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Collectible Antique Longarms
(pre-1899)

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Collectible Antique Longarms for sale (pre-1899)

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We have divided this catalog into several sections:
(new items are added at the top of each section)

U.S. Military Antique Longarms
Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)
Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)
Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

U.S. Military Antique Longarms

**NEW ADDITION** 22054 HPH14 - U.S. MODEL 1888 .45-70 TRAPDOOR SPRINGFIELD ROD BAYONET MODEL ODDITY- FANTASTIC BORE! (From the Howard P. Hart & Jean H. Hart Collection of Historic Arms)
Serial number 97794 assembled circa 1889, along with a number of other widely spread “out of range” early numbers using up serviceable receivers on hand.  Over 60,000 of these rod bayonet rifles were made 1889-1893, and many of them were used in the Spanish American War although there is no history for this specific rifle, or even any nearby numbers on which to base speculation.  The M1888 rifles were made at the end of the trapdoor era using the same silly idea (first tried in 1833 with Hall carbines and later repeated again with the M1903 Springfield prior to 1905) whereby a rod bayonet would be used, eliminating the need for a separate bayonet.  Since the Indian Wars had not seen much (if any) use of the bayonet, it probably seemed like a good idea, especially since the cost would be cheaper than getting back into the socket bayonet manufacturing business.  Up until that point most of the trapdoor bayonets had been made by altering left over Civil War era .58 caliber musket bayonets, and Springfield had run out of them.  This is an excellent example of the Model 1888 Rod Bayonet Trapdoor.  Bore is excellent, exceptionally sharp and bright.  Stock has been lightly sanded with semi-legible SWP over 1889 cartouche and circle P.  The stock is a mellow medium brown color with an old oil finish.  It looks like there may have been a chip repair between the receiver tang and rear guard screw and a few spots on the top of the wrist which look like gouges had been filled, but maybe the grain is just funky that and undamaged.  There are a few assorted minor handling and storage dings or bruises expected on an issued martial arm. 
The bore is utterly fantastic, mirror bright and with sharp three groove rifling. The 1884 dated block has some nice case hardening colors on the underside, but the top has faded to a splotchy gray mix.   Remaining metal parts with about 96-97% original blue finish, trending to a plum shade, showing a little normal wear on high points.  Excellent mechanics.  The hammer screw is an incorrect replacement (CW flat style head instead of rounder head).  Reportedly these were tough to shoot accurately due to the solid attachment of the heavy rod bayonet to the muzzle, so that when fired, the rod acted like a tuning fork- vibrating the whole time the bullet was headed out the barrel.  Simply removing the rod when shooting eliminates that problem, and the Buffington sights (especially with addition of a front sight hood) are capable of excellent accuracy.  Butt trap has the standard two holes with a slot along one edge for carrying a M1879 combination tool, M1882 headless shell extractor and a cleaning tip for the rod bayonet.  The front sight blade is original, but can be easily replaced with a higher one so a person might actually hit something at less than the 200 yard zero with the original blade.  A really nice rifle, but not so screaming minty that you would be afraid to shoot it once in a while if you like.  (Note: all guns sold as collector items only and must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to shooting.)  Of the 60,000 rod bayonet rifles made, a great many have been chopped down for sporting use over the years, (perhaps up to 30-40 percent of them in our opinion) making these a lot less common than the production figures suggest.  As the last of the single shot, blackpowder rifles, this is a key milestone in U.S. martial arms history, as well as an iconic weapon of the Spanish American War and Philippine Insurrection.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed.
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is item number 14 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html $1,250.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22054 HPH112 - COLONIAL-FEDERAL PERIOD NEW ENGLAND MILITIA MUSKET CIRCA 1792-1830 (From the Howard P. Hart & Jean H. Hart Collection of Historic Arms)
The American Revolution showed that our nation’s independence and freedom was won by a well armed citizenry, not a standing army.  In fact, prior to the War of 1812 the active Army strength was usually in the range of 2,000 to 4,500 men, mostly in coastal fortifications and on the Indian frontier.  The Militia Act of 1792 required that every able bodied free white male “…provide himself with a good musket or firelock, a sufficient bayonet and belt, two spare flints, and a knapsack, a pouch, with a box therein, to contain not less than twenty four cartridges, suited to the bore of his musket or firelock, each cartridge to contain a proper quantity of powder and ball; or with a good rifle, knapsack, shot-pouch, and powder-horn, twenty balls suited to the bore of his rifle, and a quarter of a pound of powder; and shall appear so armed, accoutred and provided, when called out to exercise or into service.”  It further specified that after 1797 all muskets “shall be of bores sufficient for balls of the eighteenth part of a pound” which was .69 caliber. 
While compliance with the law was lackluster, it was most nearly observed in New England, and in some cases arms were even furnished at public expense.  However, both those and the privately purchased arms tended to follow similar patterns.  While these are referred to as “Militia muskets” to the owner they were also utilitarian tools suitable for hunting deer with ball ammunition, or when loaded with shot the .69 caliber smoothbore barrel performed pretty much the same as a 12 gauge shotgun.  In general, these tended to resemble a lightened British Brown Bess with pin fastened barrels, similar style (but lighter) buttplate, trigger guard, sideplate and ramrod pipes of brass.  Locks were usually smaller “rifle size.”  The side plate was often a distinctive modified “S” pattern. 
This one has the traditional British military .75 caliber barrel, and probably pre-dates the 1797 deadline for switch to .69 caliber barrels and was possibly salvaged from an earlier gun as it lacks the Massachusetts proof markings found on many of the later militia muskets.  The smoothbore barrel is 41 inches long and has a top mounted bayonet stud.  The walnut full length stock reaches to within 3 inches of the muzzle, and is checkered at the wrist as many were.  The barrel has no visible proof marks and some used unmarked salvaged barrels, or salvaged military musket barrels with U.S. or foreign proof marks, or in some cases the Massachusetts proof marks consisting of PM, initials and date.  The 4 5/8” x 15/16” lock was originally flint, but later converted to percussion, and is marked I.P. MOORE/ WARRANTED.  The front lock screw is missing and the hole plugged, the owner probably figuring it would work okay without it so why waste money getting it repaired.  The uncleaned brass furniture has a heavy chocolate patina.  The wooden ramorod is old but now old is uncertain, but it is more or less correct. The iron barrel and lock have a smooth dark patina with some roughness around the drum conversion and nipple area.
These are the types of arms which were brought out for militia musters, and when called to service to repress rebellious farmers, or fight hostile Indians, or even when called to service against the British in our Second War for Independence in 1812-1815.  They remained in service as the militia program atrophied in the first half of the 19th century.  However, even then, Massachusetts and the New England militias were considered to be the best, “although a cynic would note the competition was not keen” as Dr. John K. Mahon, the foremost historian of militia affairs noted.
This is an important historical piece, explaining much of the philosophy of our founders towards military service and the necessity for free men to keep and bear arms.  The later .69 caliber militia muskets are seen fairly often, but these early .75 caliber arms are seldom encountered as they were no longer approved after 1797.  ANTIQUE- No FFL needed.
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is item number 112 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html $795.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22054 HPH111 - U.S. Model 1819 Hall Breechloading Rifle (converted to percussion) made in 1832 (From the Howard P. Hart & Jean H. Hart Collection of Historic Arms)
The first breechloading rifle adopted by the U.S. military (or any other nation!), and the first to be made to 100% interchangeable standards, under the supervision of the inventor, John H. Hall.  Hall was authorized to set up and run the “Rifle Factory” at Harpers Ferry Armory, separate from the regular operation where the workers and managers bitterly opposed any attempt to change from their traditional hand made non-interchangeable autonomous and insubordinate habits.  Adopted in 1819, total production was a very small 19,680 with delivered by Harpers Ferry in 1819, 1823-24 and 1827-1840.  About 35,000 more Hall rifles and carbines of various models were delivered up through about 1853 by Harpers Ferry or by Simeon North of Middletown, CT, who was held to the same tight tolerances as the national armory.   These are unusual in having very shallow sixteen groove rifling, at a time when other military rifles has seven deep grooves.  Also, these had about 1.5 inches at the muzzle bored out slightly oversize (and removing the rifling) to facilitate loading from the muzzle in an emergency.  Because these loaded from the breed by dumping the powder into the breech then pressing the ball into place, the ball could be the correct diameter to engage the rifling, rather than undersize or fitted with a patch and rammed down from the muzzle.  Because the hammer is located in the center of the breechblock, the front and rear sights are offset to the left.  You will sometimes see M1816 style bayonets that have a small “V” notch offset on the bridge at the back of the socket.  Those are actually Hall rifle bayonets (and quite scarce!).  Considered quite the innovation at the time, Hall’s breechloaders were fairly well received, especially the carbine used by mounted troops where they were far more convenient to load on horseback than the traditional muzzle loaders.  Hall rifles were used in the Blackhawk, Seminole and Mexican wars, and 15 were presented to Japan by Commodore M.C. Perry in 1854.  However, the novelty eventually wore off, and chronically cheapskate Congresses objected to the high cost of these patent arms when cheaper muzzle loaders were good enough.  Many of the late production Hall rifles remained in storage and were converted to percussion before (or early in) the Civil War, and several thousand were issued (by both sides).  However, by the end of 1862, all the Halls seem to have been retired from service.  Overlooked initially, it was later realized that if powder spilled while loading it tended to accumulate under the breech- and then ignite when the gun was fired, often burning hands or destroying the stock. By the 1860s far better breechloaders were being made, ending the 40 year service life of the Hall design.  
This rifle is a beautiful example, one of 340 made at Harpers Ferry in 1832.  About 95-97% of the original lacquer brown finish remains on most parts, even the buttplate, and about 98-99% of the blue-like finish on the breech done at the time of conversion.  The bore is like a mirror and probably unfired since leaving the Armory in 1832. The stock shows assorted handling and storage dings and bruises picked up over the last 165 years, including several large ones near the toe of the butt.  Stock is unsanded and has the original oil finish. most of the finish wear is around the muzzle and on the left side of the middle band where someone was clumsy when fiddling with the pin that holds the band in place.  Some minor staining near the head of the bright finished ramrod.  The M1819 Hall is a very important milestone in U.S. small arms history, and this is a truly excellent (or better) example.  ANTIQUE- No FFL needed.
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is item number 111 from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and comes with a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page- http://oldguns.net/Hart_Collection_Bio.html $2,750 (View Picture)

23114 U.S. MODEL 1840 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE BY NIPPES IN 1842- MAYNARD TAPE PRIMER CONVERSION - Original flintlock M1840 muskets are nearly impossible to find, and even the percussion conversions are scarce compared to the ubiquitous Model 1816s. Springfield only made about 30,241 Model 1840s circa 1840-1843, Nippes made only about 5,100 circa 1842-1848, and Pomeroy making another 7,000 1840-1846. This musket was made by Nippes in Philadelphia (Mill Creek) in 1842. One of the earlier percussion conversions of .69 caliber flintlock muskets was this conversion using the Maynard tape primer system done on 2,000 muskets in 1848-1849 by Nippes, almost all on unissued muskets he had made. Basically, the conversion consisted of adding a drum for the nipple and a percussion hammer, and a circular magazine and feed mechanism cycled by cocking the hammer. This mechanism was attached on the outside of the lockplate with a center screw and the old frizzen screw. The Maynard system was an important step towards increasing the rate of fire as it eliminated the need to fumble around placing percussion caps on the nipple because cocking the hammer would automatically advance the Maynard tape so a new spot of priming compound was over the nipple, and when the hammer fell it would act as the ignition for the main charge. However, the tapes proved to be less reliable than hoped for, and although they were initially tried in a variety of different military and sporting arms, they pretty much faded from use by 1861. The demise of the Maynard system led to many of the Nippes alterations to be further modified by removal of the Maynard tape mechanism, leaving a standard nipple and percussion hammer ready for use. There are some documented cases of Confederates doing this on a quantity of guns in Louisiana. We don’t know if it was Confederates or Bubba who removed the Maynard parts on this one. If you want to replace them, the Rifle Shoppe has most of them in their catalog. The half cock sear notch is broken, but full cock is okay although the nose of the sear may be boogered somewhat. This makes removing the lock a bit tricky as the sear rest a bit lower than it should and hard to wiggle out of the lock mortise. Overall the metal parts have been nicely cleaned to bright, and the stock nicely refinished with a small wood repair to the area behind the hammer. A good representative example of a scarce musket with a scarce alteration, and very likely used during the Civil War by one, or possibly both sides. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1250.00 (View Picture)

16083 U.S. MODEL 1840 FLINTLOCK .69 CALIBER SMOOTHBORE MUSKET MADE BY NIPPES- ORIGINAL FLINT! - The Model 1840 was the last flintlock smoothbore musket made for the U.S. Army, the direct descendant of the old French Charlevilles. The pattern arms were made in 1835 but production did not start until 1840, so sometimes you will see these referred to as Model 1835 or 1835/1840. Production quickly stopped at Springfield, after the Model 1842 percussion musket model was adopted. Production lingered on for a few more years and the two civilian contractors finished up their production by 1848. Original flintlock M1840 muskets are nearly impossible to find, and even the percussion conversions are scarce compared to the ubiquitous Model 1816s. Springfield Armory only made about 30,241 (circa 1840-43), Nippes made 5,100 (circa 1842-1848), and Pomeroy made another 7,000 (circa 1840-1846). See Flayderman 9A-258 through 9A-263. This one was made by Nippes in Philadephia in 1845 with matching dates on the lock and barrel. This is one of the very few that escaped conversion to percussion (but sadly did not escape other molestation). Most likely this was used in the Civil War by Union or Confederate soldiers and was possibly taken home by one (with or without permission to go home and/or take a musket), or maybe picked up off a battlefield. Or possibly it served honorably and ended up among the vast quantities of Civil War surplus arms later sold by Bannerman. At some point in civilian hands the mutilations began. The muzzle of the barrel was cut back an inch and a half, getting rid of the bayonet stud, and leaving the barrel 40.5 inches long instead of the original 42 inches. I suspect that the owner was an exceptionally tall man as they neatly added a walnut extension on the butt to make the butt about 1.5” longer and trimmed the nose of the comb down a bit. The stock was once cracked along the grain between the lock and lower band, but this was very neatly repaired and not noticeable from the outside, but when the barrel is removed you can see some of the epoxy material in the barrel channel. The barrel is original flint with only the flint flash hole, never any nipple added. The lockplate retains the original brass pan and frizzen spring and the screws for the hammer, frizzen and frizzen spring. The frizzen fits pretty well but is probably a replacement of some sort. The hammer is a U.S. M1816 hammer which is a loose fit on the tumbler but looks okay. The brass pan has some sort of iron filler piece installed secured by a rivet through the bottom of the pan but the reason for this is a mystery to me. The changes to the lock were probably done to keep the gun functioning for killing hogs, hunting critters or for protection against biped or quadraped predators. Since the barrel has been cut and the butt extended, the changes to the lock might be best to ignore and leave everything alone as part of the history of the gun. Good quality reproduction M1840 hammers and frizzens are available if you want to install them to get back closer to original. Overall condition is GOOD (as modified). Metal parts have a smooth mellow brown patina with some heavier rust or light pitting around the breech end of the barrel, but little or no pitting elsewhere except at the Nippes marking n the center of the lockplate. The metal parts could easily be cleaned bright again if you want to do that. A good machinist could take a piece of .69 musket barrel and make an extension with a slight overlapping or telescope braze joint to stretch the barrel back to the original length. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $895.00 (View Picture)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

3946 REMINGTON ROLLING BLOCK .58 CALIBER “MODEL 1868 TRANSFORMED” RIFLE - Remington introduced the rolling block rifle in 1865 with limited U.S. military sales in a “split breech” version. A stronger breechblock design followed that became the most widely used singe shot breechloader in the world, and kept Remington alive in the lean years following the Civil War as surplus arms saturated the market. The U.S. Navy adopted Remington rolling block system as the Model 1865 pistol, followed by carbines and cadet rifles in 1867 and rifles in 1870. The Army tested the rolling block in 1868 and 1870, followed by manufacture of a large number of rifles and pistols in 1871. New York purchased 15,000 rolling block rifles in 1870. Circa 1869-1870 South Carolina and Texas purchased smaller numbers for militia use. Most of these arms were newly made by Remington, or a joint project involving both Remington and Springfield Armory. Some, however, were conversions made using obsolete Civil War .58 caliber muskets, such as the SC and Texas rifles, and many more made for foreign sales. This is one of the guns made using the barrel, stock and furniture of a M1863(type II) musket, chambered for the .58 caliber centerfire Berdan cartridge. Basically they just cut out the portion of the stock inletted for the lock and adapted the rear of the barrel to fit a newly made Remington action for a very simple and reliable breechloading rifle at a fraction of the cost of a totally new gun. (However, trapdoor Springfields cost even less.) These “transformed” or converted rifles varied over their production life, with the very earliest, like this one using a dovetailed plate to widen the face of the block for use with .58 caliber cartridges, but later production used a purpose made one piece block. Transformed files were apparently made and sold circa 1868 to 1888, with the last sale of 400 to the Dominican Republic in 1888 The .58 conversions are not encountered nearly as often as the later foreign rolling blocks, and are in important part of any military arms collection. This one was originally a M1863 Type 2 .58 caliber rifle musket, and has the rounded bands with band springs. The bore is VG-fine, in case you have a bunch of .58 Berdan ammo stashed away to shoot. The wood has numerous dings and bruises and was cleaned long ago and now has a mellow old oil finish. The forend has a large wedge shaped chip missing (about ½” x 3”) on the right side, and a slight loss with a crack on the left side between the middle and upper bands. The metal is dull steel gray and was heavily cleaned long ago, most likely during the period of use as nearly all of these I have seen are in similar (usually worse) condition. Rear sight leaves may be replacements and rear sight screw is damaged but works. Ramrod has a pair of holes drilled in the tulip head, as with others I have seen. Sling swivel on the trigger guard is bent or replaced. This is one that was in my collection for many years that I am thinning out. For more info on these see George Layman’s “Remington Rolling Block Military Rifles of the World.” ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $750.00 (View Picture)

20544 U.S. MODEL 1873 .45-70 TRAPDOOR CARBINE PROJECT - Serial number 507474 on the receiver with rifle barrel cut to 22 inch carbine length. Bore is excellent plus- bright and sharp, and the exterior has much of the original blue turning plum in places. This was made as a M1888 Rod bayonet rifle but butchered long ago into a shorter “cadet” gun, so we did not initiate the atrocities committed upon this, but are helping salvage what can be used. The muzzle has been crowned and a flat spot milled for a front sight. The stock has been cut to carbine length and the ramrod groove filled and the tip shaped to the proper carbine shape. Buttpalte is a junky one which ad the tang broken but has been welded and needs the upper screw hole cleaned up and countersunk. A sight protector barrel band in rough condition is included if you want to use it. You will need to come up with a lock, trigger guard, and breechblock, bandspring and sights, but they are all out there and can be inexpensive if you are patient and not too picky about finish. When done this should be a great shooter or reenactor gun, but obviously is not a collector prize. Using a cut down original stock will save many hours of tedious labor trying to do finish inletting on a repro stock. Bargain price for what you see is $249.00 (View Picture)

3492 RARE! U.S. MODEL 1892 KRAG .30-40 CALIBER RIFLE- NICELY RESTORED - Serial number 8991. This is a nice restoration with mostly correct original parts. The original Model 1892 Krag rifles did not actually begin production until 1894, due to delays caused by complaints about adoption of a “foreign” instead of domestic invention. Only about 24,562 Model 1892 rifles were made, before switching to the Model 1896. In 1900 Springfield Armory recalled all of the M1892s still in service and updated them to Model 1896 configuration. Some 18,559 are documented as being converted, but as Mallory notes in his book “…evidently many of these unconverted rifles were lost or destroyed in service or were scrapped, because unaltered Model 1892 rifles are extremely scarce.” The consensus among advanced collectors is that they are about as scarce as Gas Trap Garands, or M1903 Rod Bayonet rifles or Pedersen devices, with no more than an estimated 50 to 100 examples surviving in, or restored to, original configuration. The Model 1892 is easily recognizable by the full length cleaning rod mounted under the barrel; the upper band having a small guide for the rod; the flat no-trap buttplate, not curved at the toe; the short handguard leaving the receiver ring exposed; the flat, uncrowned muzzle; the lack of a hold open pin on the extractor and a corresponding notch on the receiver; and the back of the cocking piece being box shaped instead of tapered. This restoration uses correct original parts with only three exceptions, and only one of those is obvious. Here are the details so you will know, although most people will not notice them. 1. The cocking piece is M1896 type with a bevel on the bottom leading to the sear notch. The M1892 had a squared off part instead of the bevel. 2. The extractor is M1896 type modified to eliminate the hold open pin, looking like the original, even though it is not. 3. The cleaning rod is a good quality reproduction. The action is marked on the left side 1894 SPRINGFIELD ARMORY 8991 and the sideplate and loading gate have matching numbers. The safety is the correct early type with flat spring instead of the later plunger. The visible surfaces are free from pitting, but there is some moderate pitting on the barrel below the wood line. Bore has strong rifling, but is worn and dark in the grooves, not real bad, not real good. This rifle never had the notch added for 1896 upgrade, and the muzzle is original flat face with the original front sight and blade. It has the correct M1892 rear sight and short handguard. The ORIGINAL unmodified M1892 stock has the flat butt and cleaning rod inletting. The upper band is a correct original part with the rare guide for the cleaning rod. A correct flat straight buttplate with no trap is installed, replacing an incorrect one that a previous owner had installed. He had straightened out the toe of a later trap type buttplate and gouged a hole in the butt where the trap parts went, but this is invisible unless you remove the buttplate. Large buttplate screw is correct oval head type. The stock has a fairly legible JSA cartouche but the date is not visible. Circle P is faint. This is a very good visual representative example of the very rare Model 1892 Krag and you can take care of the minor detail of the cocking piece at your convenience or just leave it as is. The extreme scarcity of surviving unmodified M1892 rifles eliminates the chances for most collectors to ever own one, so this is an excellent opportunity to get one at a very reasonable price. Antique, no FFL needed. $3450.00 (View Picture)

20875 U.S. MODEL 1870 .50-70 “TRAPDOOR” SPRINGFIELD RIFLE- SCARCE! - (Not serial numbered- correct for this model.) A nice example of this fairly scarce trapdoor. A total of only about 11,531 of these were made 1870-1873, compared to 52,145 Model 1868 or 52,300 Model 1866 rifles. These were very similar to the Model 1868 except for the shorter nose on the front of the receiver, the same length as was later used in the .45-70s. As with the earlier model, the 1870 continued to cut costs by using many parts salvaged from the hundreds of thousands of obsolete .58 caliber muskets on hand. The locks, most stock furniture and the stocks themselves were used with whatever minor modification were necessary. Unlike the earlier .50-70 rifles, the Model 1870s mostly used newly made barrels instead of sleeved musket barrels. The action has most of its original oil blackened finish, and the trigger and rear sight retain some of their original blue. The lock was originally color case hardened but the colors are largely gone and it looks like it has been touched up with blue finish of some sort of blue type finish. The remaining parts have the correct “bright” finish, probably lightly cleaned many years ago. The breechblock is marked 1870/[eagle head/crossed arrows] over U.S. The bore is fine to excellent with strong rifling and only a bit of scattered roughness or dirt. The walnut stock was lightly sanded long ago slightly rounding the sharp edges of the lock panels, and removing any cartouches on the left side, and it now has an old coat of varnish which looks like a glazed donut. It really should be stripped and then maybe a coat of walnut stain and some linseed or tung oil for the original type appearance. The scarce Model 1870 is missing from many U.S. martial collections, but here is a chance to get a well above average example at a reasonable price. ANTIQUE- No FFL required. $1450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5980 - U.S MODEL 1884 .45-70 CADET RIFLE (SECOND TYPE) - Serial number 215289.  This is one of the earlier standard infantry rifles which was converted by Springfield Armory (NOT Bannerman) to Cadet style in 1895, when 1,800 were so converted, or 1901 when 5,000 were converted.  This involved shortening the forend about 3 inches, slimming the butt and installing the narrower cadet style buttplate, which was also converted from the regular buttplate and is visibly thicker than usual.  Barrels were shortened about 3 inches and tapered to accept the bayonet and the front sight replaced.  Overall excellent with about 90% arsenal blue finish remaining, thinning in places, and picking up some plum color here and there. Good case colors on the tang and breechblock.  Muzzle has the most wear from bayonet installation. 

Very handsome rifle.  Stock is lovely medium brown color with old oil finish from time of conversion, with a few very minor handling and storage dings, but nothing major.  No signs of cartouches, but as these were not "new" rifles, but rebuilt, they are found with cartouches in the 1895 lot, and often without in the 1901 batch.  Excellent bright shiny bore.  Cadet model rifles were made for issue to the cadets at West Point and other military schools and to what later would be called ROTC units.  Total production of all models (1873, 1877, 1879 and 1884 type 1 and 2) of the cadet rifle were about 65,000 or about the same quantity as trapdoor carbines.  Most cadet rifles were badly abused and really nice ones are tough to find.  While not quite in the minty category, this is a well above average example, and interesting to show the thrifty side of the Ordnance Department which altered early trapdoor infantry rifles (made obsolete by adoption of the ramrod bayonet in 1888) into cadet rifles to fill the growing demand for that type.  Every collector needs one of these to complete their collection of Springfield trapdoors.  ANTIQUE, no FFL needed.  $1095.00 (View Picture)

17359 LONDON ARMOURY COMPANY- POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE- PATTERN 1853 .577 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MUSKET - London Armoury Company was founded in 1859 by several British arms makers (including Robert Adams, Blackett Beaumont, and James Kerr) taking over the patents and machinery formerly used by Deane Adams & Dean for making revolvers. London Armoury company became famous for their high quality production of Kerr revolvers and machine made Enfield rifle muskets. In early 1861 Confederate agent Caleb Huse succeeded in getting London Armoury Company to commit to selling him their entire output. First they had to deliver some 1200 rifles on a Massachusetts contract which was completed by September, 1861. Eventually some 70,000 muskets were sold to the Confederacy. Thus, most London Armoury Enfields can be considered to be Confederate, realizing that there was the small Massachusetts contract, and that many rifles paid for by Huse ended up being captured by the Union Navy blockade fleet and diverted to use by federal forces. And a few may have been sold to other buyers. There is no way to tell for sure about a specific gun exactly where it may have served. At least this one doe NOT have the usual British crown over VR or other British military inspector marks which would be found on arms delivered to the crown, and unlikely to have reached America during the war. (Exception- the crown marked middle band, which may be a period or later collector replacement.) This is a standard 3-band rifle musket with 39 inch barrel, brass buttplate and trigger guard with a mellow old patina, and Baddley clamping bands. Front and rear sights are intact and not boogered by shooters. The lockplate markings are nicely engraved “LONDON ARMOURY.” and no date. The barrel is mostly dull steel gray mixed with some staining, and also having the expected light roughness and fine pitting around the breech. The European walnut stock shows normal shrinkage so that the buttplate stands a bit proud and the bands do not clamp real tightly. It has the usual assortment of minor dings and bruises, but no cracks, repairs or even significant dings to point out. Even the often rotted wood behind the nipple area is intact. Totally untouched and uncleaned. The bore is very sharp and smooth, although in need of a good cleaning. 31 over 31 stamped on the buttplate tang. The sling swivels have been removed, but very few troops actually used slings during the Civil War, so that was probably done during the period of use. A good solid representative Civil War imported Enfield .577 three band rifle musket, and quite likely a Confederate import. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2350.00 (View Picture)


**STOLEN BY PERSON IN PORTLAND, OR AREA, or possibly a long haul trucker. $500 reward for return of this item or information leading to arrest and conviction of the thief, who got several other antique arms from other dealers by credit card fraud... $100 reward if you are first to spot this on an auction site.** 12036 U.S. MODEL 1863 TYPE II .58 CALIBER RIFLE MUSKET - Made at Springfield in 1864 and so marked on the lockplate. Barrel date not visible. Excellent bore. This is a good representative example of a .58 caliber Civil War musket, although not in the best condition. Basically a "brown gun" except for the trigger guard which has about 90-95% arsenal blue and must have been taken from a trapdoor (parts are identical except for being left bright on the M1855-1870 and blued on the M1873-1888 trapdoors. Otherwise all original and correct parts. Stock has been broken through he wrist and repaired long ago, but is not real tight and should be redone with epoxy which will make it stronger than the original wood. The stock has been sanded, but not badly. Metal parts (except trigger guard) mostly have a layer of brown patina/rust, with some light pitting under some areas, most notably around the nipple. Displays okay as is, or could be polished up with 320 emery cloth if you prefer the original bright look. The M1863 (type 2) which is sometimes called the M1864, was the highpoint in the development of the rifle musket for Infantry use, and the next year was replaced by the first of the Allin breechloding "trapdoors." The M1863 (Type 2) differed from the M1863 only in having the rounded bands retained by band springs instead of merely screw clamps. The M1863 differed from the M1861 which had flat bands retained by bandsprings, and the nipple bolster set out a bit further and having a clean out screw instead of an angled flash hole, and used a "swell" in the ramrod to hold it in place instead of a screw plate. All the .58 rifle muskets fired a 500 grain (little over 1 ounce) soft lead Minie ball with a hollow base. When the 60 grains of black powder was ignited by the flash from the percussion cap, the expanding gasses expanded the rear of the Minie ball to engage the rifling. Sights are provided for 100, 300 and 500 yards, but masses of troops could be engaged at ranges up to 1,000 yards. With a rate of fire of about 3 rounds per minute, and its long range, the .58 caliber rifle muskets forced dramatic changes in tactics from the massed formations used for the preceding several hundred years. Many collectors have a musket from the Civil War as a logical starting point for a collection of "modern" military rifles. This one comes with a good quality reproduction sling. Civil War muskets are getting more expensive but this one is affordable (due to the flaws) and has the potential to be much nicer after the stock has been repaired properly. $995.00 (View Picture)


Non-Military Antique American Longarms (Kentucky Rifles, pre-1898 Winchesters, etc)

22256 LARGE AMERICAN PERCUSSION FOWLING PIECE CIRCA 1830 - This is the type generally called a “club butt” which has a much larger than usual butt stock and often more extreme drop to the butt, as was originally found on Dutch arms brought to the new world by Dutch settlers in the Hudson River valley. Overall length is 60 inches This has a 42 inches long .78 caliber barrel with remnants of the bands at the breech found on Brown Bess style muskets, and what look like English proof marks and the letters I.W. usually associated with James Wilson, a prolific British gun maker. There is a brass blade type front sight but no signs of a bayonet lug. The underside of the barrel has an iron rib soldered to it, with one ramrod pipe. The pipe holds a brass tube which extends full length of the rib, and houses an improvised iron ramrod which is too short for use, but is probably a later owner’s replacement for one that got lost or appropriated for more important uses. The rod looks good for decorative use, or could be replaced with a wooden rod by removing the brass tube. There is a large “76” engraved on the top of the breech, but the meaning is uncertain. It is (remotely) possible it indicates use by the 76th Regiment of Foot, MacDonald’s Highlanders which served in America 1779-1784 including the Charleston campaign and finally surrendering at Yorktown. The brass trigger guard, ramrod entry pipe and buttplate are all British Second Model (Short Land pattern) Brown Bess style furniture circa 1740-1790, likely salvaged from a Revolutionary War British musket. Since there were numerous campaigns and battles in the Hudson River valley or adjacent areas, it is reasonable to find them on a gun made in that area. The lock was made as a percussion lock, probably in England, with modest decorative engraving marked “MELCHIOR- WARRANTED.” It is likely that the barrel and furniture had originally be assembled into a fowler circa 1790-1810 as a flintlock, but probably was broken or damaged and the parts used again with a new-fangled percussion lock circa 1830 resulting in the gun as it is today. Overall condition is as shown in the photos- well used, trigger guard broken at the screw hole, and lock needs tinkering, but still an impressive old gun to hang on the wall, especially in an old house circa 1800-1850. Due to length and weight, shipping will have to be $65.00. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $395.00 (View Picture)



Foreign Antique Longarms (Military and non-military)

14630 SCARCE SWEDISH MODEL 1867 ROLLING BLOCK RIFLE MADE BY REMINGTON IN 1867- WITH BAYONET! - Serial number 3701, matching on left side of the receiver, butt stock and buttplate, with the 1867 date of manufacture on the right side of the barrel, receiver and butt. Additional number 6538 stamped on left barrel flat. This is one of the most desirable of all the Swedish M1867 rolling blocks as it is one of the original 10,000 made by Remington in Ilion. Remington also provided 20,000 actions, and licensed the Swedes to make rifles in Sweden, selling them tooling and jigs for the purpose, along with American made production machinery. This tooling ended up as the basis for Carl Gustafs Stad Gevarsfaktori and other arms making plants, and eventually they turned out some 100,000 rolling block rifles and at least 4.000 carbines. In addition, Norway ended up making about 53,000 M1867 rifles at the Norwegian arsenal at Kongsberg, and buying 5,000 from Husqvarna in Sweden. These are historically significant arms, from a period when Sweden and Norway were unified to a some extent. They jointly adopted the Remington rolling block system in 1867. The Swedes had a bunch of muzzle loading rifles they intended to convert to breechloaders, so they chose a 12.17mm cartridge with the same bore diameter as the muzzle loaders, converting those using actions provided by Remington, or made in Sweden under license. Depending on the original model those became "gevär m/1860-68", "gevär m/1864-68" or "gevär m/1860-64-68." The M1867 rifles remained in Swedish service until replaced by the Model 1894/1896 Mauser carbines and rifles. Originally made in 12.17x44mm rimfire (comparable to, but not identical with the .50-70 case), some of the M1867s were converted to 12.17x44mmR centerfire starting in 1874 (Model 1867-74). In 1884 the Norwegians adopted 10.15x61mmR Jarmann rifles, but the Swedes declined. In 1889 Sweden modernized some their rolling blocks using new barrels in 8x58mmR Danish Krag caliber. (Not part of the Sweden-Norway union but strongly tied to them, Denmark also adopted a Model 1867 rolling block, but chambered for a 11.35mm rimfire cartridge, replacing these with the Danish 8mm Krag rifle in 1889, while Norway adopted a 6.5mm Krag in 1894. As you can see, the Scandinavian weapons history is a bit of a tangled story, but it would be an interesting and not too expensive collecting niche.) Overall condition of this Remington made Swedish Model 1867 rifle is about fine, with traces of case colors on the receiver, and about 80% thinning original blue on the barrel. The American walnut stocks show assorted mostly minor dings and scars of an issued service arm. The wood is a little dry and some appropriate treatment would improve the appearance. Excellent bore. Note that this comes with the correct Model 1867 Swedish socket bayonet, with most of its blue finish, going nicely with the rifle. These rifles were made with a lug on the side of the barrel so that they could be issued with either the socket bayonet or a sword bayonet. A very nice example of the scarce early Remington made Swedish rifle, not the more common Swedish made guns. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $1350.00 (View Picture)

3946 REMINGTON ROLLING BLOCK .58 CALIBER “MODEL 1868 TRANSFORMED” RIFLE - Remington introduced the rolling block rifle in 1865 with limited U.S. military sales in a “split breech” version. A stronger breechblock design followed that became the most widely used singe shot breechloader in the world, and kept Remington alive in the lean years following the Civil War as surplus arms saturated the market. The U.S. Navy adopted Remington rolling block system as the Model 1865 pistol, followed by carbines and cadet rifles in 1867 and rifles in 1870. The Army tested the rolling block in 1868 and 1870, followed by manufacture of a large number of rifles and pistols in 1871. New York purchased 15,000 rolling block rifles in 1870. Circa 1869-1870 South Carolina and Texas purchased smaller numbers for militia use. Most of these arms were newly made by Remington, or a joint project involving both Remington and Springfield Armory. Some, however, were conversions made using obsolete Civil War .58 caliber muskets, such as the SC and Texas rifles, and many more made for foreign sales. This is one of the guns made using the barrel, stock and furniture of a M1863(type II) musket, chambered for the .58 caliber centerfire Berdan cartridge. Basically they just cut out the portion of the stock inletted for the lock and adapted the rear of the barrel to fit a newly made Remington action for a very simple and reliable breechloading rifle at a fraction of the cost of a totally new gun. (However, trapdoor Springfields cost even less.) These “transformed” or converted rifles varied over their production life, with the very earliest, like this one using a dovetailed plate to widen the face of the block for use with .58 caliber cartridges, but later production used a purpose made one piece block. Transformed files were apparently made and sold circa 1868 to 1888, with the last sale of 400 to the Dominican Republic in 1888 The .58 conversions are not encountered nearly as often as the later foreign rolling blocks, and are in important part of any military arms collection. This one was originally a M1863 Type 2 .58 caliber rifle musket, and has the rounded bands with band springs. The bore is VG-fine, in case you have a bunch of .58 Berdan ammo stashed away to shoot. The wood has numerous dings and bruises and was cleaned long ago and now has a mellow old oil finish. The forend has a large wedge shaped chip missing (about ½” x 3”) on the right side, and a slight loss with a crack on the left side between the middle and upper bands. The metal is dull steel gray and was heavily cleaned long ago, most likely during the period of use as nearly all of these I have seen are in similar (usually worse) condition. Rear sight leaves may be replacements and rear sight screw is damaged but works. Ramrod has a pair of holes drilled in the tulip head, as with others I have seen. Sling swivel on the trigger guard is bent or replaced. This is one that was in my collection for many years that I am thinning out. For more info on these see George Layman’s “Remington Rolling Block Military Rifles of the World.” ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $750.00 (View Picture)

19435 SCARCE AUSTRIAN MODEL 1854/1867 WANZL BREECHLOADING CONVERSION OF LORENZ MUSKET (14 x 33mm Rimfire) - In 1866 the Austrians fought a disastrous seven week war with German, where the German breechloading needle fire rifles decimated the Austrians with their muzzle loading Lorenz rifles. Therefore, in January 1867, the Austrians adopted the Wanzl system for converting their muzzle loading rifles to breechloading cartridge arms. (Six months later they adopted the rotary breech Werndl rifles for new manufacture by the new firm of Steyr.) This is the standard infantry model Wanzl, with total barrel length of about 37.5 inches and overall length of about 53 inches. The lock bears the original manufacture date of 1862, stamped in the Austrian method of only the last three digits, 862. The Wanzl conversion s similar to the later Allin Trapdoor system, where a new receiver is attached to the rear of the barrel, having a breechblock that flips up like the trapdoor. The locking system is unique, being an internal rod that locks into the rear of the breechblock as the hammer falls. The tang is marked THERESIA- ZEILINGER in a circle, the firm that did the conversion. The barrel is marked W 68 indicating acceptance at Vienna (Wein) in 1868. Overall condition is fine but will easily clean to excellent. Most parts retain their original bright polished finish under dried oil and crud. Several areas of the barrel and a few other parts have some very thin surface rust that can be carefully cleaned and blended into the rest of the polished areas. The bore is fantastic- mirror bright and sharp. The unsanded beech stock has a few assorted minor handling and storage dings and blemishes, but nothing significant. Stock is somewhat sticky from old oil or grease whichi probably has accumulated a lot of dirt which will clean off with it. Several cartouches or other stampings are sharp. The Wanzel is a very scarce gun, and would be an excellent addition to a collection of European military arms. An excellent collecting niche would be to specialize in the evolution of military rifle technology, something like “Military muskets converted to breechloaders.” Other examples that would fit in there are the British Sniders, the French Tabatier, the Swiss Milbank-Amsler; the U.S. first and second Allin trapdoors, some of the Remington rolling blocks, and several others. The best source of info on arms of this era is Keith Doyon’s superb site http://www.militaryrifles.com/ which we use often. (Note- The Lorenz muskets were nominally .54 caliber and the conversion used a rimfire cartridge variously called any of the following: 13.9 x 33mm Wanzel Model 1867 rimfire; 14 mm rimfire Wanzl ; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14.3 x 32.3mm rimfire Wänzel Mod. 1869; 14.5 x 32.5mm rimfire Austrian Wänzel; 14 mm Scharfe gewehrpatrone or the 14 x 33mm rimfire Wänzel. But whatever you call it, forget about ever finding any ammo for it!) ANTIQUE- No FFL needed $1295.00 (View Picture)

21101 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER RIFLE – SUPERB! - Serial Number M5762 matching throughout, except for the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine or Belgian Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. The ground area has not had the finish touched up to blend in, but a few minutes with cold blue can do the job if you prefer to alter the history. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers in 1898 to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in excellent plus condition, with all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 98-99% original blue on other parts, with slight losses on some of the sharp corners, and a bit less finish on the buttplate. The stock is also in excellent plus condition, with just a few extremely minor bruises and dings and a bit of striped grain in the butt, but with little contrast. This is one of 130,000 made by Loewe in 1895, the fourth year of production with most of the late production features like the long handguard, gas deflection wings on the sides of the bolt sleeve, andr the magazine lock screw was adopted. From an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is among the top five examples of the dozens of these wonderful M1891 Argentines we have had over the years, and would be nearly impossible to upgrade. The bore is in the same superb condition as the exterior. Comes with original brass muzzle cover, not numbered. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive “Argentine Mauser Rifles” for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)

16014 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER RIFLE – SUPERB! - Serial Number F9967 matching throughout, including the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine or Belgian Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. The ground area has not had the finish touched up to blend in, but a few minutes with cold blue can do the job if you prefer to alter the history. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers in 1898 to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in excellent plus condition, with all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 98-99% original blue on other parts, with slight losses on some of the sharp corners, and additional finish loss on the buttplate. The stock is also in excellent plus condition, with just a few minor bruises and dings. There is usually a serial number stamped on the right side of the stock below the numbers on the receiver and barrel, but no sign of one ever being stamped or removed. Good cartouches on the toe of the stock and traces of the liberty cap cartouche on the right side of the butt which may have been very lightly sanded many decades ago. This is one of 35,000 made by Loewe in 1893, the second year of production. This has mostly early features like the short handguard, and no gas deflection wings on the sides of the bolt sleeve, but was made after the magazine lock screw was adopted. From an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is among the top three examples of the dozens of these wonderful M1891 Argentines we have had over the years, and would be nearly impossible to upgrade. The bore is in the same superb condition as the exterior. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $750.00 (View Picture)

21160 SCARCE FRENCH MODEL 1874-80 GRAS ARTILLERY MUSKETOON 11 x 59mm Rimmed caliber - Serial number 42320 made at Manufacture D’ Armes Tulle in 1878 as indicated by the receiver markings and the T.1878 marks on the barrel. The 80 on the left receiver flat indicates it received the 1880 modification to the receiver to cut larger gas relief slots around the head of he bolt for greater safety. The Gras was the first French service arm to use metallic cartridges, and was very similar to the bolt action Model 1866 Chassepot “Needle Fire” rifles which used paper cartridges enclosing an 11mm bullet and a powder charge with a primer mounted on the back of the bullet base. An extra long firing pin would pierce the paper and penetrate the powder and hit the primer to ignite it. The bolt head had a large rubber washer around it to seal (ineffectively) against gas leakage. Many of the Chassepot rifles were modified to use Gras cartridges by replacing the bolts with ones having regular firing pins and an extractor and eliminating the rubber washer design. French military arms were traditionally made in several different variations, depending on the power and vanity of different factions who insisted their awesomeness justified a unique arm for some peculiar reason. By 1874, after the humiliating defeat by the Germans in the Franco Prussian War, these distinctive arms were down to only a long infantry rifle with a 32.3 inch barrel and a wicked long sword bayonet. The Cavalry carbine had a 27.6 inch barrel, turned down bolt and was not fitted for a bayonet. The Mounted Gendarmes Carbine was similar, but set up for a cruciform socket bayonet on the 27.6” barrel. The (unmounted) Gendarmes Carbine was the same as their mounted counterparts but with the long sword bayonet. The final variation was the Artillery musketoon, with a short 20 inch barrel, but still taking the long sword bayonet. It is really a very handy, and good looking firearm. This example is in excellent condition with excellent bore, and matching numbers except for the mismatched bolt assembly. The stock is excellent with the “holy water plug” still in place although the surrounding roundel is mostly cleaned away. The stock has none of the usual fussy French wood repairs or grungy oil soaked through it. Metal parts retain about 90-95% of the old arsenal refinish. A really nice example of the most desirable of the Gras family. ANTIQUE- No FFL needed. $775.00 (View Picture)

20827 URUGUAY DAUDETAU-DOVITIIS-MAUSER 6.5 x 53.5mm RIFLE - Serial number 91680, single shot. Born as a German Mauser Model 1871 rifle (marks on left side of receiver "I.G. Mod 71" for Infantire Gewehr Model 1871. Right side marked 82 and 1881, showing it was made in1881 and initial German military issue was in 1882. These were converted circa 1895 for the 6.5x53.5mm Daudetau No. 12 semi-rimmed cartridge by the French "Societe Francaise des Armes Portatives of Saint Denis, Paris, France, as indicated by the markings on the barrel "S.F.A.P/St. Denis." In the 1880s, the South American nation of Uruguay had purchased a quantity of Mauser Infanteriegewehre Moel 1871 rifles. When neighboring Argentina adopted the 7.65mm small bore smokeless cartridges and Model 1891 Mauser rifles in 1891, Uruguay felt a need to keep up with the neighbors. But funding was very limited. As a stopgap measure it was decided in 1894 to have their Model 1871 rifles re-barreled for a modern cartridge. Enter Antonio De Dovitiis (usually mispelled Dovitis), an immigrant tailor actually born in Picerno, Potenza Province, Italy, but usually claimed to be from Greece. De Dovitiis had a military equipment store specialized in tailoring articles and bladed weapons, located at 18 de Julio street no. 130, Montevideo. He was also personal tailor of Julio Herrera y Obes, president of Uruguay between 1890-1894, and that probably accounts for him being sent to Europe on the armament mission. Dovitiis took advantage of business contacts in France to arrange for the work to be done by Societe Francais des Armes Portative, which was then promoting the a rifle designed by Frenchman Luis D’Audeteau who had also designed several 6.5mm cartridges. His “Cartouche No. 12” was pushed on the gullible Uruguayans as a wonderful choice as their new service cartridge. The chief benefit seems to be that SFAP St. Denis would be able to use their existing machinery to produce the barrels, sights and other fittings necessary to convert the Mausers. The conversion consisted of fitting a new barrel, bolt head, extractor, sights, bands and a stock. In fact, the only original Mauser parts retained were the receiver, trigger mechanism, buttplate, and brass trigger guard while the sights and bayonet were the same pattern as those used on the Lebel. Approximately 10,000 pieces were converted, including some cut down to a short rifle configuration. Although sounding good on paper (or because of the assorted cash under the table which seems probable) this international cross breeding program was a failure. The main problem was the ammunition which had hard primers while the rifles had weak springs, and there were extraction problems caused by differences in rim dimensions, but most South American countries were reluctant to allow the troops to shoot very much as it might encourage them to overthrow the current governments. This is a good representative example, although in desperate need of a good cleaning as it lived in a home with smokers and there is a thin film of dried smoke, dirt and crud all over everything, along with a tiny bit of scattered light surface rust that will easily clean off. A small patch of light pitting on the top of the bolt sleeve or cocking piece. Excellent bore, (but no one has any ammo for these!). Receiver retains most of the blue finish from the time of conversion. The bolt retains most of its bright polished finish, turning dull steel gray. Buttplate and bands were originally finished bright but are now stained and lightly rusted and would clean up okay. Mismatched numbers on most parts but bolt and receiver seem to match, typical of all these. Brass trigger guard is a mellow old patina. Full length walnut stock looks like it was lightly cleaned and varnished long ago, and would look nice if stripped and finished with linseed or tung oil. Has correct brass tipped cleaning rod. One of the oddball features of this rifle is the fact that the cleaning rod was mounted on the side instead of underneath the forend. There are only a few other examples with this feature, and for a rather eccentric collecting niche, that might be fun to explore. Look for the French Model 1892 carbines, Portuguese Model 1886 Kropatshek rifles, the Russian Model 1938 Tokarevs, a few Winchester Model 1876 rifles, some of the Remington Keen military rifles, and maybe a few others. So, we have a rifle made in Germany, sold to Uruguay, converted in France to use a French designed cartridge, in a transaction brokered by an Italian tailor. While lacking much of a service history, they are certainly one of the most unusual stories of military arms on the cheap, and such an abject failure. This is a really unusual early South American military rifle, a field with a lot of variety and mostly reasonable prices, and this would be a key piece in such a collection. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $725.00 (View Picture)

21532 SWISS MODEL 1878 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) VETTERLI RIFLE .41 RIMFIRE (10.38 x 38mmR) - Serial number 185657 Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/ 185657/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 95% original blue finish on most parts with slight age toning toward plum color. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and old oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This was the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Swiss military arms are an interesting collecting specialty, with a good variety to find, including the Federal percussion rifles, the Millbank Amsler, all the Vetterli family, several varieties of Schmidt Rubin rifles, and even the modern assault style guns, and you can go for the whole history, or just concentrate on one niche. Most are available at prices a mere fraction of what some other collecting specialties cost. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is very good to fine, but since you won’t find any ammo, it is irrelevant. The overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 135 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $595.00 (View Picture)

22813 SWISS MODEL 1871 VETTERLI .41 RIMFIRE BOLT ACTION RIFLE MADE BY SIG, NEUHAUSEN - Serial number 85681 all matching Sometimes these are called the Model 1869/1871. These never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly man peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not (but they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights). The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo was loaded up until WW2. This rifle is in fine to excellent condition with about 90-95% of the original blue remaining although thinning. It looks a bit gray in the photos, but is actually a blue-gray shade, but definitely original, not touched up or anything. Buttplate suffers from a layer of rust due to poor storage, but the other parts are really nice. Walnut stock has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is excellent but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This one even has the almost always missing cleaning rod. We get a lot of the Model 1878 and 1881 Vetterlis in minty condition but few of the M1871, and very seldom see any of the 1869 rifles. Swiss military arms are a varied and relatively inexpensive collecting niche. This is a good representative example of an uncommon, important and interesting rifle. $650.00 (View Picture)

20634 Italian M1870/1887/1916 Vetterli-Mannlicher 6.5mm Bolt Action Rifle - Serial number R5928 probably made circa 1890 at Torino, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better examples of this model we have encountered, although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen. Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered after 1887 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles in 1916 by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the early loads first used in the 6.5mm, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (where the Italians were notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked with illegible maker and date on one side and serial number R5928 on the other. Walnut stock has an old military oil finish and is also somewhat oil soaked. Except for a crack over the cleaning rod hole in the forend the stock is actually pretty good with a legible roundel on the left side, “REPARIZONE, FABR D’ ARMI GARDONE, VT” from the time of last conversion. Right side has deeply struck serial number 5928. Metal parts with about 50-60% thinning arsenal refinish on most parts, that seems to be blue on some parts and a black paint type finish on others, and some areas of light rust or patina. We have seen a number of these over the years and this is among the better of a sorry lot. Unlike every other one we have had, this one actually had the cleaning rod! Good mechanics. Bore is dark and rough looking and may clean, or may not, but in our opinion these are UNSAFE TO SHOOT under any circumstances. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle which served into the WW1 era and even to a limited extent in WW2. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

23268 Swiss Model 1869/1871 .41 rimfire Bolt Action Vetterli Repeating Rifle - Serial number 7129 matching, made by Rychner & Keller, Aarau. Although never used in combat (due to the Swiss policy of ensuring that all citizens were heavily armed skilled marksmen, not disarmed girly-men peaceniks). The bolt action Vetterli rifle with its 11 round tubular magazine was adopted at a time when most nations were still diddling with single shots, or attempting cheapskate conversions of muzzle loaders. The U.S. Army was in love with Trapdoors, and rejected other options for more than 20 years after the Swiss adopted the Vetterli. The only downside of the Swiss Vetterli was the weak rimfire ammunition (nominally 10.4x46mmR). This rifle is the standard infantry model with 33 inch barrel. The Models 1869 and 1871 have the square checkering on the forend, while the later 1878 and 1881 models do not, although they had minor mechanical improvements and better sights. The 1869 had a sliding cover for the loading gate, which was eliminated on the 1871. Many of the Swiss rifles were sold off as surplus in the early to mid 20th century. Winchester loaded .41 rimfire ammo up until WW2 and in the 1960s nearly unissued Vetterli rifles were selling from “Ye Olde Hunter” for $9.95 each. Ah, the good old days. This rifle is in good condition except that it has been poorly stored, so much of the original blue finish has turned to plum patina or acquired some light surface rust. This needs a good cleaning of all the metal parts, and a good rubbing with linseed oil on the stock to make it look a lot nicer than it is now. The unsanded walnut stock is dry and has assorted minor handling dings and bruises. Bore is dirty but good, and may clean better, but irrelevant as you are unlikely to find any .41 Swiss ammo to shoot. This is complete with the cleaning rod, which is often missing. A good representative example of an important and interesting rifle. These early Model 1869-1871 rifles are much harder to find, and usually in lesser condition than the later Model 1878 and 1881 rifles. Swiss rifles can be a fun and (relatively) inexpensive collecting niche, with a wide variety of variations from the core group of muzzle loading Federal rifles, the Milbank Amslers, Vetterlis, and Schmidt-Rubins. All are made of the finest materials to the highest quality standards, and fairly easy to find at affordable prices. $595.00 (View Picture)

7358 Italian M1870/87/16 6.5mm bolt action Vetterli-Vitalli-Mannlicher Rifle - Serial number LO1708 made circa 1870-1878 at Brescia, (one of four Italian state run arsenals). This is one of the better looking examples of this model we have seen lately (although a cynic would note that the competition is not keen). Originally made as a single shot Vetterli rifle firing the 10.35 x 47mm rimmed cartridge, the model 1870 rifles were altered from 1887 through 1896 to add a Vitalli type box magazine, much like the Dutch and their Beaumont-Vitalli rifles. In WW1, shortages of arms led the Italians to further alter these rifles by lining the bore to use the 6.5x52mm Carcano centerfire cartridge and replacing the magazine with a Mannlicher type magazine. This conversion was only marginally safe for the old black powder loads, and they were generally issued to second line troops, or colonial infantrymen. Some of the rifles served with the Italian forces in North Africa in WW2, (notably defeated by Haille Selassie's spear wielding Ethiopian tribesmen). WE CONSIDER THES UNSAFE TO SHOOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTNACES AND SELL ONLY AS A COLLECTOR ITEM, NEVER TO BE FIRED! Lug on side of barrel for sword/knife bayonet. Barrel flats marked BRESCIA on one side and serial number LO1708 on the other. Walnut stock has been lightly sanded during the period of it service and now has an old military oil finish. Right side has deeply struck serial number LO1708. Metal parts with about 90-95% of an old black paint finish, probably not military, but it makes the gun look nice…from a distance. Unlike very other example we have seen, THIS ONE HAS THE CLEANING ROD! As is almost always the case, the cleaning rod is missing. Good mechanics. Rough bore. Unlike the later Mannlicher-Carcanos of WW2, these early Italian military rifles are not encountered very often. A good representative example of this important early European military bolt action rifle. Antique, no FFL needed. $325.00 (View Picture)

17359 LONDON ARMOURY COMPANY- POSSIBLE CONFEDERATE- PATTERN 1853 .577 “ENFIELD” RIFLE MUSKET - London Armoury Company was founded in 1859 by several British arms makers (including Robert Adams, Blackett Beaumont, and James Kerr) taking over the patents and machinery formerly used by Deane Adams & Dean for making revolvers. London Armoury company became famous for their high quality production of Kerr revolvers and machine made Enfield rifle muskets. In early 1861 Confederate agent Caleb Huse succeeded in getting London Armoury Company to commit to selling him their entire output. First they had to deliver some 1200 rifles on a Massachusetts contract which was completed by September, 1861. Eventually some 70,000 muskets were sold to the Confederacy. Thus, most London Armoury Enfields can be considered to be Confederate, realizing that there was the small Massachusetts contract, and that many rifles paid for by Huse ended up being captured by the Union Navy blockade fleet and diverted to use by federal forces. And a few may have been sold to other buyers. There is no way to tell for sure about a specific gun exactly where it may have served. At least this one doe NOT have the usual British crown over VR or other British military inspector marks which would be found on arms delivered to the crown, and unlikely to have reached America during the war. (Exception- the crown marked middle band, which may be a period or later collector replacement.) This is a standard 3-band rifle musket with 39 inch barrel, brass buttplate and trigger guard with a mellow old patina, and Baddley clamping bands. Front and rear sights are intact and not boogered by shooters. The lockplate markings are nicely engraved “LONDON ARMOURY.” and no date. The barrel is mostly dull steel gray mixed with some staining, and also having the expected light roughness and fine pitting around the breech. The European walnut stock shows normal shrinkage so that the buttplate stands a bit proud and the bands do not clamp real tightly. It has the usual assortment of minor dings and bruises, but no cracks, repairs or even significant dings to point out. Even the often rotted wood behind the nipple area is intact. Totally untouched and uncleaned. The bore is very sharp and smooth, although in need of a good cleaning. 31 over 31 stamped on the buttplate tang. The sling swivels have been removed, but very few troops actually used slings during the Civil War, so that was probably done during the period of use. A good solid representative Civil War imported Enfield .577 three band rifle musket, and quite likely a Confederate import. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $2350.00 (View Picture)

17801 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 7.65MM MAUSER RIFLE- Nice! - Serial Number N5873 matching throughout, except for the cleaning rod-P0825. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). These are important milestones as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ MANUFACTURA LOEWE BERLIN" Receiver ring has the crest ground off, per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. Loewe later merged with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). This rifle is in excellent condition, with nearly all the bright polished finish on the bolt and about 97-98% original blue looking sort of ugly now. We think that is just from a coat of old dried up grease or oil, but may be the blue is starting to turn plum. The stock has been lightly sanded in the past leaving only a faint trace of the liberty cap cartouche, but is free from any significant dings or blemishes. This is one of 55,000 made by Loewe in 1894 under their third contract. This is from an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is a nice rifle, or will be after a light cleaning, and only the fact that some are found in even better condition make this one less nice by comparison. The bore is G-VG with strong rifling but dark in the grooves. This has the later features (wings on the bolt sleeve, long handguard, steel tipped cleaning rod, etc). South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $550.00 (View Picture)

17800 Swiss Model 1878 .41 rimfire (10.38 x 38Rmm) Vetterli Rifle - Serial number 190244 (Repetier-Gewehr 1878) Receiver marked "[cross]/ Waffenfabrik/Bern/190244/M.78" with matching numbers on other parts. Metal parts with about 80-90% original blue finish on most parts. The top of the barrel between the lower band and the rear sight has thinning finish turning plum and mixed with patina. Excellent medium brown color walnut stock with good cartouches and original oil finish with some assorted mostly minor storage and handling bruises. This one previously lived with a smoker and it reeks of tobacco smoke and has a thin film of crud that needs to be cleaned off and it will look much nicer. This is the standard Swiss Infantry rifle, a bolt action tubular magazine (12 round) repeating rifle from the period when we were still fussing with single shot flopdoor fusils. Admittedly the .45-70 cartridge was good for long ranges, while the .41 rimfire was a pretty puny load. Bore in the 33 inch barrel is sharp and mirror bright, and overall workmanship reflects the legendary Swiss precision workmanship. Upper band has stud on right side for sword bayonet, but these could also use a socket bayonet with a cruciform blade. Complete with the original cleaning rod, which is usually missing from these rifles. These were made between 1879 and 1881. A handsome example of 130 year old rifle! Antique, no FFL needed. $795.00 (View Picture)

** HOLD** 17798 PORTUGUESE MODEL 1886/89 STEYR KROPATSCHEK RIFLE - Serial number Q940. Made by Steyer in Austria in 1886. Marked on receiver OE.W.F.G. Steyer/ 1886, faint traces of crown over L.Io., and M.1886 due to old arsenal refinish. Receiver, barrel and stock with serial Q940. Bolt mismatched O914 and other numbers. The Steyer Kropatschek is very similar to the German Mauser 1871/84 with a tubular magazine, but the details are slightly different throughout. Caliber is 8x60R Kropatschek, so you probably will not find any ammo. This example had the 1889 modification which added a handguard over the top of the barrel between the rear sight and the middle band, as shown by clearance cuts in the barrel channel for the clips to hold the handguard on. Handguard is missing (as with nearly all of these), leaving this looking just like the original M1886 if you don't spot the additional inletting for the clips. Stock is a nice medium brown walnut having been sanded long ago and picking up only a few tiny blemishes since then. There is a small crack on the left die of the wrist by the receiver tang, but it does not appear to affect strength much. About 90% thinning arsenal refinish blue on receiver and barrel, but the finish is mostly worn off the bands. Bolt and innards of action are nice and bright. Bore is about fine. Complete with the nearly always missing cleaning rod. Overall fine plus condition, much nicer than these are usually found. The 1886/89 model reportedly was sent to colonial outposts to minimize heat wave interference with the sight picture. Portugal had significant colonial holdings in Africa and Asia until early in the 20th century. ANTIQUE- no FFL needed. $650.00 (View Picture)


Miscellaneous Stuff and Restoration Projects!

Cootl stuf that does not fit well in the other categories. And, for those of you who have thoughtfully stashed away some stocks and hardware (or stocks and bonds with which to invest in stocks and bands) here are some prime candidates for restoration. Some of these rifles were converted to sporters many years ago when no one was interested in collecting "surplus" military  rifles and everybody was busy turning them into cheap deer rifles. While many people butchered the stocks and cut off barrels and refinished things, a few considerate (or lazy) people merely chopped off the stock and threw away all the useless bands and stuff. These rifles are very easy to restore if you have an appropriate stock and bands.

**SOLD** 11689 WINCHESTER LEE NAVY 6MM STRAIGHT PULL RIFLE (RESTORATION PROJECT) - Serial number 15044 (made in June 1898 per Winchester polishing shop records) marked on the receiver ring -U.S.N.- /[anchor]/ No. 15044/ J.N.J. An excellent all correct matching and unbuggered example of this historic type rifle- EXCEPT that Bubba shopped off the forend and lost a couple of parts. These feature an unusual straight pull action and extremely small bore (.236 bullet diameter) adopted when most military rifles had just made the change from about .45 caliber down to .30 caliber (11mm to 8mm in Europe). These were the standard U.S. Marine Corps rifles during the Spanish American War and the Boxer Rebellion, although replaced shortly afterwards in the interest of having all services using the same .30-40 Krag ammunition and rifles. (A nifty policy that was soon abandoned when the Army began issuing M1903 Springfields.) The Navy also used the Winchester Lee rifles. Only about 15,000 were purchased for military use, about half the number of M1903A4 sniper rifles made. They were the first U.S. military arms to be loaded with a clip, and the first smallbore service rifle adopted, and the first of two "straight pull" designs used by U.S. Forces. (The other being the 20,000 Ross rifles obtained from Canada during WW1.) Walnut stock is generally excellent with original oil finish and only a very few assorted minor storage and handling dings. Handguard is original to this rifle. Action is mechanically excellent and the often missing extractor is present. About 95% original blue finish on the bolt and magazine assembly. Barrel and receiver and buttplate show about 95% finish, but is it dulled and turning plum and needs a good cleaning to remove the patina and any accumulated crud and dirt. Buttplate has more patina than blue, but much better than usual. Bore is dirty but should clean to excellent, just in case you have a pile of 6mm Navy ammo sitting around. (WARNING- there are potentially deadly problems with some of the improvised 6mm ammo being sold and it is best not to even think about shooting any of these rifles. Google will tell you more.) Prices on these have risen dramatically in recent years as collectors seek the small supply of decent examples on the market. This would rate among the top three of these we have had in the last 20 years, except for Bubba’s maltreatment. However, reproduction forends are available, and if you are handy with woodwork you can save a very substantial amount over getting a totally original rifle. You will also need an upper band and both band screws, all of which are available from S&S. It is also missing the front sight cover, but you may or may not feel the need to replace that, and I do not know of a source on those. ANTIQUE, no FFL needed. $995.00 (View Picture)
PROVENANCE NOTE-  This is from the Howard P. Hart and Jean H. Hart Collection of Historical Arms.  Mr. Hart was a career Central Intelligence Agency Officer as well as an avid arms collector.  A large part of their collection was donated to the Virginia War Memorial Museum in Richmond, VA, and many other items donated to the National WW2 Museum in New Orleans, LA.   This item has the Hart Collection inventory tag attached, and has a certificate of provenance and a copy of Howard’s fascinating autobiography, signed by Jean Hart.  The association of this item with Mr. Howard Hart, and this outstanding collection adds to its desirability for your collection and for future owners and helps preserve the legacy of Mr. Hart.)  Read more about the biography of this remarkable American patriot on the Hart Collection Biography page.

20544 U.S. MODEL 1873 .45-70 TRAPDOOR CARBINE PROJECT - Serial number 507474 on the receiver with rifle barrel cut to 22 inch carbine length. Bore is excellent plus- bright and sharp, and the exterior has much of the original blue turning plum in places. This was made as a M1888 Rod bayonet rifle but butchered long ago into a shorter “cadet” gun, so we did not initiate the atrocities committed upon this, but are helping salvage what can be used. The muzzle has been crowned and a flat spot milled for a front sight. The stock has been cut to carbine length and the ramrod groove filled and the tip shaped to the proper carbine shape. Buttpalte is a junky one which ad the tang broken but has been welded and needs the upper screw hole cleaned up and countersunk. A sight protector barrel band in rough condition is included if you want to use it. You will need to come up with a lock, trigger guard, and breechblock, bandspring and sights, but they are all out there and can be inexpensive if you are patient and not too picky about finish. When done this should be a great shooter or reenactor gun, but obviously is not a collector prize. Using a cut down original stock will save many hours of tedious labor trying to do finish inletting on a repro stock. Bargain price for what you see is $249.00 (View Picture)

22740 RARE UNMODIFIED MODEL 1892 KRAG BUTTSTOCK- TYPE FOR CLEANING ROD - This is one of the few stocks which remains correct and escaped modification to the 1896 configuration by rounding the toe, drilling the butt for tools and oiler, and filling the ramrod groove. But, alas, Bubba wanted a Bambi blaster so he wacked the forend off. This stock has the correct original straight toe, with the thin, no-trap buttplate and very good legible JSA 1895 and circle P. It also has the letter “J: near the cartouche, which I believe is a Span-Am era overhaul marking, but I do not know the location. Initials WFP lightly scratched on the bottom of the stock ahead of the trigger guard but not very noticeable. Correct oval head large buttplate screw, but like most Krags, the finish is gone from the buttplate. It does not have any of the usual cracks or damage in the action area, but is good and solid. It is cut at the lower band, but the end of the cleaning rod groove is clearly visible, and it was never enlarged for the 1896 filler strip. It had some ugly varnish stripped without harming the markings, and has the expected assorted minor dings and scrapes of an issued arm. Restoration of the stock would involve splicing a new forend piece in place, with a groove for the cleaning rod. This is not a hard job, but requires some patience and skill. Finding an unmodified full length stock is less likely than winning the lottery the same say you marry a nymphomaniac heiress to a distillery, so finding even this one is about the only option to restore a M1892 Krag with correct metal but a later stock. $475.00 (View Picture)

14811 COMMIE BLOC "FENCING MUSKET" - Obviously patterned after the Mosin Nagant, but then altered with a block of wood resembling an AK style magazine added to the bottom, these were used for teaching bayonet fighting. The spring loaded tip can be depressed about 4 inches into the barrel, similar to a pogo stick. This is a fairly common approach, and I have seen fencing muskets with the same concept from Sweden and England as well. The U.S. used bayonets with passed spring steel blades, and later switched to "pugil sticks". Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. These may be East German as some are marked "MODELL 4.853" which sounds German to me. Overall excellent condition (except for some scattered light surface rust that should clean up). Complete with original excellent sling. Still legal in Kalifornia, but may be next on their ban list. Non-firearm, no FFL needed. Photo shows a typical example, but this is one we were going to keep and is nicer than the one in the photo. $95.00 (View Picture)


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