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Collectible Antique Longarms
(pre-1899)

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If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items liste by the BATFE as Curiios & Relics directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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NOTE: THE ITEMS BELOW ARE "ANTIQUES" AND NO NOT REQUIRE A FFL FOR SHIPMENT.

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Collectible Antique Longarms for sale (pre-1899)
NOTE: ALL ITEMS BELOW ARE "ANTIQUES" AND NO NOT REQUIRE A FFL FOR SHIPMENT.

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We have divided this catalog into several sections:
(new items are added at the top of each section)

U.S. Military Antique Longarms
Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)
Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)
Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

U.S. Military Antique Longarms

**NEW ADDITION** 22890 PARKER-HALE PERCUSSION WHITWORTH SNIPER RIFLE WITH HEXAGONAL BORE .451 CALIBER - Serial number 34484. A top quality replica of one of the most famous Civil War sniper rifles, in almost new condition. Sir Joseph Whitworth was a British engineering and manufacturing genius in the mid 19th Century. His achievements include the standardization of measurements and the “Whitworth thread” standards for English industry and all sorts of machine tools and mechanical inventions. Among these was a design for rifling barrels with a hexagonal bore and swaging hexagonal bullets to be fired from them. This was applied not only to rifle noted for their exceptional accuracy (out to 1,000 or even 2,000 yards!), but also to cannons made on the same principle, several of which were used by the Confederates. Whitworth rifles were prized by target shooters in England, and by Confederate snipers, sometimes fitted with telescopic sights. Today, originals are unaffordable for all but the wealthiest collectors. Parker Hale, in Birmingham, England, began making high quality replicas of .577 Enfield rifle muskets in 1972, referring to the original sealed pattern gauges, making them a virtual “second generation” production run but identical to the originals, much like Colt did with their percussion guns. The Birmingham made Parker Hale rifles are most desirable, but Parker Hale got out of the muzzle loader business in the 1990s, and sold their tooling to the Italian firm Euroarms, which continued production with the same the very high quality standards, as well as use of the Parker-Hale name. In 2011 Euroarms ceased operations and was acquired by Davide Pedersoli. Although Pedersolid continues to make some of the old Parker Hale line, apparently the Whitworths have not been made for several years, and are impossible to find, except for some Dixie Gun Works branded guns which always seem to be inferior to other makers. This rifle was made in 1998 by Euroarms under the Parker-Hale brand, according to the “BL” date code in the Italian proof mark, reportedly still using barrels made in Birmingham. Overall fit and finish is excellent, with only a few tiny handling blemishes on the walnut stock picked up over the last 15 years to distinguish it from new. Handsome deep blue finish on the barrel and bands, and attractive color case hardening on the lock assembly, with maybe a tiny scratch or two at worst. I think the previous owner fired this a couple of rounds and then cleaned it and put it away, so it is almost new condition. The front sight is a bit loose in its dovetail, but easily fixed. Beautiful hexagonal bore. However, hexagonal bullets or molds are expensive and very hard to find with lots of quality issues, so most shooters use cylindrical bullets, often with paper patches, sometimes the Lyman 457121 mold which is 475 grains, or the 457132 which is 525 grains. There are lots of opinions and tips on firing these, but cleaning after every shot seems to be necessary for top accuracy, and lots of experimentation. Google is your friend to find the many threads on this topic. An exceptionally handsome example, albeit a replica, of one of the most famous sniper rifles of the Civil War, and a great starting point for a sniper rifle collection, or a shooter for those willing to work up a good load. ANTIQUE- no FFL required. $1495.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** 21127 U.S. MODEL 1898 KRAG RIFLE MADE IN 1898 --“ANTIQUE” WITH NO FFL NEEDED! - Serial number 119729 made in early 1898, shortly after the switch from the Model 1896. This is all correct with the early 1898 features including use of the 1896 rear sight, low front sight blade, and no slot on the bottom of the front band. Finish has mostly faded to plum and smooth patina. The case hardening on the action has aged and stained Bore is about good, a bit dark and rough, not great but not totally trashed like so many Krags. This serial number is in a range mixed with both rifles and carbines, and the rifles seem to have been issued to several different units during the Spanish American War, but there is no way to tell any specific history about this rifle since it is not listed. This is a good honest example of the “new” rifles issued to some troops during the Spanish-American War and in the subsequent Philippine Insurrection, and one of only about 40,000 that were made in 1898 and thus qualify as ANTIQUES with no FFL hassles involved in purchase. But, if you want a nicer one with the BATF hassles, about 300,000 M1898 rifles and carbines were made 1899- 1904. $750.00 (View Picture)

20875 U.S. MODEL 1870 .50-70 “TRAPDOOR” SPRINGFIELD RIFLE- SCARCE! - (No serial number- correct for this model, although the M1868 and M1873 rifles were numbered.) A good representative example of this fairly scarce trapdoor. A total of only about 11,531 of these were made 1870-1873, compared to 52,145 Model 1868 or 52,300 Model 1866 rifles. These were very similar to the Model 1868 except for the shorter nose on the front of the receiver, the same length as was later used in the .45-70s. As with the earlier model, the 1870 continued to cut costs by using many parts salvaged from the hundreds of thousands of obsolete .58 caliber muskets on hand. The locks, most stock furniture and the stocks themselves were used with whatever minor modification were necessary. Unlike the first .50-70 rifles, the Model 1870s seem to have used newly made barrels instead of sleeved musket barrels. Good mechanics although the tumbler and hammer screw were replaced using old original parts. Bore is about good with strong rifling and shootable (in my opinion) but with roughness most of the way so it will not be as accurate as a really great bore. The stock is solid, showing considerable wear and use, but no major defects. This has a 1864 dated lock, reflecting the thrifty recycling of musket parts, and the breech block is correctly marked “MODEL 1870.” This rifle has been poorly stored and is, frankly, sort of ugly right now. It could use a good cleaning to return it to a bright finish appearance. Most of the metal parts are stained dark, or have a smooth brown patina but very little in the way of crusty rust or pitting, so a good cleaning should leave very nice results. (The receiver and breech block had a blackened finish, so pretty much leave those alone.) The buttplate, however, is heavily rusted and has a large dent in the heel, so it would be best to replace this with another buttplate. Or, if you are lazy, or are a member of the “I like them all original, including original rust” school of collectors, you can just leave it as is. Overall, a presentable example of a pretty scarce model of the Springfield “Trapdoor” rifle family at a very modest price. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)

19661 CIRCA 1808-1812 FLINTLOCK MILITIA STYLE MUSKET- CONVERTED TO PERCUSSION - This has a 41 inch barrel, .69 caliber and the three barrel bands have the springs to the rear, typical of the guns based on the 1763 Charleville patterns, and made prior to 1812 when forward facing bandsprings became standard. Probably made circa 1808-1812 to fill a militia contract or for private sale to individuals seeking to meet the 1792 Militia Act requirement that every man have a musket. Only visible markings anywhere are a faint “8” on the buttplate tang, probably the final 8 in 1808 date, and the inside of the lockplate has forgers marks WC but I do not know which maker(s) that might relate to. The barrel welding is poor quality, with obvious flaws about a foot from the muzzle, carefully oriented so it is hidden by the stock when assembled, but the bore seems okay inside. So it has not burst…yet, so don’t even think about shooting this one! The lock was originally flint, and converted to percussion using a drum type alteration, and would be easy to convert back to percussion with repro parts. The metal parts were heavily cleaned many years ago. When we got it, the metal had all been painted black, and the stock had a thick layer of nasty old varnish. We stripped the paint and varnish, and it looks pretty darn good now, very close to its original service appearance. During its period of use, the nose of the stock comb was cut back slightly, or maybe it was made that way originally. Militia pattern muskets varied much more from official patterns than federal contract guns, and quality ranged from quite good, the same as feds purchased, to junk assembled from rejected parts foisted off on states, or impoverished farmers. I suspect this is towards the latter end of the spectrum. Still, a very handsome genuine 200 year old American military musket reflecting our citizen-soldier heritage and the evolved nature of firearms which were updated to continue their usefulness for decades after originally made. This is a good representative example of any of the flintlock muskets from the Revolution though the early federal period as modified to percussion, and can also be a very handsome decorative piece of history in an old house of that period. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $695.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5980 - U.S MODEL 1884 .45-70 CADET RIFLE (SECOND TYPE) - Serial number 215289.  This is one of the earlier standard infantry rifles which was converted by Springfield Armory (NOT Bannerman) to Cadet style in 1895, when 1,800 were so converted, or 1901 when 5,000 were converted.  This involved shortening the forend about 3 inches, slimming the butt and installing the narrower cadet style buttplate, which was also converted from the regular buttplate and is visibly thicker than usual.  Barrels were shortened about 3 inches and tapered to accept the bayonet and the front sight replaced.  Overall excellent with about 90% arsenal blue finish remaining, thinning in places, and picking up some plum color here and there. Good case colors on the tang and breechblock.  Muzzle has the most wear from bayonet installation. 

Very handsome rifle.  Stock is lovely medium brown color with old oil finish from time of conversion, with a few very minor handling and storage dings, but nothing major.  No signs of cartouches, but as these were not "new" rifles, but rebuilt, they are found with cartouches in the 1895 lot, and often without in the 1901 batch.  Excellent bright shiny bore.  Cadet model rifles were made for issue to the cadets at West Point and other military schools and to what later would be called ROTC units.  Total production of all models (1873, 1877, 1879 and 1884 type 1 and 2) of the cadet rifle were about 65,000 or about the same quantity as trapdoor carbines.  Most cadet rifles were badly abused and really nice ones are tough to find.  While not quite in the minty category, this is a well above average example, and interesting to show the thrifty side of the Ordnance Department which altered early trapdoor infantry rifles (made obsolete by adoption of the ramrod bayonet in 1888) into cadet rifles to fill the growing demand for that type.  Every collector needs one of these to complete their collection of Springfield trapdoors.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed.  $1095.00 (View Picture)

17359 LONDON ARMOURY COMPANY- POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE- PATTERN 1853 .577 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MUSKET - London Armoury Company was founded in 1859 by several British arms makers (including Robert Adams, Blackett Beaumont, and James Kerr) taking over the patents and machinery formerly used by Deane Adams & Dean for making revolvers. London Armoury company became famous for their high quality production of Kerr revolvers and machine made Enfield rifle muskets. In early 1861 Confederate agent Caleb Huse succeeded in getting London Armoury Company to commit to selling him their entire output. First they had to deliver some 1200 rifles on a Massachusetts contract which was completed by September, 1861. Eventually some 70,000 muskets were sold to the Confederacy. Thus, most London Armoury Enfields can be considered to be Confederate, realizing that there was the small Massachusetts contract, and that many rifles paid for by Huse ended up being captured by the Union Navy blockade fleet and diverted to use by federal forces. And a few may have been sold to other buyers. There is no way to tell for sure about a specific gun exactly where it may have served. At least this one doe NOT have the usual British crown over VR or other British military inspector marks which would be found on arms delivered to the crown, and unlikely to have reached America during the war. (Exception- the crown marked middle band, which may be a period or later collector replacement.) This is a standard 3-band rifle musket with 39 inch barrel, brass buttplate and trigger guard with a mellow old patina, and Baddley clamping bands. Front and rear sights are intact and not boogered by shooters. The lockplate markings are nicely engraved “LONDON ARMOURY.” and no date. The barrel is mostly dull steel gray mixed with some staining, and also having the expected light roughness and fine pitting around the breech. The European walnut stock shows normal shrinkage so that the buttplate stands a bit proud and the bands do not clamp real tightly. It has the usual assortment of minor dings and bruises, but no cracks, repairs or even significant dings to point out. Even the often rotted wood behind the nipple area is intact. Totally untouched and uncleaned. The bore is very sharp and smooth, although in need of a good cleaning. 31 over 31 stamped on the buttplate tang. The sling swivels have been removed, but very few troops actually used slings during the Civil War, so that was probably done during the period of use. A good solid representative Civil War imported Enfield .577 three band rifle musket, and quite likely a Confederate import. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2350.00 (View Picture)

22467 U.S. NAVY DUMMY TRAINING RIFLE, MARK I (M1903 SPRINGFIELD TYPE) W/ SLING - Rifles were desperately needed for front line troops during WW2, leading to the purchase of dummy rifles for use in basic training to teach marching and close order drill, etc. This made hundreds of thousands of "real" rifles available for issue to troops in combat units, or advanced training. The Parris-Dunn Corporation of Clarinda, Iowa, produced a full size replica of the Model 1903 Springfield, and the Navy bought 300,000 and the Army got 200,000 more. These were marked on the buttplate “U.S.N./ Dummy Rifle/Mark I” along with the maker’s name. Nearly identical versions were sold as the “Victory Trainer,” and smaller versions were made for commercial sales until a few years ago. The Dummy Rifle Mark I continued in ceremonial use in some Naval commands well into the 1970s. This example has about 85-90% original finish- blued metal parts (turning plum) and correct black painted bolt and trigger guard parts. However, the front sight and the stamped sheet metal rear sight are missing. The lower band is the painted type, not the sheet metal type found on some. Wood parts with original stained and painted finish, and very few storage and handling dings for a 60 year old item. Small crack in the wrist area but not bad. Buttplate marked "DUMMY TRAINING RIFLE/ MARK I - U.S.N./ PARRIS-DUNN CORP/ CLARINDA IOWA" has some original blue finish, along with scars from use and a bit of rust around the edges. Maybe you have a boogered up example you can salvage the sights from to restore this. This comes with an original WW2 issue M1907 leather sling made by MILSCO, but it is very stiff and dry and best left in place. A must for any M1903 Springfield collector. Not a firearm, no FFL or paperwork needed, and not even banned in Kalifornia, yet. $135.00 (View Picture)

5859 U.S. Model 1896 .30-40 Krag Rifle- (Philadelphia elite “State Fencibles” used??) - Serial number 104641 all matching original and correct except for missing handguard. This is the type of rifle used by most of the U.S. regulars, and some of the volunteers in the Spanish American War and the Philippine Insurrection. This one is unusual in the markings on the stock, neatly stamped B/S.F./30. Initially I thought these may have indicated San Francisco Police usage, but they seem to have used SFP on their Colt Lightning rifles, and I was unable to verify the marks on any of the other guns they used. However the history of the State Fencibles specifically notes that they had Krag rifles circa 1908-1918 so I think that correctly matches the unit with this rifle, although there are no serial number records to verify anything. The State Fencibles were a Philadelphia militia unit founded in 1813 and active until the post Spanish American War era, serving in all the wars plus various riots or labor disputes. At end of the century, they broke ties with the new National Guard oversight requirements and after a lawsuit in 1901 regained possession of their old Armory, and continued as a quasi-military but primarily social club, lasting until at least 1980. In addition to periodic musters and encampments they participated in drill competition and the like with flamboyant uniforms, returning to the militia traditions of the 19th Century. Overall this rifle is in VG-fine condition. The barreled action was reblued long ago and about 95+% remains, but the other fittings seem to have the original finish now mostly turned plum and patina. The bolt body is darkened from handling, and is the correct 1896 type with the short flat underneath. This has the unslotted upper band and the correct M1896 rear sight and matching short front sight blade. The unsanded walnut stock has assorted minor and a few medium dings and bruises. I think there was a small crack extending back from the trigger guard (common on Krags) that was professionally repaired and nearly invisible. The bore has very strong rifling but is a bit dark (almost nasty, but not quite) and may or may not clean up a whole lot. This only needs a 1896 type handguard to be complete. The JSA/1896 cartouche and circle P are nice and legible, and the stock just has a mellow old original oil finish with nice sharp edges. A somewhat above average condition Model 1896 Krag rifle with the added feature of a possibly interesting history which nicely summarizes the American tradition of the volunteer soldier. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

20131 CUSTER ERA TRAPDOOR CARBINE OR RIFLE RECEIVER (SERIAL NUMBER (24062) AND BREECHBLOCK - Serial numjber 24062 was made in 1874. Early Model 1873 Trapdoor rifles and carbines are very scarce because in the 1880s, most of the early guns were recalled and stripped down and the salvageable parts used to reassemble new rifles or carbines with the latest improvements, mainly for issue to the militia. Those are the ones with the “star” mark at the end of the serial number. Stock fittings, the locks, and some of the internal action parts were reused, but the barrels, receiver, breechblocks and stocks were all scrapped as not meeting current standards. They ended up in the hands of surplus dealers and many ersatz trapdoors were assembled with these parts, and Dixie Gun Works was selling low number trapdoor receivers until near the end of the 20th Century. Both rifles and carbines have been documents in the mid 20,000 range of serial numbers and there is no way to be sure if this came from a rifle or carbine, or where it might have served, but it is possible that it was a Custer gun, or at least well within the Custer serial number range. (It is also possible you may win the lottery next week, so understand possible is not proof.) This has been cleaned up and refinished with a color case hardened finish and is very attractive, if not totally authentic. The breechblock is the correct high arch type for that serial number range, with matching finish. Both receiver and block are stripped of all small parts, except the ejector permanently attached to the receiver. There is a FREE hinge pin (long one for the 1877 and later rifles, but missing the tiny tit at the bottom) to help hold the block in place. What you see is what you get, ideal for building up that :Custer range” gun as a filler for your collection. Better grab this before someone from a big gambling city snatches it up and we see it as a complete carbine with an elaborate history in a few months. $350.00 (View Picture)

4143 U.S. Model 1884 .45-70 Springfield "trapdoor rifle"- lots of finish- great bore - Serial number 445028- Metal is in great condition with about 90% color case hardening on the breechblock and tang, and about 90% original blue on the other parts. However, this came from the old Stembridge Gun Rental collection and was probably rented for use in some of the movies where these were placed in the hands of various extras and bit actors who made up the vast armies in virtually all of the Civil War and cowboy theme movies. Unfortunately, the Hollywood riff-raff did not care much about guns then (especially when they could buy brand new trapdoors by the case for about $25 per rifle!). As a result of heroic battle scenes or mere carelessness, the stock has picked up a lot of minor, some medium and two major dings. Large ones are on left side of stock just below the rear lock screw, and a gouge out of the lower left side on the forend behind the lower band. With some careful soaking, steaming, and a light sanding and some filler in the two big boo boos this will be a very handsome specimen. SWP/1889 cartouche is mostly visible and good circle P. Bore is about excellent but needs a good cleaning. Excellent mechanics. Comes with a sling that is from some foreign rifle, but sort of looks like a trapdoor sling. M1884 Buffington rear sight has a piece broken off the bottom of the slide (S&S has repro slides for $35). Overall a god looking rifle as is, and it will look better with the stock fixed up a little and be an excellent representative example of the classic Indian War era .45-70 “Trapdoor” with an interesting Hollywood connection to boot. $895.00 (View Picture)

**STOLEN BY PERSON IN PORTLAND, OR AREA, or possibly a long haul trucker. $500 reward for return of this item or information leading to arrest and conviction of the thief, who got several other antique arms from other dealers by credit card fraud... $100 reward if you are first to spot this on an auction site.** 12036 U.S. MODEL 1863 TYPE II .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET - Made at Springfield in 1864 and so marked on the lockplate. Barrel date not visible. Excellent bore. This is a good representative example of a .58 caliber Civil War musket, although not in the best condition. Basically a "brown gun" except for the trigger guard which has about 90-95% arsenal blue and must have been taken from a trapdoor (parts are identical except for being left bright on the M1855-1870 and blued on the M1873-1888 trapdoors. Otherwise all original and correct parts. Stock has been broken through he wrist and repaired long ago, but is not real tight and should be redone with epoxy which will make it stronger than the original wood. The stock has been sanded, but not badly. Metal parts (except trigger guard) mostly have a layer of brown patina/rust, with some light pitting under some areas, most notably around the nipple. Displays okay as is, or could be polished up with 320 emery cloth if you prefer the original bright look. The M1863 (type 2) which is sometimes called the M1864, was the highpoint in the development of the rifle musket for Infantry use, and the next year was replaced by the first of the Allin breechloding "trapdoors." The M1863 (Type 2) differed from the M1863 only in having the rounded bands retained by band springs instead of merely screw clamps. The M1863 differed from the M1861 which had flat bands retained by bandsprings, and the nipple bolster set out a bit further and having a clean out screw instead of an angled flash hole, and used a "swell" in the ramrod to hold it in place instead of a screw plate. All the .58 rifle muskets fired a 500 grain (little over 1 ounce) soft lead Minie ball with a hollow base. When the 60 grains of black powder was ignited by the flash from the percussion cap, the expanding gasses expanded the rear of the Minie ball to engage the rifling. Sights are provided for 100, 300 and 500 yards, but masses of troops could be engaged at ranges up to 1,000 yards. With a rate of fire of about 3 rounds per minute, and its long range, the .58 caliber rifle muskets forced dramatic changes in tactics from the massed formations used for the preceding several hundred years. Many collectors have a musket from the Civil War as a logical starting point for a collection of "modern" military rifles. This one comes with a good quality reproduction sling. Civil War muskets are getting more expensive but this one is affordable (due to the flaws) and has the potential to be much nicer after the stock has been repaired properly. $995.00 (View Picture)

 


Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)

23015 UNUSUAL LEFT HAND .40 CALIBER HALF STOCK PERCUSSION RIFLE - Just the oddity you need to confuse and confound your gun buddies who will insist such things do not exist. Probably made circa 1840-1870. Lock is hand stamped with hard to read “T.F. MITORE/MAKER” but I cannot find any information on anyone with that name. The barrel is 32.5 inches long, about .40 caliber with a VG-fine bore, sharp lands and grooved but dark and dirty. The buttplate and a toe plate are brass, and the trigger guard is iron. I think this probably was made in the Mississippi River area somewhere between St. Louis and New Orleans, but that is just a hunch more than anything that I can actually document or verify. The octagon barrel is slightly swamped towards the muzzle which measures about 13/16” across the flats, with a simple blade front sight and extreme buckhorn style rear sight. There is an iron rib under the barrel and it once had two ramrod pipes, now missing. The lock was purpose made for use as a left hand, and appears to be made for rifles, not a double barrel shotgun lock that has been salvaged. Triggers are double set and they require some tinkering to make them work properly. The walnut stock is well made and inletted, but the design of the panel area around the lock and on the opposite side is awkward. Overall condition is about good, with the iron parts having a layer of brown patina, and the brass parts show heavy patina, and the wood is a mellow old oil type finish. A great decorator, or gun to be an example of the unusual “LEFT HAND” rifle. $325.00 (View Picture)

**PRICE REDUCED** 18442 GERMAN JAEGER RIFLE CIRCA 1750-1790- CONVERTED TO PERCUSSION - The only visible marking is a round cartouche on the barrel with the letters CB over an unidentified shape over B. Heer Der Neue Stoeckel shows this identical marking and notes it was found on a Wheelock rifle circa 1648-1650, but clearly the gun is much newer than that. However, it was common to use the barrels from older weapons to make new guns, especially military arms, or privately owned arms among the middle class. (The rich would buy new fancy stuff and the peasants could not afford a gun, even if they could be trusted with any!) German Jaeger rifles were traditionally the arms used by hunters, and later by specialized rifle units in the army. It was the Jaeger rifles brought by German immigrants circa 1700-1710 that served as the earliest patterns for the Pennsylvania (and later Kentucky) rifles which were made by gunsmiths who had trained in Germany. This has a 24.75 inch long barrel, 1.24” across at the muzzle, swamped to about 1.10” at the narrowest point, and about 1.35” at the breech. The .72 caliber bore is deeply rifled with eight grooves and while the rifling is very strong and deep, it is dark and rough. The front sight is a dovetailed brass blade, while the rear sight is a robust iron affair dovetailed into the barrel and having a very handsome scroll or flame detail at the front. The Germanic style percussion lock has been converted from flintlock, probably circa 1830s or 1840s. The brass buttplate measures 2 1/8” wide by 5” high with a 2 ¼” tang. The walnut(?) stock is in good condition with a prominent cheek piece, but no carving or fancy work. There appears to be a break on the left side between the lock screws, but there does not appear to be any corresponding damage on the right side to indicate it was completely broken, but still, 200 year old wood needs to be treated carefully and with respect. The sideplate is actually two separate brass pieces with a great vine and C-scroll motif. The tip of the stock has a bone cap, as was common on these. In my opinion the lock screws and tang screw, horn nose cap and ramrod are likely replacements. The buttplate screws may or may not be originals, and if original, I believe the heads have been filed nearly flush. Sling swivels are missing- upper one from near the forend tip and the lower one probably screwed into the stock just behind the trigger guard, but possibly mounted in the hole across the trigger guard bow. This is a handsome example of the classic German Jaeger rifle, the ancestor of the Pennsylvania rifle. If it were still in original flintlock, the price would be several times higher, but it is a great representative example of the type, even though converted to percussion. $1,795.00 (View Picture)

**PRICE REDUCED** 18449 HEAVY BARREL HALFSTOCK PERCUSSION TARGET RIFLE BY DREPPARD, LANCASTER, PA - A heavy barrel rifle, probably intended for target use, weighing 11 pounds 13 ounces. The .38 caliber barrel measures 1 1/8” across the flats and 32 inches long with eight groove rifling. The lockplate is 7/8” x 4 ½” with a clipped tail and neatly stamped DREPPERD/LANCASTER. The double set triggers need some tinkering to fix. The forend ha1s a pewter cap, and the barrel has an iron rib with an iron ramrod thimble and a brass entry pipe. Nicely detailed front sight, and the rear sight is a long one slotted for a stepped elevator which is missing. The tang is drilled for a sight of some sort, also missing. The iron parts with a smooth brown finish, which may be original acid brown type finish, or just accumulated age patina. Frank Sellers’ American Gunsmiths lists eleven makers named Drepperd or Dreppard working in Lancaster, PA at various times between 1766 and 1857, so it is hard to pin this down to an exact maker. From the design features it seems to date to circa 1840-1850. The stock with about 95% of its original finish seems to be made out of walnut, but perhaps some other similar species. Brass buttplate, round patch box, and trigger guard. Brass barrel retention wedge is probably a replacement. This rifle shows the gradual shift away from the graceful artistry of the Pennsylvania long rifles into more utilitarian designs and more emphasis on leisure time sport shooting than the earlier necessity to put meat in the pot and drive hostiles away. Except for the relatively small “eastern” caliber, this resembles the heavy “plains rifles” or Hawken rifles of the same period. A handsome mid-19th century target rifle. $795.00 (View Picture)



Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)

**NEW ADDITION** 22813 SWISS MODEL 1871 VETTERLI .41 RIMFIRE BOLT ACTION RIFLE MADE BY SIG, NEUHAUSEN - Serial number 85681 all matching Sometimes these are called the Model 1869/1871. These never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly man peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not (but they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights). The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo was loaded up until WW2. This rifle is in fine to excellent condition with about 90-95% of the original blue remaining although thinning. It looks a bit gray in the photos, but is actually a blue-gray shade, but definitely original, not touched up or anything. Buttplate suffers from a layer of rust due to poor storage, but the other parts are really nice. Walnut stock has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is excellent but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This one even has the almost always missing cleaning rod. We get a lot of the Model 1878 and 1881 Vetterlis in minty condition but few of the M1871, and very seldom see any of the 1869 rifles. Swiss military arms are a varied and relatively inexpensive collecting niche. This is a good representative example of an uncommon, important and interesting rifle. $650.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21798 SCARCE SWISS MODEL 1870 VETTERLI SINGLE SHOT CADET RIFLE - Serial number 6058, made 1870-1873 by SIG, in Neuhausen, the only maker of this model. The single shot Model 1870 Cadet Rifle was authorized for production by the Eidgenossische Military Department on November 22nd, 1870. These were specifically made for cadet use, with a single shot action, one piece stock, 26.75” barrel and weight of 7.16 pounds. This was a big difference from the tubular magazine repeating rifle with a two piece stock used by infantry with a 33 inch barrel and weighing 10.4 pounds. Both were chambered for the 10.4 x 38mmR (or .41 Swiss) rimfire cartridge, but there was a special cadet cartridge with a lighter powder charge, although the regular service rounds will chamber and fire in the cadet rifles. No one seems to know the actual number of cadet rifles made, but this seems to be one of the highest serial numbers, so my guess would be maybe 7,500 or fewer total. Collecting Swiss rifles is an interesting and fairly affordable collecting specialty, and this is one of the hardest rifles to find. This example is in near excellent condition, with about 90% of the brown finish on the barrel, and about 80% faded color case hardening on the receiver, trigger guard and buttplate. The cleaning rod is the correct cadet type with a slotted brass tip. Good mechanics. The walnut stock was broken at the toe, and repaired long ago with a new piece of wood that shows a handful of small nails which held it in place, along with glue. It has been neatly finished and blends in nicely. Bore is excellent, like anyone has a bunch of .41 Swiss ammo to shoot or anything. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $775.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20032 RARE WW2 JAPANESE TRAINING RIFLE MADE FROM GERMAN MODEL 1888 MAUSER COMMISSION RIFLE - Serial number 3078c, originally made at Danzig in 1889 for German military use. This is unquestionably an item extensively modified and used in Japan as a training rifle, not one of the Turked up pieces of junk, or a crude Chinese “Han rifle” copy. Merely an interesting oddity to normal collectors, this is an exotic and little known treasure for advanced and obsessive Japanese rifle collectors. Confuse and confound your friends when you start to talk about your GERMAN made Model 1888 Jap rifle. I found there is almost no information available on these except for a brief mention of a similar (but not identical) rifle on Malcolm MacPherson’s superb “Non-Firing Drill and Training Rifles” page, where he shows a M1888 Mauser with barrel jacket and magazine removed and restocked to resemble the Type 38 rifles. However, this one retains the standard M1888 magazine, but had the barrel jacket removed, Jap style sights installed, and a new Japanese stock assembly with band for the Type 30 bayonet and a dummy cleaning installed. Japanese markings are painted on the butt, but meaning unknown. MacPherson summarizes the Jap Training rifle program: “Starting in the 1920's, the Japanese government required all junior and senior high school boys to have two hours a week of military training. Several companies started producing the necessary training rifles for this purpose. Unfortunately most training rifles did not bear markings that identified their origin. These training rifles had no standard design and were often made from older models of military rifles or parts from these rifles. Therefore you will find many variations of the same model. There are known models that used 1888 Mauser, type 99, type 30, and type 38 rifle parts. These training rifles continued to be produced until the late 1930's. Some of these rifles could not be fired while others would fire wooden bullet blank ammunition. Many of the blank firing rifles were made with smooth bore barrels. Rarely would any of these rifles fire the standard service round. Nearly all of these training rifles could carry bayonets.” There is a more comprehensive discussion of Japanese training arms and equipment and use at http://www.japaneseweapons.net/gunyojyu/kyoren/english.htm but nothing specific on M1888 Mausers. This rifle is in overall VG-fine condition, as modified. Bore is mediocre, but these were not intended for firing, although I do not see that they did anything to prevent firing, and I assume it is still chambered for 8 x 57mm Mauser. We are selling as a training rifle for collectors and NOT SAFE TO FIRE. A very rare item for that very advanced collector of Japanese rifles or training rifles. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $350.00 (View Picture)

19645 DUTCH BEAUMONT- VITALLI 11 x 52mmR RIFLE MADE IN 1873 (CUT DOWN) CHEAP! - Serial number X89 on receiver with other parts mismatched. 1873 manufacture date on barrel. Partially legible cartouche on right side of butt consisting of MAASTRICHT, (The Dutch Arsenal where it was made), the royal cipher W, illegible date 18??. Left side of the receiver is lightly marked with a poorly struck MAASTRICHT under STEVENS, the name of the plant at Maastricht where the conversions to use the Vitalli magazine were made. Walnut stock has mellow old brown patina with just a few very minor storage and handling dings accumulated in the last 135 years. Buttplate marked 1890 over 1013 presumably the date and serial number from the conversion. Metal parts are a dull steel gray color with some patina and staining, but no pitting. These were made as single shot rifles in 1873, and had the Vitalli magazines added in modifications circa 1890. These use an oddball 11 x 52mm rimmed cartridge you are unlikely to ever encounter, but are neat old rifles anyway, especially when you consider that the U.S. was still tinkering with single shot trapdoors while the Dutch Army had bolt action repeaters. Bore is great, but with no ammo, it really does not matter. The barrel has been cut to 25.5 inches long and a new front sight added. The stock has been cut back and an upper band relocated. The mainsping (a “V” shaped spring in the bolt handle) is missing, so the firing pin does not stay in position or fire. Otherwise mechanics are good, and parts could be use for repair of another rifle of this model which needs parts. Overall, this is an “old and odd” looking rifle that would be a good wall hanger, or the basis for a gunsmithing practice project where you do not want to booger up a good (or expensive) rifle. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed, and one of the cheapest 125 year old guns you can buy at only $185.00 (View Picture)

19409 SCARCE RUSSIAN MODEL 1870 “BERDAN II” BOLT ACTION MADE AT SESTROETSK IN 1881 (10.75 x 58 mm rimmed caliber) NICE! - Serial number 67881. This is an excellent example of an interesting and historically important arm, both in Russian military arms, and in general arms technology history. The Russian “Berdan” rifles were designed American General Hiram Berdan, the famous sharpshooter commanders, and a prolific designer who also designed a “trapdoor” style system. This pre-dated Erskin Allin’s work at Springfield and eventually Berdan won a lawsuit for patent infringement. Berdan consulted and worked with the Colt company in the manufacture of the Russian Model 1868 “Berdan I rifles” which used his “trapdoor” system. Berdan also designed the priming system used virtually everywhere except for the U.S. A British officer, Col. Boxer, designed the priming system used in the US, as part of his development of the British Snider conversion rifle. The 10.75 x 58mmR cartridge (a .42 caliber centerfire black powder round) used in the Berdan I rifle was very powerful, and one of the best in the world when introduced, but the rifle had much room for improvement. By 1870, Berdan had a new single shot, bolt action design adopted by the Russians, generally known as the “Berdan II.” A distinctive feature is that the stubby little bolt handle only turns 45 degrees, instead of the 90 degrees for most bolt action rifles. The rifle was known for its accuracy, simplicity and reliability. There are four variations of the Berdan II, the infantry rifle like this one; the lighter and slightly shorter Dragoon rifle; a Cossack rifle with a button trigger and no trigger guard, and a cavalry carbine. Infantry and dragoon rifles were issued with quadrangular socket bayonets. Initial production of the Berdan II was at Birmingham Small Arms in England. The rifles were later manufactured in large numbers by Russian factories at Tula, Izhevsk, and Sestroretsk. Eventually a total of nearly 3 million Berdan II rifles were made, remaining in serves until replaced by the M1891 Mosin Nagants, and lingering into the WW1 era for a few second line units. Like the early Mosing-Nagants the Berdan sighs are calibrated in “arshins.’ Aside from very small numbers sold or given to Bulgaria, Ethiopia, and Serbia, the vast majority remained in Russian hands and eventually were destroyed. Except for several thousand captured by Finland which were finally sold off as surplus in the 1950, almost no Berdan II rifles have ever reached the collector market. Yeah, you should have bought one then when the price was only $13.95 (and mint, British Lend Lease M1 Garands were $79.95…) This one is in near excellent condition with about 85% original blue finish, worn on the trigger guard and buttplate, with some staining and spots of patina, but no rust or pitting. Excellent bore (should have gotten the ammo at 50 cents per packet of 6 rounds when you got a rifle back then…). Crisp markings on the metal, and the roundel on the butt with 1882 date is pretty legible. Unlike most of the Berdans we have seen, this one has the original correct cleaning rod, although not numbered. Bolt assembly and stock match condition of the rest of the gun, but the serial numbers are mismatched. This comes with an old leather sling which may or may not be correct. It is correct for the period with a standing loop at one end, and a single hook at the other, It is made of two sections, stitched together, but the thread failed and it was field repaired with wire long ago. Two excellent source for more information on the Berdan rifles are: http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Single%20Shot%20Cartridge%20Rifles/M1870%20Russian%20Berdan%20II/M1870%20Russian%20Berdan%20II.htm and http://www.militaryrifles.com/Russia/RBerdan2.htm This is a great addition to a Russian military rifle collection, or a key piece for a focused collection in the very much neglected and somewhat underpriced niche of single shot blackpowder military rifles circa 1865-1880. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $1595.00 (View Picture)

19557 INDIAN MATCHLOCK WITH EXTRA LONG BARREL "TORADOR" (CIRCA 1800-1850?) - This beast is something really different! The barrel is an incredible 53 inches long, and overall it measures 72.5 inches long. Muzzle crown, with crude ornamentation is about 1 inch across, and the breech is significantly heavier at about 1 3/8” across. Barrel walls are fairly thick, and bore is typical dark and rough as found on most old black powder smoothbores. It is about .50 caliber, and is definitely an actual working firearm, not some piece of trash made up for the tourist trade. Our estimate is that it was made circa 1800-1850. Indian laws under the Raj (British rule) required all guns to be registered, and this is accordingly stamped on the buttstock with the number 1193. The breech of the barrel is stamped JPR/EXR/214891, probably from another registration mandate. Two crude brass or copper bands or wrappings retain the barrel. This is a very simple design, where the trigger bar basically just lowers the hammer jaws enough so that a burning match would ignite priming powder in the pan, if the cover is opened. Construction is simple, an reasonably good, although primitive and using several splices in the wood (butt and forend have a “V” joint near the breech, and the “cap” over the area behind the breech is attached to the butt). These are typical of most of this species. Matchlocks were among the most primitive firearms, only one step more advanced than the “hand cannons” attached to a pole and ignited with a burning match held by hand. The use of a primitive lock mechanism ensured proper alignment with the priming pan and greater chances that the gun would actually fire, and be pointed in the desired direction at the time of discharge. They were made in varying quality levels, from the most crude for riff-raff and rabble, to a bit better for military use, to ornate examples for wealthy customers, and high art levels for the truly elite class. An interesting, and outrageously long, example of one of the key steps in the evolution of firearms technology. Condition is as shown in the photos, with what appears to be an old repaired crack or break in the stock at the trigger pin/breech area. Due to the extreme length and delicate design of the stock, this will have to have a wood crate made at an added cost of $50 in addition to regular shipping charges. Or, we will be happy to arrange FREE delivery to shows in Baltimore, Denver, Reno, or Missoula and eliminate the shipping hassles with attendant risk of damage. ORIGINALLY $795.00 REDUCED TO ONLY $575.00 (View Picture)

18442 GERMAN JAEGER RIFLE CIRCA 1750-1790- CONVERTED TO PERCUSSION - The only visible marking is a round cartouche on the barrel with the letters CB over an unidentified shape over B. Heer Der Neue Stoeckel shows this identical marking and notes it was found on a Wheelock rifle circa 1648-1650, but clearly the gun is much newer than that. However, it was common to use the barrels from older weapons to make new guns, especially military arms, or privately owned arms among the middle class. (The rich would buy new fancy stuff and the peasants could not afford a gun, even if they could be trusted with any!) German Jaeger rifles were traditionally the arms used by hunters, and later by specialized rifle units in the army. It was the Jaeger rifles brought by German immigrants circa 1700-1710 that served as the earliest patterns for the Pennsylvania (and later Kentucky) rifles which were made by gunsmiths who had trained in Germany. This has a 24.75 inch long barrel, 1.24” across at the muzzle, swamped to about 1.10” at the narrowest point, and about 1.35” at the breech. The .72 caliber bore is deeply rifled with eight grooves and while the rifling is very strong and deep, it is dark and rough. The front sight is a dovetailed brass blade, while the rear sight is a robust iron affair dovetailed into the barrel and having a very handsome scroll or flame detail at the front. The Germanic style percussion lock has been converted from flintlock, probably circa 1830s or 1840s. The brass buttplate measures 2 1/8” wide by 5” high with a 2 ¼” tang. The walnut(?) stock is in good condition with a prominent cheek piece, but no carving or fancy work. There appears to be a break on the left side between the lock screws, but there does not appear to be any corresponding damage on the right side to indicate it was completely broken, but still, 200 year old wood needs to be treated carefully and with respect. The sideplate is actually two separate brass pieces with a great vine and C-scroll motif. The tip of the stock has a bone cap, as was common on these. In my opinion the lock screws and tang screw, horn nose cap and ramrod are likely replacements. The buttplate screws may or may not be originals, and if original, I believe the heads have been filed nearly flush. Sling swivels are missing- upper one from near the forend tip and the lower one probably screwed into the stock just behind the trigger guard, but possibly mounted in the hole across the trigger guard bow. This is a handsome example of the classic German Jaeger rifle, the ancestor of the Pennsylvania rifle. If it were still in original flintlock, the price would be several times higher, but it is a great representative example of the type, even though converted to percussion. $1,795.00 (View Picture)

20314 SCARCE GERMAN GEWEHR 91 (KARABINER 88) 8mm MAUSER CARBINE - Serial number 2397a made by C.G. Haenel in 1891. This has the “S” marking on the receiver ring indicating it was altered circa 1903-1905 for the “S” or Spitzer type 7.92 x 57mm (8mm Mauser) ammunition. These were essentially a shortened version of the Gewehr 88 “Commission rifle” with a 18 inch barrel and the bolt handle bent and flattened to the “butter knife” style. Like its longer brother, the Gew 91 and Karabiner 88 has the steel barrel jacket which also serves as a handguard. The main difference between the two is that the GEW 91 has a stacking rod on the nosecap, while the Kar 88 did not. The Gew 91 was adopted in March 1891 for use by foot artillerymen of Prussia, Saxony and Wurttemberg. This is all matching, and correct and original except some dumbkopf switched the bolt which is number 4665. Upper band has unit mark 11.A.F.I.I.H.117 which probably represents something like the 11th Field Artillery light munitions column (Howitzer) , but I do not pretend to understand the subtle meanings of the longer German abbreviations. Lower band has canceled unit markings which are illegible. This desperately needs a thorough cleaning inside and out. The unsanded stock has several crown type markings but overall is dirty and dinged from honest service use. Metal parts with most of the blue on the barrel jacket, turning plum with the trigger guard and magazine turned mostly plum. The originally bright finished receiver and bolt are now aged and stained to a dull patina. Bore is filthy but should clean to good to very good with strong rifling. These served with the dragoons, hussars, cuirassiers and lancers as well as with logistics and some specialized units until the adoption of the Karabiner 98 AZ in 1908. This is a good example of a pretty scarce German military arm. Not some Turked up junk, or one of the common Gew 88 rifles, but a genuine Gew 91 variant of the Kar 88 carbine. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $850.00 (View Picture)

20634 Italian M1870/1887/1916 Vetterli-Mannlicher 6.5mm Bolt Action Rifle - Serial number R5928 probably made circa 1890 at Torino, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better examples of this model we have encountered, although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen. Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered after 1887 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles in 1916 by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the early loads first used in the 6.5mm, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (where the Italians were notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked with illegible maker and date on one side and serial number R5928 on the other. Walnut stock has an old military oil finish and is also somewhat oil soaked. Except for a crack over the cleaning rod hole in the forend the stock is actually pretty good with a legible roundel on the left side, “REPARIZONE, FABR D’ ARMI GARDONE, VT” from the time of last conversion. Right side has deeply struck serial number 5928. Metal parts with about 50-60% thinning arsenal refinish on most parts, that seems to be blue on some parts and a black paint type finish on others, and some areas of light rust or patina. We have seen a number of these over the years and this is among the better of a sorry lot. Unlike every other one we have had, this one actually had the cleaning rod! Good mechanics. Bore is dark and rough looking and may clean, or may not, but in our opinion these are UNSAFE TO SHOOT under any circumstances. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle which served into the WW1 era and even to a limited extent in WW2. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

23268 Swiss Model 1869/1871 .41 rimfire Bolt Action Vetterli Repeating Rifle - Serial number 7129 matching, made by Rychner & Keller, Aarau. Although never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly-men peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not, although they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights. The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo up until WW2 and in the 1960s nearly unissued Vetterli rifles were selling from “Ye Olde Hunter” for $9.95 each. Ah, the good old days. This rifle is in good condition except that it has been poorly stored, so much of the original blue finish has turned to plum patina or acquired some light surface rust. This needs a good cleaning of all the metal parts, and a good rubbing with linseed oil on the stock to make it look a lot nicer than it is now. The unsanded walnut stock is dry and has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is dirty but good, and may clean better, but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This is complete with the cleaning rod, which is often missing. A good representative example of an important and interesting rifle. These early Model 1869-1871 rifles are much harder to find, and usually in lesser condition than the later Model 1878 and 1881 rifles. Swiss rifles can be a fun and (relatively) inexpensive collecting niche, with a wide variety of variations from the core group of muzzle loading Federal rifles, the Milbank Amslers, Vetterlis, and Schmidt-Rubins. All are made of the finest materials to the highest quality standards, and fairly easy to find at affordable prices. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5985 - 21091 - SCARCE GERMAN KARABINER 88 CARBINE Serial number 1862b made at Erfurt in 1891. This has the “S” marking on the receiver ring indicating it was altered circa 1903-1905 for the “S” or Spitzer type 7.92 x 57mm (8mm Mauser) ammunition. These were essentially a shortened version of the Gewehr 88 “Commission rifle” with a 18 inch barrel and the bolt handle bent and flattened to the “butter knife” style. Like its longer brother, the Karabiner has the steel barrel jacket which also serves as a handguard. This is all matching, and correct and original except some schweinkopf cut down the ears on the side of the upper band which serve as sight protectors.

Upper band has unit mark B.2.Ch.3.79 for the Bavarian “Bayerisches Chevalulegers- Regiment 2, Eskadron 3, waffen number 79. Lower band is marked B.2.R.C.4.122 for another Bavarian regiment, probably the “Bayerisches Reserve Infanterie Regiment 2,” with the subordinate designation not one we can translate.

The unsanded stock has several crown type markings under a very old coat of varnish. One crack along the left side of the receiver for about 4 inches that would be an easy repair. Metal parts with most of the blue on the barrel jacket, much on the trigger guard and magazine, but the originally bright finished receiver and bolt are now aged and stained to a dull patina. Bore is fair to good, decent rifling, but worn and a bit dark. The Karabiner 88 served with the dragoons, hussars, cuirassiers and lancers as well as with logistics and some specialized units until the adoption of the Karabiner 98 AZ in 1908. Most of the Kar 88s seem to have been made by the contractors Haenel and Schilling, and relatively few by Erfurt which only made them 1891-1896.

Even with the boogered front sight protective ears and replaced band, this is a very nice example of a pretty scarce German military arm. Not some Turked up junk, or one of the common Gew 88 rifles, but a genuine Kar 88 carbine. $795.00 (View Picture)

7358 Italian M1870/87/16 6.5mm bolt action Vetterli-Vitalli-Mannlicher Rifle - Serial number LO1708 made circa 1870-1878 at Brescia, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better looking examples of this model we have seen lately (although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen). Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered from 1887 through 1896 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the old black powder loads, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). WE CONSIDER THES UNSAFE TO SHOOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTNACES AND SELL ONLY AS A COLLECTOR ITEM, NEVER TO BE FIRED! Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked BRESCIA on one side and serial number LO1708 on the other. Walnut stock has been lightly sanded during the period of it service and now has an old military oil finish. Right side has deeply struck serial number LO1708. Metal parts with about 90-95% of an old black paint finish, probably not military, but it makes the gun look nice…from a distance. Unlike very other example we have seen, THIS ONE HAS THE CLEANING ROD! As is almost always the case, the cleaning rod is missing. Good mechanics. Rough bore. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these early Italian military rifles are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

20410 BRITISH THIRD MODEL "INDIA PATTERN" BROWN BESS MUSKET - The .75 caliber flintlock Brown Bess musket, in various forms, was the standard British military arm from circa 1722 to 1838, differing mainly in barrel length and minor construction details. This encompasses the formative years of both their colonial empire, especially in North America and what eventually became India, and their wars against the French known to Americans as the French and Indian War, and later the Napoleonic Wars (including the War of 1812 in America), as well as the American Revolution. These were simple, rugged, and reliable arms often remaining in service for decades after their original procurement. They also served with the quasi-military forces of the East India Company, and the Company’s arms were sometimes taken up for military issue in times when Army needs exceeded available supplies. Normally, the Ordnance Board bought locks and barrels from separate suppliers in advance, and then contracted with other specialists to provide stocks and fittings and assemble the parts into completed arms as needed. Thus there are many subtle differences between guns of the same model, depending on the original sources of the parts and when and where they were assembled, and how long they served, and where. The Brown Bess is generally grouped into three patterns or models for use by the “Land Service” or Army, while the “Sea Service” or Navy had their own distinct variations. The First “Long Land” Pattern had a 46 inch barrel and was used circa 1722- 1793. The Second “Short Land” Pattern with a 42 inch barrel was used circa 1768-1797. The Third, or “India Pattern,” Brown Bess had a 39 inch barrel and was used from the mid 1790s until the end of the flintlock musket era in the late 1830s. Erik Goldstein’s superb “The Brown Bess; An Identification Guide and Illustrated Study of Britain's Most Famous Musket“ is highly recommended to sort out the details of the various models and their evolution. This is an example of the “Third Model or India Pattern” musket with a 39.25 inch .75 caliber barrel. In addition to the shorter barrel, this model used a redesigned hammer with a “double throat” instead of the flimsy (but more attractive) “goose neck” hammer of earlier models. Mountings are all brass, with three ramrod pipes, the upper being the long “trumpet” shaped style. The 6.75” x 1.25” lockplate is marked TOWER behind the hammer with a crown over GR in front, with a crude arrow mark. This is ORIGINAL FLINTLOCK, not a reconversion! The left side of the barrel has a crown/B Birmingham proof, a crown/[?]F/broad arrow inspector(?) mark, and a crown/broad arrow property mark. No marks noted on the stock or mountings. The buttplate shows damage at the lower screw location, and possibly an old repair, and there is a repaired chip on the left side of the buttplate heel. Otherwise, the walnut stock is solid, with just the minor dings, blemishes and dirty patina of a 200 year old military arm. The overall workmanship on the stock is somewhat crude (lowest bidder!) and this may be either as originally assembled, or perhaps one that was restocked at some point long, long ago. Ramrod, lock screws, hammer screw and one (or both?) buttplate screws seem to be old replacements. Iron barrel and lock are basically dull gray steel mixed with patina, and having some areas of light pitting and roughness, especially on the lock plate tail, and near the muzzle. This is a very presentable example of a generic “Brown Bess” for the general collector, or for the more specialized collector, an example of the Napoleonic/War of 1812 arm of the British Infantry. It would be nicer with War Department markings to confirm British military use, but even without them, this is the same type of musket, and may have been used by the East India Company, or even provided commercially, or under the table, to British allies. A good representative example priced reasonably at only $1995.00 (View Picture)

19435 SCARCE AUSTRIAN MODEL 1854/1867 WANZL BREECHLOADING CONVERSION OF LORENZ MUSKET (14 x 33mm Rimfire) - In 1866 the Austrians fought a disastrous seven week war with German, where the German breechloading needle fire rifles decimated the Austrians with their muzzle loading Lorenz rifles. Therefore, in January 1867, the Austrians adopted the Wanzl system for converting their muzzle loading rifles to breechloading cartridge arms. (Six months later they adopted the rotary breech Werndl rifles for new manufacture by the new firm of Steyr.) This is the standard infantry model Wanzl, with total barrel length of about 37.5 inches and overall length of about 53 inches. The lock bears the original manufacture date of 1862, stamped in the Austrian method of only the last three digits, 862. The Wanzl conversion s similar to the later Allin Trapdoor system, where a new receiver is attached to the rear of the barrel, having a breechblock that flips up like the trapdoor. The locking system is unique, being an internal rod that locks into the rear of the breechblock as the hammer falls. The tang is marked THERESIA- ZEILINGER in a circle, the firm that did the conversion. The barrel is marked W 68 indicating acceptance at Vienna (Wein) in 1868. Overall condition is fine but will easily clean to excellent. Most parts retain their original bright polished finish under dried oil and crud. Several areas of the barrel and a few other parts have some very thin surface rust that can be carefully cleaned and blended into the rest of the polished areas. The bore is fantastic- mirror bright and sharp. The unsanded beech stock has a few assorted minor handling and storage dings and blemishes, but nothing significant. Stock is somewhat sticky from old oil or grease whichi probably has accumulated a lot of dirt which will clean off with it. Several cartouches or other stampings are sharp. The Wanzel is a very scarce gun, and would be an excellent addition to a collection of European military arms. An excellent collecting niche would be to specialize in the evolution of military rifle technology, something like “Military muskets converted to breechloaders.” Other examples that would fit in there are the British Sniders, the French Tabatier, the Swiss Milbank-Amsler; the U.S. first and second Allin trapdoors, some of the Remington rolling blocks, and several others. The best source of info on arms of this era is Keith Doyon’s superb site http://www.militaryrifles.com/ which we use often. (Note- The Lorenz muskets were nominally .54 caliber and the conversion used a rimfire cartridge variously called any of the following: 13.9 x 33mm Wanzel Model 1867 rimfire; 14 mm rimfire Wanzl ; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Wänzel Mod. 1869; 14.5 x 32.5mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14 mm Scharfe gewehrpatrone or the 14 x 33mm rimfire Wänzel. But whatever you call it, forget about ever finding any ammo for it!) ANTIQUE- No FFL needed $1495.00 (View Picture)

17359 LONDON ARMOURY COMPANY- POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE- PATTERN 1853 .577 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MUSKET - London Armoury Company was founded in 1859 by several British arms makers (including Robert Adams, Blackett Beaumont, and James Kerr) taking over the patents and machinery formerly used by Deane Adams & Dean for making revolvers. London Armoury company became famous for their high quality production of Kerr revolvers and machine made Enfield rifle muskets. In early 1861 Confederate agent Caleb Huse succeeded in getting London Armoury Company to commit to selling him their entire output. First they had to deliver some 1200 rifles on a Massachusetts contract which was completed by September, 1861. Eventually some 70,000 muskets were sold to the Confederacy. Thus, most London Armoury Enfields can be considered to be Confederate, realizing that there was the small Massachusetts contract, and that many rifles paid for by Huse ended up being captured by the Union Navy blockade fleet and diverted to use by federal forces. And a few may have been sold to other buyers. There is no way to tell for sure about a specific gun exactly where it may have served. At least this one doe NOT have the usual British crown over VR or other British military inspector marks which would be found on arms delivered to the crown, and unlikely to have reached America during the war. (Exception- the crown marked middle band, which may be a period or later collector replacement.) This is a standard 3-band rifle musket with 39 inch barrel, brass buttplate and trigger guard with a mellow old patina, and Baddley clamping bands. Front and rear sights are intact and not boogered by shooters. The lockplate markings are nicely engraved “LONDON ARMOURY.” and no date. The barrel is mostly dull steel gray mixed with some staining, and also having the expected light roughness and fine pitting around the breech. The European walnut stock shows normal shrinkage so that the buttplate stands a bit proud and the bands do not clamp real tightly. It has the usual assortment of minor dings and bruises, but no cracks, repairs or even significant dings to point out. Even the often rotted wood behind the nipple area is intact. Totally untouched and uncleaned. The bore is very sharp and smooth, although in need of a good cleaning. 31 over 31 stamped on the buttplate tang. The sling swivels have been removed, but very few troops actually used slings during the Civil War, so that was probably done during the period of use. A good solid representative Civil War imported Enfield .577 three band rifle musket, and quite likely a Confederate import. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2350.00 (View Picture)

22222 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER 7.65mm RIFLE- NICE! - Serial Number P8846 matching throughout, including the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in excellent condition, with nearly all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 98-99% original blue. There are a number of scattered light specks of surface rust, especially on the lower band that should clean off easily. The stock was lightly sanded in the past leaving only a faint trace of the liberty cap cartouche, but is free from any significant dings or blemishes other than those near the upper band spring shown in the photos. This is from an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is a very nice rifle. The bore is G-VG with strong rifling but dark in the grooves. This has the later features (wings on the bolt sleeve, long handguard, steel tipped cleaning rod, etc). South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $550.00 (View Picture)

17801 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 7.65MM MAUSER RIFLE- Nice! - Serial Number N5873 matching throughout, except for the cleaning rod-P0825. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in excellent condition, with nearly all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 97-98% original blue looking sort of ugly now. We think that is just from a coat of old dried up grease or oil, but may be the blue is starting to turn plum. The stock has been lightly sanded in the past leaving only a faint trace of the liberty cap cartouche, but is free from any significant dings or blemishes. This is one of 55,000 made by Loewe in 1894 under their third contract. This is from an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is a nice rifle, or will be after a light cleaning, and only the fact that some are found in even better condition make this one less nice by comparison. The bore is G-VG with strong rifling but dark in the grooves. This has the later features (wings on the bolt sleeve, long handguard, steel tipped cleaning rod, etc). South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $550.00 (View Picture)

18333 Scarce Swiss Milbank-Amsler Infanteriegewehr Rifle Model 1863/1867 - Serial number 518 matching with added rack number 145 on the right side of the barrel and left stock flat. This is a superb example of a key milestone in Swiss military arms- the first model to use the .41 caliber rimfire cartridge (10.4 x 38mmR) which is familiar to most collectors as the Swiss Vetterli cartridge. This action is a flip up type initially designed by an American, Isaac Milbank, and refined and perfected by the Swiss Rudolf Amsler. It was adopted in 1867 as the standard action for converting several models of muzzle loading rifles then in service, all being designated by their original model and the addition of /1867 when modified. This was a modification of the Model 1863 infantry rifle which had been the first Swiss infantry arm that was rifled, although rifles had been used by Jaegers before that. The 1867 Milbank Amsler conversion was also applied to two different sharpshooter models (1851 and 1864) and the 1856 Jaeger and also to a Model 1842/59 infantry musket in .69 caliber (18mm) which used a different cartridge. The breech block is a two part hinged affair lifted by a round, flat, "beaver tail" paddle in a motion similar to the American “trapdoor” although mechanically quite different. Identifying a Milbank-Amsler is relatively easy, the flat, square, blocky two part breech-block is readily identifiable and seldom mistaken for anything else, but they are seldom seen in the collector world and this is the first we have ever found. Condition is spectacular with mirror bright and sharp bore, unsanded stock free from all but a few insignificant tiny blemishes, and about 96-97% original finish on the metal parts. The barrel and some other parts have a deep browned type finish, while others are blued or case hardened. There is one fingerprint size patch of light surface rust on the tang of the trigger guard. A really great example of an unusual early military cartridge rifle. I think that this could be an interesting collecting niche just looking for the different types of actions used to transform obsolete muzzle loaders into breech loading infantry arms. That would include the American Allin trapdoor, the British Snider, the Austrian Wanzel, whatever the French called the “Zulu” type action, etc. Or, just use this as the anchor for the earliest phase of a collection of Swiss military arms. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1895.00 (View Picture)

17800 Swiss Model 1878 .41 rimfire (10.38 x 38Rmm) Vetterli Rifle - Serial number 190244 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/190244/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 80-90% original blue finish on most parts. The top of the barrel between the lower band and the rear sight has thinning finish turning plum and mixed with patina. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and original oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This one previously lived with a smoker and it reeks of tobacco smoke and has a thin film of crud that needs to be cleaned off and it will look much nicer. This is the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is sharp and mirror bright, and overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 130 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)

17798 PORTUGUESE MODEL 1886/89 STEYR KROPATSCHEK RIFLE - Serial number Q940. Made by Steyer in Austria in 1886. Marked on receiver OE.W.F.G. Steyer/ 1886, faint traces of crown over L.Io., and M.1886 due to old arsenal refinish. Receiver, barrel and stock with serial Q940. Bolt mismatched O914 and other numbers. The Steyer Kropatschek is very similar to the German Mauser 1871/84 with a tubular magazine, but the details are slightly different throughout. Caliber is 8x60R Kropatschek, so you probably will not find any ammo. This example had the 1889 modification which added a handguard over the top of the barrel between the rear sight and the middle band, as shown by clearance cuts in the barrel channel for the clips to hold the handguard on. Handguard is missing (as with nearly all of these), leaving this looking just like the original M1886 if you don't spot the additional inletting for the clips. Stock is a nice medium brown walnut having been sanded long ago and picking up only a few tiny blemishes since then. There is a small crack on the left die of the wrist by the receiver tang, but it does not appear to affect strength much. About 90% thinning arsenal refinish blue on receiver and barrel, but the finish is mostly worn off the bands. Bolt and innards of action are nice and bright. Bore is about fine. Complete with the nearly always missing cleaning rod. Overall fine plus condition, much nicer than these are usually found. The 1886/89 model reportedly was sent to colonial outposts to minimize heat wave interference with the sight picture. Portugal had significant colonial holdings in Africa and Asia until early in the 20th century. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $650.00 (View Picture)


Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

Cootl stuf that does not fit well in the other categories. And, for those of you who have thoughtfully stashed away some stocks and hardware (or stocks and bonds with which to invest in stocks and bands) here are some prime candidates for restoration. Some of these rifles were converted to sporters many years ago when no one was interested in collecting "surplus" military  rifles and everybody was busy turning them into cheap deer rifles. While many people butchered the stocks and cut off barrels and refinished things, a few considerate (or lazy) people merely chopped off the stock and threw away all the useless bands and stuff. These rifles are very easy to restore if you have an appropriate stock and bands.

22186 U.S. NAVY DUMMY TRAINING RIFLE, MARK I (M1903 SPRINGFIELD TYPE) (NICE!) - Rifles were desperately needed for front line troops during WW2, leading to the purchase of dummy rifles for use in basic training to teach marching and close order drill, etc. This made hundreds of thousands of "real" rifles available for issue to troops in combat units, or advanced training. The Parris-Dunn Corporation of Clarinda, Iowa, produced a full size replica of the Model 1903 Springfield, and the Navy bought 300,000 and the Army got 200,000 more. These were marked on the buttplate “U.S.N./ Dummy Rifle/Mark I” along with the maker’s name. Nearly identical versions were sold as the “Victory Trainer,” and smaller versions were made for commercial sales until a few years ago. The Dummy Rifle Mark I continued in ceremonial use in some Naval commands well into the 1970s. This example is totally correct and complete with about 95% original finish- blued metal parts except correct black painted bolt and trigger guard parts. Wood parts with original stained and painted finish, and very few storage and handling dings for a 70 year old item. Minor crack through the wrist area but barely noticeable. Buttplate marked "DUMMY TRAINING RIFLE/ MARK I - U.S.N./ PARRIS-DUNN CORP/ CLARINDA IOWA" has some of the original blue finish, mixed with scars from use and some light rust around the edges. Among the top 10% of all these we have seen over the years. A must for any M1903 Springfield collector. Not a firearm, no FFL or paperwork needed, and not even banned in Kalifornia, yet. $195.00 (View Picture)

14811 COMMIE BLOC "FENCING MUSKET" - Obviously patterned after the Mosin Nagant, but then altered with a block of wood resembling an AK style magazine added to the bottom, these were used for teaching bayonet fighting. The spring loaded tip can be depressed about 4 inches into the barrel, similar to a pogo stick. This is a fairly common approach, and I have seen fencing muskets with the same concept from Sweden and England as well. The U.S. used bayonets with passed spring steel blades, and later switched to "pugil sticks". Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. These may be East German as some are marked "MODELL 4.853" which sounds German to me. Overall excellent condition (except for some scattered light surface rust that should clean up). Complete with original excellent sling. Still legal in Kalifornia, but may be next on their ban list. Non-firearm, no FFL needed. Photo shows a typical example, but this is one we were going to keep and is nicer than the one in the photo. $95.00 (View Picture)


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