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Collectible Foreign Longarms
(post-1898)

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If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items considered by the BATF directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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Collectible Foreign Military Longarms
(post-1898)

**NEW ADDITION** SMOF6158 - TYPE 99 JAPANESE WORLD WAR II RIFLE MADE AT THE KOISHIKAWA (TOKYO) ARSENAL. SERIAL NUMBER 59847 FIRST SERIES. Caliber 7.7 mm. ALL MATCHING with intact mum, and anti-aircraft sights.

The Japan entered the industrial age with single minded determination to create the industrial base equivalent to the one that had allow the European navies to force their country to open its people to trade. The Japanese quickly created a firearms industry unlike the Chinese who continued to purchased most of their small arms in Europe. By 1905 the Japanese Army had developed the strongest bolt actions rifle in the world when they adopted the Type 38 in 6.5 mm.

In 1939 the military decided to increase the caliber of their rifles to 7.7 mm, and introduced the Type 99 rifle. It used the basic action of Type 38, and was the first military rifle to have a chrome lined barrel. P.O. Ackley, the noted gunsmith compared the Japanese military bolt action rifles of World War II to those of Germany, England and the U.S. by seeing which ones could withstand the highest pressure loads. The Japanese bolt actions were still shooting when all the other actions including the Mauser's had blown up.

The Imperial Japanese army had used their 6.5 mm Type 38 rifles in China. The units going to the Pacific island were generally armed with the Type 99 rifle. The Type 99 rifle was the ones most of our GI's encountered in the actions that rolled back the Japanese Empire from Guadalcanal to Okinawa.

This rifle is in excellent condition, all matching, with intact Mum, 95% of the original bluing present, a bright bore, and anti-aircraft sights. It does not have a dust cover, but we have dust covers available on our web page. All numbers match. The stock is also in good condition with just a few storage dings. $650.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMOF6224 - RARE EXCELLENT ALL MATCHING!!! GERMAN KAR 98K MADE BY GUSTLOF (CODE BCD) IN 1943 SERIAL 56B CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The Karbine 98 Kurtz (Carbine 98 short) or Kar 98k was the standard service rifle of the German Military during World War II. It was developed from the Gewehr (rifle) 1898 designed by Mauser and adopted by the German army in 1898. Over 10 million were made between 1934 and 1946 when production ceased. The Kar 98k was rugged, reliable and accurate. The large number of Kar 98 k receivers that have formed the basis for custom magnum sporting rifles is testimony to the soundness of the design and the manufacturing.

This rifle was one of the 315,000 made by the Gustlof company in 1943. All serial numbers on the rifle match except for the safety. This includes the bolt, barrel bands, trigger guard and floor plate, rear sight leaf and slider and stock. The original blued finish would rate about 95% with just high edge wear. The bore bright with sharp riflings. All matching Kar 98k's are getting extremely difficult to find in any condition. The condition on this rifle is excellent. $1095.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMOF6372 - 19160 - ARGENTINE NAVY 7.62MM CONVERSION OF SAFN 49 SEMI AUTO RIFLE Serial number 2110, made for the Argentine Marine Corps by FN, originally in 7.65 x 53mm Argentine/Belgium caliber. The Marines were the first Argentine forces to be armed with semi-auto rifles, after many decades of Mauser rifle usage. There were only 5,536 of these rifles made, delivered on a July 29, 1953 contract following an earlier test. This was the eighth, and one of the smallest, contracts for the SAFN 49 rifles, a surprisingly good gun adopted by several nations but soon rendered obsolete by the select fire FN-FAL rifles. Thus, the Argentine Marines had the SAFN 49 in 1955, but their Army then ordered FN-FAL rifles in 7.62mm NATO taking delivery in 1958. Argentina had FN convert one SAFN-49 to 7.62mm in 1967, but did not order any. Instead, the remaining armory stock of the Argentine rifles were converted domestically by Metalúrgica Centro a company formerly known as Fábrica de armas Halcón. Metalúrgica Centro provided and installed new barrels in 7.62mm NATO, modified ejectors, and the trigger guards to take a new 20 round detachable box magazine. The proprietary 20 round detachable box magazines manufactured by Metalúrgica Centro only fit the SAFN 1949 rifle conversions, but can use the same magazine loading charger (stripper clips and guide) as the FN FAL rifle used by the Argentine Army. These chargers are the same as for the Argentine Mauser rifles, and thus not interchangeable with standard NATO stripper clips. Reportedly, a very small number of the converted SAFN 49 rifles were used in the 1982 Falklands (Malvinas) War as sniper rifles, but most of the converted SAFN 49 rifles ended up being used by the Argentine Naval Schools prior to being sold as surplus.

This rifle has matching numbers 2110 on all the numbered metal parts, although the stock is numbered 2108. Rack number 31 painted on the side and toe of the butt. This comes with your choice of an original 20 round magazine, or if you live in a place run by idiots, we will replace that with a 10 round magazine so you can comply with the whims of tyrants. Metal parts with about 90% of the arsenal black paint finish, with expected wear, chips and flaking. Buttplate is worn and rusty, typical of a school issued weapon. Receiver ring has the Argentine national crest, although difficult to see as it has a lot of paint over it. ARA on left side for Armada Republica Argentina which encompasses both their Navy and Marine Corps. ARA cartouche on stock as well. Walnut stock has assorted dings and bruises but no cracks or chipped areas, but would look nicer with a light cleaning. Bore is excellent, bright and sharp.

South American military rifles are a good collecting niche with a wide variety at usually modest prices, mainly in the bolt action Mauser area, but with most nations having some semi-auto rifles as well. Just Argentine military arms alone is a challenging and interesting field with Mausers, Remington rolling blocks, lots of M1911 pistols and their imitations to select from, along with a number of edged weapons. All SAFN 49 rifles are classified as Curio and Relic (C&R) firearms by the BATF. Here is a chance to get a nice example of a scarce South American military rifle, from John’s collection. $995.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** SMOF6228 - EXCELLENT BRAZILIAN MAUSER MODEL 1908 MADE BY DWM SERIAL NUMBER 6792N CALIBER 7 MM MAUSER The Mauser company introduced the Gewehr (rifle) bolt action in 1898. The 1898 Mauser action was the basis for the German military rifles during World War I and II, and was sold to many, many countries ranging from Argentina to Yugoslavia with many others in between (Chile, China, Persia, Turkey,etc.) with minor variations to meet the country's specific requirements. The action was so well designed that it remains in production to this day, and is the basis for many custom hunting rifles.

The Mauser company formed a partnership with DWM, a large Berlin weapons manufacturing company. DWM filled many of the contracts with foreign countries and until the outbreak of World War I in 1914 turned out some of the most beautifully made military rifles in the world. This is one of those rifles. It was made for the Brazilian military sometime before World War I ended DWM's trade with South America. The rifle is all correct with matching numbers on bolt, receiver and stock. The bore is bright with sharp riflings. Overall condition is excellent. This is one of the best we've seen in years. $750.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** SMOF6255 - SCARCE BRITISH SMLE RIFLE NO. 1 MARK V (TRIALS RIFLE) .303 BRITISH CALIBER Serial number 3373 made at Enfield in 1922 with all matching numbers on the receiver, bolt and nosecap, but the bolt number looks like it was an arsenal renumber job. Only 20,000 of these were made in 1922-24 to test improvements over the venerable No.1 Mark III rifles using an improved rear sight mounted on the receiver rather than on the barrel. The other clearly seen improvement is the addition of a second band around the stock at the rear of the nosecap. Most of these were heavily used in WW2 and many undoubtedly lost at Dunkirk, making them very scarce on the collector market. About half of those seen have been butchered into sporters, so collectors wanting an original have a hard time finding a good one of these! This is a G-VG excellent example, with about 75% original blue finish, showing normal wear and turning plum. The wood is solid, but dark and somewhat oil soaked and both wood and metal need a good thorough cleaning which will improve the appearance. Bor is a bit rough and work, say about good. Tiny import marks on the right side of the clip guide. Complete with the magazine cutoff, invariably missing on the older rifles. A good representative example of one of the key variants of the SMLE series of .303 bolt actin rifles. $750.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6338 - 20611 - SCARCE L940 DATED BRITISH NO. 1 MARK III LEE ENFIELD “BATTLE OF BRITAIN” RIFLE MADE WITH MAGAZINE CUTOFF - - Serial number M10522 made in 1940 by BSA Co. Production of the No. 1 Mark III rifle continued until about 1945, although in dwindling numbers after adoption of the better and simpler No. 4 Mark I rifles in 1939 (with actual production beginning in 1941).

The No. 1 Mark III was adopted in 1907 and was the standard British battle rifle of WW1, but in 1916 it was simplified by elimination of the magazine cutoff and nearly all of the subsequent production was in this configuration as the No 1 Mark III*. However, during WW2 small arms contracting was “fuddled” (to used Ian Skennerton’s descriptive term) with the constant bombings and the Battle of Britain underway and the loss of arms at Dunkirk. During this chaos, apparently contracts were issued to BSA for rifles in both III and III* specifications with and without magazine cutoffs respectively. This rifle has the cutoff, and is marked as Mark III (no star). All parts with number match, except the bolt assembly which is mismatched.

Overall condition is G-VG with about 70-80% blue finish remaining, although it is turning plum and mixed with dried grease and crud and a few light rust freckles. It should look a lot nicer after a thorough cleaning. Bore is good, but very dirty. Upper handguard has a crack at the rear, easily repaired if you want to. Walnut stocks are pretty good, with expected minor dings of an issued military arm. Looks like the wood was lightly scraped at some point in its service career, but not later sanded by a zealous collector, and it has a mellow oil finish. Not import marked, but it does have the British proof marks required on all exported arms, so this was probably brought in prior to 1968, when rifles like these sold for $9.95 in hundreds of stores including many major department stores.

Visually this is identical to the WW1 Lee Enfields with the magazine cutoff, so it can do double duty filling the niche for a WW1 example, as well as for a WW2 produced rifle. An above average example of this type rifle, a duplicate from John’s collection. $450.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6310 - JAPANESE TYPE 38 CARBINE, 6.5MM, MADE AT NAGOYA (SERIES 4) ALL MATCHING WITH INTACT MUM REALLY NICE! - - Serial number 43295 made at Chigusa factory of Nagoya Arsenal. This model was adopted in 1906, along with the long Type 38 6.5mm rifles, the Type 38 carbines remained in use until the end of WW2 with cavalry and other specialty troops. Complete and correct with all matching parts including the cleaning rod but missing the and bolt cover, which is missing from most. Metal parts retain about 95+% original blue finish, showing normal wear on high points. There are a few scattered light rust freckles that should easily clean up okay. There are some scratches on the bottom left side of the forend, but outweighed by the remainder of the condition which is exceptional for a carbine. Overall, this is one of the nicest Type 38 carbines we have ever had. Bore looks excellent. Stock is medium brown with assorted minor dents and dings, but nothing bad and never refinished or sanded in any way. These use the common Type 30 bayonet with the 16 inch blade and are a very impressive display when mounted on the carbine with a 19 inch barrel. The mum is intact and the serial numbers on all of the parts match. An excellent example of the Type 38 carbine as widely used by Japanese forces during WW2. $595.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMF6304 - TULA MOSIN NAGANT 91/30 SERIAL NUMBER N2740 CALIBER 7.62 X 54R The Mosin Nagant rifle has a unique history among battle rifles from the early 20th century. It was adopted by the Russian Imperial government in 1891, updated by the Communist government in 1930, and distributed to satellite nations for usage in proxy warfare up until the collapse of the Soviet Union. Few rifles can claim as colorful a history as the Mosin Nagant.

This rifle was produced in 1921 (the receiver is dated 1920), and at some time was updated to 91/30 specifications. It is impossible to determine an exact date when this rifle was updated, but there are a few clues for trained eyes. First, there are no escutcheons (or "sling eyes") for a sling mounted in the stock and second the rear sight has four welds that hold it in place. These are features seen typically on rifles that were updated during WWII to meet the demand of the Red Army.

The Cyrillic on the barrel shank reads “Foremost Tula Ordinance Factory RSFSR.” It is interesting to note that on the receiver of this rifle there is an Imperial Eagle proof mark that has not been vandalized, even though this rifle was produced after the Reds had control of the Tula factory. The serial numbers are matched on this rifle and there are no import marks. Condition is very good, the stock is nice with only the normal wear and the metal has about 90-95% finish remaining. the bore is dark but it may clean up. $295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6269 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE 8MM MAUSER CALIBER- A NICE ONE! Serial number 41099 made circa 1960 at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation. Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find, and they represent a very interesting era of small arms development. Based on the Swedish AG42B Ljungman rifle, these were made in Egypt, during the mid-1950s-60s. The FN-49 rifles had not performed well for the Egyptians, so they adopted the Hakim, continuing to use the 8mm Mauser cartridge as their standard rifle caliber. They quickly found out that the fine tolerances of rifles that worked well in snowy Sweden with fastidious soldiers did not like the sand and grit in the desert in the hands of unenthusiastic conscripts. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the eventual adoption of the AK-47 and domestic manufacture of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles. The Hakim is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle. They are also very heavy compared to other rifles. This one is in about excellent condition (unlike most which are pretty beat up) with about 95% original blue-black finish, and pretty nice stock, not the usual dinged up and oil soaked wood. Bore looks like it will clean to excellent. Tiny Century import marks on barrel near the muzzle. Serial number on receiver does not look the same as on the buttplate (although they are n Arabic, which most people will not notice). A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, Greener shotguns, etc for an well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. $625.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6253 - 22884 BRITISH NO. 1 MARK III .303 LEE ENFIELD, MADE BY BSA IN 1918- MATCHING NUMBERS! Serial number I99473 matching on the receiver, bolt, sight and upper band. A very handsome example, arsenal refinished long ago, with numbers matched at that time. About 95+% of the old blue remains. The walnut stock is a matching medium brown, with a nice mellow old oil finish. There are four patched areas on the butt, at the heel, toe, filling the marking disc recess, and a1” square patch on the right side, all typical arsenal work to return rifles to serviceable condition ready for reissue. Bore is VG-fine, nice and bright on the lands but dirty in the grooves.

This example was made at the height of World War I in 1918 by Birmingham Small Arms [& Motorcycle] Company as indicated by the markings on the butt socket. There is no visible “F.T.R.” marking indicating a “factory thorough repair” (probably before World War 2) but it definitely has been arsenal overhauled.

Besides being the main British battle rifle of WW1, these continued in that role in WW2 as well, even after the simplified and improved No. 4 Mark I rifles entered service around 1941. This one has the cuts in the receiver for a magazine cutoff, but the III* indicates it was assembled without one to speed manufacture. The cutoff was used to keep the full magazine of 10 rounds in reserve, and firing as a single shot for slow fire, until ordered to fire rapid fire, so a full magazine would be ready to go when needed. The cutoff was eliminated from the No. 1 Mark III* rifles in 1918 and usually removed from rifles when overhauled, so it is unusual to find them intact. (American Krag and M1903 rifles also had cutoffs, so the “full magazine in reserve” was a common doctrine at the time. No import marks visible, although there may be some lurking under the handguards, so this is probably one of the pre-1968 rifles, which sold for $9.95 each back in the “good old days” even at Sears Roebuck and other department stores. This likely has the mandatory British proof marks tastefully concealed under the handguard. The point to point broad arrow mark is on the top of the receiver ring and the Nocks form of the barrel, indicating it was officially sold out of service. This comes with a British OD color web sling.

A very good representative, matching numbers example of the main British rifle of WW1 and WW2. $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6167 - KAR 98K MADE FOR PORTUGAL IN 1941 BY MAUSER SERIAL NUMBER G8257 CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The Karbine 98 Kurtz (Carbine 98 short) or Kar 98k was the standard service rifle of the German Military during World War II. It was developed from the Gewehr (rifle) 1898 designed by Mauser and adopted by the German army in 1898. After World War I it was from a full length rifle to a carbine length rifle. Over 10 million were made between 1934 and 1946 when production ceased. It was sturdy, dependable, and accurate. The German military to hide production from their potential enemies assigned codes the manufacturers of military equipment.

The Government of Portugal contracted with the Mauser company to supply their army with the Kar 98k rifles. Mauser made two batches, the first in 1937 and the second in 1941. The German army was facing the loss of many rifles with the war in Russia and most of the 1941 rifles were diverted from Portugal to the German army. The rifles had all of the standard German military inspector's marks (Waffenamts) but have the elaborate Portuguese crest on the top of the receiver.

This rifle was one sent to the German army and saw service with the army. These rifles were imported by Mitchell Arms, cleaned up, the bolt polished, and a new stock provided. The overall condition is "restored to new condition". $850.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMOF6041 - TYPE 99 JAPANESE WORLD WAR II RIFLE MADE AT THE NAGOYA ARSENAL. SERIAL NUMBER 54230 3RD SERIES. Caliber 7.7 mm. ALL MATCHING with intact mum.

The Japan entered the industrial age with single minded determination to create the industrial base equivalent to the one that had allow the European navies to force their country to open its people to trade. The Japanese quickly created a firearms industry unlike the Chinese who continued to purchased most of their small arms in Europe. By 1905 the Japanese Army had developed the strongest bolt actions rifle in the world when they adopted the Type 38 in 6.5 mm.

In 1939 the military decided to increase the caliber of their rifles to 7.7 mm, and introduced the Type 99 rifle. It used the basic action of Type 38, and was the first military rifle to have a chrome lined barrel. P.O. Ackley, the noted gunsmith compared the Japanese military bolt action rifles of World War II to those of Germany, England and the U.S. by seeing which ones could withstand the highest pressure loads. The Japanese bolt actions were still shooting when all the other actions including the Mauser's had blown up.

The Imperial Japanese army had used their 6.5 mm Type 38 rifles in China. The units going to the Pacific island were generally armed with the Type 99 rifle. The Type 99 rifle was the ones most of our GI's encountered in the actions that rolled back the Japanese Empire from Guadalcanal to Okinawa.

This rifle is in excellent condition, all matching, with intact Mum, 95% of the original bluing present, and a bright bore. It does not have a dust cover, but we have dust covers available on our web page). All numbers match. The stock is in good condition with a few storage dings. This rifle is good example of the standard Type 99 Japanese rifle used by their military throughout World War II. Over condition is above average. It has the Imperial crest, anti- aircraft sights and it is is all matching. The metal finish would rate about 95%, and the chrome lined bore is bright. $550.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6241 - 12767 – JAPANESE TYPE 38 CARBINE, 6.5MM, MADE AT NAGOYA (SERIES 5) REALLY NICE! - Serial number 82676 made at Chigusa factory of Nagoya Arsenal. Adopted in 1906, along with the long Type 38 6.5mm rifles, the Type 38 carbines remained in use until the end of WW2 with cavalry and other specialty troops. This one was made during WW2, but at a time when the quality of workmanship was still quite good. Complete and correct with all matching parts except missing the bolt cover, which is missing from most. Cleaning rod is included! Metal parts retain about 97+% original blue finish, showing a little wear on high points and some streaks on the bolt from operation, and even the buttplate retains over 90% original blue with a few scattered light rust freckles that will easily clean up. The unsanded stock has the original dark orange- brown finish, with quite a few shallow bumps and bruises, but few serious scars or dings. The carbines are usually found in relatively poor condition, and this is an exceptionally nice example. Overall, this is one of the nicest Type 38 carbines we have ever had. Bore looks excellent. These use the common Type 30 bayonet with the 16 inch blade and are a very impressive display when mounted on the carbine with a 19 inch barrel. The mum has been partially ground but is mostly visible. An excellent representative example of the Type 38 carbine as widely used by Japanese forces during WW2. $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6252 - 20032 - RARE WW2 JAPANESE TRAINING RIFLE MADE FROM GERMAN MODEL 1888 MAUSER COMMISSION RIFLE - Serial number 3078c, originally made at Danzig in 1889 for German military use. This is unquestionably an item extensively modified and used in Japan as a training rifle, not one of the Turked up pieces of junk, or a crude Chinese “Han rifle” copy. Merely an interesting oddity to normal collectors, this is an exotic and little known treasure for advanced and obsessive Japanese rifle collectors. Confuse and confound your friends when you start to talk about your GERMAN made Model 1888 Japanese rifle.

I found there is almost no information available on these except for a brief mention of a similar (but not identical) rifle on Malcolm MacPherson’s superb “Non-Firing Drill and Training Rifles” page, where he shows a M1888 Mauser with barrel jacket and magazine removed and restocked to resemble the Type 38 rifles. However, this one retains the standard M1888 magazine, but had the barrel jacket removed, Jap style sights installed, and a new Japanese stock assembly with band for the Type 30 bayonet and a dummy cleaning installed. Japanese markings are painted on the butt, but meaning unknown. MacPherson summarizes the Jap Training rifle program:

“Starting in the 1920's, the Japanese government required all junior and senior high school boys to have two hours a week of military training. Several companies started producing the necessary training rifles for this purpose. Unfortunately most training rifles did not bear markings that identified their origin.

These training rifles had no standard design and were often made from older models of military rifles or parts from these rifles. Therefore you will find many variations of the same model. There are known models that used 1888 Mauser, type 99, type 30, and type 38 rifle parts. These training rifles continued to be produced until the late 1930's. Some of these rifles could not be fired while others would fire wooden bullet blank ammunition. Many of the blank firing rifles were made with smooth bore barrels. Rarely would any of these rifles fire the standard service round. Nearly all of these training rifles could carry bayonets.”

There is a more comprehensive discussion of Japanese training arms and equipment and use at http://www.japaneseweapons.net/gunyojyu/kyoren/english.htm but nothing specific on M1888 Mausers.

This rifle is in overall VG-fine condition, as modified. Bore is mediocre, but these were not intended for firing, although I do not see that they did anything to prevent firing, and I assume it is still chambered for 8 x 57mm Mauser. We are selling as a training rifle for collectors and NOT SAFE TO FIRE. A very rare item for that very advanced collector of Japanese rifles or training rifles. $350.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6244 - 11769 - SWEDISH MODEL 1894 6.5 X 55MM MAUSER CARBINE MADE BY CARL GUSTAFS IN 1907 - Serial number 53269 made at Carl Gustafs Stads Gevarsfaktori (Carl Gustaf State Rifle Factory) in 1907. These Swedish Mausers are really superb rifles, with exceptionally fine quality materials and workmanship, in one of the finest (and most under appreciated) rifle calibers that is still excellent today, with ammo readily available. These showed that the Swedes were advanced thinkers for the period, adopting a relatively small caliber (6.5mm) while many were still fiddling with 7.62mm to 8mm cartridges. These handy little carbines have nearly all the desirable features that made the Mauser 98 action the ultimate standard for all bolt action designs. These carbines feature a turned down bolt handle and originally had 17.1 inch barrels. In 1914 the 1894 Carbines were arsenal modified to take a knife type bayonet by addition of a heavy upper band with bayonet lug, similar to that found on the British No. 1 Mark III SMLE rifles. This one was imported prior to 1968, and therefore has no ugly import marks, but like all the rest imported then, there is a short extension added to the muzzle to comply with the minimum 18 inch barrel length requirement in effect back then. Bore is very good and may clean to excellent. Except for the bayonet lug, all numbers match. Back in the 1960s, these were considered to be superb deer rifles, and many of the carbines were “sporterized” and the front of the stock and heavy bayonet lug discarded.

This one suffered that fate, but we found an original forend piece and bayonet lug and had them reinstalled. Although there is a slight difference on color and the joint is visible on close inspection, it looks pretty much as it did originally. This restoration is reflected in the price, and it is still an excellent collector piece.

The KKS No. 39 marking on the stock disk indicates it was issued to to the Kuengliga Krigsskkolen (Royal Miiltary College) as rifle number 39 at some point in its career. There is a leather sling attached, which I believe to be an original, but it has been modified to a fixed length with rivets on the upper swivel instead of being longer with a buckle to adjust length. Except to a few experts it will look fine for display. About 95% original (or arsenal reblue from the 1914 bayonet alteration) remains with a few touch ups on the bayonet lug. Stock has original oil finish except for the restored section. Overall a nice representative example of the scarce and desirable Swedish 1894 Carbine. (We usually have one of the bayonets to fit this model on the edged weapons page.) Swedish military arms are an interesting and varied collecting niche with a good variety and mostly reasonable prices. I highly recommend Dana Jones’ “Crown Jewels: The Mauser in Sweden” as a superb reference on the subject. $675.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6226 - RARE GERMAN KAR 98K "HIGH TURRET" SNIPER RIFLE MADE BY MAUSER 1940 SERIAL NUMBER 3343 CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The German army had used snipers extensively during World War I. The Germans carried this tradition into World War II with a school to train a sniper in the art of concealment, range finding and, of course, accurate shooting. Those who graduated received a special badge which was a hawk's head over crossed oak leaves. Based on observation of captured sniping rifles, two arms makers, the Mauser Company and the J.P. Sauer and Company, made virtually all sniping rifles until 1944 when the Gustlof company began producing a specially thickened receiver for long rail side mounted telescope.

The Germans, unlike the U.S. did not have a single scope mounting system, instead they developed several different systems including short and long side rail mounts, claw mounts and turret mounts. The turret mounting system is the most common scope mounting system seen on German snipers.

Just as with the scope mount system, no single optical company provided telescopes to the German Army, but scopes made by Zeiss, Hensoldt, Ajax were all attached to sniping rifles. Early in the war the scopes have commercial markings, later they have the German Army letter code.

This rifle was made by the Mauser factory at Oberndorf in 1940. It was fitted with high turret mount. The turret mounts had a front "turret" like structure soldered onto the front receiver ring, and then held down with two screws. The rear receiver ring had a separate soldered and screwed down mount to hold the scope and to adjust for windage. Two receiver rings were then soldered onto the scope body. These rings locked the scope to the turret mounts. The base of the front receiver ring is serial numbered to the rifle.

Small amounts of solder can be seen where the turret mounts were joined to the receiver ring. This is normal for a World War II installation. The telescopic sight is a 4 power commercial hungting scope made by the Zeiss company, and as is typical of all German scopes of this era is only adjustable for elevation. It has a single post reticule, and the optics are clear.

The bolt on this rifle is a replacement that has been re-serial numbered to the rifle. The bore is bright with sharp rifles. The solid walnut stock is in excellent condition but is probably a later replacement since the butt plate is dated 1941. The rifle likely went through a rebuild sometime in its war time service. $8550.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6183 - 21066 - RUSSIAN 1891/30 MOSIN-NAGANT EARLY STYLE SNIPER RIFLE WITH PE SCOPE WITH TOP MOUNT - Serial number B105486 made by Izhevsk in 1939. Caliber 7.62 x 54mmR.

First, let’s be clear that this is s rifle that has been recently modified to sniper configuration, using a repro scope and mount--- just like the vast majority of Russian sniper rifles on the market. But most of the sellers want you to believe they were originally made that way, not cobbled together to satisfy the lust of the American collectors.

Most of the faux Russian snipers are the later style which used a shorter and lighter PU model telescope on a mount which attaches to the side of the receiver, a reasonably good, but cheaper and more easily made design.

This one, however, imitates the earliest of the Russian sniper rifle configurations. It uses the first style PE scope, made with a focus adjustment which was later omitted on the PEM scope. The top mount system uses a male dovetail base on a saddle secured to the top of the receiver ring with three screws on each side. The scope mount itself is a robust steel set of rings and large female dovetail base that slips onto the base on the rifle and is secured by two thumbscrews. There is a “tunnel” in the mount so that iron sights can be used in an emergency. The “top mount” was used from 1932 to 1936 on rifles with hex receivers, and 1936-1938 on round receivers. Around 1938, a dovetailed “long side rail” mount system was used. Starting in 1939 the simpler PU scope and side mount were adopted instead of the PE and PEM scopes and mounts

The PE scope was pretty much a copy of the Zeiss scopes that the Russians had obtained for tests prior to WW2, and used the three post reticule common the German sniper scopes. The PE scope was made for use on Russian sniper rifles from 1932 to 1936, and the simplified PEM was made from 1936 until replaced by the PU scopes in 1939-40. The best source of info on Russian sniper rifles is http://www.russian-mosin-nagant.com/sniper_9130PEM.html

The scope and mount are excellent Russian made replicas. Excellent optics. Totally unmarked, unlike some being sold now with “authentic(!)” fake dates and maker marks. About 99% original finish remains on these parts.

The rifle is a 1939 Izhevsk made M91/30 with Finnish SA capture mark on the left side of the barrel. Not a lot of finish left, maybe 30% thinning. Floorplate and barrel numbers match, but bolt with the long sniper handle, is not numbered. Tiny Century import marks near the muzzle. Bore has strong rifling but is dark in the grooves. Stock is solid with usual dings and scars of an issued martial arm. The This is a rifle that would look a lot better if someone who values appearance over originality spent an hour or two with some cold blue and touched up the finish, and maybe enhanced the stock finish a bit. Price reflects the fact that this is a clone of the early (and hardly ever seen) PE style Russian sniper rifle, but competitive with the ubiquitous faux PU style sniper rifles seen every day. $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5793 - 22120 - JAPANESE TYPE 38 TRAINING RIFLE (BLANKS ONLY) - Serial number- none- maker unknown Japanese factory. These are pretty scarce compared to “regular” Type 38 rifles, and this is the only one we have seen that includes a bolt cover. Will look better cleaned up. An interesting addition to any WW2 or Japanese weapon collection.

Although some Japanese training rifles were damaged or obsolete arms slightly modified for training use, many, like this one, were purpose made using very crude materials totally unsafe for ever firing with live ammunition. These use cast iron for receivers and other parts were crudely fashioned and ill-fitting, but good enough for youngsters to practice drill. These were also used to fire blank cartridges (and those made from “real” guns were specifically marked to be used with blanks only). The bores on these barrels are simple smoothbore holes either crudely drilled of even cast, and the locking lugs on the bolt are more decorative than functional. The “cleaning rod” is a dummy part just stuck into the stock tip.

This is a good example of these somewhat scarce Japanese military arms with the typical one piece stock (instead of the usual use of a separate piece of wood for the lower part of the Buttstock) which is unsanded and has the original finish and an old rack number 82 painted on the right side. This one is a bit unusual in having a crudely made bolt cover. The rear sight sleeve is very loose on the barrel, and just about every part you look at is decidedly non-standard and “cheap Jap junk” quality.

Metal parts were originally finished some dark color, perhaps by bluing or some other process but that has turned mostly to light brown patina, but it may clean up with some patient work with some oil and steel wool.

Remember, this is NOT TO BE FIRED Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $225.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6190 - 21094 - WW2 BRITISH SHORT MAGAZINE LEE ENFIELD NO. 4 MARK I (F) MADE BY BSA SHIRLEY IN 1943 .303 BRITISH CALIBER - Serial number AB4423 with serial number and No. 4 Mk I (F) FTR electric penciled on the left side of the receiver, FTR is “Factory Thorough Repair” Brit speak for arsenal overhauled. The (F) indicates the rifle has a “fine adjustable” rear sight, not the crude “L” shaped battle sight originally used on most of the WW2 made rifles. In this case it is the stamped Mark III sight, not a milled sight. Butt socket is marked M47, the early code for BSA Shirley (later changed to M47C) and the 1943 date of manufacture. This rifle was made with five groove rifling and the bore is good, although dirty and a bit frosty and dirty in the grooves, and it may or may not clean up to be nicer. Metal parts with about 90% of the black paint finish from the FTR overhaul. Bolt is either not numbered, or numbers are painted over. British export proof markings are on the exposed barrel at the muzzle. No import marks noted, so this is probably a rifle imported circa 1960 and sold for about $14.95. (At the time when nearly new lend lease Garands were $79.95, and Lugers or 1911 pistols were $39.95….) Wooden parts are birch or beech, with a pleasing and more or less matching honey brown color and relatively few dents or dings. This is an attractive example of the main British battle rifle of WW2 which remained in use through Korea and beyond until replaced by the FAL (L1A1) rifles. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5890 - 23287 - WW2 JAPANESE TYPE 99 ARISAKA 7.7MM RIFLE MADE BY NAGOYA (SERIES 2) WITH MUM- NICE! - Serial number 5148 of Series 2, made by the Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. This is an excellent plus condition example with intact “mum” on the receiver, typically the case for rifles that were captured during the Pacific island hopping campaigns, not the rifles passed out to occupation forces from Japanese arsenals after the war which generally had the mums defaced. This rifle has about 95% of the original nice quality blue finish remaining, except on the buttplate which has more wear and some rust. The unsanded stock is a pleasing orange-brown color with original oil finish and just a few dings and dents, the worst being on the right side of the grip. A great looking example of the classic Type 99 7.7mm rifle which was the main Japanese battle rifle of WW2. However, a purist will note that the bolt assembly numbers 268 do not match the rifle number, and the monopod and anti-aircraft sight leaves were removed long ago, but often not installed on later production rifles, so this looks “okay” even with these parts missing. No cleaning rod or dust cover. Still a very nice rifle, far above average in condition with intact mum. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6001 - 21088 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 1924/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL- MITCHELLS’S MAUSERS “PREMIUM GRADE” Serial number ZH3933 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock and floorplate. Left receiver rail marked PREDUZECE 44, one of the various names of the Kragujevac Arsenal. Arsenal refinished to as new condition. This is the “premium grade- the top level of rifles offered by Mitchell’s Mausers which has been the source of most (and the best) of the large number of Yugoslavian Mausers sold in the last 10 years. Their seemingly limitless supply is nearly exhausted now, and values are climbing on the Yugos as more people begin to appreciate the quality and value from the very modest prices of these rifles.

Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about ¼ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time.

About 99% of the finish remains, with just a few minor scratches. The arsenal refinished stock is a pleasing medium brown color with a nice oil finish. Import marked (of course) and the ZH3933 number marked on the receiver with the light dot punch process over the deeply stamped 3933. Comes with the “accessory pack consisting of a sling, cleaning pull through and ammo pouches. An extremely handsome and interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and the definitive North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. Mitchell’s price on these (luck of the draw as to what you will get) is now $499, but our price for the exact rifle shown is $450.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6101 - RUSSIAN MODEL 1891/30 MOSIN NAGANT RIFLE 7.632 X 54MMR CALIBER MADE AT TULA IN 1936 Serial number 232879 matching, including the bolt which has been “force matched” during an arsenal overhaul. Bore has strong rifling and the tops of the lands look smooth, but the grooves are dark and may or may not clean up. Stock has been nicely sanded to a very smooth finish. No import marks noted. Metal parts with about 95% blue finish, thinning a bit from normal wear and starting to dull or turn plum in places. Comes complete with the leather “dog collars” for the sling. A very nice example of a WW2 vintage Mosin Nagant Model 1891/30. $250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5487 - - 19685 - RUSSIAN/FINNISH MODEL MODEL 39 MOSIN-NAGANT RIFLE (7.65X54MMR CALIBER) - Serial number 73661 assembled by VKT in 1944 on a Russian receiver made by Izhevsk in 1915, as indicated by the bow and arrow and date on the bottom of the receiver tang. This design was adopted in 1939 as the Finnish “Infantry Rifle Model 1939” and became the preferred rifle for use during World War II as the Finns fought the Russians, eventually losing in 1944. These used a mix of newly made parts and reworked parts from earlier Mosin Nagants which had been purchased or captured by the Finns. The M39 features entirely new sights, better barrels, two sets of sling swivels a two piece finger jointed stock, and the improved two piece magazine stop. This example was made by VKT (Valtion Kirvaaritehdas). Bore is nice and bright, but rifling is somewhat rounded on the lands. Reportedly these are excellent shooters. (Reminder: we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) Looks like about 98% of old arsenal blue finish remains. Bolt number 3661 is matching, but as with most of these, the other parts numbers are totally mismatched. Stock is solid, with the assorted minor dings and scars of an issued military arm. The birch stock color is medium to dark brown. Import marks on upper part of the barrel. Complete with the cleaning rod which is often missing. Overall an excellent example of a Mosin Nagant that actually looks different from most of the other variations. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF5635 - SMOF5635 – 20198 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 98(N) 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE (KAR98K) REMANUFACTURED BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL (ZF-41 SNIPER STOCK?) Serial number M8211 matching on the receiver, bolt and stock. Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about ¼ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k and all used the standard 7.92 x 57mm ammunition popularly called 8mm Mauser in the U.S.

During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old Mauser rifles on hand (including various Model 1924 and Model 98 and Kar98k types on hand) were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designations. This rifle has one of the WW2 era German made K98k Mauser full length actions, overhauled to as new with a repaired and recycled laminated German stock K98k stock with the stamped cup type buttplate. The stock has been cut down about ¼” along the left side at the rear of the barrel, as was done for K98k rifles fitted with ZF41 sniper scopes. The workmanship looks a little sloppy and the finish does not show as much wear as the rest of the stock, so we are not sure if this was actually from a ZF41 sniper rifle, or if Bubba fiddled with it. If someone is going to make up a replica ZF41 sniper rifle this is a stock that is “pre-boogered” so you won’t be struck by lightning for messing up a nice standard stock. This rifle retains the bent down bolt handle of the K98k. The Yugos designated this type rifle as the “7.92 x 57mm Rifle Model 98(n) indicating it was one of about 310,000 of the German army rifles rebuilt at Kragujevac in 1948-1951. Unlike most of the Model 24/47, 24/52 or Model 48 Yugoslavian Mausers, the Model 98(n) did not have a new model designation stamped on them, although the receiver ring marks were scrubbed and the Yugo communist crest applied, and the guns were totally refinished at that time. There is no crest on this one, so it has obviously been “scrubbed” but if that was simply to remove the German maker marks or the Yugo crest is unknown. About 90% of the rebuild refinish remains. although quality is sort of sloppy (as typical of unenthusiastic workers in most Communist regimes!). Bore is excellent plus- bright and sharp. No import marks noted, although some me be hidden somewhere that we missed. A nice example of one of their rebuilt rifles, not one of the new made and unissued rifles, but a real bargain compared to a nice all German K98k.

This is just one of many interesting variants of the classic 98 Mauser family made by the Yugoslavians. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb Mauser Military Rifles of the World for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and the North Cape “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5638 - SMOF5638 JAPANESE RIFLE TYPE 99 7.7MM (SERIES 8- "LAST DITCH") Serial Number 56334 made at Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. "Last Ditch" type made late in the war, with wood buttplate, fixed rear sight, no ears on the front sight. loose forend piece restrained by the bands. Receiver ring has the "mum" ground off, and overall about 90+% of the very rough finish blue remains. Just a bit of wear on the edges of the wooden buttplate. One of the nicer "last ditch" rifles we have seen in a while. $250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5837 - JUNGLE CARBINE – MARK V MK I DATED 4/46) SERIAL NUMBER U6506 CALIBER 303 BRITISH The British Army adopted a magazine feed bolt action rifle in 1888. The design came from a Scottish emigrant to the U.S. James Lee, and featured a 10 round, top loading, detachable magazine, and a bolt with rear locking lugs. It was modified based on experience in the Boer War. The barrel was shortened, and a receiver bridge added for loading with stripper clips. The Lee-Enfield action continued in British (and Commonwealth) service till 1955 with about 17 million being made. It is considered one of the best designed bolt battle rifles in the world for the following reasons. The ten round magazine gave it an advantage over all other bolt action rifles. The rear locking lugs were much less likely to foul with dirt, and the bolt could be operated more rapidly than the standard Mauser bolt.

During World War II the British military shortened the standard No.4, Mk I rifle, put a flash hider on the barrel, added a hard rubber butt pad, and moved he sling attachment from the bottom to the side. It was officially called the No. 5, Mk I rifle, but picked up the nickname, “Jungle Carbine”. It proved popular with the troops.

This rifle was made after the end of the war and has not been reworked. Numbers on the bolt handle and stock match the serial number. The metal was finished with a baked on black enamel paint over phosphate. The finish is about 90% intact with some high edge wear. The wood has some small dings and dents, but no major gouges. The rubber butt pad is intact, but has some dings. The bore is bright with sharp riflings. $550.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF5229 - 17870 - BRITISH NO. 5 MARK I .303 "JUNGLE CARBINE" MADE BY ROF FAZAKERLY-1945 DATED - Serial number S4269. Left side of receiver electric pencil marked "No 5 Mk I ROF(F) over 10/45 S4629" indicating manufacture at the Royal Ordnance Factory Fazakerly in October 1945, about two months after V-J day. About 169,807 of the Jungle Carbines were made by Fazakerly 1944-1947. The “Jungle carbine” design was approved in September 1944, and was nearly two pounds lighter and 5 inches shorter than the No, 4 rifles. Back of bolt handle has matching serial number and the stock and magazine are not numbered, a practice that started later. This is one of the few we have seen that has the forend tip merely rounded off, without the metal forend tip. This is an absolutely a genuine jungle carbine, not one of the cut down copies being dumped at bargain prices. Not import marked, but it does have the usual export proof markings on the barrel. About 30-40% original black paint over dark parkerize finish remains, worn thin from normal wear, not abuse. This is a well used example, probably one originally sold in the early 1960s for about $29.95 (the new ones went for $39.95!). It is not one of the badly battered and abused relics dumped on the surplus market in recent years, or the oil soaked klunkers from India (easily identified by the large stock bolt ahead of the action). Bore is dirty but should clean to fine to excellent. Wooden parts are dark walnut with assorted dings, nicks and gouges and just the military oil finish. Recoil pad is in good condition, although somewhat aged stiffened so it will not cushion the recoil much. These are very handy little rifles, and fun to play with, but they are brutal, abusive, un-fun to shoot monsters if you ever shoot one. The flash hider partially tames the horrendous muzzle blast, but the light weight results in ferocious recoil that the rubber butt pad fails to reduce to acceptable levels. An important milestone in the British Lee Enfield story. The great bulk of the Jungle carbines were made after the end of WW2, so wartime dated (or even almost wartime dated) examples are especially prized by collectors. If you like to clean up surplus rifles and steam the stocks to raise dents, and perhaps touch up the “British black paint” finishes, this could be returned to a much nicer looking condition, but is a good representative example of the famous “Jungle Carbine” at a more affordable price than the minty ones. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5495 - JAPANESE TYPE 38 RIFLE CONVERTED TO A TRAINER. CALIBER - BLANKS ONLY 6.5 ARISAKA. SERIAL NUMBER 10667 MARKED IN ENGLISH -"SASEBO -1945" The Sasebo Naval base was the home of the Imperial Japanese Navy. It was established in the 1880's and was base from which Admiral Togo sailed to defeat the Russian fleet in May 1905 at the Battle of Tsushima. The U.S. 5th Marines landed there after the surrender of Japan in August 1945. The base has continued to be used by the U.S. as a base for our fleet.

The Japanese converted many rifles to trainers by boring out the barrel to remove the rifling, and altering the bolt. This rifle was so altered. It appears to have been at Sasebo in 1945 because Sasebo and the date in English is stamped on the rifle. It is an interesting variant of the rifles that came home with our returning GI's after the end of World War II. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5393 - 19130 YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 48 8MM MAUSER MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL (BOLT ALTERED FOR SCOPE) - Serial number M99073. Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about ¼ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. Later, they began producing the standard K98k type Mauser as the Model 48. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. New production (like the Model 48 rifles) were marked with the new style crest at time of manufacture.

This rifle is one of the Model 48 rifles with the short action, probably made circa 1948 to early 1950s, but possibly rebuilt on an earlier action with updated markings. It appears to have all new made parts except for the floorplate which has an old serial number lined out, and the new number added. Receiver, stock and floorplate numbers all match. The bolt is not numbered, but is probably original to the rifle, but it has been altered for use with a scope with a new handle resembling those used on the Winchester Model 70. The stock has been notched to clear the new handle, but if you replaced to bolt body it would restore it to factory configuration and the notch would not really be visible unless you lifted the bolt. If you want to use the excellent Mauser style action to make a sporter (Barbarian!) then the hardest and most expensive job- altering the bolt- has already been done. Otherwise this seems to be a near mint unissued rifle. Bore is sharp and mirror bright. Metal parts with about 99% original factory blue, except the polished bolt assembly and the buttplate. The buttplate has some staining but that could be polished out. Tiny “GPC W. HURLEY NY 8MM”import marks on barrel near the muzzle.

An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and a new North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5352 - 19005- RUSSIAN/FINNISH MODEL 39 MOSIN-NAGANT RIFLE (7.65X54MMR CALIBER) - SERIAL NUMBER 213668 assembled by SAKO in 1944 on a Russian receiver made by Tula in 1903 (as indicated by the 903r and “T” hammer mark on the underside of the receiver tang. This design was adopted in 1939 as the Finnish “Infantry Rifle Model 1939” and became the preferred rifle for use during World War II as the Finns fought the Russians, eventually losing in 1944. These used a mix of newly made parts and reworked parts from earlier Mosin Nagants which had been purchased or captured by the Finns. The M39 features entirely new sights, better barrels, two sets of sling swivels a two piece finger jointed stock, and the improved two piece magazine stop. This example was made by SAKO (the Finnish State Rifle Factory at an unpronounceable place Rhiimimaki). Bore is bright, although somewhat worn, and reportedly these are excellent shooters. (Reminder: we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) About 90%+ arsenal blue finish remains. MATCHING NUMBERS on barrel, receiver and bolt, with other parts not numbered. Stock is a dark brown, in fine plus to excellent with a few assorted minor dings. Sharp SAKO markings on the right side of the butt along with an arsenal marking. Complete with the cleaning rod and the original leather sling. Tiny import marks on the rights side of the barrel at the muzzle. The SAKO rifles are considered to be the best quality of all the Finnish made rifles. Overall an excellent representative example of a Mosin Nagant that actually looks different from most of the other variations. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5356 - 19010 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE 8MM MAUSER CALIBER – SERIAL NUMBER 30052 made in 1961 at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation. Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find, and they represent a very interesting era of small arms development. Based on the Swedish AG42B Ljungman rifle, these were made in Egypt, during the mid-1950s-60s. The FN-49 rifles had not performed well for the Egyptians, so they adopted the Hakim, but later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in snowy Sweden with fastidious soldiers did not like the sand and grit in the desert in the hands of unenthusiastic conscripts. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the eventual adoption of the AK-47 and domestic manufacture of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles. The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle. Theya re also very heavy compared to other rifles. This one is in VG-fine condition (unlike most which are pretty beat up) with about 95% original blue- black finish, but everything is covered with a grimy layer of dried grease and crud and really needs a good cleaning. Bore looks like it will clean to excellent. Stock has some minor handling dings and is covered with grimy dirt and needs to be cleaned. Tiny Century import marks on barrel near the muzzle. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, Greener shotguns, etc for an well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $775.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5281 - 18289 - SPANISH MODEL 1943 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY LACORUNA IN 1953 - Serial number Y8193 with matching numbers (although the bolt has 2H-8193 instead of Y2193). After receiving many weapons from German during the Spanish Civil War, they finally decided in 1943 to adopt the 8 x 57mm Mauser caliber as standard for their service rifles, replacing the well used 7 x 57mm Mausers dating back to the 1890s. This is essentially the familiar Kar98k style rifle with a bit different handguard arrangement, and dual sling swivels on the lower band. The bayonet lug has an adapter in place which was provided so that older style bayonets could be used (just as the Argentines did with their M1909 rifles). This one is a good representative example, with about 90-95% old blue thinning in places and a few areas turning plum from normal use. There is some heavy rust and “blood pitting” on the bolt release, but otherwise nothing remarkable. Bore is fair to good, worn and dirty. The stock is solid but with assorted dings and scars from service use. Unlike the junky Turkish rifles (which I would not shoot if you paid me!) these Spanish rifles were well made of quality materials and although not real pretty are solid old guns. Of course, we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing. This example is not import marked, so likely one of those which came in prior to 1968. Check our edged weapons page for bayonets for this one. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5307 - 18395 - CZECH MADE COLD WAR ERA K98K 8MM MAUSER (7.92 X 57MM) MILITARY RIFLE - Serial number 1701K matching on receiver and bolt, with no other parts numbered. Left side rail stamped "Ceskoslovenská Zbrojovka, A.S., BRNO" indicating manufacture at the Brno (“Waffen Werke Brunn” to the Germans) plant which had made K98ks during German occupation with the DOT code and then code SWP in 1945. This factory was largely untouched at the end of the War, and the Czechs made a small number of rifles for rearming their forces and for export sales circa 1946-1950. These were essentially the standard late war K98k “kreigsmodell” design with the stamped buttplate and bands and the laminated stocks, and no guide rib on the bolt body. As the Brno factory had largely gotten their trigger guard assemblies from German suppliers, they tooled up for a simple and cheap stamped trigger guard (similar to the U.S. M1903A3) with a large guard bow allowing use with gloves in cold weather. This has led to the collector term “arctic model” or “winter type” but they were never really sold as anything but a standard rifle. Some of these used salvaged German K98k parts, but others, like this one, were entirely new made. These were very well made and finished arms, not crude wartime “last ditch” jobs. Some had foreign crests, others no crests, but some had the Czech rampant lion crest, which was removed before being sold to foreign buyers (either military or surplus). Israel bought a lot of these (mainly the refurbished/salvaged German type) in 1947, but most of those were well used and later converted to 7.62mm. This one had the crest removed, but is otherwise in excellent condition with about 95%+ original blue remaining. Bore is superb, mirror bright and sharp. Bubba put a couple of coats of varnish on the stock, and added two screws to hold the end of his sling in place, but the holes will be hidden by t correct sling (or easily filled) and removing the varnish is a simple task with some paint stripper after you disassemble the rifle. Missing the cleaning rod.

This is significant as one of the last of the Model 98 Mauser rifles made for military use. See http://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=1735 for a lot more detailed info on this scarce K98k variant. Absolutely the best condition example of these we have ever seen. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $695.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5310 - 18435 - VERY UNUSUAL- CRUDE KHYBER PASS COPY OF BRITISH ENFIELD NO. 5 MARK I “JUNGLE CARBINE” - From a few feet away this looks like a standard British No. 5 Mark 1 .303 “Jungle Carbine.” However, closer inspection show that it is a crude hand made copy turned out in the “Khyber Pass” region of Pakistan/Afghanistan. These talented craftsmen make copies of an amazing variety of guns using whatever materials they can find, almost entirely by hand. The quality ranges from very good to laughably poor in appearance, but the quality of the materials and heat treatment (if any) and the tolerances make them all UNSAFE TO FIRE UNDER ANY CONDITIONS. While the locals do sometimes fire these things, they do so with reloaded ammunition, the bullets sometimes recovered from rifle ranges with the rifling marks filed off, and powder of varying quality. Most of these people are illiterate, so the markings (if any) are very creative in spelling, punctuation, and inexplicably mix stuff so you might find Broowneng Patant, and the crown/V.R. from the reign of Queen Victoria on a gun that is a mongrel mix of broomhandle Mauser and Astra features. Today their specialty is making copies of pre-1898 British arms for sale to American troops who can bring home “antique” guns but not modern guns. [See our main page for more on those…]

This “Jungle Carbine” is one of a handful that Century Arms found among the stuff they imported in the 1980s, and was sold via Springfield Sporters in Pennsylvania. They had the wisdom to cut off the firing pin and weld the firing pin hole shut so that no one can fire it. The bolt they used was made by Savage (square S on the back of the handle and old number removed). Or, perhaps the makers used this one, as it has been extensively filed so that it will fit the receiver and then refinished. The receiver shows all sorts of crude details, but is a faithful copy of the real Jungle Carbine. Similarly, the other parts show many crude features, and probably not a single part would interchange with a real Lee Enfield. The barrel and receiver have a nicely polished and blued finish of unknown age. The barrel may have been salvaged from a “real” Enfield, or at least the rifling looks well done (albeit rusty and rough) or they may have just gotten good at rifling barrels after many decades of practice. The stock is not too badly done, but the butt swivel is a non-regulation feature, and the recoil pad was probably cut from someone’s truck tire (with or without their knowledge!).

This is the perfect addition to an “Enfield” collection that has everything else. NOT SAFE TO FIRE, but we still need to transfer it to a FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $625.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5230 - 17871 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 1924/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL - Serial number R2280 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock. Left receiver rail marked with script T.R.Z. 5 indicating it was reworked at some time in the refurbishing facilities in Hadzici (in the Bosnia-Herzegovina part of former Yugoslavia). See the article in Miitary Rifle Journal by Yugo expert James Golub for more on the work done by Hadzici and the marking variations.

Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about ¼ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time. About 98-99% of the finish remains, although quality is sort of sloppy (as typical of unenthusiastic workers in most Communist regimes!). Bore should be excellent but filled with gooey cosmoline right now. Century import marked on barrel near the muzzle and a new serial number marked on the receiver M2401555. An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and a new North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5234 - 17802 - RUSSIAN/FINNISH MODEL MODEL 39 MOSIN- NAGANT RIFLE (7.65X54MMR CALIBER) - Serial number 258186 assembled by SAKO in late 1944 on a Russian receiver made in 1899. This design was adopted in 1939 as the Finnish “Infantry Rifle Model 1939” and became the preferred rifle for use during World War II as the Finns fought the Russians, eventually losing in September, 1944. At that time, SAKO had reached 259278, so this was probably made in the final week or two of the war. These used a mix of newly made parts and reworked parts from earlier Mosin Nagants which had been purchased or captured by the Finns. The M39 features entirely new sights, better barrels, two sets of sling swivels a two piece finger jointed stock, and the improved two piece magazine stop.

This example was made by SAKO (the Finnish State Rifle Factory at an unpronounceable place Rhiimimaki). Fine to excellent bore, and reportedly these are excellent shooters. (Reminder: we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) About 98% original blue finish (or arsenal refinish on the salvaged parts) remains. Matching numbers on receiver and bolt, but floorplate does not match. Stock is excellent with a very few very minor assorted dings, and most of the dark brown protective coat of varnish (or something) in place. Complete with the correct cleaning rod. However, despite the superb appearance, this does have one flaw- the rear sight base is loose on the barrel, and need to be firmly anchored- we are not sure how these are attached if it is a loose mounting screw, or if it needs a shim or wedge, or some degreasing and application of epoxy, but it should be an easy fix, or looks great as is. Tiny import marks on the barrel near the muzzle. Overall an excellent representative example of a Mosin Nagant that actually looks different from most of the other variations. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5222 - 17812 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM 8MM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE- NICE! - - Serial number 34796, made in 1964 at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation.

Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find, and they represent a very interesting era of small arms development. Based on the Swedish AG42B Ljungman rifle, these were made in Egypt, during the mid-1950s-60s, with this 1964 dated example being the latest date we have seen. The FN-49 rifles had not performed well for the Egyptians, so they adopted the Hakim, but later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in snowy Sweden with fastidious soldiers did not like the sand and grit in the desert in the hands of unenthusiastic conscripts. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the eventual adoption of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles.

The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle. This one is in excellent condition (unlike most which are pretty beat up) with about 97-98% original blue-black finish. Just a bit of wear on the high points and a few streaks on the bolt carrier from cycling it. Bore has strong rifling but is dark and cruddy which may be just grease or may not clean up much. Stock is likewise excellent with just a few minor handling dings. Tiny Century import marks on barrel near the muzzle. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, Greener shotguns, etc for an well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5226 - 17810 - AUSTRIAN MODEL 1895 MANNLICHER 8 X 56MMR CALIBER STRAIGHT PULL CARBINE MADE BY STEYR - Serial number 9415Z, this rifle (also known as the Osterreichisches Repetier-Stutzen M.95) has "W-n 18" marking on the barrel, indicating it was manufactured by Steyr in 1918. Although a few were made after the end of WW1, in 1920 the post-WWI remnants of the Austro-Hungarian Empire finally ended production after the 1919 Treaty of St. Germain limited production at Steyr to small numbers of weapons for newly formed local army and police units. The rifle began life as a stutzen with sling swivels on both the side and bottom to accomodate both infantry (who used the bottom swivels) and mounted cavalry (who used the side swivels). The rifle was later converted from 8x50R (M.93) to the more powerful 8x56R (M.30) caliber in the mid 1930's, and the latter is sometimes called the 8mm M30 Scharfe Patrone. A taller front sight was added to the still-original stutzen dovetailed sight base to compensate for this change, while the rear sight markings were ground off and markings calibrated to the new round were added. Additionally, the sling swivels were removed: the front swivel would have been hinged into the barrel band, and was replaced with a spacer, while the rear swivel was removed and its hole plugged with wood. This is a great example with about 98% of the arsenal refinish blue. The light colored (beech?) stock was refinished at the same time, and has a nice coat of finish with only a few minor dings or bruises. There is a small arsenal wood repair on the left side of the receiver tang. Bore is about fine.

From about 1880 to 1900 there was a worldwide fad where many countries adopted straight pull rifle designs. They actually are a pretty good concept, although an unnatural motion nowadays to folks raised on bolt action rifles. Steyr had several models along with the Swiss Schmidt Rubins, the Canadian Ross and the American Winchester Lee Navy to name some of the best known examples. However, mechanical problems and the simpler Mauser and Lee- Enfield type bolt actions doomed them to a relatively brief era of popularity. That would be an interesting collecting niche to specialize in. When Austria was absorbed into the third Reich in the late 1930s, the Model 95 rifles and carbines were withdrawn from service and Austrian troops were issued K98k Mausers. However, the eventual need for all available arms led to the Model 95s being reissued to a variety of Austrian and German second line and support units. The oddball 8 x 56mmR cartridges are still found occasionally at gun shows in their 5 round en-block clips, packed in boxes with German markings. Overall a really handsome example of an unusual episode in martial arms evolution. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5231 - 17872 - TURKISH MODEL 1938 8MM MAUSER RIFLE ASSEMBLED AT K. KALE IN 1942 - Serial number 105846, mismatched. Receiver ring marked K.Kale under the usual TC, crescent and AFSA Turkish government and arsenal markings, indicating assembly at the K. Kale facility.

We really are not big fans of the myriad Turkish Mauser variations, but got a couple as part of package deals. This could be a very inexpensive collecting specialty with oodles of variations, some more interesting than others. The Turks are noted for their long history of warfare with other groups or nations, and domestic unrest, and thus have been voracious consumers of firearms for centuries. You may recall the Turks “bought American” in the 1860s-70s, and slaughtered Russians with a mix of Peabody rifles for long range fire and Model 1866 Winchesters for rapid close range fire at the battle of Plevna. In 1887 the Mauser brothers convinced the Turks to buy a large number of 11mm Model 1871/84 Mausers (Turkish Model 1887). Their contract very smartly included a clause that specified that if a newer model rifle was introduced the balance of the contract would be filled with the newer model. Thus the Turks leapfrogged into variations of the Model 1889 (in 7.65mm) with the single column box magazine, then the Model 1893 (in 8mm) and then the 1898, but all under Turkish designations and usually in several variations. In addition the Turks received large numbers of Model 1888 “Commission Rifles” from Germany during WW1, and captured thousands of British Lee Enfields during the Gallipoli campaign. In the 1930s the Turks began a program to overhaul their hoarded arms and convert everything into a more or less standard configuration, and standardize on the 7.92 x 57mm Mauser cartridge as the common ammunition. This involved reworking the various guns by replacing barrels, altering or replacing stocks and mashing the metal parts into conformity. Meanwhile, new rifle production continued by AFSA (the Turkish military arsenal) in Ankara, Turkey. These were the “Model 1938” rifles essentially a 98 Mauser type design with the older style upper band assembly. To thoroughly confuse collectors, all of the rifles being updated were also called Model 1938s, regardless of what they started off as. There is some info on all of these in Robert Ball’s superb Mauser Military Rifles of the World, and one excellent on line source is http://www.turkmauser.com, run by a collector who seems to have an excellent grasp on the subject.

This rifle is a true M1938, assembled during WW2 from parts on hand (probably a mix of new manufacture, in storage or salvaged parts from older rifles) at K.Kale under the AFSA control. The serial number is correct for this date and configuration, although it is poorly hand stamped and the second number is easily confused for a “9” instead of a “0” but careful examination and comparison with the serial number ranges confirms it is a “0.” As Turkish rifles go, this is in about average condition, with the blue finish mostly turned to plum or patina, the stock oil soaked. The bore is greasy but looks like it should clean to good or better. There is a crack extending back from the right side of the receiver tang. Small Century import marks on the barrel. Although some people shoot these, we sell all firearms as collector items only, and the must be approved by a competent gunsmith. If the stock is degreased, it will look a lot better as the metal is actually pretty decent with no pitting and a blue-black tone mixed with patina, rather than the crust of rust over gaping pits as sometimes found on the turked up rifles. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $195.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5225 - 17808 - SPANISH MODEL 1916 7 X 57MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE - SERIAL NUMBER 59142 made by Oviedo. Basically a shortened version of the Model 1893 Mausers purchased by Spain from German makers, but produced by their own arsenal. This has a 21.5 inch barrel and the tangent type rear sight adopted during the Spanish Civil War era (replacing the “lang vizier” roller coaster style sight used previously). Bore is worn but otherwise good. Matching numbers on bolt, stock and floorplate, and no other parts numbers noted. About 90-95% of an old blue finish remains, probably an old arsenal refinish, as most seen were refinished at some point. Bore is fair to good. This is from an old collection and does not have the import marks required after 1968. The walnut stock has been nicely cleaned and oiled and looks pretty good. This has a cleaning rod, although I am not certain it is exactly correct. The two buttplate screws and the lower band screw appear to be incorrect replacements. Bore is about good. A good representative example of the main rifle of the Spanish Civil War, and one of many models needed to complete a Mauser collection. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $225.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5235 - 17813 - GERMAN KAR98K-ZF 41 SNIPER RIFLE WITH ZF/41 SNIPER SCOPE (REPLICA) Serial number 3388 made by Mauser-Werke, Oberndorf am Neckar (code 42) in 1939. The Kar98k Mauser with the Zf 41 telescope was the most widely produced German sniper rifle of WW2, but also the least preferred. The concept was simple- modify the rear sight base to accept a mount and put on a scope with a long eye relief and shazam! you got a sniper rifle. However, the 12-15 inch eye relief and tiny tube diameter of the 1.5 power telescope meant that the field of view was almost useless except against a stationary target. Factory produced rifles were all dated 1941 or later, but Robert Ball’s “Sniper Variations of the German K98k Rifle” notes that some earlier rifles and even Gew 98s were converted for sniper use.

However, this one is NOT a genuine sniper rifle made with an original Zf 41 scope, as those are very rare, and therefore very expensive. Most of the Zf 41 snipers found on the market are at best replicas (if described honestly) or at worst fakes trying to steal your hard earned cash. This is a replica at an affordable price offered as a filler for a collector on a budget, or a reenactor. The rifle itself has virtually no finish, having had it all removed, except the trigger guard which has about 50-60%. Metal parts are smooth with no pitting except a bit on the bands where they contact the wood. The scope mount bar is a repro mounting bar attached to a standard rear sight base by solder, instead of being machined integral with the sight sleeve. The stock has been altered to clear the scope mount. The scope and scope mount are very high quality reproductions, with correct period markings and excellent optics, probably better than the originals. The mount and base have 99% of their finish (except a couple of rust spots on the mount), so they look out of place on the mostly no finish rifle. This is an excellent candidate for someone to either take the time to do the simple (but time consuming) rust blue process on, or just hit it all with one of Brownell’s excellent cold blue products to turn it all a nice deep blue black color. If this were a genuine correct Zf 41 rifle and scope, the price would be many times higher, but being what it is, you can decide if it will fit your collecting needs, and save a bundle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $1150.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5000 - 16605 - ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER 7.65MM RIFLE MADE BY DWM IN 1899 - Serial Number S3238 matching throughout, including the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). The Model 1891 is an important milestone as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ DEUTSCHES WAFFEN-UND MUNITIONS FABRIKEN/ BERLIN" Argentine crest has been ground off the receiver ring per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces.

Loewe was the original maker of the M1891 Argentine rifles, but after merging in 1899 with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) filled the rest of the contracts under the DWM name. Overall excellent plus condition. The stock has just a few minor storage dings, the worst being shown in the photos. Bolt retains most of its original bright polished finish, including on the handle and knob which usually are darker, but nice and bright on this one. Other parts with about 95% original brilliant blue finish, except where the removed receiver crest was touched up to blend in; some wear on the magazine floorplate and adjacent sharp corners and some wear on the buttplate. Stock is a very pleasing light brown colored straight grain walnut with matching handguard. The stock has had the argentine crest removed by grinding.

This is one of 53,000 Argentine rifles made in 1899 under the DWM name. From an old pre- 1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is among the very best of the M1891 Argentine rifles we have had in years. The bore is dirty (old grease?) although we expect it will clean to the same superb condition as the exterior. These are usually found in nice condition, but often with mismatched parts. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) Argentine Mausers made before the “O” prefix block were made in 1898 or earlier, but this one was made in 1899 and thus does not qualify as an “antique” so we need to ship to a FFL (C&R is okay). Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $675.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4982 - 16371 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM 8 X 57MM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE (SUPERB!) - Serial number 49268, absolutely the best condition Hakim we have ever seen. Made at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation. Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find with any sort of condition. These represent a very interesting era of small arms development. The FN-49 rifles made for Egypt had not performed well for them. So, the Egyptians bought the surplus Swedish AG42 Ljungman machinery and after modifying it slightly to use 8mm Mauser ammunition, adopted it as the Hakim. They later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in Sweden did not like the sand and grit in the desert. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, and periodic butt-kickings by the Israelis, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the later adoption of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles, a much modified cousin of the Hakim The number above the serial number on the receiver of this Hakim translates to 1967, but we are not sure if that is the date of manufacture or something else, and there does not seem to be any reliable source of that actual dates of manufacture for the Hakim or the Rashid rifles. The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, using a detachable 10 round box magazine. It uses a “direct impingement” gas system, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle

This one is in excellent condition (unlike many which are pretty beat up) with about 98% original blue-black finish having just a few minor storage and handling scrapes but almost no wear. Bore looks like it will clean to excellent once the dried grease and crud are removed. Stock is likewise excellent with just a very few minor handling dings. There is a wire staple on the right side of the bolt carrier, intended for a rubber pad, almost always missing, but the remnants are here, held with electrical tape. Comes with an old web Russian style sling which may or may not be correct, but is a free bonus anyway. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, etc for a well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4980 - 16368 - ARGENTINA MODEL 1909 MAUSER CARBINE 7.65MM MADE BY FMAP IN 1948 - Serial number 003037 matching. This is one of only 5,000 Model 1909/1926 first model Cavalry Carbines made in Argentina by DGFM-FMAP. (Dirrecion General de Fabricaciones Militares- Fabrica Militar de Armas Portatiles) This was the Argentine arsenal set up to make Mauser rifles on machinery purchased from Germany under license from Mauser. The equipment was purchased in 1926-27, but chronic financial problems delayed actual construction of the factory and production until 1947. The Model 1909 cavalry carbine was originally made without any provisions for a bayonet, but in 1926 the design was altered to add a bayonet lug under the stock, and a large muzzle cap for the muzzle ring, being a retrofit on the early carbines made by DWM in Germany. However, the bayonet provisions were added during manufacture on the DGFM-FMAP made guns. They first model carbines like this one were made 1947-1949 and are marked with the national crest on the receiver ring, and EJERCITO ARGENTIONO MAUSER MOD 1909 on the left side of the ring, with the DGFM-(FMAP) markings on the left rail. The more common second model carbines (11,905 made 1949-1959) used a simplified crest with EJERCITO ARGENTINO on the top of the ring

Colin Webster’s superb “Argentine Mauser Rifles 1871-1959” is the definitive study on the Argentine arms, and is highly recommended for anyone interested in South American military arms as it has info on several models provided to other countries

This example is in average condition for this model, well used and then arsenal refinished prior to export. Stock has large repair to the toe, as with most I have seen. Assorted dings and bruises and overall a very dark brown, almost black color. Metal with about 98-99% of the arsenal blue-black refinish and bright polished receiver for a handsome appearance. Bore is good, but shows use. There appears to be a small crack in the wood alongside the receiver tang inletting, but it does not appear to be anything serious. Chipped section at right front of the handguard. Tiny import marks on right rear side of receiver. A good example of this fairly scarce Argentine military arm. I have always recommended South American military arms as a collecting niche with a large variety of items available at mostly reasonable prices. And, most are types that should be immune to crazy gun ban schemes. First one of these we have had for sale in several years. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $525.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4900 - 16156 - ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER 7.65MM RIFLE MADE BY DWM - Serial Number T3614 matching throughout, including the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). The Model 1891 is an important milestone as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ DEUTSCHES WAFFEN-UND MUNITIONS FABRIKEN/ BERLIN" Argentine crest has been ground off the receiver ring per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces. Loewe was the original maker of the M1891 Argentine rifles, but after merging in 1899 with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) filled the rest of the contracts under the DWM name. Overall excellent plus condition. The stock has just a couple of hardly noticeable storage dings, the worst being a nick on the wrist (shown in the photo). Bolt retains most of its original bright polished finish, including on the handle and knob which usually are darker, but nice and bright on this one. Other parts with about 99% original brilliant blue finish, except where the removed receiver crest was touched up to blend in. A few small dings or scratches, including on the bolt release/stripper clip guide and the underside of the muzzle. Stock is a very pleasing light brown colored walnut with lots of tiger stripe figure, and the handguard is a darker shade of walnut. The stock has had a coat of oil applied but the cartouche on the stock is clear. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. This is one of 53,000 made in 1899 under the DWM name. From an old pre-1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is among the very best of the M1891 Argentine rifles we have had in years. The bore is dirty (old grease?) although we expect it may clean to the same superb condition as the exterior. These are usually found in nice condition, but often with mismatched parts. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) Argentine Mausers made before the “O” prefix block were made in 1898 or earlier, but this one was made in 1899 and thus does not qualify as an “antique” so we need to ship to a FFL (C&R is okay). $695.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4838 - 15538 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 24/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL Serial number A3499 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock. Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about ¼ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time. About 98-99% of the finish remains, although quality is sort of sloppy (as typical of unenthusiastic workers in most Communist regimes!). Bore is excellent- bright and sharp. Tiny SAMCO import marks on barrel near the muzzle. An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb Mauser Military Rifles of the World for more on any type of Mauser rifle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $375.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4837 - 15535 - JAP TYPE 99 7.7MM RIFLE (“LAST DITCH” SERIES 37) - Serial number 49194 made at Tokyo Juki Kogyo in Tokyo. Except for retaining the adjustable rear sight, this has most of the crude features which have earned the name “last ditch” rifles including: lack of protective ears on the front sight, single screw butt swivel, wood buttplate, no provisions for the monopod, two screw upper band, and very crude metal finish and woodworking. Although not as well made as the rifles used by the allies, these “last ditch” rifles were completely serviceable and were used in many of the Pacific battlefields. Bolt assembly numbers do not match, but are correct for this maker and serial number range. Metal parts with about 95-96% original blue finish showing just normal wear patterns. No dust cover or cleaning rod, as usual. The stock has not been sanded, but the finish appears to be just a simple brown stain, not the usual reddish-brown shellac, however we think it is probably original, not Bubba’s strip and stain work. There is some brown yuck on the upper and lower tangs that is some sort of tape residue or something and will flake right off to reveal the blue underneath. Excellent bore. A very nice representative “last ditch” rifle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4627 - 14294 BRITISH ''DRILL PURPOSE'' PATTERN 1914 .303 CALIBER RIFLE BY REMINGTON Serial number 359704 with matching number on bolt. Other parts appear to be typical mix of makers including the ''fat boy” Eddystone stock. Drill purpose rifles were made from obsolete patterns to provide non-lethal arms to be used by recruits or cadets learning the manual of arms, close order drill, punishment marching, etc where a current service rifle was not needed, but something with the approximate weight and feel was desired. This would be an interesting collecting niche, with the goal of including the many different ''Drill Purpose” arms from the British, the US Navy Mark I Training rifle made by Parris Dunn and the Mark V dummy drill rifle, , the M16 ''Rubber Duck” and the CMP M1903 and M1 drill rifles. The Pattern 1914 DP rifles were converted by drilling a hole laterally through the chamber (and adjacent stock and handguard) and welding a steel rod in place, painting a red and white stripe around the action area, and stamping DP on just about every part. These rifles had seen hard use prior to conversion and usually show numerous stock repairs, as well as dings and bruises acquired throughout their career aggravated by clumsy handling by awkward recruits intimidated by screaming sergeants. A number of these came into the US in the 1980s or 90s, and sold for ridiculously low prices at the time, with most of them snatched up and stripped down for their actions to make sporters. This has left surviving examples rather scarce. A great addition for a British collection, or for the P1914/M1917 addict, or someone interested in ''drill rifles”. Overall condition is VG. The wood continues to weep a bit of the heavy grease they were packed in for storage, although we cleaned all we could. Small split on let side above trigger that could be repaired or tripped to avoid splinters. Even though incapable of firing with the drilled and plugged chamber, this still is considered a ''firearm” and must go to a FFL or C&R FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4629 - 14293 BRITISH ''DRILL PURPOSE'' PATTERN 1914 .303 CALIBER RIFLE BY WINCHESTER Serial number 51684 with matching number on bolt. Other parts appear to be typical mix of makers including the ''fat boy'' Eddystone stock. Drill purpose rifles were made from obsolete patterns to provide non-lethal arms to be used by recruits or cadets learning the manual of arms, close order drill, punishment marching, etc where a current service rifle was not needed, but something with the approximate weight and feel was desired. This would be an interesting collecting niche, with the goal of including the many different ''Drill Purpose” arms from the British, the US Navy Mark I Training rifle made by Parris Dunn and the Mark V dummy drill rifle, , the M16 ''Rubber Duck” and the CMP M1903 and M1 drill rifles. The Pattern 1914 DP rifles were converted by drilling a hole laterally through the chamber (and adjacent stock and handguard) and welding a steel rod in place, painting a red and white stripe around the action area, and stamping DP on just about every part. These rifles had seen hard use prior to conversion and usually show numerous stock repairs, as well as dings and bruises acquired throughout their career aggravated by clumsy handling by awkward recruits intimidated by screaming sergeants. A number of these came into the US in the 1980s or 90s, and sold for ridiculously low prices at the time, with most of them snatched up and stripped down for their actions to make sporters. This has left surviving examples rather scarce. A great addition for a British collection, or for the P1914/M1917 addict, or someone interested in ''drill rifles”. Overall condition is VG. The wood continues to weep a bit of the heavy grease they were packed in for storage, although we cleaned all we could. Even though incapable of firing with the drilled and plugged chamber, this still is considered a ''firearm” and must go to a FFL or C&R FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3659 - 9610 SPANISH MODEL 1943 8MM MAUSER RIFLE MADE AT LA CORUNA IN 1950 SERIAL NUMBER P2560. Not matching numbers. Basically a K98k with an adaptor lug added to the standard Mauser bayonet bar so that the older bayonets for the M1893 and M1916 rifles could be used, and slightly different sling configuration. Unlike some of the earlier Spanish Mausers, these are well made of good materials. This has about 80-90% original blue finish, but mostly turning plum and covered with greasy residue, but should clean up to look better than it is right now. Bore is dirty but should clean to fine to excellent. A good example of the post-WW2 bolt action military rifles, obsolescent relics even as they were being made. This one has the standard Spanish crest receiver ring markings, not the Air Force marks, so you will know to look for yet another variation. Stock still has the old Interarms gold label from the 1960s. Not import marked. Sorry we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $325.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3899 - JAPANESE RIFLE TYPE 99 7.7MM (SERIES 10- "LAST DITCH") SERIAL NUMBER 59423 Made at Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. "Last Ditch" type made late in the war, with wood buttplate, fixed rear sight, no ears on the front sight. loose forend piece restrained by the bands. "Mum" is mostly visible, but defaced by chisel marks. Overall about 90+% of the very rough finish blue remains. Wooden buttplate shows wear on the top and bottom, and there is a chip out of the pistol grip on the right side, the latter probably done at time of manufacture. Missing the crude butt swivel which was held by a single screw. $249.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3919 - 10809- JAPANESE TYPE 38 6. 5MM CARBINE MADE AT MUKDEN (MANCHURIA)- SERIAL NUMBER 41326 (SERIES 6). Probably the nicest Type 38 carbine we have ever had, and perhaps the nicest we have ever seen. The 6.5mm Type 38 rifle was the standards Japanese Infantry rifle from 1906 until 1939 when the 7.7mm Type 99 was adopted. During that time the short Type 38 Carbine was standard for the Japanese cavalry, and made in very small numbers compared to the rifles. In 1931 the Japanese took over the Mukden Arsenal in Manchuria (in China) and a few years later began rifle and carbine production there, although in much smaller numbers than at Japanese homeland facilities. Apparently about 110,000 Type 38 rifles were made at Mukden, and 51,000 Type 38 Carbines. Of the type 38 carbines, collectors recognize three serial number blocks- two without any series designation and only the final 15,000 or so having the "series 6" series indicator. This carbine has about 97-98% original blue finish mixed with a little light fingerprint surface rusting here and there and two tiny patches of pitting (less than 1/4" diameter) on the trigger guard- one hidden by the floorplate. Interestingly, the outside of the flooplate is nicely finished and blued, but the inside is really rough and crude and bare metal, so they must have used the rust blue method instead of a dip process. Bolt handle, safety and floorplate all have number 32 with an illegible mark, and I am not sure if that indicates that they are matching to the gun (which ends in 326) or if mismatched. The underside of the bolt handle and the firing pin are marked 135. I will let someone who knows more about Japanese arms decide if this is matched or mismatched, but it sure is nice anyway. Trigger, bolt catch spring, floorplate catch and sight spring are all straw colored, mixed with darker staining. Bolt body is bright but handle and exposed part of the body are stained dark to almost blue appearance. Bright finished cleaning rod, but exposed portion is stained dark. Superb bright and sharp bore. Unsanded stock has nearly all of the original shellac finish and a pleasing reddish brown color. Only a few mostly very minor storage and handling dings in the wood. Even the buttplate retains most of the blue finish, although thinning and worn bright on the heel. Mum has been lightly ground with a few chisel marks, but faintly visible, and the Type 38 markings are mostly intact. Not import marked. If you want a great example of a Type 38 carbine from the scarcest maker, this is for you. Sorry we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $795.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4363 - 13358 - BRAZIL MODEL 1908 7 X 57MM MAUSER LONG RIFLE MADE BY DWM. Serial number 8391a matching on receiver, bolt, and trigger guard, but floorplate is numbered 90. Nearly identical to the German Gewehr 98 rifle, the Brazilian Model 1908 has the longer handguard, and is 7 x 57mm Mauser caliber instead of 8 x 57mm. A fairly large number of these were purchased from DWM and this is one that was made by DWM in Berlin. (Others may be found marked DWM over Oberndorf, indicating they were delivered under a Mauser subcontract.) The Model 1908 was made in the long rifle version like this one, and also in a short rifle and a carbine version. About 1934 the Model 1908/34 was introduced, very similar to the earlier rifles except being in .30-06 caliber and made in Brazil which has an excellent reputation for quality arms production. Just a collection of Brazilian arms would be a fun goal, or examples from all the Latin American countries. Another collecting theme could be getting all the Gewehr 98 Mauser variants made for different countries. Don`t you love these great excuses you can use on your spouse to explain why you NEED another gun? This rifle is much better than the usual M1908s we have seen, and the action retains most of the original bright polished finish. Other metal parts were finished in blue, with about 85-90% remaining, some turning plum and mixed with a few scattered light rust freckles or patina. Stock is generally fine to excellent with some of the usual minor dings and bruises of an issued martial arm. However, there are two ugly gouges about 1/8" deep and 1" long on the left side of the butt, and there is a chip about 1" long x 3/4" wide missing by the buttplate tang. These can be repaired without too much work, or left alone. Bore is mostly bright and sharp, but has a number of clumps of stuff that may be dried grease or perhaps rust, so a good cleaning is needed to see exactly how good it will end up. This rifle comes complete with a sling and the special quick detach lower swivel so that it can be hooked to the butt, or to the trigger guard. Tiny import marks on the barrel near the muzzle. An uncommon rifle in very nice condition except for the stock boogers. Sorry we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4377 - 9389 - JAPANESE 6. 5MM TYPE 38 CARBINE MADE BY KOISHIKAWA. Serial number 136182. About 90% original blue finish showing just normal wear. Trigger, bolt stop spring and rear sight spring all retain some or most of straw color. Stock assembly has old thick layer of varnish that has picked up some dirt and crud and could stand a gentle cleaning. Excellent bore. Numbers on bolt and upper band are mismatched to either the serial number of the assembly number on the bottom of the receiver. Mum has been ground, but patina now blends in with the finish. Cleaning rod missing. Very handsome example of these somewhat scarce Japanese arms. This one was reportedly a WW2 vet bring-back, but no further information was available. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)


Restoration Projects

SMOF5189 - WINCHESTER RECEIVER AND TRIGGER GUARD FOR A BRITISH PATTERN 14 RIFLE MADE BY WINCHESTER SERIAL W157760 The British Army, charged with maintaining order in a world wide empire, adopted a bolt action rifle firing a rimmed cartridge in 1892. After their experience of being wounded and killed by the 7 mm Mauser rifles during the Boer War, the British Army decided to adopt a new rifle in 7 mm using the Mauser bolt system. This rifle was called the Pattern 1913, and enough were made for trials by selected infantry units in 1913-14. The outbreak of World War I in August 1914 stopped the plan to adopt a new rifle, and the British Army fought World War I with their Lee Enfields.

The British Army contracted with three U.S. arms makers to produce the Pattern 1913. This rifle was called the Pattern 1914 rifle. Contracts were issued to Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone, a division of Remington, and several hundred thousand rifles were made. In one of the great ironies of history when the U.S. entered the War in April 1917, the U.S. could not made enough Model 1903 “Springfield” rifles, and turned to these firearms makers with existing equipment, changed the caliber to 30-06, and the Pattern 14 became the U.S. Model 1917, equipping the majority of U.S. troops who fought in France.

This receiver was in a rifle made by Winchester. The floorplate, and magazine are also included. The action has the letters DP inscribed on the trigger guard and bolt, but it intact. The Pattern 14 receivers are valued as the basis for magnum caliber sporting rifles because of their size and strength. $225.00 (View Picture)


Classic & Collectible Commercial Longarms
(post-1898)

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