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Collectible Antique Longarms
(pre-1899)

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If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items liste by the BATFE as Curiios & Relics directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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Collectible Antique Longarms for sale (pre-1899)

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We have divided this catalog into several sections:
(new items are added at the top of each section)

U.S. Military Antique Longarms
Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)
Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)
Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

U.S. Military Antique Longarms

**NEW ADDITION** 22386 RARE U.S. SPRINGFIELD MODEL 1865 JOSLYN .50 CALIBER BREECHLOADING RIFLE - Serial number M1266, matching, still in rimfire configuration. The Joslyn rifle is one of the most historically significant, yet little known U.S. martial long arms. It was the first breechloading rifle (made as a breechloader) produced by Springfield Armory. Only 3,007 were made in the first half of 1865. (Springfield’s only prior breechloading work was conversion of 56 .69 caliber Morse conversion muskets in 1859, but they were never issued and the project ended at the start of the Civil War.) The Joslyn rifle design was simple to make and operate. It married Joslyn’s rotating breech with a full length rifle stock and furniture adapted from the Springfield .58 caliber muskets. The breech actions were actually purchased from Joslyn, which had supplied 16,000 carbines using this breech design during the War. Everything for the rifles but the breech actions were made by Springfield. These were chambered for a .50-60-450 rimfire cartridge made at Frankford Arsenal specifically for these rifles. Although a .56-50 Spencer would fit and fire, that was a much less powerful cartridge. Of the 3,007 Springfield Joslyn rifles made, some 1,600 were converted to .50-70 centerfire in 1870 and sold to France, with many of those eventually being converted to shotguns, making surviving examples in original rimfire much scarcer than most people realize. The standard Model 1855 bayonet with 18 inch blade will fit these, but Springfield made 3,000 bayonets with 20inch blades for the Joslyn, so that the overall “reach” of the bayonet tip would be the same as the M1855-63 .58 caliber rifle muskets. By June, 1865, some 794 Joslyn rifles had been issued to the newly raised 5th and 8th U.S. Veteran Volunteer Infantry (VVI) Regiments, along with 200,000 rounds of ammunition. The Veteran Volunteer Infantry Regiments were raised mainly from soldiers who had competed a previous enlistment, or had recovered from wounds, and one of the incentives was to be issue of the best possible arms, which included Henry rifles for some regiments, and Joslyns for others. Since the war ended just before the VVI units were raised, they performed mainly garrison type duties, with the 5th serving around Washington and also at fortifications in Rhode Island and New York. The Veteran Volunteer units were mustered out in 1866 as part of the “peace dividend” as the Army was slashed from over 1,304,000 men at the time of Lee’s surrender in April 1865, to only 54,302. When the 5th and 8th VVI were mustered out 171 of the soldiers took advantage of the May 30, 1865 General Orders 101 which allowed discharged troops to buy their arms at very low prices. ($6.00 for muskets, $10.00 for Spencer carbines, or $8.00 for all other carbines; $15 for Henry rifles; revolvers were priced at $8.00 and swords were $3.00.) This is an excellent example of this scarce and important U.S. military rifle. Bore is excellent plus. Metal parts were gently cleaned long ago and have very nice correct bright metal finish on all the parts except for the sight and trigger whish have most of their clued finish, and the breech mechanism with retains most of its blackened case hardened finish. The lock has the flaky, speckled appearance often seen on Springfield muskets, but overall a muted bright/dull steel gray mix. The stock is a pleasing medium brown walnut with an old linseed oil finish, with only a few very minor storage or handling blemishes, nothing worth singling out. A previous owner’s name “JAS.DODDS” is neatly stamped in small letters on both sides of the butt. It is possible, but unproven, that this may be the name of a Veteran Volunteer soldier who brought the rifle home with him at the end of the war. Men named James Dodds served in nine units from various states which might have had men end up in the VVI units. Again, the Springfield Joslyn is a key milestone in Springfield Armory production, and a great starting point for a collection of Springfield Armory cartridge arms. McAulay’s “Rifles of the U.S. Army” is the best source of info on these rifles. This is a duplicate from John’s collection. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2250.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20448 SCARCE U.S. NAVY BREECHLOADING .52 CALIBER JENKS CARBINE- MINTY! - No serial number, one of about 4,250 made 1843-46 by Nathan P. Ames in Springfield, Massachusetts. Ames is well known for their manufacture of swords, tools and cutlery, and casting bronze cannons and statues. But, their only firearms were the Jenks breechloaders and some “box lock” pistols for the Navy and Revenue Service in the mid-1840s. The Jenks are the earliest U.S. martial breechloaders, preceded only by those of John H. Hall, and unique as the ONLY sidehammer or “mule ear” arms ever adopted by the U.S. military. One official document described the operation: “Opened by drawing back top lever. By means of a link this draws back a sliding breech-plug, and exposes a round hole in the top of the barrel a little larger than the ball. The ball is inserted through this and allowed to run forward to it seat. The powder is then poured in and pressed forward by reversing the movement of the lever. The forward end of the lever covers this hole when the piece is closed and protects it from weather. The piece is fired by a side hammer, the comb of which is folded so as to lap over the end of the lever and keep it down. The position of the joints of the link, being in line with the abutment on the tang of the receiver, keeps the breech from blowing open; the hammer is an additional precaution. This arm has no gas-check.” The Jenks was surprisingly durable, and in a 1842 Navy trial, 14,813 successive shots were fired in a durability test - before the nipple failed. Although mechanically ingenious, the military was not ready for breechloaders, and one trials board reporting on the Jenks carbine, expressed the opinion that it was a well-built arm and would be 'suitable for service use if converted to a muzzle-loader....” Survival rate on these is low. This one is excellent plus, with nearly all the original lacquer browned finish on the barrel, case hardening on lock and breech mechanism, and brightly polished operating surfaces. Rifled with 6 grooves, the bore is superb- bright and shiny. The stock has a few small storage and handling blemishes and one ½” ding on the left side of the butt, but mostly retains the raised grain of an unissued martial arm with the original oil finish. Sharp cartouche. This has been in John’s collection for many years, and the previous owner was President of the Winchester Arms Collectors Association, a sophisticated U.S. martial arms collector. A great chance to own a most interesting U.S. martial arm with unique mechanical features and history, and in superb condition. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $3650.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 16586 MODEL 1867 U.S. NAVY .50 CALIBER ROLLING BLOCK CARBINE (RESTORED) - Serial number 1296 on left side of barrel. The U.S. Navy love affair with the simple and relatively cheap Remington Rolling Block system began at the end of the Civil War. The first guns purchased were about 6,500 Model 1865 pistols in .50 rimfire, later modified to .50 centerfire in 1867. In 1867 the Navy bought 5,000 carbines made at Remington, and 498 cadet rifles made at Springfield using actions supplied by Remington. Both of these used a .50-45 cartridge, basically a slightly shorter and lighter round than the .50-70 used most U.S. military rifles of the era. In 1870 they decided to get rolling block rifles for the entire Navy, and arranged for 10,000 of them to be made entirely at Springfield under license from Remington. The 1867 carbines continued to serve into the 1880s when replaced by .45-70 arms, and were sold as surplus. With no demand for .50 caliber guns, but many foreign buyers wanting rolling blocks in .43 Spanish or other calibers, the surplus dealers pulled the barrels and forends off the Navy carbines and installed new barrels and forends for a fraction of the cost of making a new gun, and sold them quickly. The “front half” of the Navy carbines eventually were used to restore or replicate the now scarce U.S. Navy rolling block carbines. The original actions were marked with inspector initials “FCW” and “P” on the right side of the receiver, and used a stud on the extension of the rolling block as an extractor. The restored guns usually were later model actions with the bar type extractor and lacking the Navy inspection markings, but visually identical to the original configuration. This carbine is one of those restorations, using a front half which was probably mint unissued with a perfect mirror bright and sharp bore, and 98% original blue finish, anchor inspector stamp at the breech, and FCW in banner cartouche on the right side of the minty forend. The buttsock is nearly as nice. The action is mechanically excellent although the exterior is steel gray with some staining and salt and pepper roughness, but still a nice looking gun. There is a tiny FCW/P stamped on the upper right of the receiver, but it is not authentic (or even correct in size or location). This has the bar type extractor. A good representative example to complete a U.S. Navy small arms collection. This is from John’s collection, and was described as a restoration when bought, and is being sold with the same caveat. We have never seen a nice USN M1867 carbine for sale, so if you want one, this is an affordable and attractive option. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 10103 RARE U.S. MODEL 1892 30-40 KRAG RIFLE- SERIAL NUMBER 71- (RESTORATION PROJECT) - Serial number 71, probably made in the first week of production in 1894. Model 1892 Krag rifles did not actually begin production until 1894, due to delays caused by complaints about adoption of a “foreign” instead of domestic invention. Only about 24,562 Model 1892 rifles were made, before switching to the Model 1896. In 1900 Springfield Armory recalled all of the M1892s still in service and updated them to Model 1896 configuration. Some 18,559 are documented as being converted, but as Mallory notes in his book “…evidently many of these unconverted rifles were lost or destroyed in service or were scrapped, because unaltered Model 1892 rifles are extremely scarce.” The consensus among advanced collectors is that they are about as scarce as Gas Trap Garands, or M1903 Rod Bayonet rifles or Pedersen devices, with no more than an estimated 50 to 100 examples surviving in, or restored to, original configuration. The Model 1892 is easily recognizable by the full length cleaning rod mounted under the barrel; the upper band having a small guide for the rod; the flat no-trap buttplate, not curved at the toe; the short handguard leaving the receiver ring exposed; the flat, uncrowned muzzle; the lack of a hold open pin on the extractor or the corresponding notch on the receiver; and the back of the cocking piece being box shaped instead of tapered. This example is mostly correct with the exception of the cut off forend, missing upper band and cleaning rod. The bolt body is the correct early type, but not numbered to the gun. The cocking piece has the later beveled edge and the extractor is a later one modified to look like the early type. Correct M1894 sight installed although one of the screws is not exactly right. Barrel retains the flat muzzle crown. Bore shows wear near the breech but stronger rifling as you get to the muzzle, but it is rough and rusted. This has the matching serial number “71” on the receiver, size plate, loading gate, follower and extractor. The stock has been stripped and lightly sanded, leaving a barely legible JSA cartouche over faint 1894, and only a hint of the circle P. Forend was cut ahead of the lower band, leaving plenty of room to splice a new forend under the band. Metal parts have no original finish, only dull gray mixed with patina and scattered patches of light roughness and pitting. This is a “wish it were better gun” but hard to find in ANY condition, and the two digit serial number makes it more desirable. The Krag was a major milestone in U.S. military small arms evolution, and only a few collectors are ever fortunate enough to own one which escaped conversion to Model 1896. This is an excellent opportunity to get a restoration project at a very reasonable price. Antique, no FFL needed. $525.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 15010 U.S. NAVY MODEL 1870 SPRINGFIELD ROLLING BLOCK .50-70 RIFLE-POSSIBLE USMC - (No serial number) The U.S. Navy love affair with the simple and relatively cheap Remington Rolling Block system began at the end of the Civil War. The first guns purchased were about 6,500 Model 1865 pistols in .50 rimfire, later modified to .50 centerfire in 1867. In 1867 the Navy bought 5,000 carbines made at Remington, and 498 cadet rifles made at Springfield using actions supplied by Remington. Both of these used a .50-45 cartridge, basically a slightly shorter and lighter round than the .50-70 used most U.S. military rifles of the era. In 1870 they decided to get rolling block rifles for the entire Navy, and arranged for them to be made at Springfield under license from Remington. The Navy ordered 10,000 rifles, but by the time they were delivered, the Franco-Prussian War had started and the French were desperate to by any arms they could find chambered for .50-70 ammunition, and were busy buying up arms in America. The Navy decided that the rear sights on their brand new rifles “were in a dangerous location” and condemned the entire lot so they could be sold to France. The French paid enough that the Navy was able to turn around and buy 12,000 replacement rifles with the “defective” sight problem fixed. This is one of the few times a government agency has ever made a profit on anything! This rifle is one of the second type of Model 1870 rifles with the “improved” rear sight location. It is an above average example with the stock showing only a few assorted dings and scrapes of an issued martial arm. The light colored scrape on the right side of the butt is only a surface scrape where the finish got disturbed and will blend in with a little linseed oil. One very tiny chip on the left shoulder of the buttstock against the receiver. Bore is fine to excellent with bright and sharp rifling although there are a few small patches of light roughness. Receiver has traces of color case hardening mixed with dull steel gray and age patina. Barrel appear to have old arsenal blue finish and looks good. P over H.B.R. inspector marks on left side at the breech. Excellent mechanics. The rear sight leaf had the top of the leaf damaged and neatly braze repaired, easily overlooked except for the brass color. Correct original single shoulder cleaning rod. Stock furniture finishes bright with mellow dull gray/age patina mix. These take a handsome brass handled sword bayonet, which is being sold separately, but listed below so you don’t have to search for it. The bayonet lug on the bottom of the barrel has been slightly modified to remove the “lede” or guide portion so that a .58 caliber musket socket bayonet can be used if desired. Bayonet expert Jerry Janzen contends on page 96 of his “Bayonets of the Remington Cartridge Period” that the rifles with partially removed lugs like this were modified for the U.S. Marine Corps so M1855 socket bayonet could be used in the field, or the fancy sword bayonet for ceremonial occasions. This is more plausible because the Navy only ordered 10,000 bayonets, even though they ended up with 12,000 rifles. It is also possible that surplus dealers or Bubba did the modification, but in any case either the M1855 socket or M1870 USN sword bayonet will fit. See below for special deal on the USN M1870 bayonet with special price if ordered with this rifle. These are duplicates from John’s collection which won awards at two recent gun shows. If requested we will send a copy of a PowerPoint presentation he did which has a lot of info on USN small arms 1845-1890. ANTIQUE, NO FFL needed. $1,295.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 15010B - U.S. NAVY MODEL 1870 SWORD BAYONET & SCABBARD
(Janzen 209-3) Made in 1870 for use on the M1870 .50-70 rolling block rifles made by Springfield Armory. These are big, handsome and interesting. The double edge blade is 20 inches long with a central fuller. Overall 24.75 inches long with the heavy cast brass handle having a “fish scale” pattern for better grip, and the seal of the Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance for decoration. There is a deep hole in the grip to allow it to slip over the cleaning rod so the bayonet is under the barrel instead of off to one side where the balance is messed up, and also reducing the weight of the bayonet somewhat. This is an overall VG example with some areas of stain, roughness or light pitting as shown in the photos. Ricasso is stamped USN/GGS/1870 on one side with no traces of AMES MFG CO, CHICOPEE MASS on the other due to roughness and pitting. Brass-mounted black leather scabbard is in excellent condition and much harder to find than the bayonets, especially in nice condition. We would prefer to sell this with the USN M1870 rifle, and with the rifle the price is $275.00 and shipping free with the rifle. Purchased separately the shipping will be extra and bayonet & scabbard price is $350.00 (View Picture)

7192 U.S. MODEL 1817 .54 CALIBER FLINTLOCK “COMMON RIFLE” BY SIMEON NORTH 1825 - Back then, infantry troops were armed with smoothbore muskets and engaged in linear tactics firing volleys at close range and then attacked with bayonets. Specially designated “Rifle Regiments” armed with rifles deployed as skirmishers, scouts, advance guards etc, and used individual aimed shots against officers, artillery crews and other high value targets and to detect any enemy advances. Their rifles were not equipped with bayonets. The Model 1817 marked the first really large procurement of rifles for the U.S. Army Previously, about 3,500 rifles similar to a Kentucky rifle were procured from several Pennsylvania makers in 1792-1794. Between 1803 and 1820 about 19,000 Model 1803 flintlock rifles were made at Harpers Ferry. This new pattern was adopted in 1817 and eventually about 18,000 were made by 5 contractors circa 1817-1840. In 1819 production began on Hall’s patent breech loading rifles with interchangeable parts, and to avoid confusion the Halls were generally called “Hall” or “patent” rifles while the traditional M1817 rifles were called “common rifles.” This is a nice example of the classic and important Model 1817 Common rifle, although it is a professionally done reconversion to flintlock. Bore has the original seven groove rifling, and while filthy should clean up to be VG. Former owner actually used this for some hunting and reports it was a good shooter. (We sell all guns as collector items only and must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) This is overall G-VG condition with full length stock with minimal dings and bruises, and one tiny age crack between the rear lock screw and the breech shoulder. Metal parts are a dull steel gray mixed with some staining and salt and pepper roughness and scattered light surface rust. It really need a good cleaning, of the metal parts and some linseed oil and wax on the stock which would improve the appearance quite a bit. Both of the fragile sling swivels are intact, a rarity for these. Patchbox functions properly. Ramrod is a correct style reproduction. Despite the large numbers made, they are not common on the collector market, and this was in John’s collection for a number of years. A nice gun to represent an important step in U.S. martial arms evolution. These make an especially interesting display when contrasted with one of the Hall rifles. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1595.00 (View Picture)

20873 U.S. LINE THROWING GUN- KILGORE MODEL GR-52 - Serial number 617 with USCG approval 160/040/4/0 as marked on the frame. Theoretically, the approval number should allow dating these to within a five year period corresponding with the date of USCG approval under section section 160.040 covering life saving appliances. However, no complete list has been found of all approvals, so with only a few scattered examples the best I can do is estimate that this was circa 1960s-1980s, but I believe the basic model dates to 1952. This is a “Schermuly” type life saving line throwing gun which uses a small pistol type launcher firing a stubby “impulse-ignition cartridge.” Before firing, a rocket motor with an attached wire frame sticking back for attachment of the “line” is inserted in the muzzle. When fired, the impulse ignition cartridge flash ignites the rocket motor and kicks the rocket out on its way. The basic concept was invented by Richard Schermuly, a British seaman and inventor around the beginning of the 20th century. However, despite its simplicity, low cost, and effectives (so easy a young child could use it) the concept was not adopted until 1929 by the International Conference for Saving of Life at Sea Treaty (SOLAS). Multiple types of line throwing devices have been invented over the years since 1807 when George Manby came up with a mortar for the purpose of line throwing, followed by David Lyle’s cannons in the 1870s and shoulder fired guns by Ingersoll, Coston and others in the 1880s and later. Ships still carry line throwers in various configuration, and they are also widely used by firefighters. Today most ships have switched to Schermuly type rockets, but fired from a single-use plastic canister which is not subject to regulation as a “firearm” by gun-phobic foreign governments. As life saving devices, with the bore obstructed by small projections to prevent firing of projectiles but not interfering with the launching of the line throwing rocket, the Kilgore GR-52 is not considered a firearm and no FFL is needed to purchase. Overall fine to excellent outside with most of the gloss black paint finish remaining. The bore has corrosion from firing and poor cleaning, or maybe just exposure to salt air for extended periods. I discovered that it is missing the extractor, but since no one has the impulse cartridges or rockets any more who cares. These have a handle on the top of the barrel to help hold it when firing, not so much for the very limited recoil, but because the gun with rocket inserted is heavy and you want it under good control when on a heaving deck of a ship in distress. I have done a lot of research on various line throwing guns, and would be happy to share a copy upon request, or will try to post it on our other site, ArmsCollectors.com, and it will eventually be posted at http://ASOAC.org for whom it was written and first published. Price for Kilgore GR-52 line throwing pistol and one fired case is $265.00 (View Picture)

**REDUCED!**20254 HPH221 - TRAPDOOR SPRINGFIELD FENCING MUSKET (TYPE IV) WITH BAYONET AND PROTECTIVE GLOVE- NICE! (From the Hart Collection!)
Serial number 16625? with the last number hidden by the breech block, with sharp SWP 1881 cartouche and circle P. (Flayderman 9A-394)
Bayonet fighting was considered an essential skill prior to and during World War I. To avoid costly damage to newly adopted Model 1903 rifles (and the troops who would use them) the U.S. Army provided "fencing muskets". Obsolete .45-70 “trapdoor” Springfields cut to the same length as the Model 1903 rifle, with hammers, sights, and sharp corners removed. A flexible spring steel bayonet with a rounded tip was used. Early Fencing Muskets made between 1906 and 1909 used socket bayonets and are called “Type III” by collectors. About 10,000-12,000 of the later “Type IV” made between 1909 and 1916 using flat blade bayonets with two mounting rings, like this one. This is in well above average condition without the numerous scars, nicks dings and gouges incurred during hand to hand combat training, although it does have a couple minor dings and one large dent just behind the lower band on the right side as shown in the photos. Breechblock camshaft was ground flush at time of conversion so it is impossible to open the breech. (Barbarians can cut a small slot into the remains of the shaft so you can open the block to determine the full serial number.) Survival rate on these is extremely low as most were stripped for parts or turned into ersatz carbines even though the barrel ended up 21 inches long instead of 22.
This one is in excellent condition except for the stock dings noted above. About 95% original blue remains, turning a bit plum on the buttplate and a few other areas. Great case colors on the breechplug tang and faded colors on the breech block

This comes with the best Model 1912 Fencing Bayonet we have seen (Janzen 236-2). Like the earlier Model 1909 it has two “crossguard” type pieces attached to the rear of the blade, so that the muzzle rings slip over the exposed part of the barrel and are then held in place with screws. The M1912 added a much thicker area on the right side of the muzzle rings to strengthen them where the screw holes removed so much metal. The blade is made of spring steel, with a 90 degree twist ahead of the muzzle, and a rounded tip, all covered with leather. This one has clear Rock Island Arsenal 1914 date and indistinct inspector initials.

This also comes with an original Fencing Musket practice protective gauntlet for the left arm. It has a stiff fiber forearm protective section, lined with heavy felt, and a leather glove filled with horsehair to protect the hand. This is mint unissued, with sharp maker marks, 1918 date and ordnance bomb. Some little critter was hungry once and nibbled some of the leather off the tip of the forefinger, otherwise abut perfect. The fencing muskets turn up from time to time, but this is the only piece of the protective gear we have ever seen.

This is being sold as the complete set with the trapdoor cut to M1903 length for fencing musket use, the correct bayonet and the protective gauntlet, and all are in far above average condition for these scarce items. A very unusual U.S. martial long arm which belongs in any collection of M1903 Springfields, or trapdoors, or bayonets. In fact, there are a dozen or more different "fencing muskets" from various countries that would make an interesting collecting niche to pursue. $1,195.00 REDUCED TO $950.00! (View Picture)

(PROVENANCE NOTE- This is item number 221 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms. Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector. A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA. This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and has a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart. The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)

**REDUCED!** 22054 HPH14 - U.S. MODEL 1888 .45-70 TRAPDOOR SPRINGFIELD ROD BAYONET MODEL ODDITY- FANTASTIC BORE! (From the Howard P. Hart & Jean H. Hart Collection of Historic Arms)
Serial number 97794 assembled circa 1889, along with a number of other widely spread “out of range” early numbers using up serviceable receivers on hand.  Over 60,000 of these rod bayonet rifles were made 1889-1893, and many of them were used in the Spanish American War although there is no history for this specific rifle, or even any nearby numbers on which to base speculation.  The M1888 rifles were made at the end of the trapdoor era using the same silly idea (first tried in 1833 with Hall carbines and later repeated again with the M1903 Springfield prior to 1905) whereby a rod bayonet would be used, eliminating the need for a separate bayonet.  Since the Indian Wars had not seen much (if any) use of the bayonet, it probably seemed like a good idea, especially since the cost would be cheaper than getting back into the socket bayonet manufacturing business.  Up until that point most of the trapdoor bayonets had been made by altering left over Civil War era .58 caliber musket bayonets, and Springfield had run out of them.  This is an excellent example of the Model 1888 Rod Bayonet Trapdoor.  Bore is excellent, exceptionally sharp and bright.  Stock has been lightly sanded with semi-legible SWP over 1889 cartouche and circle P.  The stock is a mellow medium brown color with an old oil finish.  It looks like there may have been a chip repair between the receiver tang and rear guard screw and a few spots on the top of the wrist which look like gouges had been filled, but maybe the grain is just funky that and undamaged.  There are a few assorted minor handling and storage dings or bruises expected on an issued martial arm. 
The bore is utterly fantastic, mirror bright and with sharp three groove rifling. The 1884 dated block has some nice case hardening colors on the underside, but the top has faded to a splotchy gray mix.   Remaining metal parts with about 96-97% original blue finish, trending to a plum shade, showing a little normal wear on high points.  Excellent mechanics.  The hammer screw is an incorrect replacement (CW flat style head instead of rounder head).  Reportedly these were tough to shoot accurately due to the solid attachment of the heavy rod bayonet to the muzzle, so that when fired, the rod acted like a tuning fork- vibrating the whole time the bullet was headed out the barrel.  Simply removing the rod when shooting eliminates that problem, and the Buffington sights (especially with addition of a front sight hood) are capable of excellent accuracy.  Butt trap has the standard two holes with a slot along one edge for carrying a M1879 combination tool, M1882 headless shell extractor and a cleaning tip for the rod bayonet.  The front sight blade is original, but can be easily replaced with a higher one so a person might actually hit something at less than the 200 yard zero with the original blade.  A really nice rifle, but not so screaming minty that you would be afraid to shoot it once in a while if you like.  (Note: all guns sold as collector items only and must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to shooting.)  Of the 60,000 rod bayonet rifles made, a great many have been chopped down for sporting use over the years, (perhaps up to 30-40 percent of them in our opinion) making these a lot less common than the production figures suggest.  As the last of the single shot, blackpowder rifles, this is a key milestone in U.S. martial arms history, as well as an iconic weapon of the Spanish American War and Philippine Insurrection.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1,250.00 REDUCED TO $995.00! (View Picture)
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is item number 14 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html

**REDUCED!** 22054 HPH112 - COLONIAL-FEDERAL PERIOD NEW ENGLAND MILITIA MUSKET CIRCA 1792-1830 (From the Howard P. Hart & Jean H. Hart Collection of Historic Arms)
The American Revolution showed that our nation’s independence and freedom was won by a well armed citizenry, not a standing army.  In fact, prior to the War of 1812 the active Army strength was usually in the range of 2,000 to 4,500 men, mostly in coastal fortifications and on the Indian frontier.  The Militia Act of 1792 required that every able bodied free white male “…provide himself with a good musket or firelock, a sufficient bayonet and belt, two spare flints, and a knapsack, a pouch, with a box therein, to contain not less than twenty four cartridges, suited to the bore of his musket or firelock, each cartridge to contain a proper quantity of powder and ball; or with a good rifle, knapsack, shot-pouch, and powder-horn, twenty balls suited to the bore of his rifle, and a quarter of a pound of powder; and shall appear so armed, accoutred and provided, when called out to exercise or into service.”  It further specified that after 1797 all muskets “shall be of bores sufficient for balls of the eighteenth part of a pound” which was .69 caliber. 
While compliance with the law was lackluster, it was most nearly observed in New England, and in some cases arms were even furnished at public expense.  However, both those and the privately purchased arms tended to follow similar patterns.  While these are referred to as “Militia muskets” to the owner they were also utilitarian tools suitable for hunting deer with ball ammunition, or when loaded with shot the .69 caliber smoothbore barrel performed pretty much the same as a 12 gauge shotgun.  In general, these tended to resemble a lightened British Brown Bess with pin fastened barrels, similar style (but lighter) buttplate, trigger guard, sideplate and ramrod pipes of brass.  Locks were usually smaller “rifle size.”  The side plate was often a distinctive modified “S” pattern. 
This one has the traditional British military .75 caliber barrel, and probably pre-dates the 1797 deadline for switch to .69 caliber barrels and was possibly salvaged from an earlier gun as it lacks the Massachusetts proof markings found on many of the later militia muskets.  The smoothbore barrel is 41 inches long and has a top mounted bayonet stud.  The walnut full length stock reaches to within 3 inches of the muzzle, and is checkered at the wrist as many were.  The barrel has no visible proof marks and some used unmarked salvaged barrels, or salvaged military musket barrels with U.S. or foreign proof marks, or in some cases the Massachusetts proof marks consisting of PM, initials and date.  The 4 5/8” x 15/16” lock was originally flint, but later converted to percussion, and is marked I.P. MOORE/ WARRANTED.  The front lock screw is missing and the hole plugged, the owner probably figuring it would work okay without it so why waste money getting it repaired.  The uncleaned brass furniture has a heavy chocolate patina.  The wooden ramorod is old but now old is uncertain, but it is more or less correct. The iron barrel and lock have a smooth dark patina with some roughness around the drum conversion and nipple area.
These are the types of arms which were brought out for militia musters, and when called to service to repress rebellious farmers, or fight hostile Indians, or even when called to service against the British in our Second War for Independence in 1812-1815.  They remained in service as the militia program atrophied in the first half of the 19th century.  However, even then, Massachusetts and the New England militias were considered to be the best, “although a cynic would note the competition was not keen” as Dr. John K. Mahon, the foremost historian of militia affairs noted.
This is an important historical piece, explaining much of the philosophy of our founders towards military service and the necessity for free men to keep and bear arms.  The later .69 caliber militia muskets are seen fairly often, but these early .75 caliber arms are seldom encountered as they were no longer approved after 1797.  ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $795.00 REDUCED TO $695.00! (View Picture)
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is item number 112 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html

**REDUCED!** 22054 HPH190 - SUPERB U.S. MODEL 1842 SPRINGFIELD .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE PERCUSSION MUSKET MADE IN 1853- MINTY! - Made at Springfield in 1853 with matching dates on lockplate and barrel. Springfield made about 172,000 of these 1844-1855 (about 14,500 in 1853), and Harpers Ferry made about 103,000 more. This model is a significant historical milestone, as it was the first percussion musket adopted for the U.S. Army, and the first to be made with 100% interchangeable parts by both the National Armories. It was also the last of the smoothbore muskets, marking the end of the lineage traced back to the French Charleville muskets first supplied to the American army during the Revolutionary War. At the outbreak of the Civil War, nearly every available M1842 musket was pressed into service, and saw hard usage by raw troops during the early years of the war, and many remained in service until the war’s end. This is one of a very small number that somehow escaped active service and remains in near mint condition. These are very hard to find in better condition grades and this is much better than the one in John’s collection. As nice as you will find one of these guns! Retains about 99% of the original bright polished finish, somewhat obscured by a film of dried oil and tobacco smoke. (Mr. Hart was a smoker and this was one of the favorite pieces in his collection for nearly 20 years, so it was exposed to a lot of smoke.) If desired, a gentle cleaning with a mild solvent and 0000 steel wool will remove the film and a good coat of oil will protect the finish for future generations. The bore is as nice as the outside, probably unfired since manufacture and not even pin prick roughness around the nipple. The walnut stock is excellent with only a few insignificant storage or handling blemishes other than two scrapes to the left of the barrel tang and a ding on the left of butt as shown in the photos. The wood has a nice medium brown tone with just the original oiled finish and crisp edges and the slightly raised grain of an unissued martial arm. There is a crisp cartouche on the left flat a script JAS in an oval on the left flat. John A. Shaeffer is known to be a Harpers Ferry inspector, and his mark has been found on a number of M1842 Springfield muskets in excellent condition. The Daum and Pate book on inspectors speculates as to how this came to be, possibly from parts switching in the WW2 era or earlier, but no one know for sure. Despite the incongruity of the inspector mark, this remains one of the nicest Model 1842 muskets we have ever seen anywhere. Overall an outstanding example of a US M1842 musket from the famous Springfield Armory, extremely crisp and sharp throughout. It is really amazing that a 165-year-old military musket has survived in this fabulous condition. The M1842 is an essential gun for any serious collector of US martial long arms. It was the first interchangeable parts US infantry musket, the first percussion US infantry musket, and the last of the large-bore, smoothbore US infantry muskets. Due to the Civil War these historic arms’ service life extended well after they were rendered obsolete by rifle muskets. As such, they are an important addition to any Civil War arms collection, as well as an indispensable part of the history of the development of U.S. infantry longarms. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $3,995.00 REDUCED TO $3,600.00!

PROVENANCE NOTE- This is item number 190 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms. Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector. A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA. This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart. The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.) Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html (View Picture)

**HOLD** 22054 HPH5 – U.S. MODEL 1816 (TYPE 1) .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE FLINTLOCK MUSKET HARPERS FERRY 1821 CONVERTED TO PERCUSSION- NICE!! (From the Hart Collection!) - One of the nicest M1816 conversion muskets we have seen with unsanded stock, sharp cartouches, sharp markings on metal parts, great bore and extremely pleasing overall appearance. The Model 1816 musket is underappreciated in terms of its historical significance, being the primary infantry arm for nearly 40 years, (longer than any other single model except the M16) and used from right after the War of 1812 through the Mexican War. Huge numbers were converted to percussion, and for at least the first year or two of the Civil War many more troops were using smoothbore ..69 caliber muskets (M1816 converted or M1842) than the better known and more effective .58 caliber rifle muskets. Harpers Ferry was as productive as Springfield Armory, and made about 350,000 M1816 muskets while Springfield made 325,000. The survival rate for Harpers Ferry guns seems to be much lower and finding examples in good condition is much harder. The M1816 Type I muskets are easily recognized by the use of a separate stud for the lower sling swivel instead of being mounted on the trigger guard bow, and this type was only made circa 1819-1822, and only about 61,000 of Harpers Ferry’s 350,000 M1816s were the first type. Upon adoption of the Model 1842 smoothbore musket with a percussion lock, the Army began to plan for converting their vast stock of flintlocks to percussion, with a formal program to inspect and classify them as Grade 1, 2, 3 or 4. Most of those inspected in federal arsenals were marked with inspector initials and a number (1,2,3,4) on the left stock flat near the original inspector cartouche. Harpers Ferry made seven sets of tooling to do the “cone in barrel” alteration in 1848-1849 and these were passed around various arsenals to complete work on the arms in storage there, then sent on to another location. Most of the conversion work was completed by 1852 but continued sporadically into the opening months of the Civil War. In 1855 more alterations were made by rifling many of the previously percussioned arms. States were allowed to send arms to be converted to percussion and those generally did NOT have the Grade 1,2,3,4 markings on them. In 1860 Tennessee purchased one of the sets of tooling and used it convert arms at the Nashville Armory for several Confederate states. (See Moeller’s American Military Shoulder Arms volume 2 pages 10-22 for more details.) This musket has a good JS and V/JH cartouches on the left flat, but does NOT have a Grade marking so it was probably in a state arsenal at the time, but exactly when and where it was converted cannot be determined. This exceptionally nice example is far above the condition of nearly all the M1816 muskets we have ever encountered. It is somewhat unusual in having the assembly number “6” (or “9”?) stamped on the bands, trigger guard, buttplate, buttplate screws and one of the lock screws. Breech has number 69 stamped on it, and the stock has 35 ahead of the buttplate tang and a combined N B over 50 behind the barrel tang. Stock has sharp edges on the lock panels, somewhat raised grain, never sanded or messed with. There is no pitting around the nipple area or any burn or rot damage to the wood behind the hammer was common after even just a few firings with the highly corrosive and mercuric percussion caps of the day. Ramrod appears to be a reproduction, otherwise 100% original and correct and superb example of a scarce Model 1816 Type I flintlock which was arsenal converted to percussion. There are a lot of M1816 conversions around, but not in this condition, so it will be nearly impossible to find a nicer example of an important U.S. martial arm. $1,795.00 REDUCED TO $1,650.00!

PROVENANCE NOTE- This is item number 5 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms. Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector. A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA. This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart. The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.) Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html (View Picture)

22747 SHARPS & HANKINS MODEL 1862 CIVIL WAR NAVY CARBINE (WITH PARTIAL LEATHER COVER) - Serial number 6037. Nominally a .52 caliber gun, these were made for the “Number 56 Sharps & Hankins rimfire cartridge” although later production reportedly slightly altered the chambers to us Spencer ammunition. This ingenious design was from Christian Sharps, the inventor of the famous “Sharps” rifles. This carbine, patented in 1859 shares the same concept with the cute little four barrel derringers, with the barrel sliding forward on receiver rails to allow loading from the breech, then being slid back into position and locked for firing. The Navy ordered some 6,686 of these carbines in 1862 and they served throughout the Civil War and for a number of years after, until replaced by the Remington rolling blocks. The Navy version included a leather cover over the barrel, missing on about 80% of the guns we have seen. Theoretically, the leather would protect the barrel from salt water exposure, but in reality it seems to have collected the salt under the leather, rotting the leather and pitting the metal. The leather was sewn into a tube type shape to slip over the barrel, and then secured in place by a steel band around the barrel at the muzzle and two screws at the breech end of the barrel. Cover is in generally ratty condition, with about 60-70% remaining,but a section about 1” long missing at the muzzle end and about 5” from the rear (everything between the rear sight and the breech) and another palm size chunk near where you naturally grab the barrel. A clever design feature is the safety which is a flat strip along the left side of the frame by the hammer. When the hammer is at half cock, the safety can be pushed up, and will block the hammer from fully striking the firing pin. When the hammer is fully cocked it automatically disengages the safety. Firing pin is a floating design secured by a screw and either has the tip broke off or is missing, but should be a simple part to turn on a lather or even a drill. Bore is rifled with six grooves, dark and rough, but it’s not like anyone has any ammo to shoot in these anyway, and it may (or may not) clean up. Walnut buttstock with mellow old oil finish has some assorted dings and scars of an issued martial arm. Metal parts were case hardened when made and now are basically a dull steel gray mixed with thin patina in places and showing signs of a gentle cleaning long ago. No real rust or pitting anywhere. Good mechanics, including the often broken catch for the lever. A good representative example of a clever Civil War carbine, and one of Christian Sharps least known inventions. Wish the leather were nicer, but having even this much is better than most of these. Antique, no FFL needed. $1095.00 (View Picture)

22964 CIVIL WAR JOSLYN MODEL 1864 SADDLE RING CARBINE .52 CALIBER - Serial number 4797, all matching. The Joslyn was a brilliantly simple design, with a side swinging breechblock that used a wedge type extractor to remove the fired case. There were three basic models, the first being the Model 1855 in .54 caliber, firing a paper cartridge ignited by a percussion cap placed on a nipple in the breechblock. In 1862, the first cartridge model was made, substituting a firing pin for the nipple, and chambered for the Spencer rimfire cartridge (either the .56-56 or .56-52 types would work), with about 3,600 made. This was followed by the Model 1864 (about 12,500 made) differing from the M1862 mainly in having a spring loaded latch to hold the block in the closed position, a protective ring around the firing pin, and iron instead of brass furniture. This carbine is the Model 1864, made in 1864 and undoubtedly reaching the field late that year. The following Cavalry units are listed in John McAulay’s superb “U.S. Military Carbines” as having the Model 1864 Joslyn carbines: 2nd California; 4th & 8th Indiana; 2nd Kentucky; 4th Missouri; 1st Nebraska; 11th Ohio; 9th Pennsylvania; 13th Tennessee; 2nd & 3rd West Virginia; 1st Wisconsin, and the 3rd and 5th U.S. Colored. I believe that the 1st Colorado Volunteer Cavalry should be on the list as well. (The M1864 Joslyn action became the basis for Springfield Armory’s Model 1865 Joslyn RIFLE, the first breechloading rifles made there, the with 3,0007 made in early 1865 but delivered too late for combat use.) This is an excellent looking example with about 90-95% old dark blue finish. The walnut stock has a few assorted storage and handling dings, and a darkened oil finish, and show signs of having been scraped clean at one time, removing the cartouches. The three groove bore is bright and sharp. Lockplate marked JOSLYN FIRE ARMS Co., STONINGTON, CONN, 1864. Rear of breech block marked B.F. JOSLYN’S PATENT, OCTOBER 8th 1861, JUNE 24th 1862. During the French arms buying frenzy in 1870-1871 (when they were short on arms to surrender to the Germans in the Franco-Prussian War) the U.S. Army basically sold off most of its surplus Civil War era arms. The long list included sale of some 6,600 of the Joslyn carbines to the French. Many were captured or seized by the Germans and eventually sold to Belgium, and some have found their way back to the U.S. I believe that this carbine is one which was sold to France after the Civil War, and that it was lightly refinished sometime after that. In any case, this is an extremely nice example of an important Civil War saddle ring carbine model. $1795.00 (View Picture)

10100 U.S. MODEL 1877- 1879 TRANSITION .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLE- SUPER NICE! - Serial number 99674 with sharp SWP/1878 in oval cartouche. Bore is about perfect, bright and sharp. About 90% brilliant color case hardening on the breechblock and barrel tang. About 90-95% original blue on remaining parts with most on the barrel and receiver, and less on the buttplate, the typical wear patterns. Unsanded stock with a few minor storage and handling blemishes and old oil finish. Springfield Armory never used the “Model 1877” designation for rifles, only carbines, but collectors have applied it to the guns made in 1877-78 as a series of changes were made from the original Model 1873 design. These include the long comb-short wrist stock, wider receiver with long gas escape cuts, rounded notch for the rounded nose of the wider low arch breech block and blade type front sight. Most of these were completed in 1878, and the next changes were changes to the rear sight to add a “buckhorn” on the sliding elevation bar with three minor variations made during 1879. As usual, military arms in service had such things as sights were frequently updated to the latest configuration and this rifle had the Model 1879 buckhorn sight (third type) installed during its period of service. Springfield never used a Model 1879 designation but collectors do for rifles with the M1879 rear sight installed. So, this rifle could be referred to as a Model 1877 with updated rear sight or 1877-1879 transition or a Model 1879. We will just call it a really great example of the trapdoor rifle and you can call it whatever you like. There is no documented history on this number, but it is representative example of the rifle used by the Regular Army in the Indian Wars and by the volunteer units during the Spanish American War and Philippine Insurrection. A previous owner very slightly rounded the edge of the stock shoulder behind the lower band, not a big deal, but we wanted to point that out so there will not be any surprises. This comes with a slightly later circa 1885-1890 leather sling for trapdoors with the thick claws which looks good. However, the leather on the sling has broken and cannot be used, but still looks okay for display. Someone clever with leather work can probably figure a way to stabilize or repair it. A really handsome example with fantastic bore! There are a lot of Model 1884 rifle in excellent condition but nice examples of the Model 1877 or 1879 rifles are much harder to find. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $1450.00 (View Picture)

9183 U.S. MODEL 1877 .45-70 “TRAPDOOR” SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MADE IN 1878 - Serial number 95007 made in 1878. The 1877 designation for rifles was coined by collectors to distinguish rifles with the improvements made from the original 1873 design and the later Model 1879. (Officially, only carbines were designated Model 1877, mainly reflecting the addition of the trap in the butt for a cleaning rod and strengthened stock with long comb and short wrist.) Most of the Model 1877 rifles and carbines show a mix of changing features and this rifle has the narrow receiver and breech block (with the stronger low arch design), and long gas escape cuts. (The wide receiver and block came along shortly after this one was made.) Hammer has the fine checkering. Lockplate omits the 1873 date. Stock has the stronger long comb/short wrist design. Rear sight was probably the second Model 1877 with slotless screws originally, but has period upgrade with the better M1879 “buckhorn” rear sight and slotted screws. Cleaning rod is the slightly later streamlined type instead of the early grooved head type. Bore is about excellent with sharp rifling and should be a fun shooter if approved by a competent gunsmith. Metal parts have mostly worn or aged to a pleasing mix of faded thin blue with some roughness on the trigger guard and buttplate. The stock has traces of circle P and some of the ESA in an oval but the date (1877 or 1878 only for this type cartouche) is not visible. Stock was lightly cleaned decades ago and has an old oil finish. There are a few assorted dings and scrapes and right side of the butt has carved marking “1909” or “bobi” which adds “character” but not historic value. This is an above average example of the typical “Trapdoor” rifles used in the Indian Wars or in the Spanish-American War, although there is no documentation in the Springfield Research Service database to show where this might have served or with whom. This rifle is from the Clint Smith’s collection of historical arms at his famous “Thunder Ranch” training facility in Oregon. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $850.00 (View Picture)

20478 U.S. MODEL 1884 .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLE- NICE! - Serial number 352327 made in 1887. A great representative example of the trapdoor rifle if you only plan on getting one. (Later you will realize the narrow-mindedness of such a decision and accept that you really need several more variations….but this is a good starting point.) This has the improved Buffington rear sight for long range use, and all the mechanical improvements found in trapdoors. It was the last version made before they went off on the rod-bayonet kick which eliminated the need to carry a separate bayonet (which was little used) and instead added a point and a latch so the cleaning rod served as a bayonet, which was also little used. This rifle was made in 1887 and has a faint SWP/1887 cartouche and legible circle P. The walnut stock has an old oil finish and only a few insignificant scratches or dings. The metal parts retain about 95% of the original arsenal rust blue finish with a bit more wear on the buttplate and some light pitting on the heel of the buttplate. Former vandal/owner marked his initials “L.R.S.” on the buttplate, however this is right next to the lightly pitted area and you would be forgiven if you lightly filed and polished those areas and touched them up. The breech block retains nearly all of its vivid color case hardening, and also the tang. Bore is sharp and excellent, bright on the top of the lands but a little rough in the grooves which is probably dried grease or crud and might clean out. Mechanically excellent. There are a bunch of scrapes, nicks and dings near the muzzle upon close inspection (see photos) we point out so you won't be surprised.

There is no documented history for this rifle, but nearby numbers (+/- 1,000 or about the number of men in a regiment) have been documented as serving during the Spanish American War with volunteer units from CO, DC, DE, IA, OR, PA, TN and TX. This illustrates why it is impossible and silly to try to claim that a gun with a number nearby must have been used by the same unit. Still, it is likely that this gun did get issued for Spanish American War use. A very handsome example, either of the Model 1884 if you need one of those, or of the entire family if that is your goal. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1395.00 (View Picture)

17187 U.S. Model 1879 .45-70 “Trapdoor” rifle- NICE! - Serial number 200422 made in 1882. The typical U.S. Infantry arm during the Indian War era, with the wider receiver and breech block than the Model 1873 and the improved 1879 “Buckhorn” rear sight. A really nice example with lots of bright case hardening colors on the breech block, and about 95% original blue finish, except the buttplate which has much less, typical for an issued arm. The unsanded stock has sharp SWP/1882 cartouche and circle P. One tiny chip at the front of the lock inletting, and a number of assorted dings, bruises and scrapes of a 125 year old military rifle. Wood has just the original oiled finish, and a bit more oil finish would blend in the few recent scratches which showup lighter. Nice bore, excellent mechanics. Buttplate has unitmark L over 109, so we know it was issued to soldier 109 of Company L, but not a clue as to what Regiment or even state. It was likely used in the Spanish American War, but there is no documented history for this serial number. While the stock dings may be a markdown factor if this were one of the later Model 1884 rifles which sat in crates instead of going to war, the condition of the metal and even of the stock overall makes it far above average for the Model 1879. It really is MUCH harder to find the Model 1879 rifles in nice condition as most of these were issued and used, while thousands of the later Model 1884 were never issued and minty examples are pretty common. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $1450.00 (View Picture)

23114 U.S. MODEL 1840 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE BY NIPPES IN 1842- MAYNARD TAPE PRIMER CONVERSION - Original flintlock M1840 muskets are nearly impossible to find, and even the percussion conversions are scarce compared to the ubiquitous Model 1816s. Springfield only made about 30,241 Model 1840s circa 1840-1843, Nippes made only about 5,100 circa 1842-1848, and Pomeroy making another 7,000 1840-1846. This musket was made by Nippes in Philadelphia (Mill Creek) in 1842. One of the earlier percussion conversions of .69 caliber flintlock muskets was this conversion using the Maynard tape primer system done on 2,000 muskets in 1848-1849 by Nippes, almost all on unissued muskets he had made. Basically, the conversion consisted of adding a drum for the nipple and a percussion hammer, and a circular magazine and feed mechanism cycled by cocking the hammer. This mechanism was attached on the outside of the lockplate with a center screw and the old frizzen screw. The Maynard system was an important step towards increasing the rate of fire as it eliminated the need to fumble around placing percussion caps on the nipple because cocking the hammer would automatically advance the Maynard tape so a new spot of priming compound was over the nipple, and when the hammer fell it would act as the ignition for the main charge. However, the tapes proved to be less reliable than hoped for, and although they were initially tried in a variety of different military and sporting arms, they pretty much faded from use by 1861. The demise of the Maynard system led to many of the Nippes alterations to be further modified by removal of the Maynard tape mechanism, leaving a standard nipple and percussion hammer ready for use. There are some documented cases of Confederates doing this on a quantity of guns in Louisiana. We don’t know if it was Confederates or Bubba who removed the Maynard parts on this one. If you want to replace them, the Rifle Shoppe has most of them in their catalog. The half cock sear notch is broken, but full cock is okay although the nose of the sear may be boogered somewhat. This makes removing the lock a bit tricky as the sear rest a bit lower than it should and hard to wiggle out of the lock mortise. Overall the metal parts have been nicely cleaned to bright, and the stock nicely refinished with a small wood repair to the area behind the hammer. A good representative example of a scarce musket with a scarce alteration, and very likely used during the Civil War by one, or possibly both sides. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1250.00 (View Picture)

16083 U.S. MODEL 1840 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE BY NIPPES- ORIGINAL FLINT! - The Model 1840 was the last flintlock smoothbore musket made for the U.S. Army, the direct descendant of the old French Charlevilles. The pattern arms were made in 1835 but production did not start until 1840, so sometimes you will see these referred to as Model 1835 or 1835/1840. Production quickly stopped at Springfield, after the Model 1842 percussion musket model was adopted. Production lingered on for a few more years and the two civilian contractors finished up their production by 1848. Original flintlock M1840 muskets are nearly impossible to find, and even the percussion conversions are scarce compared to the ubiquitous Model 1816s. Springfield Armory only made about 30,241 (circa 1840-43), Nippes made 5,100 (circa 1842-1848), and Pomeroy made another 7,000 (circa 1840-1846). See Flayderman 9A-258 through 9A-263. This one was made by Nippes in Philadephia in 1845 with matching dates on the lock and barrel. This is one of the very few that escaped conversion to percussion (but sadly did not escape other molestation). Most likely this was used in the Civil War by Union or Confederate soldiers and was possibly taken home by one (with or without permission to go home and/or take a musket), or maybe picked up off a battlefield. Or possibly it served honorably and ended up among the vast quantities of Civil War surplus arms later sold by Bannerman. At some point in civilian hands the mutilations began. The muzzle of the barrel was cut back an inch and a half, getting rid of the bayonet stud, and leaving the barrel 40.5 inches long instead of the original 42 inches. I suspect that the owner was an exceptionally tall man as they neatly added a walnut extension on the butt to make the butt about 1.5” longer and trimmed the nose of the comb down a bit. The stock was once cracked along the grain between the lock and lower band, but this was very neatly repaired and not noticeable from the outside, but when the barrel is removed you can see some of the epoxy material in the barrel channel. The barrel is original flint with only the flint flash hole, never any nipple added. The lockplate retains the original brass pan and frizzen spring and the screws for the hammer, frizzen and frizzen spring. The frizzen fits pretty well but is probably a replacement of some sort. The hammer is a U.S. M1816 hammer which is a loose fit on the tumbler but looks okay. The brass pan has some sort of iron filler piece installed secured by a rivet through the bottom of the pan but the reason for this is a mystery to me. The changes to the lock were probably done to keep the gun functioning for killing hogs, hunting critters or for protection against biped or quadraped predators. Since the barrel has been cut and the butt extended, the changes to the lock might be best to ignore and leave everything alone as part of the history of the gun. Good quality reproduction M1840 hammers and frizzens are available if you want to install them to get back closer to original. Overall condition is GOOD (as modified). Metal parts have a smooth mellow brown patina with some heavier rust or light pitting around the breech end of the barrel, but little or no pitting elsewhere except at the Nippes marking n the center of the lockplate. The metal parts could easily be cleaned bright again if you want to do that. A good machinist could take a piece of .69 musket barrel and make an extension with a slight overlapping or telescope braze joint to stretch the barrel back to the original length. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

**STOLEN BY PERSON IN PORTLAND, OR AREA, or possibly a long haul trucker. $500 reward for return of this item or information leading to arrest and conviction of the thief, who got several other antique arms from other dealers by credit card fraud... $100 reward if you are first to spot this on an auction site.** 12036 U.S. MODEL 1863 TYPE II .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET - Made at Springfield in 1864 and so marked on the lockplate. Barrel date not visible. Excellent bore. This is a good representative example of a .58 caliber Civil War musket, although not in the best condition. Basically a "brown gun" except for the trigger guard which has about 90-95% arsenal blue and must have been taken from a trapdoor (parts are identical except for being left bright on the M1855-1870 and blued on the M1873-1888 trapdoors. Otherwise all original and correct parts. Stock has been broken through he wrist and repaired long ago, but is not real tight and should be redone with epoxy which will make it stronger than the original wood. The stock has been sanded, but not badly. Metal parts (except trigger guard) mostly have a layer of brown patina/rust, with some light pitting under some areas, most notably around the nipple. Displays okay as is, or could be polished up with 320 emery cloth if you prefer the original bright look. The M1863 (type 2) which is sometimes called the M1864, was the highpoint in the development of the rifle musket for Infantry use, and the next year was replaced by the first of the Allin breechloding "trapdoors." The M1863 (Type 2) differed from the M1863 only in having the rounded bands retained by band springs instead of merely screw clamps. The M1863 differed from the M1861 which had flat bands retained by bandsprings, and the nipple bolster set out a bit further and having a clean out screw instead of an angled flash hole, and used a "swell" in the ramrod to hold it in place instead of a screw plate. All the .58 rifle muskets fired a 500 grain (little over 1 ounce) soft lead Minie ball with a hollow base. When the 60 grains of black powder was ignited by the flash from the percussion cap, the expanding gasses expanded the rear of the Minie ball to engage the rifling. Sights are provided for 100, 300 and 500 yards, but masses of troops could be engaged at ranges up to 1,000 yards. With a rate of fire of about 3 rounds per minute, and its long range, the .58 caliber rifle muskets forced dramatic changes in tactics from the massed formations used for the preceding several hundred years. Many collectors have a musket from the Civil War as a logical starting point for a collection of "modern" military rifles. This one comes with a good quality reproduction sling. Civil War muskets are getting more expensive but this one is affordable (due to the flaws) and has the potential to be much nicer after the stock has been repaired properly. $995.00 (View Picture)


Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)

21436 MORTIMER OF LONDON 12 GA FLINTLOCK SHOTGUN REPLICA BY PEDERSOLI - Serial number 51735. Very high quality replica with 36 inch smoothbore, cylinder choke barrel. Beautiful browned finish and handsome checkered walnut stock with cheekrest for right handed shooter. The lock has a thumb safety behind the hammer, a fashionable feature circa 1800 and still a good idea. These are made for shooting with black powder and Dixie Gun Works recommends a load of 80 grains FFg blsck powder with 1 1/8 ounce shot. Overalllength about 54.5” and weight about 1 pounds. Mortimer was one of the best English gun makers, and this is a nice copy of their work circa 1800, and the type of gun proudly used by anyone who could afford one back then. This is from an estate, but it appears that the previous owner never fired it. Sling swivels have been misplaced otherwise about new condition with only a couple of tiny handling blemishes in the wood. We did not have time to do proper photos so grabbed one from another site, but they all look the same- and that is a good thing- very handsome guns. On line reviews from shooters seem to be pretty favorable. As a muzzle loading flintlock this is legally an “ANTIQUE” with no FFL required. These sell for about $1,595 new but this one is a bargain at only $995.00 (View Picture)

22256 LARGE AMERICAN PERCUSSION FOWLING PIECE CIRCA 1830 - This is the type generally called a “club butt” which has a much larger than usual butt stock and often more extreme drop to the butt, as was originally found on Dutch arms brought to the new world by Dutch settlers in the Hudson River valley. Overall length is 60 inches This has a 42 inches long .78 caliber barrel with remnants of the bands at the breech found on Brown Bess style muskets, and what look like English proof marks and the letters I.W. usually associated with James Wilson, a prolific British gun maker. There is a brass blade type front sight but no signs of a bayonet lug. The underside of the barrel has an iron rib soldered to it, with one ramrod pipe. The pipe holds a brass tube which extends full length of the rib, and houses an improvised iron ramrod which is too short for use, but is probably a later owner’s replacement for one that got lost or appropriated for more important uses. The rod looks good for decorative use, or could be replaced with a wooden rod by removing the brass tube. There is a large “76” engraved on the top of the breech, but the meaning is uncertain. It is (remotely) possible it indicates use by the 76th Regiment of Foot, MacDonald’s Highlanders which served in America 1779-1784 including the Charleston campaign and finally surrendering at Yorktown. The brass trigger guard, ramrod entry pipe and buttplate are all British Second Model (Short Land pattern) Brown Bess style furniture circa 1740-1790, likely salvaged from a Revolutionary War British musket. Since there were numerous campaigns and battles in the Hudson River valley or adjacent areas, it is reasonable to find them on a gun made in that area. The lock was made as a percussion lock, probably in England, with modest decorative engraving marked “MELCHIOR- WARRANTED.” It is likely that the barrel and furniture had originally be assembled into a fowler circa 1790-1810 as a flintlock, but probably was broken or damaged and the parts used again with a new-fangled percussion lock circa 1830 resulting in the gun as it is today. Overall condition is as shown in the photos- well used, trigger guard broken at the screw hole, and lock needs tinkering, but still an impressive old gun to hang on the wall, especially in an old house circa 1800-1850. Due to length and weight, shipping will have to be $65.00. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $395.00 (View Picture)



Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)

21436 MORTIMER OF LONDON 12 GA FLINTLOCK SHOTGUN REPLICA BY PEDERSOLI - Serial number 51735. Very high quality replica with 36 inch smoothbore, cylinder choke barrel. Beautiful browned finish and handsome checkered walnut stock with cheekrest for right handed shooter. The lock has a thumb safety behind the hammer, a fashionable feature circa 1800 and still a good idea. These are made for shooting with black powder and Dixie Gun Works recommends a load of 80 grains FFg blsck powder with 1 1/8 ounce shot. Overalllength about 54.5” and weight about 1 pounds. Mortimer was one of the best English gun makers, and this is a nice copy of their work circa 1800, and the type of gun proudly used by anyone who could afford one back then. This is from an estate, but it appears that the previous owner never fired it. Sling swivels have been misplaced otherwise about new condition with only a couple of tiny handling blemishes in the wood. We did not have time to do proper photos so grabbed one from another site, but they all look the same- and that is a good thing- very handsome guns. On line reviews from shooters seem to be pretty favorable. As a muzzle loading flintlock this is legally an “ANTIQUE” with no FFL required. These sell for about $1,595 new but this one is a bargain at only $995.00 (View Picture)

21271 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER RIFLE- CHEAP - Serial Number F2013 matching on the metal parts but the stock has a different numberD6353. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine or Belgian Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. The ground area has not had the finish touched up to blend in, but a few minutes with cold blue can do the job if you prefer reduce the visibility of this part of its history. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers in 1898 to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in Very Good condition, with all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 90% original blue on other parts, showing normal wear, with a few small freckles of surface rust that should clean off easily. A reinforcing bolt was arsenal added to the wrist at some point in its history. This was made by Loewe in 1893 with some of the improvements like the magazine lock screw and long handguard, but before the gas deflector wings were added to the bolt sleeve. From an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is a good representative example of these wonderful M1891 Argentine Mausers. Fine to excellent bore. This is missing the flat metal plate on the tip of the stock (Liberty Tree has them for $6 as “nose cap” and you need two small wood screws) and it is missing the cleaning rod. Because of these missing parts this is price much lower than some of the M1891 Argentines we have had. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive “Argentine Mauser Rifles” for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

18776 CIVIL WAR PATTERN 1853 .577 ENFIELF RIFLE MUSKET- TOWER 1861- NICE! - (No serial number) This is a nice example of the second most widely used infantry arm of the Civil War. Hundreds of thousands of the .577 Enfield were imported for use by both Union and Confederate forces during the war. A few of the Confederate imports had distinctive markings to help identify them, but there are no such markings on Union imports or the majority of those shipped south which made it through the blockade. One quick way to eliminate many Enfields from Civil War use is if they have the British broad arrow government property marking as those remained in British service until after the war was over. This one is an “attic find” from a family with New York roots which believed one of their ancestors carried it in the Civil War and brought it home. This was allowed and the soldier was docked a modest amount from their back pay, a double win for the Army downsizing from a million men to less than 100,000 with huge stockpiles of purchased and captured weapons surplus to their needs, so every gun sold eliminated the need to ship and store it, and also reduced the amount of cash the army had to pay out. This is a the used rifle-musket with standard 39 inch barrel in .577 caliber (close enough that .58 caliber minie balls were issued for both the .577 Enfield and .58 caliber Springfields.) There are no broad arrow markings and the TOWER 1861 places it early enough in the war that it undoubtedly saw service. Quite a few New York infantry regiments were armed with Enfields starting in 1861, which is supportive of the family oral history. Unfortunately they had no information on the ancestor’s regiment and were not quite sure about which of the family members brought it home. This lack of specific facts makes guns with documented usage even more desirable for their history. This one has an excellent bore, bright with sharp three groove rifling. Exterior iron surfaces were originally blued, but many regiments ordered the troops to strike them bright so be uniform in appearance with the bright finished Springfields. The metal parts have a mellow steel-gray tone with light attic haze of dirt, fingerprint rust and surface patina which should come off with a gentle cleaning with 0000 steel wool and a little WD-40. There is a very small amount of minor roughness from nipple flash at the breech, but not really any pitting. The walnut stock has a mellow patina with assorted minor nicks and dings of a gun that went to war instead of cowering in some armory crate. A few specks of white paint on the left side of the butt as a legacy from a prior owner’s sloppy housepainting. Left flat of the stock has initials G T and J E neatly and deeply carved by two different people. Small “C” or G” on right side of butt that is very light. The small collar on the end of the two upper band screws have been removed, probably when a sling swivel was installed on the middle band instead of the upper band. Swivel is from some other gun and may be wartime or later switch. Wood behind the nipple area is solid, not rotted or punky from nipple flash. Overall a really nice, honest, untouched Civil War Enfield. Some might want to leave it in “attic” condition but I was planning to spend a little time with a light cleaning which will make it much nicer looking. Even in present uncleaned condition it is far better than most of the Enfields I have seen in recent years. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $1250.00 (View Picture)

17798 PORTUGUESE MODEL 1886/89 STEYR KROPATSCHEK RIFLE - Serial number Q940. Made by Steyer in Austria in 1886. Marked on receiver OE.W.F.G. Steyer/ 1886, faint traces of crown over L.Io., and M.1886 due to old arsenal refinish. Receiver, barrel and stock with serial Q940. Bolt mismatched O914 and other numbers. The Steyer Kropatschek is very similar to the German Mauser 1871/84 with a tubular magazine, but the details are slightly different throughout. Caliber is 8x60R Kropatschek, so you probably will not find any ammo. This example had the 1889 modification which added a handguard over the top of the barrel between the rear sight and the middle band, as shown by clearance cuts in the barrel channel for the clips to hold the handguard on. Handguard is missing (as with nearly all of these), leaving this looking just like the original M1886 if you don't spot the additional inletting for the clips. Stock is a nice medium brown walnut having been sanded long ago and picking up only a few tiny blemishes since then. There is a small crack on the left die of the wrist by the receiver tang, but it does not appear to affect strength much. About 90% thinning arsenal refinish blue on receiver and barrel, but the finish is mostly worn off the bands. Bolt and innards of action are nice and bright. Bore is about fine. Complete with the nearly always missing cleaning rod. Overall fine plus condition, much nicer than these are usually found. The 1886/89 model reportedly was sent to colonial outposts to minimize heat wave interference with the sight picture. Portugal had significant colonial holdings in Africa and Asia until early in the 20th century. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $450.00 (View Picture)

17168 GERMAN MODEL 1871/1884 MAUSER RIFLE (IG 71/84) MADE BY AMBERG IN 1888 - Serial number 90530 made at Amberg in 1888. The Infanterie Gewehr Model 1871/1884, Germany's first infantry repeating rifle, is an evolution of Paul Mauser's first successful military rifle, the Model 1871 single shot Mauser. Learning from the Turkish victory at the battles of Plevna in 1877, (where the Turks, partially armed with Model 1866 Winchester repeating rifles soundly defeated the numerically superior Russians armed with Krnka and Berdan II single shot rifles) the I.G.Mod.71/84 uses a tubular magazine (similar to the Winchester system), and the basic Mauser bolt action. The 8 round tubular magazine in the forestock loaded singly from the top with the bolt open. Rounds are carried to the chamber by an elevator which pivots at the back, similarly to the Kropatcheks but quite unlike the Swiss Vetterli repeater. There is a magazine cut-off lever on the left side so that the rifle may be used in single shot mode. The 71/84 rifles are superbly made and finished, with blued barrel, receiver and bolt in the white, and fire blued small parts. The Prussian state where the rifles were in service is indicted by the crowned monarch’s cypher on the barrel: This one bears the mark L. for King Ludwig of Bavaria, while others are marked F.W. (Fredrik Wilhelm of Prussia), or W. (for the Wurttemberg Kingdom). Although the I.G.Mod.71/84 never saw front line military service, many saw service with German reserve and behind the lines units through WW1. This one has no unit markings Although not unit marked, the rifle appears to have been issued and used with signs of cleaning and an old (arsenal?) refinish over fine salt and pepper roughness. About 80-90% of the old finish remains Matching numbers on everything, down to the screwheads. Good mechanics, but the bore is dark and rough. The unsanded walnut stock has a heavy patina with a few minor dings of an issued military arm. The M1871/84 is a historic milestone in the development of Mauser rifles, and indeed all military small arms. (NOTE: For more excellent history and disassembly instructions on this model, and info on all military rifles of the black powder era see Keith Doyan’s OUTSTANDING site at http://www.militaryrifles.com.) A good representative example of this historic arm at an affordable price. $575.00 (View Picture)

18588 SCARCE FRENCH MODEL 1874/1880 GRAS .22 CALIBER TRAINING RIFLE - Serial number 13843, Made at Manufacture D’Armes, St. Etienne in 1873 according to the receiver and barrel markings, as a Model 1874 single shot 11 x 59mmR single shot metallic cartridge rifle, with the 1880 improvements. This was later converted to .22 rimfire caliber using a sleeve in the barrel and modified bolt assembly, which is numbered to match the rifle, and a unique rear sight with windage adjustment screw and calibrated 0 to 35 on the leaf. Barrel length about 27.8 inches. Stock has been cut ahead of the barrel band, and the butt and buttplate have been slimmed. Butt swivel removed but screws remain. I have not been able to find any information on these other than a similar conversion from the Ben Michel collection sold as lot 285 by Cowans Auction in November 2015. That one had a full length military stock, but otherwise appears to be the same conversion with the unique rear sight. It was described as “Scarce variant of the Gras rifle used for military training and civilian marksmanship.” Military use of .22 caliber rifles for training began in the 1880s,and I suspect this conversion was done circa 1885-1900 when the Gras rifles had been replaced by the Lebel but were good candidates for conversion to training rifles, and probably served into the WW1 period. Bore has strong rifling with scattered some spots of rust or pits and needs a good cleaning. Good mechanics. Barrel and receiver retain most of the blue finish turned to plum or patina, and bolt is mostly patina. Gras rifles are pretty cheap and you can probably find an inexpensive one to swap stocks if you want this in a full length stock. Military .22 training rifles are a popular collecting specialty and this is one was in John’s collection for many years but he is clearing those out to make room for more line throwing guns, so someone else can enjoy owning this one for a few years. While many of the .22 trainers are pretty easy to find, this one is very scarce. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $725.00 (View Picture)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

3946 REMINGTON ROLLING BLOCK .58 CALIBER “MODEL 1868 TRANSFORMED” RIFLE - Remington introduced the rolling block rifle in 1865 with limited U.S. military sales in a “split breech” version. A stronger breechblock design followed that became the most widely used singe shot breechloader in the world, and kept Remington alive in the lean years following the Civil War as surplus arms saturated the market. The U.S. Navy adopted Remington rolling block system as the Model 1865 pistol, followed by carbines and cadet rifles in 1867 and rifles in 1870. The Army tested the rolling block in 1868 and 1870, followed by manufacture of a large number of rifles and pistols in 1871. New York purchased 15,000 rolling block rifles in 1870. Circa 1869-1870 South Carolina and Texas purchased smaller numbers for militia use. Most of these arms were newly made by Remington, or a joint project involving both Remington and Springfield Armory. Some, however, were conversions made using obsolete Civil War .58 caliber muskets, such as the SC and Texas rifles, and many more made for foreign sales. This is one of the guns made using the barrel, stock and furniture of a M1863(type II) musket, chambered for the .58 caliber centerfire Berdan cartridge. Basically they just cut out the portion of the stock inletted for the lock and adapted the rear of the barrel to fit a newly made Remington action for a very simple and reliable breechloading rifle at a fraction of the cost of a totally new gun. (However, trapdoor Springfields cost even less.) These “transformed” or converted rifles varied over their production life, with the very earliest, like this one using a dovetailed plate to widen the face of the block for use with .58 caliber cartridges, but later production used a purpose made one piece block. Transformed files were apparently made and sold circa 1868 to 1888, with the last sale of 400 to the Dominican Republic in 1888 The .58 conversions are not encountered nearly as often as the later foreign rolling blocks, and are in important part of any military arms collection. This one was originally a M1863 Type 2 .58 caliber rifle musket, and has the rounded bands with band springs. The bore is VG-fine, in case you have a bunch of .58 Berdan ammo stashed away to shoot. The wood has numerous dings and bruises and was cleaned long ago and now has a mellow old oil finish. The forend has a large wedge shaped chip missing (about ½” x 3”) on the right side, and a slight loss with a crack on the left side between the middle and upper bands. The metal is dull steel gray and was heavily cleaned long ago, most likely during the period of use as nearly all of these I have seen are in similar (usually worse) condition. Rear sight leaves may be replacements and rear sight screw is damaged but works. Ramrod has a pair of holes drilled in the tulip head, as with others I have seen. Sling swivel on the trigger guard is bent or replaced. This is one that was in my collection for many years that I am thinning out. For more info on these see George Layman’s “Remington Rolling Block Military Rifles of the World.” ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $750.00 (View Picture)

21532 SWISS MODEL 1878 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) VETTERLI RIFLE .41 RIMFIRE (10.38 x 38mmR) - Serial number 185657 Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/ 185657/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 95% original blue finish on most parts with slight age toning toward plum color. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and old oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This was the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Swiss military arms are an interesting collecting specialty, with a good variety to find, including the Federal percussion rifles, the Millbank Amsler, all the Vetterli family, several varieties of Schmidt Rubin rifles, and even the modern assault style guns, and you can go for the whole history, or just concentrate on one niche. Most are available at prices a mere fraction of what some other collecting specialties cost. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is very good to fine, but since you won’t find any ammo, it is irrelevant. The overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 135 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $595.00 (View Picture)

22813 SWISS MODEL 1871 VETTERLI .41 RIMFIRE BOLT ACTION RIFLE MADE BY SIG, NEUHAUSEN - Serial number 85681 all matching Sometimes these are called the Model 1869/1871. These never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly man peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not (but they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights). The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo was loaded up until WW2. This rifle is in fine to excellent condition with about 90-95% of the original blue remaining although thinning. It looks a bit gray in the photos, but is actually a blue-gray shade, but definitely original, not touched up or anything. Buttplate suffers from a layer of rust due to poor storage, but the other parts are really nice. Walnut stock has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is excellent but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This one even has the almost always missing cleaning rod. We get a lot of the Model 1878 and 1881 Vetterlis in minty condition but few of the M1871, and very seldom see any of the 1869 rifles. Swiss military arms are a varied and relatively inexpensive collecting niche. This is a good representative example of an uncommon, important and interesting rifle. $650.00 (View Picture)

20634 Italian M1870/1887/1916 Vetterli-Mannlicher 6.5mm Bolt Action Rifle - Serial number R5928 probably made circa 1890 at Torino, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better examples of this model we have encountered, although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen. Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered after 1887 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles in 1916 by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the early loads first used in the 6.5mm, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (where the Italians were notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked with illegible maker and date on one side and serial number R5928 on the other. Walnut stock has an old military oil finish and is also somewhat oil soaked. Except for a crack over the cleaning rod hole in the forend the stock is actually pretty good with a legible roundel on the left side, “REPARIZONE, FABR D’ ARMI GARDONE, VT” from the time of last conversion. Right side has deeply struck serial number 5928. Metal parts with about 50-60% thinning arsenal refinish on most parts, that seems to be blue on some parts and a black paint type finish on others, and some areas of light rust or patina. We have seen a number of these over the years and this is among the better of a sorry lot. Unlike every other one we have had, this one actually had the cleaning rod! Good mechanics. Bore is dark and rough looking and may clean, or may not, but in our opinion these are UNSAFE TO SHOOT under any circumstances. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle which served into the WW1 era and even to a limited extent in WW2. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

23268 Swiss Model 1869/1871 .41 rimfire Bolt Action Vetterli Repeating Rifle - Serial number 7129 matching, made by Rychner & Keller, Aarau. Although never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly-men peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not, although they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights. The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo up until WW2 and in the 1960s nearly unissued Vetterli rifles were selling from “Ye Olde Hunter” for $9.95 each. Ah, the good old days. This rifle is in good condition except that it has been poorly stored, so much of the original blue finish has turned to plum patina or acquired some light surface rust. This needs a good cleaning of all the metal parts, and a good rubbing with linseed oil on the stock to make it look a lot nicer than it is now. The unsanded walnut stock is dry and has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is dirty but good, and may clean better, but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This is complete with the cleaning rod, which is often missing. A good representative example of an important and interesting rifle. These early Model 1869-1871 rifles are much harder to find, and usually in lesser condition than the later Model 1878 and 1881 rifles. Swiss rifles can be a fun and (relatively) inexpensive collecting niche, with a wide variety of variations from the core group of muzzle loading Federal rifles, the Milbank Amslers, Vetterlis, and Schmidt-Rubins. All are made of the finest materials to the highest quality standards, and fairly easy to find at affordable prices. $595.00 (View Picture)

7358 Italian M1870/87/16 6.5mm bolt action Vetterli-Vitalli-Mannlicher Rifle - Serial number LO1708 made circa 1870-1878 at Brescia, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better looking examples of this model we have seen lately (although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen). Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered from 1887 through 1896 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the old black powder loads, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). WE CONSIDER THES UNSAFE TO SHOOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTNACES AND SELL ONLY AS A COLLECTOR ITEM, NEVER TO BE FIRED! Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked BRESCIA on one side and serial number LO1708 on the other. Walnut stock has been lightly sanded during the period of it service and now has an old military oil finish. Right side has deeply struck serial number LO1708. Metal parts with about 90-95% of an old black paint finish, probably not military, but it makes the gun look nice…from a distance. Unlike very other example we have seen, THIS ONE HAS THE CLEANING ROD! As is almost always the case, the cleaning rod is missing. Good mechanics. Rough bore. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these early Italian military rifles are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

17359 LONDON ARMOURY COMPANY- POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE- PATTERN 1853 .577 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MUSKET - London Armoury Company was founded in 1859 by several British arms makers (including Robert Adams, Blackett Beaumont, and James Kerr) taking over the patents and machinery formerly used by Deane Adams & Dean for making revolvers. London Armoury company became famous for their high quality production of Kerr revolvers and machine made Enfield rifle muskets. In early 1861 Confederate agent Caleb Huse succeeded in getting London Armoury Company to commit to selling him their entire output. First they had to deliver some 1200 rifles on a Massachusetts contract which was completed by September, 1861. Eventually some 70,000 muskets were sold to the Confederacy. Thus, most London Armoury Enfields can be considered to be Confederate, realizing that there was the small Massachusetts contract, and that many rifles paid for by Huse ended up being captured by the Union Navy blockade fleet and diverted to use by federal forces. And a few may have been sold to other buyers. There is no way to tell for sure about a specific gun exactly where it may have served. At least this one doe NOT have the usual British crown over VR or other British military inspector marks which would be found on arms delivered to the crown, and unlikely to have reached America during the war. (Exception- the crown marked middle band, which may be a period or later collector replacement.) This is a standard 3-band rifle musket with 39 inch barrel, brass buttplate and trigger guard with a mellow old patina, and Baddley clamping bands. Front and rear sights are intact and not boogered by shooters. The lockplate markings are nicely engraved “LONDON ARMOURY.” and no date. The barrel is mostly dull steel gray mixed with some staining, and also having the expected light roughness and fine pitting around the breech. The European walnut stock shows normal shrinkage so that the buttplate stands a bit proud and the bands do not clamp real tightly. It has the usual assortment of minor dings and bruises, but no cracks, repairs or even significant dings to point out. Even the often rotted wood behind the nipple area is intact. Totally untouched and uncleaned. The bore is very sharp and smooth, although in need of a good cleaning. 31 over 31 stamped on the buttplate tang. The sling swivels have been removed, but very few troops actually used slings during the Civil War, so that was probably done during the period of use. A good solid representative Civil War imported Enfield .577 three band rifle musket, and quite likely a Confederate import. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2350.00 (View Picture)

17800 Swiss Model 1878 .41 rimfire (10.38 x 38Rmm) Vetterli Rifle - Serial number 190244 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/190244/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 80-90% original blue finish on most parts. The top of the barrel between the lower band and the rear sight has thinning finish turning plum and mixed with patina. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and original oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This one previously lived with a smoker and it reeks of tobacco smoke and has a thin film of crud that needs to be cleaned off and it will look much nicer. This is the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is sharp and mirror bright, and overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 130 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)


Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

Cootl stuf that does not fit well in the other categories. And, for those of you who have thoughtfully stashed away some stocks and hardware (or stocks and bonds with which to invest in stocks and bands) here are some prime candidates for restoration. Some of these rifles were converted to sporters many years ago when no one was interested in collecting "surplus" military  rifles and everybody was busy turning them into cheap deer rifles. While many people butchered the stocks and cut off barrels and refinished things, a few considerate (or lazy) people merely chopped off the stock and threw away all the useless bands and stuff. These rifles are very easy to restore if you have an appropriate stock and bands.

**NEW ADDITION** 10103 RARE U.S. MODEL 1892 30-40 KRAG RIFLE- SERIAL NUMBER 71- (RESTORATION PROJECT) - Serial number 71, probably made in the first week of production in 1894. Model 1892 Krag rifles did not actually begin production until 1894, due to delays caused by complaints about adoption of a “foreign” instead of domestic invention. Only about 24,562 Model 1892 rifles were made, before switching to the Model 1896. In 1900 Springfield Armory recalled all of the M1892s still in service and updated them to Model 1896 configuration. Some 18,559 are documented as being converted, but as Mallory notes in his book “…evidently many of these unconverted rifles were lost or destroyed in service or were scrapped, because unaltered Model 1892 rifles are extremely scarce.” The consensus among advanced collectors is that they are about as scarce as Gas Trap Garands, or M1903 Rod Bayonet rifles or Pedersen devices, with no more than an estimated 50 to 100 examples surviving in, or restored to, original configuration. The Model 1892 is easily recognizable by the full length cleaning rod mounted under the barrel; the upper band having a small guide for the rod; the flat no-trap buttplate, not curved at the toe; the short handguard leaving the receiver ring exposed; the flat, uncrowned muzzle; the lack of a hold open pin on the extractor or the corresponding notch on the receiver; and the back of the cocking piece being box shaped instead of tapered. This example is mostly correct with the exception of the cut off forend, missing upper band and cleaning rod. The bolt body is the correct early type, but not numbered to the gun. The cocking piece has the later beveled edge and the extractor is a later one modified to look like the early type. Correct M1894 sight installed although one of the screws is not exactly right. Barrel retains the flat muzzle crown. Bore shows wear near the breech but stronger rifling as you get to the muzzle, but it is rough and rusted. This has the matching serial number “71” on the receiver, size plate, loading gate, follower and extractor. The stock has been stripped and lightly sanded, leaving a barely legible JSA cartouche over faint 1894, and only a hint of the circle P. Forend was cut ahead of the lower band, leaving plenty of room to splice a new forend under the band. Metal parts have no original finish, only dull gray mixed with patina and scattered patches of light roughness and pitting. This is a “wish it were better gun” but hard to find in ANY condition, and the two digit serial number makes it more desirable. The Krag was a major milestone in U.S. military small arms evolution, and only a few collectors are ever fortunate enough to own one which escaped conversion to Model 1896. This is an excellent opportunity to get a restoration project at a very reasonable price. Antique, no FFL needed. $525.00 (View Picture)

22740 RARE UNMODIFIED MODEL 1892 KRAG BUTTSTOCK- TYPE FOR CLEANING ROD - This is one of the few stocks which remains correct and escaped modification to the 1896 configuration by rounding the toe, drilling the butt for tools and oiler, and filling the ramrod groove. But, alas, Bubba wanted a Bambi blaster so he wacked the forend off. This stock has the correct original straight toe, with the thin, no-trap buttplate and very good legible JSA 1895 and circle P. It also has the letter “J: near the cartouche, which I believe is a Span-Am era overhaul marking, but I do not know the location. Initials WFP lightly scratched on the bottom of the stock ahead of the trigger guard but not very noticeable. Correct oval head large buttplate screw, but like most Krags, the finish is gone from the buttplate. It does not have any of the usual cracks or damage in the action area, but is good and solid. It is cut at the lower band, but the end of the cleaning rod groove is clearly visible, and it was never enlarged for the 1896 filler strip. It had some ugly varnish stripped without harming the markings, and has the expected assorted minor dings and scrapes of an issued arm. Restoration of the stock would involve splicing a new forend piece in place, with a groove for the cleaning rod. This is not a hard job, but requires some patience and skill. Finding an unmodified full length stock is less likely than winning the lottery the same day you marry a nymphomaniac heiress to a distillery, so finding even this one is about the only option to restore a M1892 Krag with correct metal but a later stock. $395.00 (View Picture)

14811 COMMIE BLOC "FENCING MUSKET" - Obviously patterned after the Mosin Nagant, but then altered with a block of wood resembling an AK style magazine added to the bottom, these were used for teaching bayonet fighting. The spring loaded tip can be depressed about 4 inches into the barrel, similar to a pogo stick. This is a fairly common approach, and I have seen fencing muskets with the same concept from Sweden and England as well. The U.S. used bayonets with passed spring steel blades, and later switched to "pugil sticks". Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. These may be East German as some are marked "MODELL 4.853" which sounds German to me. Overall excellent condition (except for some scattered light surface rust that should clean up). Complete with original excellent sling. Still legal in Kalifornia, but may be next on their ban list. Non-firearm, no FFL needed. Photo shows a typical example, but this is one we were going to keep and is nicer than the one in the photo. $95.00 (View Picture)


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