooves, and most likely a 1in 66” twist. The flint lock is by R.E. Davis (their Jaeger style A- with fly in the tumbler) and also their set triggers. Source of the buttplate and trigger guard is uncertain, but they are one of the many types used on Jaeger rifles. All fittings- guard, buttplate, sideplate and ramrod pipes are iron, and all metal parts have a nice even browned finish. Traditional style front and rear sights (Well, the dab of fluorescent orange paint on the top of the front sight blade is not traditional, but easily removed.) The maple stock has a bit of figure to it, finished in a pleasing walnut shade. The stock has a fair amount of very tastefully designed traditional incised carving, very well executed. The sliding wooden patch box is the traditional style, less decorative, but more affordable in the early period than fancy brass. It is opened by squeezing the small button at the rear away from the buttplate and sliding the cover back. The forend tip is horn, probably elk. Overall condition is excellent plus. The only issues being the start of some chipping at the back of the barrel tang (which happens when you inlet exactly there instead of leaving a tiny bit of clearance for barrel set back) and I am not sure if the set triggers are properly adjusted. In any case this is an exceptionally handsome example of where the American longrifle story began, or an example of how the Hessian mercenaries were armed. It would probably make a great shooter (assuming a competent gunsmith approves it as safe- we sell all guns as collector items only). This came from the estate of an avid blackpowder shooter which had some very nice guns. No idea who the maker is, and the only markings are the number “2584” neatly stamped on the top flat at the breech, which may be a date. Priced at about the cost of a good quality Jaeger kit, but this is already fully assembled and beautifully finished. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $975.00 (View Picture)

22256 LARGE AMERICAN PERCUSSION FOWLING PIECE CIRCA 1830 - This is the type generally called a “club butt” which has a much larger than usual butt stock and often more extreme drop to the butt, as was originally found on Dutch arms brought to the new world by Dutch settlers in the Hudson River valley. Overall length is 60 inches This has a 42 inches long .78 caliber barrel with remnants of the bands at the breech found on Brown Bess style muskets, and what look like English proof marks and the letters I.W. usually associated with James Wilson, a prolific British gun maker. There is a brass blade type front sight but no signs of a bayonet lug. The underside of the barrel has an iron rib soldered to it, with one ramrod pipe. The pipe holds a brass tube which extends full length of the rib, and houses an improvised iron ramrod which is too short for use, but is probably a later owner’s replacement for one that got lost or appropriated for more important uses. The rod looks good for decorative use, or could be replaced with a wooden rod by removing the brass tube. There is a large “76” engraved on the top of the breech, but the meaning is uncertain. It is (remotely) possible it indicates use by the 76th Regiment of Foot, MacDonald’s Highlanders which served in America 1779-1784 including the Charleston campaign and finally surrendering at Yorktown. The brass trigger guard, ramrod entry pipe and buttplate are all British Second Model (Short Land pattern) Brown Bess style furniture circa 1740-1790, likely salvaged from a Revolutionary War British musket. Since there were numerous campaigns and battles in the Hudson River valley or adjacent areas, it is reasonable to find them on a gun made in that area. The lock was made as a percussion lock, probably in England, with modest decorative engraving marked “MELCHIOR- WARRANTED.” It is likely that the barrel and furniture had originally be assembled into a fowler circa 1790-1810 as a flintlock, but probably was broken or damaged and the parts used again with a new-fangled percussion lock circa 1830 resulting in the gun as it is today. Overall condition is as shown in the photos- well used, trigger guard broken at the screw hole, and lock needs tinkering, but still an impressive old gun to hang on the wall, especially in an old house circa 1800-1850. Due to length and weight, shipping will have to be $65.00. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $395.00 (View Picture)



Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)

SMOF7142 - SCARCE ITALIAN MODEL 1870/87 VETTERLI-VITALI RIFLE- 10.35 x 47mm Rimmed- MINTY! -
Serial number AE2129 made at Torino in 1878 as indicated by the barrel markings. Excellent sharp bore. Top flat also has the “PP” marks indicating the parts are interchangeable. These were made as single shot rifles between 1870 and 1887, and originally had the rotating dust cover around the receiver opening, In 1887 Italy adopted the Vitali magazine which was easily added to these single shot rifles. (The Netherlands also adopted the Vitali magazine conversion for their single-shot Beaumont rifles to magazine fed rifles.) The bottom of the stock was reinforced with a large metal plate to compensate for any weakening of the stock from removal of wood for the magazine opening. The rotating dust covers were modified to a narrow ring at the rear covering the bolt disassembly wedge, and also serving as a magazine cutoff. This rifle retains about 95% blue finish (from time of conversion) turning plum in a few places. The stock has only a few tiny storage or handling blemishes Serial number on stock matches the barrel. Roundel on right side of butt is light with mostly legible Torino and 1877. Complete with a cleaning rod which might not be correct. We have seen a lot of the later Model 1870/1887/1916 rifles where these were converted to 6.5mm, but very few of this model seem to have survived in 10.35 s 47mm caliber. The scarcity, and high condition of this example makes it an exciting find for the collector of early military cartridge rifles. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7141 - ITALIAN MODEL 1870 VETTERLI SINGLE SHOT CARBINE FOR “TRUPPE SPECIALI” 10.4 x 47mm Rimfire (“Moschetto per Truppe Speciali Mo. 1870”)- NICE!
Ser. No. K5526. Made at at Torino in 1886. These short rifles are rare, especially ones like this which escaped the 1887 “Vitalli” conversion which added a four shot magazine; and remain in fine condition and still have the rotating dust cover. About 95% original blue, with a few surface rust freckles that should clean off okay. Excellent plus bore. Stock lightly sanded long ago, leaving only traces of the oval arsenal marking on the butt, but matching serial number is clear. Small age crack under the bolt handle. Italian military arms are an inexpensive collecting specialty, with a large variety, and this is a great example of one of the scarcer ones. See bayonet page, (or ask) for a bayonet to fit . ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7148 - BELGIAN MODEL 1853/67/80 ALBINI-BRAENDLIN BREECH LOADING SINGLE SHOT RIFLE -
Serial number 2623. One of the many different attempts by various nations to convert their obsolete muzzle loading arms to breechloaders circa 1860-1870. This started out as a Belgian Model 1853 rifle, made in 1855 (as indicated by the PA over 55 marking on the lock). It was converted in 1868 as indicated by the barrel date. Matching numbers 26223 on buttplate, locking rod, barrel, middle band and even the cleaning rod. but breech block is number 179. The Albini was a typical conversion effort, with a hinged breechblock like a trapdoor, locked by the firing pin which was connected to the hammer, locking the breech as the hammer dropped, similar to the Austrian Wanzl or the U.S. Morse. Overall excellent condition with arsenal bright finish from time of conversion. Excellent bore. This has the Halkin patent extended volley sight bar on the rear sight, used with a button on the middle band, as modified in 1880. Wood has a mellow old patina, making it an handsome example of this historic design. The GB on the breech is the Government of Belgium property mark. The “P” above the serial number on the barrel and buttplate is a regimental marking. Some spotty staining on top of the barrel between the two lower bands which should clean off okay. See bayonet page, (or ask) for a bayonet to fit. An exceptional example of a scarce transitional rifle. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1,395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7155 - SCARCE AUSTRIAN MODEL 1862/1867 WANZL BREECHLOADING CONVERSION OF LORENZ MUSKET (14 x 33mm Rimfire)
In 1866 the Austrians fought a disastrous seven week war with Germany, where the German breechloading needle fire rifles decimated the Austrians with their muzzle loading Lorenz rifles. The following January (1867), the Austrians adopted the Wanzl system for converting their muzzle loading rifles to breechloading cartridge arms. Six months later they adopted the rotary breech Werndl system for new rifles to be made by the newly formed firm of Steyr. This is the standard infantry model Wanzl, with total barrel length of about 37.5 inches and overall length of about 53 inches. The lock bears the original manufacture date of 1863, stamped in the Austrian method of only the last three digits, 863. The Wanzl conversion is somewhat similar to the later Allin Trapdoor system, where a new receiver is attached to the old barrel, having a breechblock that flips up like the trapdoor. The locking system is unusual, being an internal rod that locks into the rear of the breechblock as the hammer falls. The tang is marked G. PAPISTOK, the firm that did the conversion. The breechblock is marked BOLLMAN. The barrel is marked W 68 indicating acceptance at Vienna (Wein) in 1868. Overall condition is about fine. Most parts retain their original bright polished finish under a bit of dried oil and crud. The bore is excellent, but someone drilled a 3/16” diameter hole through the barrel about 8” from the muzzle for some unknown and regrettable reason. The hole on the top has been plugged so it is not real obvious, but it is open on the bottom, so this is not for shooting (like anyone has any 14 x 33mm Rimfire Austrian ammunition to shoot). The beech stock has a few assorted minor handling and storage dings and blemishes, and one messy area on the bottom of the forend as shown in the photos. The Wanzel is a very scarce gun, and would be an excellent addition to a collection of European military arms. An excellent collecting niche would be to specialize in the evolution of military rifle technology, something like “Single Shot Blackpowder Cartridge Military Rifles” or “Military muskets converted to breechloaders.” Other examples that would fit in there are the British Sniders, the French Tabatier, the Swiss Milbank-Amsler; the U.S. first and second Allin trapdoors, some of the Remington rolling blocks, and several others. The best source of info on arms of this era is Keith Doyon’s superb site http://www.militaryrifles.com/ which we use often. (Note- The Lorenz muskets were nominally .54 caliber and the conversion used a rimfire cartridge variously called any of the following: 13.9 x 33mm Wanzel Model 1867 rimfire; 14 mm rimfire Wanzl ; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Wänzel Mod. 1869; 14.5 x 32.5mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14 mm Scharfe gewehrpatrone or the 14 x 33mm rimfire Wänzel. But whatever you call it, forget about ever finding any ammo for it!) Cleaning rod is a not quite correct replacement. See bayonet page, (or ask) for a bayonet to fit . Price is discounted significantly due to the hole problem, but few people will ever notice it. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed $ 795.00 (View Picture)

21436 CUSTOM REPLICA FLINTLOCK .62 CALIBER JAEGER RIFLE CIRCA 1740-1770- NICE! - These were the arms favored by German immigrants to the colonies, especially those settling in central Pennsylvania, where they evolved to better meet local conditions and became the legendary Pennsylvania (or later Kentucky) longrifle. During the American Revolution, the British army included many mercenary Hessian regiments from the Germanic states, armed with rifles which were nearly identical, but lacking any embellishments. All featured relatively short barrels, roughly 24-30 inches (compared to the usual 42-44 inch muskets). They were rifled and very accurate to maybe 150-200 yards, while the muskets were wildly inaccurate at anything over 100 yards. These rifles usually had economical sliding wooden patch boxes for the patching material used with round balls. Many, especially private guns, had double set triggers. This superb quality replica has all the classic features of a high quality private purchase Jaeger rifle as made in Pennsylvania circa 1740-1770, or the Germanic states roughly the same period. The heavy .62 caliber octagon barrel is “swamped” meaning it tapers from about 1 1/4” at the breech to a bit under 1” at the waist or narrowest point (about 2/3 of the way to the muzzle) then reverse tapers to about 1 1/8” at the muzzle. It is rifled with 7 grooves, and most likely a 1in 66” twist. The flint lock is by R.E. Davis (their Jaeger style A- with fly in the tumbler) and also their set triggers. Source of the buttplate and trigger guard is uncertain, but they are one of the many types used on Jaeger rifles. All fittings- guard, buttplate, sideplate and ramrod pipes are iron, and all metal parts have a nice even browned finish. Traditional style front and rear sights (Well, the dab of fluorescent orange paint on the top of the front sight blade is not traditional, but easily removed.) The maple stock has a bit of figure to it, finished in a pleasing walnut shade. The stock has a fair amount of very tastefully designed traditional incised carving, very well executed. The sliding wooden patch box is the traditional style, less decorative, but more affordable in the early period than fancy brass. It is opened by squeezing the small button at the rear away from the buttplate and sliding the cover back. The forend tip is horn, probably elk. Overall condition is excellent plus. The only issues being the start of some chipping at the back of the barrel tang (which happens when you inlet exactly there instead of leaving a tiny bit of clearance for barrel set back) and I am not sure if the set triggers are properly adjusted. In any case this is an exceptionally handsome example of where the American longrifle story began, or an example of how the Hessian mercenaries were armed. It would probably make a great shooter (assuming a competent gunsmith approves it as safe- we sell all guns as collector items only). This came from the estate of an avid blackpowder shooter which had some very nice guns. No idea who the maker is, and the only markings are the number “2584” neatly stamped on the top flat at the breech, which may be a date. Priced at about the cost of a good quality Jaeger kit, but this is already fully assembled and beautifully finished. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $975.00 (View Picture)

22892 VERY RARE BRITISH “MORRIS TUBE” SUB-CALIBER DEVICE FOR .303 CALIBER MARTINI-METFORD CARBINE - This is the .297/230 centerfire caliber “Morris Tube, adopted in the List of Changes 6860 in September 1892 as “Tube, Aiming, Martini-Metford Carbine, Artillery (Mark I), Cavalry (Marks I, II & III), Morris, with breech piece, set nut, leather and brass washers.” Earlier versions had been adopted circa 1883 for the .577-450 Martinis and later versions were made for the Lee Enfield bolt action rifles, all in different lengths for the various carbines or rifles. Circa 1908, similar devices usually called “Aiming Tubes” replaced Morris tube, and used conventional .22 rimfire cartridges. But, these required specially modified bolts with offset firing pins to work with the rimfire cartridges. The muzzle nuts and washer are present. The sliding collar on the “chamber” end acts as an extractor for the .297/230 cartridge case and sort of a loading tray for loading. The rifle’s regular extractor activates the collar. Although heavily pitted on the exterior the device actually has a very good bore with 8 groove rifling. Installation required unscrewing the chamber part, putting it in the breech, and holding it with a special tool, then threading the barrel insert into the chamber piece, then drawing it up tight with the muzzle washer and nuts. The chamber part is probably rusted in place on the tube which prevents disassembly for actual installation in a Martini, but great for display anyway as an example of the indoor “gallery practice” which was a vital part of military marksmanship training at the turn of the century in many nations. One round of the very hard to find .297/230 Morris Tube ammunition shown in the photos nest to a .22 Long Rifle is included. Most collectors have never seen or heard of these, but https://www.rifleman.org.uk/index-3.html#The_Aiming_Tubes is full of superb information on these, as well as all the rest of British military training, drill and small bore rifles. Take a while and explore all of their links and you will be amazed. That is also a good check list for an interesting collecting specialty if you need another one. Only one of these we have ever seen in person and I know I will regret parting with it. $325.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7117 - DANISH ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE M1867/1896 11.5 x 51mmR CALIBER -
Serial number 56254. One of about 30,000 made at the Danish Arsenal at Copenhagen 1870-1908, under license from Remington. This one marked on the tang KJOBENHAVNS TOIHUUS 1879 with crown and M-1867 on left side of receiver. Barrel has serial number 56254, also found on stock. Crown markings sharp and clear adjacent to serial number on barrel and also on left side of forend and buttstock. Stock never sanded but has assorted mostly minor bruises and bumps on the wood. Brass marking disc on right side of butt is not marked. Barrel marked at top rear with crown indicating conversion in 1896 to improved 11.5x51R smokeless powder centerfire cartridge, hence the 1867/96 designation. An interesting feature is that the breechblock retains a hole to allow firing pin installation for use with rimfire cartridges. Faded color casehardening on the receiver. Barrel with about 80% original blue finish mostly worn thin. Excellent shiny bore. Long range rear sight with arm for volley sight and middle band retains the screw head type volley sight. Front sight blade is a recent replacement. Barrel bands were originally finished bright but now mostly a dull steel gray/patina mix. Overall fine condition or a bit better. These are chambered for a Danish round that is slightly shorter than the .45-70 cartridge, and a bit fatter near the head. While we do not recommend shooting these, some people reportedly fire light loads using trimmed .45-70 cases and only neck size them afterwards. We sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing. These are very reasonably priced examples of a late 19th century military black powder cartridge rifle. A very nice example of this model, and a key piece for a collection of Danish or Scandinavian arms. Bayonet for these is an impressive long sword type with the fancy “Yhataghan” blade, and we might have one listed on our edged weapons page http://oldguns.net/catedw.htm Antique- no FFL required.  $695.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7118 - FRENCH MODEL 1866 CHASSEPOT NEEDLEFIRE RIFLE CONVERTED TO .43 MAUSER BY KYNOCH IN BRITAIN CIRCA 1873 -
Serial number 79717 matching on barrel and bolt. Comes complete with the hard to find original Chassepot cleaning rod (numbered 91848). This rifle was originally made as a needlefire rifle circa 1866 and would have been used by the French losers during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871). Many in the French military pointed to the finnicky Chassepot Model 1866 and its fragile cartridge as the reason for the defeat, which led to the adoption in 1874 of the Gras rifle firing an 11mm metallic cartridge, basically a modified Chassepot. Large quantities of surrendered or captured Chassepots were converted in Germany to use 11mm Mauser cartridges, and many others were sold on the surplus markets. Some people incorrectly claim that in 1873 the French government contracted with Kynoch Gun Factory in Aston, England, to convert some of their Chassepots to centerfire cartridges pending arrival of sufficient 1874 Gras rifles. Actually, there were no French contracts, and rifles like this one were converted by Kynoch for the commercial trade, possibly for China or South American use. Neither the Kynoch Chassepot conversions nor their Kynoch patent revolvers were a commercial success, so Kynoch abandoned the arms making business and stuck to their highly successful ammunition work. Conversion included modifying the bolt for cartridges and rechambering the barrel. Original markings were removed during conversions and new marks applied: “KYNOCH-GUN-FACTORY-ASTON”, “MUSKET-43-77-380” and “KYNOCH’S-PATENT.” Birmingham proof marks on barrel, receiver and bolt. The numbers on the bayonet lug, barrel and bolt match. Overall very good to fine. About 80-90% of the original blue finish remains on the rifle, although mostly turned to plum. The stock shows typical handling marks. and there is an old fashioned anchor carved on the left side of the butt, possibly reflecting naval use. Butt plate is stamped “120.” The bore is dirty but should clean to excellent. A scarce and interesting French rifle from the rapidly changing arms technology evolving in the 1870s. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $550.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7150 - SCARCE RUSSIAN M1870 BERDAN II BOLT ACTION SINGLE SHOT RIFLE MADE AT SESTRORYETSK IN 1880 - Serial number 59331 made in 1880 at the Sestroryetsk Arsenal, which was one of the smaller facilities.  The Berdan was designed by American Civil War sharpshooter and General Hiram Berdan (also inventor of the Berdan primer).  His first “Berdan I” rifles were sort of a trapdoor design, made by Colt 1868-1870.  The improved “Berdan II” rifles adopted in 1870 were initially made by Birmingham Small Arms in England, then in Russian Arsenals on BSA supplied machinery.  The Berdan was rugged, simple to operate, and reasonably effective even at long ranges.  They were replaced by the Mosin Nagant design in 1891 although many continued to serve with second line troops as late as WW1.  The Berdan ammunition was comparable to the 11mm Mauser,  43 Spanish, .45-70 or .577/450 used by other powers at that time.  Officially the 10.75 x 58mm Rimmed cartridge with a paper-patched lead bullet, also known as the 4.2 line or .42 Berdan, or 10.66 x 58mmR, depending on who is writing about it.
This is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel with provisions for cleaning rod underneath the barrel, missing as with most of them.  Maker markings, date and serial number are marked on the barrel.  Serial numbers also on bolt in two places, neither matching the number on the barrel, a result of most of the Berdan rifles’ long service and arsenal visits.  This has a bronze buttplate with the Ishvesk bow and arrow marking, so other parts may be mixed as well.  Bore is excellent.  Metal parts with about 80% thinning blue, just honest wear in the hands of ignorant peasants in harsh climates.  Crest of Tsar Nicholas II on the receiver.  Wood has period military oil finish with assorted minor dings of an issued arm, the worst being a deep scratch on the right side of the comb about 3” long.  The sling swivels are probably old field replacements, and the narrow sling looks period but we have no idea what it was originally used on. 
The Berdan II is a historically significant military rifle, designed by an American, made in Russia using British machinery; and technically interesting as a very simple and reliable single shot bolt action during a time of rapid change.  Lots of people collect Mosin Nagant rifles, and this is a very nice example of the model which preceded the M-N.  These are uncommon in the U.S., and indeed anywhere, due to the high attrition rate during Russian wars.  By WW2, the remaining Berdans were pretty well rear echelon arms by that point, while front line troops were waiting for a comrade to be shot so they could take their Mosin-Nagant rifle.  ANTIQUE- No FFL needed.  $1,650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7134  - URUGUAY DAUDETAU-DOVITIIS-MAUSER 6.5 x 53.5mm RIFLE - Serial number 90590, single shot. Born as a German Mauser Model 1871 rifle (marks on left side of receiver "I.G. Mod 71" for Infantire Gewehr Model 1871.  Right side marked  82 and 1881, showing it was made in1881 and initial German military issue was in 1882.  These were converted circa 1895 for the 6.5x53.5mm Daudetau No. 12 semi-rimmed cartridge by the French "Societe Francaise des Armes Portatives of Saint Denis, Paris, France, as indicated by the markings on the barrel "S.F.A.P/St. Denis."  

In the 1880s, the South American nation of Uruguay had purchased a quantity of Mauser Infanteriegewehre Model 1871 rifles. When neighboring Argentina adopted the 7.65mm small bore smokeless cartridges and Model 1891 Mauser rifles in 1891, Uruguay felt a need to keep up with the neighbors. But funding was very limited.  As a stopgap measure it was decided in 1894 to have their Model 1871 rifles re-barreled for a modern cartridge.

Enter Antonio De Dovitiis (usually mispelled Dovitis), an immigrant tailor actually born in Picerno, Potenza Province, Italy, but usually claimed to be from Greece.  De Dovitiis had a military equipment store specialized in tailoring articles and bladed weapons, located at 18 de Julio street no. 130, Montevideo.  He was also personal tailor of Julio Herrera y Obes, president of Uruguay between 1890-1894, and that probably accounts for him being sent to Europe on the armament mission.  Dovitiis took advantage of business contacts in France to arrange for the work to be done by Societe Francais des Armes Portative, which was then promoting the a rifle designed by Frenchman Luis D’Audeteau who had also designed several 6.5mm cartridges.  His “Cartouche No. 12” was pushed on the gullible Uruguayans as a wonderful choice as their new service cartridge.  The chief benefit seems to be that SFAP St. Denis would be able to use their existing machinery to produce the barrels, sights and other fittings necessary to convert the Mausers.
The conversion consisted of fitting a new barrel, bolt head, extractor, sights, bands and a stock. In fact, the only original Mauser parts retained were the receiver, trigger mechanism, buttplate, and brass trigger guard while the sights and bayonet were the same pattern as those used on the Lebel. Approximately 10,000 pieces were converted, including some cut down to a short rifle configuration.
Although sounding good on paper (or because of the assorted cash under the table which seems probable) this international cross breeding program was a failure.  The main problem was the ammunition which had hard primers while the rifles had weak springs, and there were extraction problems caused by differences in rim dimensions, but most South American countries were reluctant to allow the troops to shoot very much as it might encourage them to overthrow the current governments.

This is a good representative example, with lots of finish on the metal parts.  The stock has assorted minor dings and bruises and could use a good cleaning.   Excellent bore, (but no one has any ammo for these!).  Receiver, bolt and stock fitting retain most of the bright polish finish from the time of conversion.  The barrel retains about 90-95% of its blue finish.  Bolt and receiver numbers all match, but the buttplate does not, same as the others we have seen. 

Missing the cleaning rod, but one from a M1896 Swedish Mauser would be a good substitute.  One of the oddball features of this rifle is the fact that the cleaning rod was mounted on the side instead of underneath the forend.  There are only a few other examples with this feature, and for a rather eccentric collecting niche, that might be fun to explore.  Look for the French Model 1892 carbines, Portuguese Model 1886 Kropatshek rifles, the Russian Model 1938 Tokarevs, a few Winchester Model 1876 rifles, some of the Remington Keene military rifles, and maybe a few others.

So, we have a rifle made in Germany, sold to Uruguay, converted in France to use a French designed cartridge, in a transaction brokered by an Italian tailor.  While lacking much of a service history, they are certainly one of the most unusual stories of military arms on the cheap, and such an abject failure.
This is a really unusual early South American military rifle, a field with a lot of variety and mostly reasonable prices, and this would be a key piece in such a collection.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF7144 - SCARCE SWISS MODEL 1870 VETTERLI SINGLE SHOT CADET RIFLE - Serial number 6046 made by Rychner & Keller, Aarau.  According to SwissRifles.com website, the single shot Model 1870 Cadet Rifle was authorized for production by the Eidgenossische Military Department on November 22nd, 1870 and apparently all made 1870-1873.  These were specifically made for cadet use, with a single shot action, one piece stock, 26.75” barrel and weight of 7.16 pounds.  This was significantly different from the full size infantry tubular magazine repeating rifle with a two piece stock and a 33 inch barrel, weighing 10.4 pounds.  Both were chambered for the 10.4 x 38mmR (or .41 Swiss) rimfire cartridge, but the cadet model was intended for use with a special cadet cartridge with a lighter powder charge, although the regular service rounds will chamber and fire in the cadet rifles.
Collecting Swiss rifles is an interesting and fairly affordable collecting specialty, and this is one of the hardest rifles to find. 

Fantastic bore, bright and sharp.  Missing the cleaning rod with a slotted brass tip.  Good mechanics. Bolt shroud retains 95% blue finish. Barrel has mix of blue and patina and looks like the barrel was actually polished bright long ago.  Unsanded walnut stock is excellent except for barely noticeable repair at the toe where flimsy buttplate results in easy breakage there.  Good inspector cartouche of Swiss cross over a shield with letter T on right side of the butt.   A very nice example of a scarce and desirable Swiss rifle, and one which will attract more attention than any variation of its larger, clunky cousins.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $650.00 (View Picture)

21271 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER RIFLE- CHEAP - Serial Number F2013 matching on the metal parts but the stock has a different numberD6353. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine or Belgian Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. The ground area has not had the finish touched up to blend in, but a few minutes with cold blue can do the job if you prefer reduce the visibility of this part of its history. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers in 1898 to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in Very Good condition, with all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 90% original blue on other parts, showing normal wear, with a few small freckles of surface rust that should clean off easily. A reinforcing bolt was arsenal added to the wrist at some point in its history. This was made by Loewe in 1893 with some of the improvements like the magazine lock screw and long handguard, but before the gas deflector wings were added to the bolt sleeve. From an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is a good representative example of these wonderful M1891 Argentine Mausers. Fine to excellent bore. This is missing the flat metal plate on the tip of the stock (Liberty Tree has them for $6 as “nose cap” and you need two small wood screws) and it is missing the cleaning rod. Because of these missing parts this is price much lower than some of the M1891 Argentines we have had. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive “Argentine Mauser Rifles” for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

17798 PORTUGUESE MODEL 1886/89 STEYR KROPATSCHEK RIFLE - Serial number Q940. Made by Steyer in Austria in 1886. Marked on receiver OE.W.F.G. Steyer/ 1886, faint traces of crown over L.Io., and M.1886 due to old arsenal refinish. Receiver, barrel and stock with serial Q940. Bolt mismatched O914 and other numbers. The Steyer Kropatschek is very similar to the German Mauser 1871/84 with a tubular magazine, but the details are slightly different throughout. Caliber is 8x60R Kropatschek, so you probably will not find any ammo. This example had the 1889 modification which added a handguard over the top of the barrel between the rear sight and the middle band, as shown by clearance cuts in the barrel channel for the clips to hold the handguard on. Handguard is missing (as with nearly all of these), leaving this looking just like the original M1886 if you don't spot the additional inletting for the clips. Stock is a nice medium brown walnut having been sanded long ago and picking up only a few tiny blemishes since then. There is a small crack on the left die of the wrist by the receiver tang, but it does not appear to affect strength much. About 90% thinning arsenal refinish blue on receiver and barrel, but the finish is mostly worn off the bands. Bolt and innards of action are nice and bright. Bore is about fine. Complete with the nearly always missing cleaning rod. Overall fine plus condition, much nicer than these are usually found. The 1886/89 model reportedly was sent to colonial outposts to minimize heat wave interference with the sight picture. Portugal had significant colonial holdings in Africa and Asia until early in the 20th century. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $450.00 (View Picture)

18588 SCARCE FRENCH MODEL 1874/1880 GRAS .22 CALIBER TRAINING RIFLE - Serial number 13843, Made at Manufacture D’Armes, St. Etienne in 1873 according to the receiver and barrel markings, as a Model 1874 single shot 11 x 59mmR single shot metallic cartridge rifle, with the 1880 improvements. This was later converted to .22 rimfire caliber using a sleeve in the barrel and modified bolt assembly, which is numbered to match the rifle, and a unique rear sight with windage adjustment screw and calibrated 0 to 35 on the leaf. Barrel length about 27.8 inches. Stock has been cut ahead of the barrel band, and the butt and buttplate have been slimmed. Butt swivel removed but screws remain. I have not been able to find any information on these other than a similar conversion from the Ben Michel collection sold as lot 285 by Cowans Auction in November 2015. That one had a full length military stock, but otherwise appears to be the same conversion with the unique rear sight. It was described as “Scarce variant of the Gras rifle used for military training and civilian marksmanship.” Military use of .22 caliber rifles for training began in the 1880s,and I suspect this conversion was done circa 1885-1900 when the Gras rifles had been replaced by the Lebel but were good candidates for conversion to training rifles, and probably served into the WW1 period. Bore has strong rifling with scattered some spots of rust or pits and needs a good cleaning. Good mechanics. Barrel and receiver retain most of the blue finish turned to plum or patina, and bolt is mostly patina. Gras rifles are pretty cheap and you can probably find an inexpensive one to swap stocks if you want this in a full length stock. Military .22 training rifles are a popular collecting specialty and this is one was in John’s collection for many years but he is clearing those out to make room for more line throwing guns, so someone else can enjoy owning this one for a few years. While many of the .22 trainers are pretty easy to find, this one is very scarce. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $725.00 (View Picture)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

21532 SWISS MODEL 1878 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) VETTERLI RIFLE .41 RIMFIRE (10.38 x 38mmR) - Serial number 185657 Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/ 185657/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 95% original blue finish on most parts with slight age toning toward plum color. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and old oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This was the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Swiss military arms are an interesting collecting specialty, with a good variety to find, including the Federal percussion rifles, the Millbank Amsler, all the Vetterli family, several varieties of Schmidt Rubin rifles, and even the modern assault style guns, and you can go for the whole history, or just concentrate on one niche. Most are available at prices a mere fraction of what some other collecting specialties cost. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is very good to fine, but since you won’t find any ammo, it is irrelevant. The overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 135 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $595.00 (View Picture)

22813 SWISS MODEL 1871 VETTERLI .41 RIMFIRE BOLT ACTION RIFLE MADE BY SIG, NEUHAUSEN - Serial number 85681 all matching Sometimes these are called the Model 1869/1871. These never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly man peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not (but they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights). The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo was loaded up until WW2. This rifle is in fine to excellent condition with about 90-95% of the original blue remaining although thinning. It looks a bit gray in the photos, but is actually a blue-gray shade, but definitely original, not touched up or anything. Buttplate suffers from a layer of rust due to poor storage, but the other parts are really nice. Walnut stock has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is excellent but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This one even has the almost always missing cleaning rod. We get a lot of the Model 1878 and 1881 Vetterlis in minty condition but few of the M1871, and very seldom see any of the 1869 rifles. Swiss military arms are a varied and relatively inexpensive collecting niche. This is a good representative example of an uncommon, important and interesting rifle. $650.00 (View Picture)

23268 Swiss Model 1869/1871 .41 rimfire Bolt Action Vetterli Repeating Rifle - Serial number 7129 matching, made by Rychner & Keller, Aarau. Although never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly-men peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not, although they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights. The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo up until WW2 and in the 1960s nearly unissued Vetterli rifles were selling from “Ye Olde Hunter” for $9.95 each. Ah, the good old days. This rifle is in good condition except that it has been poorly stored, so much of the original blue finish has turned to plum patina or acquired some light surface rust. This needs a good cleaning of all the metal parts, and a good rubbing with linseed oil on the stock to make it look a lot nicer than it is now. The unsanded walnut stock is dry and has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is dirty but good, and may clean better, but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This is complete with the cleaning rod, which is often missing. A good representative example of an important and interesting rifle. These early Model 1869-1871 rifles are much harder to find, and usually in lesser condition than the later Model 1878 and 1881 rifles. Swiss rifles can be a fun and (relatively) inexpensive collecting niche, with a wide variety of variations from the core group of muzzle loading Federal rifles, the Milbank Amslers, Vetterlis, and Schmidt-Rubins. All are made of the finest materials to the highest quality standards, and fairly easy to find at affordable prices. $595.00 (View Picture)

7358 Italian M1870/87/16 6.5mm bolt action Vetterli-Vitalli-Mannlicher Rifle - Serial number LO1708 made circa 1870-1878 at Brescia, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better looking examples of this model we have seen lately (although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen). Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered from 1887 through 1896 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the old black powder loads, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). WE CONSIDER THES UNSAFE TO SHOOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTNACES AND SELL ONLY AS A COLLECTOR ITEM, NEVER TO BE FIRED! Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked BRESCIA on one side and serial number LO1708 on the other. Walnut stock has been lightly sanded during the period of it service and now has an old military oil finish. Right side has deeply struck serial number LO1708. Metal parts with about 90-95% of an old black paint finish, probably not military, but it makes the gun look nice…from a distance. Unlike very other example we have seen, THIS ONE HAS THE CLEANING ROD! As is almost always the case, the cleaning rod is missing. Good mechanics. Rough bore. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these early Italian military rifles are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

17800 Swiss Model 1878 .41 rimfire (10.38 x 38Rmm) Vetterli Rifle - Serial number 190244 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/190244/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 80-90% original blue finish on most parts. The top of the barrel between the lower band and the rear sight has thinning finish turning plum and mixed with patina. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and original oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This one previously lived with a smoker and it reeks of tobacco smoke and has a thin film of crud that needs to be cleaned off and it will look much nicer. This is the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is sharp and mirror bright, and overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 130 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)


Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

Cootl stuf that does not fit well in the other categories. And, for those of you who have thoughtfully stashed away some stocks and hardware (or stocks and bonds with which to invest in stocks and bands) here are some prime candidates for restoration. Some of these rifles were converted to sporters many years ago when no one was interested in collecting "surplus" military  rifles and everybody was busy turning them into cheap deer rifles. While many people butchered the stocks and cut off barrels and refinished things, a few considerate (or lazy) people merely chopped off the stock and threw away all the useless bands and stuff. These rifles are very easy to restore if you have an appropriate stock and bands.

**NEW ADDITION** 20798 RARE U.S. MODEL 1882 CHAFFEE REECE BOLT ACTION MAGAZINE RIFLE (RESTORATION PROJECT) - (Serial number- none) One of only 753 made at Springfield in 1884 for one of the interminable trials seeking a suitable repeating rifle. This rifle was tested against the Remington Lee, and the Winchester Hotchkiss bolt action repeaters, and perhaps a few others. In any case, the field results were mixed, and provided sufficient excuses to adopt none of them and to remain with the trusty, economical, and thrifty on ammunition “trapdoor” design pending a major breakthrough in rifle or ammunition design. The 1884 field trials resulted in generally negative reviews for the Chaffee-Reece. 95 reports were received from the field, with only 14 ranking the Chaffee-Reece as superior to the current Trapdoor system or the other 2 magazine rifles then being tested. The rifles saw service with elements of US 8th, 9th, 14th, 15th , 19th, 23rd & 25th Infantry, as well as the 1st US Artillery. Although some of the reports lauded the magazine system of the rifle and some commended its accuracy, most reports were not positive. The primary complaint was that the butt magazine system weakened the stock significantly and made it susceptible to breakage. Other complaints revolved around the difficulty to keep the gun clean (making the bolt difficult to open and close), the heavy trigger pull (making accurate shooting difficult), the difficulty in performing the manual of arms with the rifle, and the poor performance with reloaded ammunition in the guns. By the end of the first quarter of 1886, the Chaffee-Reece rifles were replaced by M1884 Trapdoor rifles. Ultimately the Krag was adopted to bring the Army into the bolt action magazine rifle era, but the Chaffee-Reece were the FIRST bolt action repeating rifles to be completely made at Springfield. A very important milestone in U.S. military rifle evolution, and a scarce rifle missing from all but advanced collections. (Some of the Winchester Hotchkiss rifles were assembled at Springfield, using a mix of Winchester and Springfield parts.) The Chaffee-Reece did not use a coiled spring to advance cartridges, pushing the nose of the bullets against the primers of the next cartridge, thought to be a safety issue at the time. Instead, the buttstock magazine used two two sawtooth rails in the magazine track, with operation of the bolt advancing the cartridges one step each time the bolt is operated. A selector switch on the right side of the receiver ring engaged or disengaged the ratchet rails, acting as a magazine cutoff. These rails were the weak point of the design, and became broken and are missing in most of the these rifles today, including this one. I have only seen a handful of these for sale over the years. Excellent bore. This is a handsome example with about 98% blue finish remaining on the barrel with one scrape near the band. Blue has mostly worn off the trigger guard. The color case hardened finish on the receiver has faded, and that on the buttplate worn and now there is some rust on the heel. Walnut stock with old oil finish has never been sanded, and has sharp SWP/1884 cartouche near the buttplate (instead of near the action area where the stock was fragile). Good circle P. Barrel has sharp V/P/eagle head. Rear sight is the correct C-R marked with slotless screws. Top of the receiver rail is marked “U.S.- SPRINGFIELD.- 1884.” The walnut stock has assorted mostly very minor dings and bruises of a 140 year old martial arm, and a small chipped area by the selector lever on the right side of the receiver ring. Bubba chopped off the forend ahead of the lower band, and neatly filled the bandspring notch and cleaning rod hole. The forend on these is a bit different than a trapdoor, so you will need to make one from scratch. The upper band, ramrod stop and forend tip are standard trapdoor parts, and the cleaning rod is the same except just a bit shorter. The rarity of this model, and the high condition make this a restoration project that deserves to be finished up, even with the magazine track problem common to most of them. Waiting for an equally nice example with the magazine guts may mean a very long wait indeed. Antique, no FFL needed. $2495.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20131 U.S. MODEL 1863 .58 CALIBER “LINDSAY DOUBLE MUSKET” RESTORATION PROJECT - (Serial number- none) The Lindsay “double musket” is one of the most unusual U.S. military firearms ever made. It resembles a typical civil war .58 caliber rifle musket, but has TWO hammers at the breech with a central lock instead of a single hammer and side mounted lock. To load, you insert powder followed by a Minie ball and ram it home- then load another round on top of the first! Then with hammers at half cock, cap both the nipples. When both hammers are cocked, pulling the single trigger will cause the right hammer to fall striking the right nipple. The flash hole extends through the breech section and enters the barrel about 2 inches from the breech, so the flash from the right nipple will ignite the charge closest to the muzzle. The left hammer is supposed to stay cocked and when the trigger is pulled a second time, the left hammer falls, firing the rear charge. Theoretically, the rear charge could be kept in reserve, or the soldier could just achieve a greater volume of fire by loading both charges and firing both before reloading. The concept of superimposed charges was not new, and both Lindsay and Walch had been making sumperimposed charge handguns for a while before the Double Musket was adopted by the Army, to be made at Springfield Armory. The concept was technically sound, but the mechanics were problematic and if loading was not done carefully there was a danger of flash from the front charge leaking past the rear bullet and igniting the rear charge at the same time. Only 1,000 of these were made at Springfield, and some were issued for trials in the field and saw use at Cold Harbor with negative reports, so they were withdrawn and replaced by conventional muskets. One of the problem was that when both charges fired, it often cracked or broke the stocks at the wrist. Many were cut down by Bannerman to “cadet length” to make them salable to youth cadet groups, so full length original examples are scarce, and pricey. Hicks’ “U.S. Military Firearms” has excellent drawings showing the details of these scarce guns, and there is some good info and drawings on line, although some of the text was scanned from an image and not corrected, but close enough you can figure it out: https://www.bevfitchett.us/firearms-curiosa/fume-sjwfftiitg-gut-xms.html This rifle is a restoration project, with the potential to be a good representative example at a modest price. The stock is near excellent with good cartouched, and very few dings, but it has been cut ahead of the middle band, and the cracked wrist has been neatly repaired. The barrel was cut down at one point and restored to full length by welding a front section at the middle band location, and only detected if you look down the bore and see that the rifling does not line up at that point. The lock is missing the upper part of the right hammer, and has mechanical issues including broken sear(?) spring. A couple of screws are incorrect replacements. Steel parts cleaned to bright, except for the two barrel bands. The missing piece of the forend, stock tip and upper band, and ramrod are the same as the standard M1863 rifle musket. A complete M1863 Double Musket will run about $2,500-4,500. This one is a bargain at only $725.00 (View Picture)

17037 RARE BUT JUNKY AND CHEAP- U.S. MODEL 1884 EXPERIMENTAL ROUND ROD BAYONET RIFLE- RESTORATION PROJECT - Serial number 341516. Springfield made only 1,000 of these in 1884, and nearly all were later updated to Model 1888 configuration, making survivors almost impossible to find and priced in the $5,000 up range if you can find one. This could be restored into a representative example, or a bold sinner unfraid of Divine retribution might just cut it down into a cheap imitation carbine. What you see is what you get. Barreled action with rare M1884 experimental round rod bayonet base. A latch assembly is included, but not installed, as seen in the photos. The special front sight hood is included, but missing the sight blade. The stock is a standard rifle stock modified for this model. Bore is good, not great. Buttplate, bands and trigger guard included, but lock assembly is NOT included. Did we mention it was CHEAP? ANTIQUE, NO FFL needed. $350.00 (View Picture)

22740 RARE UNMODIFIED MODEL 1892 KRAG BUTTSTOCK- TYPE FOR CLEANING ROD - This is one of the few stocks which remains correct and escaped modification to the 1896 configuration by rounding the toe, drilling the butt for tools and oiler, and filling the ramrod groove. But, alas, Bubba wanted a Bambi blaster so he wacked the forend off. This stock has the correct original straight toe, with the thin, no-trap buttplate and very good legible JSA 1895 and circle P. It also has the letter “J: near the cartouche, which I believe is a Span-Am era overhaul marking, but I do not know the location. Initials WFP lightly scratched on the bottom of the stock ahead of the trigger guard but not very noticeable. Correct oval head large buttplate screw, but like most Krags, the finish is gone from the buttplate. It does not have any of the usual cracks or damage in the action area, but is good and solid. It is cut at the lower band, but the end of the cleaning rod groove is clearly visible, and it was never enlarged for the 1896 filler strip. It had some ugly varnish stripped without harming the markings, and has the expected assorted minor dings and scrapes of an issued arm. Restoration of the stock would involve splicing a new forend piece in place, with a groove for the cleaning rod. This is not a hard job, but requires some patience and skill. Finding an unmodified full length stock is less likely than winning the lottery the same day you marry a nymphomaniac heiress to a distillery, so finding even this one is about the only option to restore a M1892 Krag with correct metal but a later stock. $395.00 (View Picture)

14811 COMMIE BLOC "FENCING MUSKET" - Obviously patterned after the Mosin Nagant, but then altered with a block of wood resembling an AK style magazine added to the bottom, these were used for teaching bayonet fighting. The spring loaded tip can be depressed about 4 inches into the barrel, similar to a pogo stick. This is a fairly common approach, and I have seen fencing muskets with the same concept from Sweden and England as well. The U.S. used bayonets with passed spring steel blades, and later switched to "pugil sticks". Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. These may be East German as some are marked "MODELL 4.853" which sounds German to me. Overall excellent condition (except for some scattered light surface rust that should clean up). Complete with original excellent sling. Still legal in Kalifornia, but may be next on their ban list. Non-firearm, no FFL needed. Photo shows a typical example, but this is one we were going to keep and is nicer than the one in the photo. $95.00 (View Picture)


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