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Collectible Foreign Longarms
(post-1898)

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If you see a firearm that you want, let us know and we will hold it for you. Firearms manufactured after 1898 can only be shipped to someone with a Federal Firearms License (FFL). If you have a Curio & Relic FFL, we can ship items considered by the BATF directly to you, as long as there are no state or local restrictions (California??). If you do not have a C&R FFL, then we can only ship guns made after 1898 to a FFL dealer in your area. The dealer will have you fill out a 4473 form ("yellow sheet") to conduct the required federal "Brady" instant background check, and any other paperwork required in your area before allowing you to take possession. FFL holders often charge a small fee for handling these transfers, as well as any state or federal fees for the background check. If you don't know of any FFL holders in your area, we may be able to help you find one willing to handle transfers.
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Collectible Foreign Military Longarms
(post-1898)

**SOLD** SMOF6446 - WW2 GERMAN K98K MAUSER (CE 43) - VET BRING BACK WITH HISTORY, PLUS BAYONET & FIRST AID POUCH Serial number 8521f with maker code ce 43, made by Sauer & Sohn, Waffenfabrik, Suhl in 1943.  This comes with a K98 bayonet, scabbard and frog and a German medic’s first aid pouch, all from the same owner.

This rifle was captured in St. Malo, France in September, 1944 by PVT Grant F. Hess (sse below for history of his very interesting unit) and sent home right away, escaping the “duffel bag cut” common on rifles brought home at the end of the war.  The rifle is all matching, but the stock was altered by PVT Hess to add three sling swivels (as shown in the photos of the loose stock), for convenience in use as a hunting rifle.  (Hey, these guys got their souvenirs the hard way, and had every right to alter them any way they wanted, even if it irritates today’s collectors.)  A correct style laminated K98k stock has been installed to restore it to “as captured” appearance, but obviously the serial number on that stock is mismatched.  Both stocks are included so you can either display it with the original matching number (but altered) stock, or the mismatched but unaltered one.

St. Malo is (now) a picturesque tourist destination, an historic walled port city in Brittany in northwestern France on the English Channel.  During WW2 it was heavily fortified and defended by the Germans.  The ancient walled city was heavily damaged by American shelling and bombing as well as British naval gunfire during August and early September 1944.  But, the thick stone-walled portions of the city, and the adjacent Ile de Cézembre, resisted repeated artillery and bombing attacks during a longer than anticipated siege.
PVT Grant F. Hess was assigned to the 3132nd Signal Services Company, part of the “23rd Headquarters and Headquarters Support Detachment, Special Troops” a deliberately  obscure unit whose operations remained classified until 1996.  This unit was relatively small (total of only about 1,100 men) made up of exceptionally smart and talented individuals, including “former actors, writers, decorators, radio and camouflage experts and even fashion designers.  They were part of a top secret American army trained to dupe the Germans in order to free up other American units and freeze Germans in position.”
The 23rd included Hess’ unit- the 3132nd Signal Services Company which mainly worked with sound deception.  Other elements included the 603rd Engineer Camouflage Battalion which dealt mainly with visual deceptions and camouflage; the 244th Signal Operations Company which specialized in radio communications deception; and Company A, 293rd Engineer Combat Battalion which mainly provided security and general engineering support.
A book by Jack Kneece, “Ghost Army of WW2,” chronicles the formation and work of the 23rd, and includes mentions of Grant Hess in several places and twice specifically notes that he took a captured German Mauser rifle as a souvenir, among other items.  The 23rd engaged in 21 separate operations (or 55 if you count al the small ones) which probably saved a large number of Allied lives.  They used a combination of camouflage, inflatable dummy tanks, vehicles and guns, along with loudspeakers creating the sounds of mechanized forces and artillery moving into position, halftracks to create “tank tracks” leading to the dummy tank positions, and fake radio communications to create the illusion of a large American force occupying an area, usually at night.  This was done in England prior to D-Day to create the illusion of a large force getting ready to attack Calais, not Normandy.  After arriving in France, they continued, often taking up positions from a real tank unit to hold the enemy’s attention and forces in place while the real tanks moved to attack elsewhere. 

During the siege of St. Malo, Hess was part of a detachment assigned with some of their loudspeakers to broadcast surrender appeals to the Germans.  These were ignored and it took several weeks of stubborn fighting to finally force the Germans to surrender.
The book quotes PVT Hess’s account of how he got the rifle on page 111:
“Later on, when they finally surrendered the island, I went out to the place.  It was elaborately tunneled and had big guns on it.  I went out to look for souvenirs.  I found two Mauser rifles. I kept one and gave one to a friend.  I also found a Walther P-38 pistol with the Nazi markings on it.”

The U.S. Army in WW2 (“Green Book”) volume by Martin Blumenson “ETO- Breakout and Pursuit,” Chapter 21, provides a detailed account of the St. Malo operation, including the use of the loudspeakers, and on page 411 shows a photo of one of the St. Malo bunkers with a K98k leaning against a bunk.  This is probably not the one PVT Hess grabbed, but certainly shows very similar circumstances.  (A copy of that photo is at the end of the rifle photos.)  Note that the St. Malo siege included both St. Malo itself, an island actually attached to the mainland by a narrow causeway, and also the smaller supporting island of Ile de Cézembre.  It is unclear exactly which island Hess visited, but they were both part of the same prolonged battle.  (This book is on line at https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-E-Breakout/USA-E-Breakout- 21.html)  There are also numerous YouTube videos of St. Malo and Ile de Cézembre then and now.

Overall condition of the rifle is VG-fine, with about 60-70% original finish worn thin, either by the Germans or the captor, with both stocks in about the same condition.  Bayonet is VG but scabbard is dinged at the tip.  Leather pouch is excellent and fairly scarce.  According to Mr. Hess the children didn’t wan the gun in the house- it could be dangerous.”

This comes as a complete package of artifacts and related documents:

  • K98k rifle with original and replacement stock
  • Bayonet, scabbard, frog and medic’s pouch.
  • Bill of sale from PVT Hess “11/1/02- M-98K sold to Al DAmore #8521 Captured WW2, Grant F. Hess.”
  • Jack Kneece book “Ghost Army of WW2” with notes and highlighted passages.
  • Typescript official unit history of 3132nd Signal Services Company provided by PVT Hess
  • Copy of the St. Malo chapter from Army Green Book- “Breakout & Pursuit.”
  • Copy of the photo showing a K98k in St. Malo
  • Copy of PVT Hess’ Obituary

A rare opportunity to get a captured rifle with a well documented history, related to an interesting unit.

$1250.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6581 - 23242 - RARE ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 ENGINEER CARBINE (WITH CREST) - Serial number B9455 made in 1899 by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken as a standard cavalry carbine in 7.65 x 53mm [Argentine] Mauser caliber. Matching numbers on major parts except buttplate, which is 394. Even the bayonet lug bands are matching. The upper sling swivel on the left side is there, unlike most are missing this part. Only about 31,000 Argentine M1891 cavalry carbines were made, making them uncommon to start with. Only 5,043 of the Engineer conversions were done, and relatively few have appeared on the surplus market in the U.S., and even fewer of the altered bayonets. Many of those imported into the U.S. had the oddball bayonet bands removed, so finding a decent example with the correct matching bands is tough.

In 1931 it was decided that their Engineer troops needed carbines with bayonets. This was during the world-wide great depression, and the Argentine military was chronically strapped for cash, so they decided to adapt old arms in their inventory to meet this need. They had a number of obsolete brass handled sword bayonets left over from the obsolete Model 1879 Remington rolling block rifles, and a good supply of the M1891 cavalry carbines. The contract for the conversion went to an automobile company (HAFDASA) which was run by a guy named Ballester-Molina. He decided he liked working with guns, and later started making copies of the Colt M1911 .45 automatic for the Argentine military. The carbine conversion involved adding a sling swivel on the left side of the butt, and a swivel on the left side of the rear bayonet lug band. (The upper swivel screws into the protruding portion of the screw holding the band, with only a few threads engaged, and most were quickly lost, but it is present on this one.)

The photos show one of the bayonets so you will know what to look for, but we are selling the CARBINE ONLY, BAYONET IS NOT INCLUDED. The modified 1879 bayonets sometimes bear the maker markings (the knights head trademark of W.S. Kirschbaum of Solinigen, Germany). The blades were shortened to 10 inches and new metal scabbards provided. HAFDASA marked the blade with the serial number of the gun they were fitted to, as they are not completely interchangeable between guns. The half moon shape “ring” on the bayonet is a unique design used only on this carbine

This carbine has all the original markings, including the Argentine crest on the receiver ring. Like most, it looks like it was arsenal blued prior to export to the U.S. with about 98% remaining. The bore is about good, but dark. The walnut stock has some figure in the butt, although much of it is dark and oil soaked. It may respond to steaming and drawing out the oil for a nicer color, but no guarantee. The has the usual assorted minor dings and scratches of an issued arm, but nothing major. Tiny import marks on the right rear of the receiver. The carbine is scarce, and a nice addition to an Argentine or South American military rifle collection. $525.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6582 - 22232 - RUSSIAN 7.62 X 54MMR SVD “DRAGUNOV” SNIPER RIFLE-U.S. ARMY TRAINING AID (“RUBBER DUCK”) - The SVD Sniper Rifle is one of a number of “Rubber Duck” training devices made by the Army to duplicate U.S. and enemy weapons. These are full-scale, three dimensional replicas of the originals, cast in molds made from the real weapons, and they pretty much duplicate the weight of the originals. The foreign arms were made for “opposition forces” to carry in the field, or as “arms caches” hidden in vehicles or villages. Copies of U.S. arms were used in basic training, bayonet drills, and field exercises and safety training like vehicle or helo escape. This avoids wear and damage to the real weapons, and to eliminates the security hassles associated with real weapons.

Muppet “Ernie” on the children’s Sesame Street TV show popularized yellow rubber ducks in 1970, by singing the song "Rubber Duckie." Ernie frequently spoke to his duck and carried it with him. Young recruits quickly started using the term “Rubber Duck” to refer to the training devices the Army issued and made them carry.

This copy of the Russian Dragunov sniper rifle is designated as training device DVC-T-30-18. These are manufactured at various Army posts, this one by the Training Support Center at Fort Knox. The scope and mount are a separate casting, attached by screws, but the rifle itself is a single piece casting of a black hard rubber/epoxy type material with a few metal parts (rod inside the barrel, trigger guard and rear sling rod). The wooden parts are painted brown, which has been scratched and scraped and sloppily touched up by the Army. The brown paint could be removed and repainted to look even more realistic if you desired.

This is a great addition to a collection of U.S. martial arms; a Vietnam through present collection, or any exhibit showing arms of our enemies, such as living history or reenactment groups. Or, this could be a fun collecting niche trying to get one of each of the dozen or more weapons made. Only one available, and we used this in a display of different “Rubber Ducks” but don’t have room to keep everything we like. The AK-47s are fairly common, but the SVDs were made in very small numbers. $265.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6583 - 22057 - RUSSIAN 7.62 X 39MM AK-47 RIFLE-U.S. ARMY TRAINING AID (“RUBBER DUCK”) – The AK-47 rifle is one of a number of “Rubber Duck” training devices made by the Army to duplicate U.S. and enemy weapons. These are full-scale, three dimensional replicas of the originals, cast in molds made from the real weapons, and they pretty much duplicate the weight of the originals. The foreign arms were made for “opposition forces” to carry in the field, or as “arms caches” hidden in vehicles or villages. Copies of U.S. arms were used in basic training, bayonet drills, and field exercises and safety training like vehicle or helo escape. This avoids wear and damage to the real weapons, and to eliminates the security hassles associated with real weapons. Muppet “Ernie” on the children’s Sesame Street TV show popularized yellow rubber ducks in 1970, by singing the song "Rubber Duckie." Ernie frequently spoke to his duck and carried it with him. Young recruits quickly started using the term “Rubber Duck” to refer to the training devices the Army issued and made them carry.

This copy of the ubiquitous AK-47 rifle is designated as training device DVC-T-30-8. These are manufactured at various Army posts, this one by the Training Support Center at Fort Knox. The rifle itself is a single piece casting of a black hard rubber/epoxy type material with a few metal parts (rod inside the barrel and cleaning rod). The wooden parts are painted brown, which has been scratched and scraped and sloppily touched up by the Army. The brown paint could be removed and repainted to look even more realistic if you desired. The rifle is slightly bowed from heat or abuse, noticeable if you look down the barrel but from the left or right it looks fine.

This is a great addition to a collection of U.S. martial arms; a Vietnam through present collection, or any exhibit showing arms of our enemies, such as living history or reenactment groups. Or, this could be a fun collecting niche trying to get one of each of the dozen or more weapons made. Only one available, and we used this in a display of different “Rubber Ducks” but don’t have room to keep everything we like. $165.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6574 - 23311 - RARE ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 ENGINEER CARBINE WITH RARE BAYONET! - Serial number C1378 made in 1899 by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken as a standard cavalry carbine in 7.65 x 53mm [Argentine] Mauser caliber. Matching numbers on major parts except stock, which is C1582. Only about 31,000 Argentine M1891 cavalry carbines were made, making them uncommon to start with.

However, in 1931 it was decided that Engineer troops needed carbines with bayonets. This was during the world-wide great depression, and the Argentine military was chronically strapped for cash, so they decided to adapt old arms in their inventory to meet this need. They had a number of obsolete brass handled sword bayonets left over from the obsolete Model 1879 Remington rolling block rifles, and a good supply of the M1891 cavalry carbines. The contract for the conversion went to an automobile company (HAFDASA) which was run by a guy named Ballester-Molina. He decided he liked working with guns, and later started making copies of the Colt M1911 .45 automatic for the Argentine military. The carbine conversion involved adding a sling swivel on the left side of the butt, and a swivel on the left side of the rear bayonet lug band. (The upper swivel screws into the protruding portion of the screw holding the band, with only a few threads engaged, and most were quickly lost, but it is present on this one.) Only 5,043 of the Engineer conversions were done, and relatively few have appeared on the surplus market in the U.S., and even fewer of the altered bayonets. The modified 1879 bayonets sometimes bear the maker markings (the knights head trademark of W.S. Kirschbaum of Solinigen, Germany), but many (like this one had the markings removed when they were altered. The blades were shortened to 10 inches and new metal scabbards provided. HAFDASA marked the blade with the serial number of the gun they were fitted to, as they are not completely interchangeable between guns.

This bayonet is number A5356 with no numbers on the scabbard. It does not latch in place, reflecting some handfitting needed. The half moon shape “ring” on the bayonet is a unique design used only on this carbine, so many were snapped up by bayonet collectors making it hard for gun collectors to get both a carbine and bayonet.

This carbine has crisp and sharp original markings, including the Argentine crest on the receiver ring. It does look like it was arsenal blued (but thankfully not polished) prior to export to the U.S. with about 98% remaining. The bore is bright and sharp, about excellent. The wood is unsanded, with a dull oil finish and numerous assorted minor dings and scratches of an issued arm, but nothing major. Tiny import marks on the right rear of the receiver. The carbine is scarce, and the bayonets are downright rare, so here is a chance to get both at the same time. A vital piece missing from most Argentine military rifle collections. This came from John’s collection after he found a slightly nicer one after several years of searching. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6567 - KAR 98K MADE BY CE (SAUER) IN 1941 SERIAL NUMBER 812 H CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The Karbiner 98 Kurtz (Carbine 98 short) or Kar 98k was the standard service rifle of the German Military during World War II. It was developed from the Gewehr (rifle) 1898 designed by the Mauser company and adopted by the German army in 1898. Over 10 million were made between 1934 and 1946 when production ceased. The Kar 98k was rugged, reliable and accurate. The large number of Kar 98 k receivers that have formed the basis for a custom magnum rifle is testimony to the soundness of the design.

This rifle was made by the Sauer Company, code ce in 1941. It is well traveled and has a mismatched bolt, stock, floor plate and barrel bands. The stock is a post war stock made by the Israeli military as a replacement for the Kar 98ks they secured for their war of independence in 1948. The barrel has strong riflings, but is dark in the grooves. The finish would rate 90% or better. As ever we sell these rifle as is, and recommend you have them checked by a gunsmith before shooting them. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6568 - K-43 RIFLE MANUFACTURED BY WALTHER IN 1944, SERIAL NUMBER 6307 O. CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The German army invaded Poland in September 1939 armed with a shortened version of the bolt action Mauser rifle that had served them since 1898. This rifle was their only rifle as they conquered Poland, Denmark, Norway, Holland, Belgium, France, Yugoslavia and Greece. When they invaded Russia in June 1941 they ran into some Russian units equipped with a 10 round semi-automatic rifle, the Tokarev. The Tokarev earned the respect of the German army and captured rifles were taken into service by some German army special units.

The German army like the Russian and American army had been developing a semi- automatic rifle before the beginning of World War II to replace their bolt action rifle, but the German ordnance experts had insisted on, the Bang gas system that quickly jammed as the rifle heated up. In 1941 small numbers of semi-automatic rifles were made by Walther and Mauser, identified as the G41(W) and G41(M) and issued for troop trials, but these jammed too easily after repeating firing.

Finally in 1943 the Germans abandoned the Bang gas system and adopted the gas system of the Tokarev rifle. The result was the G43/K43 rifle. About 450,000 were made by the Walther company, the Berlin-Luebecker company and Gustloff company. They proved to be a reliable rifle, but came into service in too late in the war (1943) when the German army was losing rifles to combat and capture in huge numbers. The demand for replacement rifle was too great to put a new rifle into production in any large numbers. (It is estimated that Germany produced 14 million Kar 98k service rifles from 1934 to 1945, compared to the 450,000 G43/K43). This makes the G43/K43 one of the rarest and most sought after of all the World War II German service rifles.

This rifle was originally identified as the G43 or Gewehr 43. As production progressed the name, but changed to the K43 or Karbiner 43. There is no difference between the G43 and K43 rifles and examples stamped G43 occurred towards the end of production in 1945. $3395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6556 - 23309 - SCARCE ITALIAN MODEL 1938 CARCANO 7.35MM CAVALRY CARBINE WITH FOLDING SPIKE BAYONET- NICE! - Serial number F6087, made by Gardone in 1939. These were a short-lived model made almost identical to the 6.5mm Model 1891 cavalry carbine, but in the newly adopted 7.35mm caliber. These introduced the 200 meter fixed rear sights, a standard rifling (instead of gain twist formerly used). However, the 7.35mm caliber was soon abandoned and production resumed again in 6.5mm, making the 7.35mm cavalry carbines far scarcer than most people realize. Do not confuse this one with the frequently seen 7.35mm short rifles which used the detachable knife bayonets with the folding blades. This is the true cavalry carbine with the permanently attached folding spike bayonet. (Only about 100,000 of these M38 carbines were made in 7.35mm, compared to 1.5 million of the 6.5mm Model 91 carbines.)

Matching numbers on barrel and stock (only parts that were numbered). Unsanded stock has good cartouches as shown in the photos and has never been messed with, having the original oiled military finish and a mellow patina. What looks like stock repairs on the right side, ahead of the receiver, and at the forend tip and around the receiver ring are actually factory installed patches where surplus stocks prepared for Model 1891 rifles with attached grenade launchers (“Launcia Bombe”) were modified specifically for use on the newly introduced Model 1938 carbines. Metal parts with about 95%+ original blue finish. Bolt was originally polished bright, but is now a mix of dull steel gray staining and patina but would clean up nicely. Bore looks excellent but needs a good cleaning. Original two piece cleaning rod is in the butt trap.

There is an excellent write up on this (among many other military arms) at CANDARSENAL.com and in Richard Hobbs’ “The Carcano:Italy’s Military Rifle.”

Not import marked. Appears to be unissued with only minor finish loss and a few stock dings from long storage. Previous owner reported that it was brought back to the U.S. by a WW2 veteran after the war, but no further info is available, but we have no reason to doubt the story. A really nice example of one of the scarcest WW2 Italian service rifles. $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6557 - 22114 - SPANISH MODEL 1893 7X57MM MAUSER RIFLE MADE AT OVIEDO- NICE! - Serial number 2U2129 made by Oviedo. This is a Spanish made version of the Model 18983 Mausers previously purchased from German contractors, but quality of workmanship at Oviedo was never as good. Most of the Spanish Mauser rifles seen on the market are the more common Model 1916 which is slightly shorter, and frankly pretty trashy so we avoid them. This is the scarcer Model 1893, identical to the rifles used in the Spanish American War, and is just so good looking we figured one of our customers with fine taste would appreciate it.

This is NOT import marked, and probably one of the guns brought in prior to the Gun Control Act of 1968, in the “golden age” of MILSURPS. This was arsenal overhauled to near new condition with a new stock and metal parts totally refinished. Receiver ring crest removed during the arsenal refinish. Bolt and receiver numbers match, but floorplate does not and no numbers noted elsewhere. Bore is good, but a bit worn and looks like roughness in the grooves, but good enough for reissue. About 99% of the arsenal refinish remains. Stock is excellent with only a couple of tiny dings, but there is a crack in the rear of the handguard, and another behind the receiver tang, both easily repaired with some epoxy if you desire. Right side of the butt has a poorly struck cartouche of a flaming bomb with MP over 8 which is believed to be a marking applied on guns at the time of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-39. If you are looking for a nice looking example of a M1893 Spanish Mauser as used in the Spanish American War through the Spanish Civil War, it will be hard to find a nicer one, even though it is arsenal overhauled and has the two cracks mentioned above. The Model 1893 rifles were made at Oviedo circa 1898-1916, so even though a Model 1893 it was made after 1898 and requires a FFL/C&R. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6387 - ALL MATCHING WW2 JAPANESE TYPE 99 7.7MM RIFLE (SERIES 5 BY TORIIMATSU FACTORY OF NAGOYA) WITH AIRCRAFT SIGHTS AND INTACT MUM Serial number 50307 made at the Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. This is fairly early WW2 period rifle made with the folding "AA" wings on the rear sight. The lower band is the simplified type which eliminated the block on the bottom for attaching the useless monopod. This has the change to a two screw upper band with matching numbers which was made for the short cleaning rod (about 5 inches long) instead of the full length rod previously used. However, the rod catch is missing. All number including the bolt numbers match the rifle. Metal retains about 95% of the original with some blue turned plum and patina. There is some light rust on left side of receiver and pitting on the bolt stop. The stock is in very nice condition. The mum is intact. Good bore. Dust cover and cleaning rod are missing as with most of these rifles. A good representative example of the main Japanese battle rifle of WW2. $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6550 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL M24/47 SERIAL NUMBER E4036 CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER WITH MATCHING PARTS In 1945 Josef Tito became the ruler of Yugoslavia. He was a Communist, but did not want to align himself too closely with Stalin. Stalin did not like Communists who were too independent of his wishes and had anyone who displayed such behavior arrested, tried and shot. Tito was aware of this and realized it was important to have his own army. Rather than arm his army with Russian weapons as other Soviet satellite countries did, he developed his own armament industry.

Titos first efforts to provide rifles was to take existing stocks of Yugoslavian Model 1924 rifle, and refurbish them, replacing the barrels and any other worn or damaged parts. These were then identified as the Model 24/47. The 47 stood for the year the rifles were upgraded, 1947. The Model 1924 was based on the Kar 98 Mauser action and was made by FN for Yugoslavia. The Model 1924 was the German designed Gewehr 1898 action used by the German Army in World I and II. Tito had undoubtedly used it in career as guerrilla against the Germans from 1941 to 1945. It featured all the good points of the Mauser bolt action rifle.

Tito also authorized the production of new rifle to supplement his existing stock of Model 24/47 rifles. These were designated as Model 48 rifles. When Yugoslavia moved to a semi- automatic rifle, the Model 24/47 and Model 48 rifles were sold into the surplus market.

This rifle is excellent condition with 98% blued finish, and a few storage dings on the stock. The bore is bright with sharp riflings. There is a small import mark near the muzzle. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6409 - ALL MATCHING GERMAN KAR 98K MANUFACTURED BY STEYR FACTORY (CODE BNZ) IN 1943. SERIAL NUMBER 8498C CALIBER 8MM MAUSER The Karbiner 98 kurtz (Carbine 98 short) or Kar 98k was the standard service rifle of the German Military during World War II. It was developed from the Gewehr (rifle) 1898 designed by the Mauser company and adopted by the German army in 1898. Over 10 million were made between 1934 and 1946 when production ceased. The Kar 98k was rugged, reliable and accurate. The large number of Kar 98k receivers that have formed the basis for a custom magnum rifle is testimony to the soundness of the design. The Steyr company had made firearms for the Austro-Hungarian empire since the 1880’s. When Hitler annexed Austria in 1938 the Steyr Company began producing arms for the German military including the Kar 98k rifle and by the end of the war they had made about 966,000 of them, most starting in 1942 as the loses on Russian front mounted. This rifle was made early in 1943 as the losses from the great battles removed many Kar 98k’s from the inventory of the German Army. About 270,000 Kar 98k’s were made by Steyr that year. This rifle is in excellent condition with all matching parts, the bore is brigh. This is a superior example of a German small arm from WWII. WWII Germman K98k rifles with all matching parts are difficult to find. $1200.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6549 - PRE-WAR CZECHOSLOVAKIAN MILITARY RIFLE SERIAL NUMBER 8994X1 CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER WITH ALL MATCHING PARTS Czechoslovakia was created after World War I from pieces of of Austro-Hungarian Empire. One of the main arms production centers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was at Brno in the new nation. Germany was forbidden to establish a military firearms industry and so the enterprising Czech started making the Vz 24 rifle, using the Gewehr 98 action for sale to Germany’s old customers throughout the world.

The Czech government decided arm its military with the same rifle. When Britain and France abandoned Czechoslovakia to Hitler in 1938 their rifles were used to re-arm several Germany infantry divisions. We believe this rifle was likely one that was seized by the Germans.

The rifle was made at Brno in 1928. All serial numbers match, but the serial number on the bolt has been restamped and turned 90 degrees so it a replacement, this was often done when rifles were taken into German service.

The overall condition of the rifle is excellent with some light pitting but 95% bluing remaining. The wood is also excellent condition. Czech military rifles were heavily used during World War II and are rarely found in this condition. $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6547 - 22990 - CZECH VZ-24 SNIPER RIFLE WITH MOUNT - 8mm Mauser CALIBER - Serial number D5500 made by CZ in Brno, Czechoslovakia (Ceskolovenska Zbrojovka, A.S., Brno). These were well made from high quality materials, and sold to dozens of nations around the world in the 1920s and 1930s, basically the same as a K98k Mauser with some differences in the stock and stock fittings. Many were captured and pressed into service by the Germans during WW2. This particular style of sniper rifle with two dovetail bases, the forward one cut on an angle, are peculiar to the Romanians, but beyond that information is hard to find, and often contradictory. The Romanian contract rifles usually have a “R” in the serial number, but this only has “D5500.” A number of the rifles with the oddball bases appeared on the surplus market about 10-15 years ago, but almost none of the scope mounts to fit them. The bases on this rifle are originals, although Numrich at one time offered repros. Someone made a small run of repro mounts (and we are pretty sure that is what is on this rifle, but they are impossible to find loose now. Note that the mount has windage adjustment by the two opposing screws on the side at the rear, so the scope only actually needs to be adjustable for elevation, although the mount adjustment may be more for boresighting than for field use.

Many of the rifles which have real or repro mounts have Russian style PE or PEM scopes in them, but these require some shims as the mounts are made for a scope with a 30mm body diameter (about 1.18”). Reportedly, some sort of IOR scope was what was originally on these, which I believe is closer to a German style scope. This one has a cheap American scope just to make it look more like it should, and had to be shimmed to fit in the rings.

Like most of these rifles, the finish is mostly gone, stocks are pretty well used and abused, and there are mismatched numbers. The sniper version has the cutout on the side of the stock at the bottom of the bolt knob, like on the K98k, but not always. This one has a Waffenamt inspected K98k bolt assembly, as did one of the very few other VZ-24s I could find any details on, and like it, this has the bolt number force matched to the rifle serial number. Bore has strong rifling, but is dark in the grooves.

This is a pretty uncommon sniper rifle admittedly with a repro mount and a junker scope, on a rifle that is in typical condition for one of these. But, finding a nicer one or one with an original mount may be a very long and expensive quest, so don’t pass this one up. $795.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6524 - ALL MATCHING! KAR 98K MADE BY DOT (BRNO) IN 1943 SERIAL NUMBER 7129C CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The Karbiner 98 Kurtz (Carbine 98 short) or Kar 98k was the standard service rifle of the German Military during World War II. It was developed from the Gewehr (rifle) 1898 designed by the Mauser company and adopted by the German army in 1898. Over 10 million were made between 1934 and 1946 when production ceased. The Kar 98k was rugged, reliable and accurate. The large number of Kar 98 k receivers that have formed the basis for a custom magnum rifle is testimony to the soundness of the design.

In 1938-1939 Hitler had taken over Czechoslovakia. The Czechs had well developed firearms industry that the Germans put to work for their army. The firearms factory at Brno had been making the VZ 24 rifle for export, and continued to make them for the German army. Changes were made to the rifle untill it had become a Kar 98k. By 1942 the huge battles on the Eastern front resulted in the loss of large numbers of Kar 98k rifles. In 1943 the Waffenwerke at Brno began to produce large numbers of Kar 98k rifles to replace these losses. The Czech arms industry was considered one of the finest in Europe.

This rifle in excellent overall condition with correct matching stock. All of the numbers on this rifle match including the numbers on the receiver, bolt, barrel, trigger guard/floorplate and barrel bands. Bluing would rate about 95% +. The bore is bright and the laminated stock is also in good condition. $1295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6542 - 21028 - K98K 8MM MAUSER RIFLE- DOT 1945 - Serial number 1225H made by Waffenwerke Brunn, Czechoslovakia, also written as Brno in 1945. This is a rifle which was made under German occupation, but never completely assembled before the end of the war. The Czechs later completed these with additional parts, especially the large bow stamped trigger guard, for sales to whoever would buy them. Many ended up being used in the Israeli war for independence in 1947, and some of those were later converted by the Israelis to 7.62mm.

This example had the original stock totally butchered so we dropped it into another stock, which looks okay, but is actually about 2 inches shorter than the normal K98k stock. It would be easy to take a K98k handguard and modify it to fit since there is no handguard installed right now. Or, you could put it in a standard length K98k stock if you have one lying around. Bore should clean to excellent. Barreled action has a black paint finish probably over a phosphate finish, but looks cool as is. A good solid gun, albeit mismatched, and a quality Czech made item, not Turkish or Slobovian junk, at a very reasonable price. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6544 - 21030 - PERU- MODEL 1909 RIFLE IN 7.65MM MADE BY MAUSER - Serial number 19120, mismatched. Peru is a fascinating country, extending for more than a thousand miles along the Pacific coast of South American, between Ecuador and Chile, and up to about 500 miles inland into the Andes. Many Americans recognize the ancient mountain top ruins of Machu Picchu, or the name of the capital, Lima, but otherwise it is mostly a barren, arid region dependent on fishing and agriculture. Independent since overthrow of the Spanish in 1821, and impoverished after losing to Chile in the War of the Pacific (1879-1883) Peruvian arms were a hodge-podge of mostly obsolete types until they began to Purchase Argentine Model 1891 style rifles in 1892-1895, and thereafter continued periodic purchases of various (mostly) Mauser model rifles. Relatively few have appeared on the surplus market over the years, and almost always in very worn and abused condition.

This one is one of the 50,000 Peruvian Model 1909 rifles purchased from Waffenfabrik Mauser circa 1910-1914. Although looking like a standard Gew 98 Mauser at first glance, close inspection will reveal that the receiver ring is slightly longer, and there is a small rise for the stripper clips and a bolt release more like the 1891 Mauser than the other 98s, and a few other minor differences. Except for a few Model 1895 Mausers obtained via Chile which were 7 x 57mm, all the Peruvian Mausers were in 7.65 x 53mm caliber, the same as the Argentine and Belgian rifles. This is the first of the Model 1909 Peruvians we have had, and in typical (almost good) condition with virtually no finish, and lots of stock dings, and numbers mismatched. There is some pitting on the top of the barrel just ahead of the lower band, and probably more under the wood line. Bore is about good. No import marks noted. Another of the many variations of South American Mausers that can be an interesting collecting specialty at relatively modest prices. $525.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6535 - 11688 - RUSSIAN MODEL 1940 TOKAREV (SVT-40) SNIPER RIFLE MADE AT TULA IN 1942 IN 7.62 X 54R CALIBER (NOT FINNISH CAPTURE) - ) - Serial number 6669 with Cyrillic letters which transliterate to “FV” preceding the number. Numbers are matching on the action, bolt, stock, and trigger guard, but mismatched on the magazine. There is a lightly pantographed TO9984 on the right rear of the receiver, done after the arsenal refinishing, the meaning unknown. Overhauled in Russian arsenals to near new condition, this has 99% of the arsenal blue refinish and 97% of the shellac finish on the stock. Bore has strong and sharp rifling lands, but the groves are dark and rough. (So, how often do you look down the bore anyway, just enjoy the beautiful outside!) Comes complete with the correct leather sling and cleaning rod.

The Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva Model 1940 (SVT-40) adopted in 1940 was the successor to Fedor Tokarev’s less than successful Model 1938 rifle. That was his first attempt at a gas operated semi-automatic rifle, after he gave up on a recoil operated design. The SVT-40 uses a detachable 10 round magazine (which could be refilled in place with stripper clips) and has a short stroke gas piston above the barrel (and invented about simultaneously by FN’s Dieudonne Saive as well as Tokarev) similar to the German G-43 and the FN-49 and FAL.

Production of the SVT-40 began at Tula Arsenal in 1940, and they were frequently issued to NCOs. Some were made at Ishevsk, but they were soon ordered to return to production of the cheaper, simpler and peasant-proof Mosin Nagant which continued to be the arm for most of the Red Army hordes. Tula continued to produce the SVT-40 until January 1945, and they remained in service in the Russian army until about 1955 when the SKS and AK- 47 rendered them obsolete.

In April 1940, the SVT was adopted as the Red Army’s sniper rifle to replace the Model 1891/30 Mosin Nagant with the PE scope and side mount. SVT-40's made until late 1942 all had the grooves or rails on the side of the receiver to optical sight mounting rails on the sides of the receiver until late 1942, when the Mosin Nagant with the PU scope was adopted as the sniper rifle, although scoped SVT-40s continued to be used in the field until the end of WW2. A total of about 56,000 of the SVT-40s were issued as sniper rifles, although many more were produced with the rails.

This rifle has one of the replica mounts and scopes added, fitting very snugly into the factory milled mounting rails. The scope mounts are retained by a pin which rests in a notch cut across the back of the rear receiver bridge, done in arsenal style, but probably by a previous owner. With the scope, it is an affordable and handsome representative example of the SVT-40 Sniper Rifle, or take the scope and mount off and it is a great example of the regular infantry version of Russia’s ww2 semi-automatic rifle which helped inspire the German G-43. $1750.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6456 - VIETNAM BRING BACK WAR TROPHY COLLECTION- SKS CARBINE, VC FLAG, VC PITH HELMET, INSIGNIA, KNIFE, ETC - These are souvenirs brought home from Vietnam in November 1969 by a USMC Corporal, (later a Sergeant) who was in country November 1968-November 1969, assigned to the 3rd Marine Division providing logistical support at the Vandegrift Combat Base (sometimes called `LZ Stud`ť).  As with many war trophy items, the true story is less sexy than what some might tell, and in this case the SKS was gotten in a trade for a quart of Canadian Club whiskey.  Details for the other items are not specified, but all came home at the same time.  With this lot we include a notarized statement  from the veteran, a slightly redacted copy of his DD-214, and an old photo of him in country holding the SKS, and a buddy with a folding stock AK standing in front of a hootch with sandbags on the roof.  There were `capture papers`ť issued when he brought it home, but in subsequent moves they were lost, so we only have the statements from the Marine to verify the history.  (Note- for privacy reasons we are not posting his name on line in this description, but it is on the paperwork which accompanies the SKS and other items and will be send to the purchaser.)

There are numerous sites on line with reminiscences from other troops who served at Vandergrift Combat Base to get a feel for the sorts of operations that took place in the region.

The 7.62 x 39mm SKS Carbine has serial number 11284764 marked on left side of receiver along with Factory 26 in a triangle and Chinese symbols for `Type 56 Carbine.`ť  This was made at the Jianshe Arsenal.  The first two digits of the serial number indicate the year of manufacture when added to 1956, so this one was made in 1967.
In 1956, when Russia ended production of the SKS at the Tula Arsenal, they shipped the tooling, spare parts and specifications to China along with technical advisors, who helped set up the manufacturing and training of the Chinese workers at Jianshe Arsenal (aka factory 26). 

China felt the SKS had a useful role alongside the AK47.  In battle, it used less ammo, it was faster to charge 10 rounds and it could provide cover fire while the AK 30 round mags were being reloaded. The longer barrel SKS was more likely to hit the target than the shorter barrel AK.  China adopted both the SKS and the AK47 in 1956, designating them the Type 56 Carbine and Type 56 Rifle respectively.  (All this background information is based on http://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=26665

The rifle is all matching and the condition is about what you expect from a rifle used by peasants in combat in a jungle environment.  The finish ranges from excellent to blue turning plum to patina and roughness with some pitting on the left side of the barrel.  But the SKS rifles worked well even when neglected.  This has a sling attached which appears to be adapted from some sort of U.S. web strap, and this is clearly visible in the photo of the Marine who brought this home. 

The other souvenir items include a Viet Cong pith helmet, and a framed group with a VC flag (sun faded), two medals, two collar tabs, and three badges.  Also, a commie style cleaning/oil bottle and a U.S. jet pilot`s knife.  Conditions as shown in the photos.

This is a nice grouping with a known history and geographic provenance from our adventures in Southeast Asia.  We owe a lot to the men who went there to do their nation`s bidding, and served honorably and even heroically, despite the despicable `leaders` in Washington who micromanaged and mismanaged the war.  Click here for documents. Click here for Picture. $1295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6442 - SCARCE WW1 JAPANESE TYPE 38 “ARISAKA” 6.5 X 50MM RIFLE MADE AT KOISHIKAWA - Serial number 240900, made at Koishikawa (Tokyo) Arsenal, which made all the Type 38 rifles and carbines from their adoption in 1906 until 1929. During that period serial numbers ran sequentially from 1 up into the 2 million range, without an “series” symbols, which began in 1933. While we do not know the exact date of manufacture, we believe that this was made prior to or during WW1. In addition to being used by Japan during WW1, several hundred thousand Type 38 rifles were used by the Russians and England, so this would be a nice addition to any WW1 collection, not just a WW2 Japanese collection. During and after WW2 the Type 38s saw widespread use in many more countries as a result of captures or sales.

This is a very attractive looking example with about 90-95% original blue finish, and some straw color remaining on the springs. The “mum” has been lightly ground, so this rifle was brought home from Japan after WW2. The bolt numbers do not match, but it does have the correct early knurled safety with long tang indicator sticking out to the side. Other part numbers likewise are mismatched. Cleaning rod and bolt cover are missing, as usual with most Japanese rifles. Great bore (but dirty), and good mechanics. Stock is pretty nice with a mellow light brown color, with assorted dings, but nothing major.

This is one of the very few WW1 era Type 38 rifles we have encountered. More than 3 million were made by the end of WW2, but the WW1 rifle survival rate seems much lower than expected. A good chance to add a scarce WW1 rifle to your collection as we mark the centennial of that conflict. $550.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6447 - WW2 GERMAN .22 CALIBER MILITARY TRAINING RIFLE- WALTHER SPORTMODELL- SA MARKED - Serial number 23754. WW2 German military training rifles are an interesting specialty niche if you want to get a bunch of them, or they are great if you only want one as a representative example, and reportedly they are usually extremely fine shooters, most made by some of the best rifle makers in the world. All of the trainers more or less imitate the German Kar98k 8mm Mauser service rifle, but vary in details.

As early as 1926-1930 several German makers were independently producing military style .22 training rifles. Circa 1931-1933 official Nazi party and German military efforts began for military style arms for use by military and paramilitary, party and youth groups. The result was the 1934 adoption of a Mauser design as the “Deutsche Sport Modell 34” or “DSM 34”designed by Mauser, but later made with some variations by 14 other makers.

In 1938 military desires for a .22 trainer even more closely duplicating the Kar98k resulted in development of the “Klein Kaliber Wehrsportgewehr,” or “KKW.” This was a joint effort between Mauser and Walther and these are another of commonly found military training rifles, so you can add some of those to your collection too.

Along with the officially sanctioned DSM 34 and KKW models, some of the makers continued production of their own designs, such as this one from Karl Walther. All these various types are pointed out so you understand the full scope of the field, and how this rifle fits into it. Too often, all of these are just lumped together and erroneously called KKWs or DSM 34s or German training rifles. The best source of information is Jon Speed’s “Mauser Smallbores, Sporting, Target & Training Rifles.”

This is a “Walther Sportmodell” which is different from the DSM 34 in a number of details, mainly because it uses the slightly larger action which was used for the “Walther Sportmodell V” high grade sporting rifle, but fitted up with military style sights and stock. Walther also made standard pattern DSM 34 rifles. Each of these three different Walther types (Sportmodell V, Sportmodell and DSM 34) were made in their own serial number ranges which did not overlap although production periods did overlap.

This one is in overall fine to excellent condition with a really great bore and about 95% original high quality blue finish. Walther markings are as shown in the photos, which also show the markings indicating use by the Sturm Abteilung (SA der NSDAP) Gruppe in Thuringen. In addition to the Gruppe markings on the butt, there are painted marks on the forend “SA.BR/44”which is probably for one of the subordinate brigade level SA units. The SA, also known as the “Brown Shirts” were Hitler’s party thugs among other things, although that function faded after the 1934 Night of the Long Knives, and they were reshaped to focus more on being a training school for the armed forces with the establishment of the SA Wehrmannschaften (SA Military Units), and also performing some civil defense type duties.

The rifle comes complete with the original sling, and does NOT have any “duffel bag cut.” However, the handguard is one modified from a K98k, perhaps during its time of use, or perhaps by the G.I. who brought it home. There is a repair to the wood to the rear of the bolt handle which we think was there before it became a souvenir. Overall a very nice quality gun with great markings. This could be a nice addition to a military training rifle collection, or the starting point for beginning one. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6441 - SMOF6441 - WW2 GERMAN G98/40 RIFLE MADE IN HUNGARY (JHV 43) - Serial number 5749 matching throughout including the bolt assembly. These were made by Fémáru Fegyver és Gépgyár, Budapest, Hungary under German occupation. It was an adaptation of the Hungarian M35 Mannlicher rifle (which used a 8 x 56mm rimmed cartridge in a single stack magazine) to 8x57 Mauser caliber with a flush magazine and German bayonet lug and other minor modifications to make them more closely match the K98k, approved in September 1941. Apparently these were widely issued to Luftwaffe units. Production began in 1941 and ended in 1944 with only about 138,400 made and they are seldom seen on the collector market and hardly ever found with matching numbers. This one matches on all numbered parts, including the stock. A very handsome gun, although the stock and metal parts have been refinished. The finish would rate about 98%, it looks like a nicely done old restoration. Good bore with strong rifling. This is 100% complete with cleaning rod and front sight cover. No import marks ever applied as this came in prior to 1968 (no duffel bag cut either). A very nice representative example of this scarce WW2 German military rifle. $1295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6477 - 20088 – SCARCE JAPANESE TYPE 99 7.7MM RIFLE- “JUKI” (SERIES 37) - Serial number 5686 made at Tokyo Juki Kogyo in Tokyo, under Kokura Arsenal supervision. The Tokyo Rifle Factory (Tokyo Juki Kyogo or TJK) was one of the smaller makers and only made a few hundred rifles in the 2nd series, about 56,000 in Series 37, and then about 41,000 in the 27th series. This production of only 98,000 rifles was spread out between mid-1942 and the end of the war in 1945, while the larger makers were churning out 5-10 times as many rifles.

Thus it is possible to find TJK rifles in every configuration from early with monopod and anti- aircraft sights to slightly simplified versions, to really crude last ditch versions. This rifle is the early style, with provisions for both monopod and AA sights, but it does not appear that either were ever installed, so the transition had already begun. The metal parts have about 95% original blue finish showing just normal wear patterns, with most of the finish worn off the buttplate. Mum has been ground. Bolt numbers are mismatched. No dust cover or cleaning rod, as usual. The stock has lots of dings and scratches and a chip off the base of the pistol grip on the left side, as shown in the photos. Excellent bore. Despite the stock dings, this is a good representative example of one of the scarcer variations of WW2 Japanese Arisaka rifles. $295.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6479 - 18589 - BRAZILIAN MODEL 1908 MAUSER RIFLE 7 X 57MM MADE BY DWM- Serial number 9697 matching on ALL parts that are numbered. This is one of the very few M1908s we have seen that was not refinished, although it has been lightly cleaned. It has the arsenal bright polished finish on the receiver and about 90- 95% of the factory original blue remaining on the blued parts. These were delivered in large numbers between 1908 and 1914, when DWM workmanship was at its peak. Do not confuse this with the later 1908/34 Mausers made in Brazil in .30-06 caliber, this is the German made version still in 7 x 57mm. This comes complete with an excellent plus black leather sling which I think is original, although the condition raises suspicion it may be a very high quality replica. Bore is dirty but should clean to VG-fine, possibly better. Stock has some assorted minor dents or dings and has never been sanded or refinished. Tiny import marks on the barrel near the muzzle. The only defect noted is the small locking screw for the front trigger guard screw is broken off and missing, and a tiny patch of pitting on the rear band spring.

This is one of dozens of different South American military rifles (mostly Mausers) available on the collector market. That is a collecting niche with a wide variety of items still available, mostly at reasonable prices. This is absolutely the best of the many M1908 rifles we have had over the last 15 years or so. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6445 - WW2 GERMAN KAR98K 8MM MAUSER RIFLE (DOT 1944)- NICE! Serial number 8013ao matching on all parts that are numbered, except for the safety which is 8014 and the bolt sleeve which might have an illegible number. This is the standard configuration for most of the K98k production by Waffen Werek Brunn (also known as BRNO) during 1944 with the simplified stamped trigger guard, floorplate and bands. It still has the stock disc which was dropped late in the year. At the end of 1944 Brunn was making the “Kreigsmodell” which eliminated the bayonet lug, bolt disassembly disc on the butt, and the bandspring. Most of Brunn’s 1944 production used a gray phosphate finish. This rifle retains about 98% of an old light gray phosphate or parkerized type finish, except the buttplate which is finished bright as was normally the case. The finish almost looks “too good” and there is some tiny pitting underneath the finish on the barrel near the muzzle, so we assume it has been refinished. In any case, it is a very good looking gun. The stock has a few assorted minor dings, a visible H (for Heer or Army) on the right side and dot on the bottom. Comes complete with the cleaning rod and sight cover. No import marks, and no duffel bag cut. A very handsome example of the standard WW2 German infantry rifle in far, far above average condition, with the price reflecting the slight concern about age of the finish. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6459 - WW2 BRITISH LEE ENFIELD NO. 4 MK I .303 CALIBER RIFLE- FAZAKERLY 1943- MATCHING- NICE! - Serial number Y22098, made by ROF Fazakerly in 1943. Matching number on receiver, bolt and magazine. This was the main WW2 British rifle made during WW2, although millions of existing WW1 era rifles were also used to arm British Commonwealth forces. The No. 4 Mark I was an improved version of the Lee Enfield rifle first adopted in 1888, eliminating some frivolous features and redesigned for easier manufacture. During WW2 there were three Royal Ordnance Factories (ROF Maltby, ROF Fazakerly and ROF Shirley) all making these rifles with a great deal of subcontracting and parts sharing to expedite production. Identifying the maker on these can be very confusing until you understand the logical system they used. All rifles were made with a four digit serial number such as 1234, then after reaching 9999 a prefix letter A was added (example A1234), then a B (example B1234) etc finally getting up through BB or higher prefixes. To distinguish between the three factories, they used a leading digit before the numbers: 1= Maltby; 2= Fazakerly and 3= Shirley. Thus A11234 would be from Maltby, A21234 from Fazakerly and A31234 would be from Shirley.

This rifle has been arsenal overhauled, as shown by the neat wood repair on the pistol grip. The beech stock assembly has been nicely cleaned and given a very attractive coating of varnish. The metal parts have been painted with black enamel, as was typical of most British arms, and at first glance it appears to be from the arsenal overhaul, but the pain covers the tiny import marks on the left side of the receiver, so it must have been done by a previous owner. About 98% of the black finish remains, with just a few chips or worn spots. Excellent bore. Comes with correct WW2 British web sling. A great looking example of a historic British military arm from WW2 which continued in use up through Korea, and in some former colonies until the present day. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6260 - SCARCE EARLY BRITISH “SHORT LEE ENFIELD MARK III” MADE BY B.S.A. IN 1909 Serial number U52764 with mismatched bolt X25013, but stock and nose cap match. This is actually a fairly scarce and mostly intact early example of the Short Lee Enfield. The first of the “Short, Magazine, Lee-Enfield” (SMLE) rifles was approved in December 1902 as the Mark I. Several minor changes in sights and stocking details were quickly made, and conversion of earlier “Long Lee Enfield” rifles began. However, in January 1907 an improved design was adopted with still more sight revisions and the addition of a charger bridge to facilitate loading with stripper clips. This was designated “Mark III” and later (1926) renamed as “No 1 Mark III.” Most of the early rifles were terribly beat up I the trenches of WW1, and few survived without being rebuilt into the later No. 1 Mark III* configuration where the volley sights and magazine cutoff were eliminated as useless features. This has the rear volley sight intact, and the plate for the front volley sight is intact, although the movable arm has been removed. Overall this is a very dirty and neglected looking rifle that desperately needs a thorough cleaning and rust removal, which will better reveal the dark finish underneath, probably 70% when cleaned. The stock really needs to be steamed and degreased and lightly refinished. The front handguard is a period replacement, but a lighter color and the rear handguard is missing. If these are replaced with ones matching the dark stock, it will look a whole lot better. Tiny Navy Arms import marks on the receiver. Bore about good. This is a scarce rifle for an advanced Enfield collector $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6329 - 22220 - JAPANESE TYPE 99 7.7MM “ARISAKA” BOLT ACTION RIFLE (SERIES 32) -SERIAL NUMBER 45503, SERIES 32, MADE BY TOYO KOGYO, HIROSHIMA PREFECTURE. Bolt serial number does not match (reportedly on ships coming home the bolts were all locked up and then passed out upon arrival and no one cared about the numbers). Otherwise all correct original parts except the invariably missing cleaning rod and dustcover. This lacks the Anti-Aircraft wings on the rear sight, and while Honeycutt & Anthony do not indicate they were never installed, there is no sign of them being installed, and we had another rifle in this range that also lacked them, so we believe this is correct as made. This was made during the time when the Japanese fortunes of war were going badly, and they were looking for ways to simplify and increase rifle production. It has the monopod type lower band without the monopod itself (correct per Honeycutt & Anthony) and it also has the simplified two screw upper band to take the short cleaning rod introduced in this series. Chromed bore is mirror bright. About 95% original blue remains just starting to turn plum, and having a few very light surface rust freckles that should come off with a good cleaning. Stock has the assorted minor bruises and dings of an issued are, but nothing bad. Mum is partially ground off but the Type 99 marking remains. This is a good clean representative Japanese rifle, a bit above average, and showing the start of the design simplification which continued throughout the war (among all nations.) $395.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMOF6417 - WW2 GERMAN G-43 SEMI-AUTOMATIC RIFLE (DUV 44) SNIPER RIFLE WITH ORIGINAL ZF4 SCOPE Serial number 3814f made by Berliner- Lubecker Maschinefabrik of Luebeck, in 1944. The G-43 was Germany’s first widely issued semi-auto rifle, an improved version derived from the earlier Walther G-41(W) and the abortive G-41(M) from Mauser. Hitler’s ranting caused a name change in 1944 from Gewehr 43 (G-43) to Karabiner 43 (Kar 43 or K-43) to give the impression it was another new weapon. The G-43 was a good design (although the Garand was better), and provided semi-automatic fire and twice the magazine capacity of the K98k bolt action Mauser rifles. Total production of the G-43 and K-43 by all three makers (Walther, BLM, and Gustloff) was only about 462,000 rifles, a miniscule number compared to the millions of K98ks, Lee Enfields, Garands or M1 Carbines made during WW2.

The G-43 was designed from the beginning to be capable of having a telescope sight attached, using an integral rail on the right side of the receiver. The plan was that during test firing, specially accurate rifles would be identified and set aside for issue with scopes for sniper use. And, about 60,000 G/K-43 rifles were issued with the ZF-4 telescope. But, the scope makers had been told to make 300,000 scopes, and about 150,000 scopes were made. Production of scope mounts for the G/K-43 were closer to the 60,000 actually issued. Thus, the majority of G/K-43 rifles with scopes today have reproduction mounts, some with original scopes and lately some with both the scope and mount being reproductions. Internet auction sites are flooded with copies of all types of WW2 German sniper scopes, mounts and accessories, so please be careful out there!

This rifle has an original WW2 production ZF4 scope made by Voigtlander with the ddx maker code. Good optics. The mount is a high quality reproduction that fits nicely.

The laminated stock as legible matching 3814f serial number on the lower edge, and semi- legible waffenamt markings on the right side. The bolt assembly is correct duv type but the serial number on it (4345f) is about 500 number off from the rest of the rifle, probably the results of mixing parts in the field, or GI’s getting stuff mixed up as they hauled their souvenirs home. The handguard is the correct “durofol” plastic/bakelite type. Unlike most G- 43/K-43 seen today, this one comes with the original leather sling, the front sight cover, and the cleaning rod. The rear trigger guard screws is an incorrect replacement, but most people would never notice. Excellent bore. Metal finish on the rifle is about 75% original thinning grayish phosphate, and standard black paint on the magazine.

A nice complete example of the G43/K43 that served so well in the German Army during WW2, and is having a great deal of collector interest since Darrin Weaver's superb "Hitler's Garands" book came out. These are tough to find with the scope so this one is ready to fill that spot in your collection of military sniper rifles, or the “full package” as an example of one of the better WW2 German military arms. $3495.00 (View Picture)

**HOLD** SMOF6226 - RARE GERMAN KAR 98K "HIGH TURRET" SNIPER RIFLE MADE BY MAUSER 1940 SERIAL NUMBER 3343 CALIBER 8 MM MAUSER The German army had used snipers extensively during World War I. The Germans carried this tradition into World War II with a school to train a sniper in the art of concealment, range finding and, of course, accurate shooting. Those who graduated received a special badge which was a hawk's head over crossed oak leaves. Based on observation of captured sniping rifles, two arms makers, the Mauser Company and the J.P. Sauer and Company, made virtually all sniping rifles until 1944 when the Gustlof company began producing a specially thickened receiver for long rail side mounted telescope.

The Germans, unlike the U.S. did not have a single scope mounting system, instead they developed several different systems including short and long side rail mounts, claw mounts and turret mounts. The turret mounting system is the most common scope mounting system seen on German snipers.

Just as with the scope mount system, no single optical company provided telescopes to the German Army, but scopes made by Zeiss, Hensoldt, Ajax were all attached to sniping rifles. Early in the war the scopes have commercial markings, later they have the German Army letter code.

This rifle was made by the Mauser factory at Oberndorf in 1940. It was fitted with high turret mount. The turret mounts had a front "turret" like structure soldered onto the front receiver ring, and then held down with two screws. The rear receiver ring had a separate soldered and screwed down mount to hold the scope and to adjust for windage. Two receiver rings were then soldered onto the scope body. These rings locked the scope to the turret mounts. The base of the front receiver ring is serial numbered to the rifle.

Small amounts of solder can be seen where the turret mounts were joined to the receiver ring. This is normal for a World War II installation. The telescopic sight is a 4 power commercial hungting scope made by the Zeiss company, and as is typical of all German scopes of this era is only adjustable for elevation. It has a single post reticule, and the optics are clear.

The bolt on this rifle is a replacement that has been re-serial numbered to the rifle. The bore is bright with sharp rifles. The solid walnut stock is in excellent condition but is probably a later replacement since the butt plate is dated 1941. The rifle likely went through a rebuild sometime in its war time service. $5000.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6366 - (LL) HUNGARIAN MODEL 98/40 RIFLE (CODE JHV MADE IN 1943) CALIBER 8MM MAUSER SN 7952L The Hungarians became a separate nation at the end of World War I with the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian empire. They adopted a home designed rifle, the Model 35 chambered for the 8 mm rimmed cartridge in 1935. The rifle used a two piece stock. With Nazi Germanys growing power they decided to change the rifle to be compatible with the German 8 mm rimless cartridge. The magazine was made flush with the bottom of the receiver and the bayonet lug modified to accept the German bayonet. German weapons inspectors took over the inspection and marking of the Hungarian rifles. The new rifles were given the code of “jhv” and the waffenamt (weapons inspector) code 56. These markings appeared on Hungarian rifles. These rifles were given the designation G98/40 and this was stamped on the left side of the receiver.

The Hungarian army participated in the invasion of Russia in the summer of 1941 and in many battles in Russia thereafter, they suffered heavy losses at Stalingrad in November 1942 and made little contribution to German military efforts thereafter.

This rifle was made in Hungarian in 1943 and has the jhv code for Hungarian firearms and standard waffenamts in the metal. The barrel bands and floor plate match, but the bolt does not match the receiver. This is a common problem with the 98/40 rifles. The stock is European hardwood. It has a good sized ding on the left side near the front. There is no pitting, and the bluing would rate about 90%. The bore is some darkening in the grooves, but sharp riflings.

Very few Hungarian G98/40 rifles appear on the U.S. collectors market. We suspect that most were lost in Russia. This a good example of one that saw considerable usage. $1400.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6375 - 16189 – BRITISH PATTERN 1914 .303 CALIBER RIFLE MADE BY WINCHESTER- CHEAP! - Serial number W115879 with matching number on rear sight, but the bolt was made by Eddystone. This is a good representative example of the Pattern 1914 rifle which was a major arm of the British in WW1 and WW2. This has a good bore, but dark and a bit rough in the grooves.

This has about 75% thinning original blue finish on most parts, but the wood has been degreased and has a dried out light appearance. It really needs a good cleaning, a bit of stain and an oil finish which will make this a much nicer looking gun. The right side of the butt ahs a broad arrow over 1W in a circle over PATT 14, which would be correct for a Winchester made rifle. But, I think the stock marks may have been added, or at least enhanced, since the front volley sight plate is marked E. The front volley sight has been removed, and the mounting stuff ground flush, typical of rifles updated to “Weedon Repair Standard” prior to WW2. The rear volley sight were removed at the same time. The marking disc has been removed, but could be replaced since the hole has not been boogered up. Stock has assorted minor dents and dings of an issued martial arm, but nothing ugly. Small Century import marks near the muzzle.

Winchester only made 235,448 Pattern 1914 rifles, while Remington made 403,126 and Eddystone made 604,941 making Winchester the scarcest of the three. Although few of the Pattern 1914s actually saw service in France in WW1, they were used by non-deployed units in that war, and again heavily during WW2. Most were altered to remove the volley sights prior to WW2, and eventually ended up in far flung points of the British Empire where they were abused and mistreated. About 90% of the Pattern 1914 rifles we have seen on the collector market in the last decade have been really doggy examples, so even though this is not a pristine example, it will suffice for many collectors, especially at a reasonable price, and look a lot better with some refinish work on the stock. $575.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6358 - RARE SPANISH CIVIL WAR MODEL 1891 DRAGOON MOSIN NAGANT SERIAL NUMBER 84903 CALIBER 7.62 X 54R Nagant rifle has a unique history among battle rifles from the early 20th century. It was adopted by the Russian Imperial government in 1891, updated by the Communist government in 1930, and distributed to satellite nations for usage in proxy warfare up until the collapse of the Soviet Union. Few rifles can claim as colorful a history as the Mosin Nagant.

The Spanish Civil War began in July of 1936. The Republicans, who initially held power, were facing a crippling shortage of arms and ammunition. Seeking support from the Soviet Union, a deal was brokered between the two parties: arms for gold. Officials within the Soviet government did not believe that the Republicans had a chance at retaining power, and therefore did not accept any tender besides gold from the Spanish treasury.

As with all things Mosin Nagant, there is much minutiae that must be combed through to trace the history of a given rifle. Fortunately, Spanish Civil War rifles have many tells that reveal their lineage. First, this rifle is a 1928 Izhevsk Dragoon. The Soviet Union sought to get rid of old style rifles while it was updating its own arsenal, and the Spanish contract was an excellent opportunity. Second, no Mosin Nagant rifles dated after 1937 are known to have fought in Spain, so the date on this rifle is correct. Third, a “MADE IN U.S.S.R.” mark appears on the receiver. Fourth, the fit and finish of this rifle is typical of one that was used in Spain: the rifle has not been counter bored, there are no import markings, the stock has been heavily sanded (a faint Tula star appears on the right hand side of the butt), and the parts are totally mismatched. Finally, on the tang of this rifle there is a “P78” marking. It is debated among collectors what this actually means, but many assume that it is a Spanish unit marking.

This rifle is a superior example of a Spanish Civil War Mosin Nagant. The bore is dark, but may clean up. The rifling remains strong. The finish would rate between 80- 90%. $595.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6376 - 19173 - JAPANESE TYPE 99 7.7MM ARISAKA RIFLE (SERIES 7) WITH CAPTURE PAPERS -

Serial number 2062, made by Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal, fairly late in the war, but not yet having the extreme shortcuts found on a “last ditch” rifle.  A very nice example of a Jap rifle as shipped back from the Pacific by so many GI's.   This one has a photocopy of the “capture papers” which listed the items the soldier was allowed to take home.  (Since few people have seen these, it is quoted here, and a copy included in the photographs.  The soldier brought several items home and the original papers were sold with the sword, hence only the photocopy with this rifle.)  The clerk did not bother to type in a serial number for the rifle, but we are confident this document refers to rifle number 2062.

CERTIFICATE
Date ___ 26 November 45___
The following authorized war trophies have been issued to [Erenst L. Williams Tec/4], who is hereby entitled to take the same to the United States.
ARTICLE        SERIAL NUMBER (If appropriate)
1 Japanese Rifle
1 Sword
1 Small sword
1 Bayonet
Note: Possession of fire arms in excess of one per individual is not authorized.
OFFICIAL
Paul P. Dunham
2nd Kt, Inf.
Adjutant
Organization Commander [signature] 1st Lt C.A.C.
Organization Co. A.  530th M.P. BN.
*************************

Overall a well above average example with about 95% original blue finish, with just normal wear on the sharp edges and mostly on the bolt, which is mismatched (number 791) but the correct cylindrical style for this time.  Mum has been ground.  Stock is exceptionally nice with just the original finish and a pleasing orange-brown color and almost no dings or blemishes.  Left side has a factory done oval shaped patch over a wood defect, a sign of declining quality standards. Soldier’s initial “W” lightly scratched in the right hand grasping groove.  No cleaning rod or dustcover.  This still has the steel buttplate, two screw butt swivel and adjustable rear sight, but the AA sight wings and monopod has already been dropped, and soon after this they began riveting the upper band, and switched to a separate forend piece.  The Type 99 rifles were the standard Japanese military arm throughout WW2, although quality declined over time, and this is an excellent choice for a single representative example, or as a Series 7 rifle for those who aspire to own one from each series.   It is clear that the removal of the “Mum” on the receiver was routinely done on the capture arms “issued” to occupation troops, while it was usually not done on the battlefield capture rifles shipped home from combat zones. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6261 - BRITISH PATTERN 1914 BY EDDYSTONE IN 303 SERIAL NUMBER 321869 The Pattern 14 used a Mauser style action which was originally tested in 1913 in .276 caliber to replace the .303 Lee Enfield. However, the outbreak of WW1 in 1914 resulted in a decision to keep the old .303 caliber using a modification of the new action which became the Pattern 1914 rifle. British arms makers had no spare capacity to make the new Pattern 1914 rifles, so contracts were let with American firms to make more than a million rifles as quickly as possible. Winchester ended up delivering 225,000, Remington made 403,000 and Eddystone turned out 605,000. Most of these saw action in WW1 and many were issued again in WW2, making the Pattern 1914 rifle historically significant. .

On this example, the bore is dark and needs a good cleaning. The finish is aboug 80-90%. Like most P1914s this saw heavy use, probably with some middle east nation, as there are traces of Arabic markings on the side of the butt. This sides of the stock have the early “fat boy” configuration which was intended to provide some protection to the volley sights. Volley sights have been removed, but the plate remains. Missing the stacking swivel. Marking disc inletting filled with wood plug as is often the case. This is a nice example of a P1914 rifle that needs a little TLC to bring it to its full potential. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6179 - (LL) JAPANESE TYPE 38 CARBINE, SECOND SERIES 18154. CALIBER 6.5X51 The Japanese Army adopted the Type 38 rifle in 1905. It used a modified Mauser bolt and ejector system, and was found by P.O. Ackley, the famous gunsmith to be the strongest military action compared to World War II military rifles from Germany, Britain and the U.S. It fires a 6.5x51mm semi-rimmed cartridge. It is also one of the simplest of all military bolt action rifles, with fewer parts to manufacture and assemble than any other military rifle of World War II.

We think of our battles with Japanese as being fought on the tropical islands of the Pacific, but Japan had been fighting the Chinese since the early 1930's, and in 1938 had seized all of Northern China including Beijing, and every important sea port including Shanghai. Over two million Japanese troops were stationed in China throughout the war. To keep this vast area pacified they used cavalry extensively. The Type 38 rifle with its 31 inch barrel was not acceptable to cavalry.

To accommodate the Japanese cavalry the Type 38 rifle was cut down and issued in shorten form designated the Type 38 carbine. These carbines saw extensive use in China, and most got left behind when the Japanese army surrendered August 1945. Type 38 is one of the rarest of the World War II carbines. It’s handy size and mild recoil have made it favorite among shooters.

This carbine was made at the Kokura arsenal. The Imperial crest is intact. The exterior metal has been well used with about 90% of original finish still remaining. The stock has dark patina on it. The bore is bright with strong riflings Overall an above average example of one of the rarest World War II military carbines. $495.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6338 - 20611 - SCARCE L940 DATED BRITISH NO. 1 MARK III LEE ENFIELD “BATTLE OF BRITAIN” RIFLE MADE WITH MAGAZINE CUTOFF - - Serial number M10522 made in 1940 by BSA Co. Production of the No. 1 Mark III rifle continued until about 1945, although in dwindling numbers after adoption of the better and simpler No. 4 Mark I rifles in 1939 (with actual production beginning in 1941).

The No. 1 Mark III was adopted in 1907 and was the standard British battle rifle of WW1, but in 1916 it was simplified by elimination of the magazine cutoff and nearly all of the subsequent production was in this configuration as the No 1 Mark III*. However, during WW2 small arms contracting was “fuddled” (to used Ian Skennerton’s descriptive term) with the constant bombings and the Battle of Britain underway and the loss of arms at Dunkirk. During this chaos, apparently contracts were issued to BSA for rifles in both III and III* specifications with and without magazine cutoffs respectively. This rifle has the cutoff, and is marked as Mark III (no star). All parts with number match, except the bolt assembly which is mismatched.

Overall condition is G-VG with about 70-80% blue finish remaining, although it is turning plum and mixed with dried grease and crud and a few light rust freckles. It should look a lot nicer after a thorough cleaning. Bore is good, but very dirty. Upper handguard has a crack at the rear, easily repaired if you want to. Walnut stocks are pretty good, with expected minor dings of an issued military arm. Looks like the wood was lightly scraped at some point in its service career, but not later sanded by a zealous collector, and it has a mellow oil finish. Not import marked, but it does have the British proof marks required on all exported arms, so this was probably brought in prior to 1968, when rifles like these sold for $9.95 in hundreds of stores including many major department stores.

Visually this is identical to the WW1 Lee Enfields with the magazine cutoff, so it can do double duty filling the niche for a WW1 example, as well as for a WW2 produced rifle. An above average example of this type rifle, a duplicate from John’s collection. $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6241 - 12767 – JAPANESE TYPE 38 CARBINE, 6.5MM, MADE AT NAGOYA (SERIES 5) REALLY NICE! - Serial number 82676 made at Chigusa factory of Nagoya Arsenal. Adopted in 1906, along with the long Type 38 6.5mm rifles, the Type 38 carbines remained in use until the end of WW2 with cavalry and other specialty troops. This one was made during WW2, but at a time when the quality of workmanship was still quite good. Complete and correct with all matching parts except missing the bolt cover, which is missing from most. Cleaning rod is included! Metal parts retain about 97+% original blue finish, showing a little wear on high points and some streaks on the bolt from operation, and even the buttplate retains over 90% original blue with a few scattered light rust freckles that will easily clean up. The unsanded stock has the original dark orange- brown finish, with quite a few shallow bumps and bruises, but few serious scars or dings. The carbines are usually found in relatively poor condition, and this is an exceptionally nice example. Overall, this is one of the nicest Type 38 carbines we have ever had. Bore looks excellent. These use the common Type 30 bayonet with the 16 inch blade and are a very impressive display when mounted on the carbine with a 19 inch barrel. The mum has been partially ground but is mostly visible. An excellent representative example of the Type 38 carbine as widely used by Japanese forces during WW2. $650.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5793 - 22120 - JAPANESE TYPE 38 TRAINING RIFLE (BLANKS ONLY) - Serial number- none- maker unknown Japanese factory. These are pretty scarce compared to “regular” Type 38 rifles, and this is the only one we have seen that includes a bolt cover. Will look better cleaned up. An interesting addition to any WW2 or Japanese weapon collection.

Although some Japanese training rifles were damaged or obsolete arms slightly modified for training use, many, like this one, were purpose made using very crude materials totally unsafe for ever firing with live ammunition. These use cast iron for receivers and other parts were crudely fashioned and ill-fitting, but good enough for youngsters to practice drill. These were also used to fire blank cartridges (and those made from “real” guns were specifically marked to be used with blanks only). The bores on these barrels are simple smoothbore holes either crudely drilled of even cast, and the locking lugs on the bolt are more decorative than functional. The “cleaning rod” is a dummy part just stuck into the stock tip.

This is a good example of these somewhat scarce Japanese military arms with the typical one piece stock (instead of the usual use of a separate piece of wood for the lower part of the Buttstock) which is unsanded and has the original finish and an old rack number 82 painted on the right side. This one is a bit unusual in having a crudely made bolt cover. The rear sight sleeve is very loose on the barrel, and just about every part you look at is decidedly non-standard and “cheap Jap junk” quality.

Metal parts were originally finished some dark color, perhaps by bluing or some other process but that has turned mostly to light brown patina, but it may clean up with some patient work with some oil and steel wool.

Remember, this is NOT TO BE FIRED Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $225.00 (View Picture)

SMOF6001 - 21088 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 1924/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL- MITCHELLS’S MAUSERS “PREMIUM GRADE” Serial number ZH3933 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock and floorplate. Left receiver rail marked PREDUZECE 44, one of the various names of the Kragujevac Arsenal. Arsenal refinished to as new condition. This is the “premium grade- the top level of rifles offered by Mitchell’s Mausers which has been the source of most (and the best) of the large number of Yugoslavian Mausers sold in the last 10 years. Their seemingly limitless supply is nearly exhausted now, and values are climbing on the Yugos as more people begin to appreciate the quality and value from the very modest prices of these rifles.

Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about Ľ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time.

About 99% of the finish remains, with just a few minor scratches. The arsenal refinished stock is a pleasing medium brown color with a nice oil finish. Import marked (of course) and the ZH3933 number marked on the receiver with the light dot punch process over the deeply stamped 3933. Comes with the “accessory pack consisting of a sling, cleaning pull through and ammo pouches. An extremely handsome and interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and the definitive North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. Mitchell’s price on these (luck of the draw as to what you will get) is now $499, but our price for the exact rifle shown is $450.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5487 - - 19685 - RUSSIAN/FINNISH MODEL MODEL 39 MOSIN-NAGANT RIFLE (7.65X54MMR CALIBER) - Serial number 73661 assembled by VKT in 1944 on a Russian receiver made by Izhevsk in 1915, as indicated by the bow and arrow and date on the bottom of the receiver tang. This design was adopted in 1939 as the Finnish “Infantry Rifle Model 1939” and became the preferred rifle for use during World War II as the Finns fought the Russians, eventually losing in 1944. These used a mix of newly made parts and reworked parts from earlier Mosin Nagants which had been purchased or captured by the Finns. The M39 features entirely new sights, better barrels, two sets of sling swivels a two piece finger jointed stock, and the improved two piece magazine stop. This example was made by VKT (Valtion Kirvaaritehdas). Bore is nice and bright, but rifling is somewhat rounded on the lands. Reportedly these are excellent shooters. (Reminder: we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) Looks like about 98% of old arsenal blue finish remains. Bolt number 3661 is matching, but as with most of these, the other parts numbers are totally mismatched. Stock is solid, with the assorted minor dings and scars of an issued military arm. The birch stock color is medium to dark brown. Import marks on upper part of the barrel. Complete with the cleaning rod which is often missing. Overall an excellent example of a Mosin Nagant that actually looks different from most of the other variations. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5638 - SMOF5638 JAPANESE RIFLE TYPE 99 7.7MM (SERIES 8- "LAST DITCH") Serial Number 56334 made at Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. "Last Ditch" type made late in the war, with wood buttplate, fixed rear sight, no ears on the front sight. loose forend piece restrained by the bands. Receiver ring has the "mum" ground off, and overall about 90+% of the very rough finish blue remains. Just a bit of wear on the edges of the wooden buttplate. One of the nicer "last ditch" rifles we have seen in a while. $250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5495 - JAPANESE TYPE 38 RIFLE CONVERTED TO A TRAINER. CALIBER - BLANKS ONLY 6.5 ARISAKA. SERIAL NUMBER 10667 MARKED IN ENGLISH -"SASEBO -1945" The Sasebo Naval base was the home of the Imperial Japanese Navy. It was established in the 1880's and was base from which Admiral Togo sailed to defeat the Russian fleet in May 1905 at the Battle of Tsushima. The U.S. 5th Marines landed there after the surrender of Japan in August 1945. The base has continued to be used by the U.S. as a base for our fleet.

The Japanese converted many rifles to trainers by boring out the barrel to remove the rifling, and altering the bolt. This rifle was so altered. It appears to have been at Sasebo in 1945 because Sasebo and the date in English is stamped on the rifle. It is an interesting variant of the rifles that came home with our returning GI's after the end of World War II. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5393 - 19130 YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 48 8MM MAUSER MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL (BOLT ALTERED FOR SCOPE) - Serial number M99073. Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about Ľ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. Later, they began producing the standard K98k type Mauser as the Model 48. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. New production (like the Model 48 rifles) were marked with the new style crest at time of manufacture.

This rifle is one of the Model 48 rifles with the short action, probably made circa 1948 to early 1950s, but possibly rebuilt on an earlier action with updated markings. It appears to have all new made parts except for the floorplate which has an old serial number lined out, and the new number added. Receiver, stock and floorplate numbers all match. The bolt is not numbered, but is probably original to the rifle, but it has been altered for use with a scope with a new handle resembling those used on the Winchester Model 70. The stock has been notched to clear the new handle, but if you replaced to bolt body it would restore it to factory configuration and the notch would not really be visible unless you lifted the bolt. If you want to use the excellent Mauser style action to make a sporter (Barbarian!) then the hardest and most expensive job- altering the bolt- has already been done. Otherwise this seems to be a near mint unissued rifle. Bore is sharp and mirror bright. Metal parts with about 99% original factory blue, except the polished bolt assembly and the buttplate. The buttplate has some staining but that could be polished out. Tiny “GPC W. HURLEY NY 8MM”import marks on barrel near the muzzle.

An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and a new North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5356 - 19010 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE 8MM MAUSER CALIBER – SERIAL NUMBER 30052 made in 1961 at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation. Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find, and they represent a very interesting era of small arms development. Based on the Swedish AG42B Ljungman rifle, these were made in Egypt, during the mid-1950s-60s. The FN-49 rifles had not performed well for the Egyptians, so they adopted the Hakim, but later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in snowy Sweden with fastidious soldiers did not like the sand and grit in the desert in the hands of unenthusiastic conscripts. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the eventual adoption of the AK-47 and domestic manufacture of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles. The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle. Theya re also very heavy compared to other rifles. This one is in VG-fine condition (unlike most which are pretty beat up) with about 95% original blue- black finish, but everything is covered with a grimy layer of dried grease and crud and really needs a good cleaning. Bore looks like it will clean to excellent. Stock has some minor handling dings and is covered with grimy dirt and needs to be cleaned. Tiny Century import marks on barrel near the muzzle. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, Greener shotguns, etc for an well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $775.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5281 - 18289 - SPANISH MODEL 1943 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY LACORUNA IN 1953 - Serial number Y8193 with matching numbers (although the bolt has 2H-8193 instead of Y2193). After receiving many weapons from German during the Spanish Civil War, they finally decided in 1943 to adopt the 8 x 57mm Mauser caliber as standard for their service rifles, replacing the well used 7 x 57mm Mausers dating back to the 1890s. This is essentially the familiar Kar98k style rifle with a bit different handguard arrangement, and dual sling swivels on the lower band. The bayonet lug has an adapter in place which was provided so that older style bayonets could be used (just as the Argentines did with their M1909 rifles). This one is a good representative example, with about 90-95% old blue thinning in places and a few areas turning plum from normal use. There is some heavy rust and “blood pitting” on the bolt release, but otherwise nothing remarkable. Bore is fair to good, worn and dirty. The stock is solid but with assorted dings and scars from service use. Unlike the junky Turkish rifles (which I would not shoot if you paid me!) these Spanish rifles were well made of quality materials and although not real pretty are solid old guns. Of course, we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing. This example is not import marked, so likely one of those which came in prior to 1968. Check our edged weapons page for bayonets for this one. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5307 - 18395 - CZECH MADE COLD WAR ERA K98K 8MM MAUSER (7.92 X 57MM) MILITARY RIFLE - Serial number 1701K matching on receiver and bolt, with no other parts numbered. Left side rail stamped "Ceskoslovenská Zbrojovka, A.S., BRNO" indicating manufacture at the Brno (“Waffen Werke Brunn” to the Germans) plant which had made K98ks during German occupation with the DOT code and then code SWP in 1945. This factory was largely untouched at the end of the War, and the Czechs made a small number of rifles for rearming their forces and for export sales circa 1946-1950. These were essentially the standard late war K98k “kreigsmodell” design with the stamped buttplate and bands and the laminated stocks, and no guide rib on the bolt body. As the Brno factory had largely gotten their trigger guard assemblies from German suppliers, they tooled up for a simple and cheap stamped trigger guard (similar to the U.S. M1903A3) with a large guard bow allowing use with gloves in cold weather. This has led to the collector term “arctic model” or “winter type” but they were never really sold as anything but a standard rifle. Some of these used salvaged German K98k parts, but others, like this one, were entirely new made. These were very well made and finished arms, not crude wartime “last ditch” jobs. Some had foreign crests, others no crests, but some had the Czech rampant lion crest, which was removed before being sold to foreign buyers (either military or surplus). Israel bought a lot of these (mainly the refurbished/salvaged German type) in 1947, but most of those were well used and later converted to 7.62mm. This one had the crest removed, but is otherwise in excellent condition with about 95%+ original blue remaining. Bore is superb, mirror bright and sharp. Bubba put a couple of coats of varnish on the stock, and added two screws to hold the end of his sling in place, but the holes will be hidden by t correct sling (or easily filled) and removing the varnish is a simple task with some paint stripper after you disassemble the rifle. Missing the cleaning rod.

This is significant as one of the last of the Model 98 Mauser rifles made for military use. See http://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=1735 for a lot more detailed info on this scarce K98k variant. Absolutely the best condition example of these we have ever seen. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $695.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5310 - 18435 - VERY UNUSUAL- CRUDE KHYBER PASS COPY OF BRITISH ENFIELD NO. 5 MARK I “JUNGLE CARBINE” - From a few feet away this looks like a standard British No. 5 Mark 1 .303 “Jungle Carbine.” However, closer inspection show that it is a crude hand made copy turned out in the “Khyber Pass” region of Pakistan/Afghanistan. These talented craftsmen make copies of an amazing variety of guns using whatever materials they can find, almost entirely by hand. The quality ranges from very good to laughably poor in appearance, but the quality of the materials and heat treatment (if any) and the tolerances make them all UNSAFE TO FIRE UNDER ANY CONDITIONS. While the locals do sometimes fire these things, they do so with reloaded ammunition, the bullets sometimes recovered from rifle ranges with the rifling marks filed off, and powder of varying quality. Most of these people are illiterate, so the markings (if any) are very creative in spelling, punctuation, and inexplicably mix stuff so you might find Broowneng Patant, and the crown/V.R. from the reign of Queen Victoria on a gun that is a mongrel mix of broomhandle Mauser and Astra features. Today their specialty is making copies of pre-1898 British arms for sale to American troops who can bring home “antique” guns but not modern guns. [See our main page for more on those…]

This “Jungle Carbine” is one of a handful that Century Arms found among the stuff they imported in the 1980s, and was sold via Springfield Sporters in Pennsylvania. They had the wisdom to cut off the firing pin and weld the firing pin hole shut so that no one can fire it. The bolt they used was made by Savage (square S on the back of the handle and old number removed). Or, perhaps the makers used this one, as it has been extensively filed so that it will fit the receiver and then refinished. The receiver shows all sorts of crude details, but is a faithful copy of the real Jungle Carbine. Similarly, the other parts show many crude features, and probably not a single part would interchange with a real Lee Enfield. The barrel and receiver have a nicely polished and blued finish of unknown age. The barrel may have been salvaged from a “real” Enfield, or at least the rifling looks well done (albeit rusty and rough) or they may have just gotten good at rifling barrels after many decades of practice. The stock is not too badly done, but the butt swivel is a non-regulation feature, and the recoil pad was probably cut from someone’s truck tire (with or without their knowledge!).

This is the perfect addition to an “Enfield” collection that has everything else. NOT SAFE TO FIRE, but we still need to transfer it to a FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $625.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5230 - 17871 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 1924/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL - Serial number R2280 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock. Left receiver rail marked with script T.R.Z. 5 indicating it was reworked at some time in the refurbishing facilities in Hadzici (in the Bosnia-Herzegovina part of former Yugoslavia). See the article in Miitary Rifle Journal by Yugo expert James Golub for more on the work done by Hadzici and the marking variations.

Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about Ľ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time. About 98-99% of the finish remains, although quality is sort of sloppy (as typical of unenthusiastic workers in most Communist regimes!). Bore should be excellent but filled with gooey cosmoline right now. Century import marked on barrel near the muzzle and a new serial number marked on the receiver M2401555. An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb “Mauser Military Rifles of the World” for more on any type of Mauser rifle, and a new North Cape book, “Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles” by Branko Bogdanovic, devoted exclusively to the Yugos. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5234 - 17802 - RUSSIAN/FINNISH MODEL MODEL 39 MOSIN- NAGANT RIFLE (7.65X54MMR CALIBER) - Serial number 258186 assembled by SAKO in late 1944 on a Russian receiver made in 1899. This design was adopted in 1939 as the Finnish “Infantry Rifle Model 1939” and became the preferred rifle for use during World War II as the Finns fought the Russians, eventually losing in September, 1944. At that time, SAKO had reached 259278, so this was probably made in the final week or two of the war. These used a mix of newly made parts and reworked parts from earlier Mosin Nagants which had been purchased or captured by the Finns. The M39 features entirely new sights, better barrels, two sets of sling swivels a two piece finger jointed stock, and the improved two piece magazine stop.

This example was made by SAKO (the Finnish State Rifle Factory at an unpronounceable place Rhiimimaki). Fine to excellent bore, and reportedly these are excellent shooters. (Reminder: we sell all guns as collector items only and they must be approved by a competent gunsmith prior to firing.) About 98% original blue finish (or arsenal refinish on the salvaged parts) remains. Matching numbers on receiver and bolt, but floorplate does not match. Stock is excellent with a very few very minor assorted dings, and most of the dark brown protective coat of varnish (or something) in place. Complete with the correct cleaning rod. However, despite the superb appearance, this does have one flaw- the rear sight base is loose on the barrel, and need to be firmly anchored- we are not sure how these are attached if it is a loose mounting screw, or if it needs a shim or wedge, or some degreasing and application of epoxy, but it should be an easy fix, or looks great as is. Tiny import marks on the barrel near the muzzle. Overall an excellent representative example of a Mosin Nagant that actually looks different from most of the other variations. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $425.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5222 - 17812 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM 8MM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE- NICE! - - Serial number 34796, made in 1964 at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation.

Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find, and they represent a very interesting era of small arms development. Based on the Swedish AG42B Ljungman rifle, these were made in Egypt, during the mid-1950s-60s, with this 1964 dated example being the latest date we have seen. The FN-49 rifles had not performed well for the Egyptians, so they adopted the Hakim, but later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in snowy Sweden with fastidious soldiers did not like the sand and grit in the desert in the hands of unenthusiastic conscripts. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the eventual adoption of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles.

The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle. This one is in excellent condition (unlike most which are pretty beat up) with about 97-98% original blue-black finish. Just a bit of wear on the high points and a few streaks on the bolt carrier from cycling it. Bore has strong rifling but is dark and cruddy which may be just grease or may not clean up much. Stock is likewise excellent with just a few minor handling dings. Tiny Century import marks on barrel near the muzzle. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, Greener shotguns, etc for an well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $950.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5226 - 17810 - AUSTRIAN MODEL 1895 MANNLICHER 8 X 56MMR CALIBER STRAIGHT PULL CARBINE MADE BY STEYR - Serial number 9415Z, this rifle (also known as the Osterreichisches Repetier-Stutzen M.95) has "W-n 18" marking on the barrel, indicating it was manufactured by Steyr in 1918. Although a few were made after the end of WW1, in 1920 the post-WWI remnants of the Austro-Hungarian Empire finally ended production after the 1919 Treaty of St. Germain limited production at Steyr to small numbers of weapons for newly formed local army and police units. The rifle began life as a stutzen with sling swivels on both the side and bottom to accomodate both infantry (who used the bottom swivels) and mounted cavalry (who used the side swivels). The rifle was later converted from 8x50R (M.93) to the more powerful 8x56R (M.30) caliber in the mid 1930's, and the latter is sometimes called the 8mm M30 Scharfe Patrone. A taller front sight was added to the still-original stutzen dovetailed sight base to compensate for this change, while the rear sight markings were ground off and markings calibrated to the new round were added. Additionally, the sling swivels were removed: the front swivel would have been hinged into the barrel band, and was replaced with a spacer, while the rear swivel was removed and its hole plugged with wood. This is a great example with about 98% of the arsenal refinish blue. The light colored (beech?) stock was refinished at the same time, and has a nice coat of finish with only a few minor dings or bruises. There is a small arsenal wood repair on the left side of the receiver tang. Bore is about fine.

From about 1880 to 1900 there was a worldwide fad where many countries adopted straight pull rifle designs. They actually are a pretty good concept, although an unnatural motion nowadays to folks raised on bolt action rifles. Steyr had several models along with the Swiss Schmidt Rubins, the Canadian Ross and the American Winchester Lee Navy to name some of the best known examples. However, mechanical problems and the simpler Mauser and Lee- Enfield type bolt actions doomed them to a relatively brief era of popularity. That would be an interesting collecting niche to specialize in. When Austria was absorbed into the third Reich in the late 1930s, the Model 95 rifles and carbines were withdrawn from service and Austrian troops were issued K98k Mausers. However, the eventual need for all available arms led to the Model 95s being reissued to a variety of Austrian and German second line and support units. The oddball 8 x 56mmR cartridges are still found occasionally at gun shows in their 5 round en-block clips, packed in boxes with German markings. Overall a really handsome example of an unusual episode in martial arms evolution. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $250.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5231 - 17872 - TURKISH MODEL 1938 8MM MAUSER RIFLE ASSEMBLED AT K. KALE IN 1942 - Serial number 105846, mismatched. Receiver ring marked K.Kale under the usual TC, crescent and AFSA Turkish government and arsenal markings, indicating assembly at the K. Kale facility.

We really are not big fans of the myriad Turkish Mauser variations, but got a couple as part of package deals. This could be a very inexpensive collecting specialty with oodles of variations, some more interesting than others. The Turks are noted for their long history of warfare with other groups or nations, and domestic unrest, and thus have been voracious consumers of firearms for centuries. You may recall the Turks “bought American” in the 1860s-70s, and slaughtered Russians with a mix of Peabody rifles for long range fire and Model 1866 Winchesters for rapid close range fire at the battle of Plevna. In 1887 the Mauser brothers convinced the Turks to buy a large number of 11mm Model 1871/84 Mausers (Turkish Model 1887). Their contract very smartly included a clause that specified that if a newer model rifle was introduced the balance of the contract would be filled with the newer model. Thus the Turks leapfrogged into variations of the Model 1889 (in 7.65mm) with the single column box magazine, then the Model 1893 (in 8mm) and then the 1898, but all under Turkish designations and usually in several variations. In addition the Turks received large numbers of Model 1888 “Commission Rifles” from Germany during WW1, and captured thousands of British Lee Enfields during the Gallipoli campaign. In the 1930s the Turks began a program to overhaul their hoarded arms and convert everything into a more or less standard configuration, and standardize on the 7.92 x 57mm Mauser cartridge as the common ammunition. This involved reworking the various guns by replacing barrels, altering or replacing stocks and mashing the metal parts into conformity. Meanwhile, new rifle production continued by AFSA (the Turkish military arsenal) in Ankara, Turkey. These were the “Model 1938” rifles essentially a 98 Mauser type design with the older style upper band assembly. To thoroughly confuse collectors, all of the rifles being updated were also called Model 1938s, regardless of what they started off as. There is some info on all of these in Robert Ball’s superb Mauser Military Rifles of the World, and one excellent on line source is http://www.turkmauser.com, run by a collector who seems to have an excellent grasp on the subject.

This rifle is a true M1938, assembled during WW2 from parts on hand (probably a mix of new manufacture, in storage or salvaged parts from older rifles) at K.Kale under the AFSA control. The serial number is correct for this date and configuration, although it is poorly hand stamped and the second number is easily confused for a “9” instead of a “0” but careful examination and comparison with the serial number ranges confirms it is a “0.” As Turkish rifles go, this is in about average condition, with the blue finish mostly turned to plum or patina, the stock oil soaked. The bore is greasy but looks like it should clean to good or better. There is a crack extending back from the right side of the receiver tang. Small Century import marks on the barrel. Although some people shoot these, we sell all firearms as collector items only, and the must be approved by a competent gunsmith. If the stock is degreased, it will look a lot better as the metal is actually pretty decent with no pitting and a blue-black tone mixed with patina, rather than the crust of rust over gaping pits as sometimes found on the turked up rifles. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $195.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5235 - 17813 - GERMAN KAR98K-ZF 41 SNIPER RIFLE WITH ZF/41 SNIPER SCOPE (REPLICA) Serial number 3388 made by Mauser-Werke, Oberndorf am Neckar (code 42) in 1939. The Kar98k Mauser with the Zf 41 telescope was the most widely produced German sniper rifle of WW2, but also the least preferred. The concept was simple- modify the rear sight base to accept a mount and put on a scope with a long eye relief and shazam! you got a sniper rifle. However, the 12-15 inch eye relief and tiny tube diameter of the 1.5 power telescope meant that the field of view was almost useless except against a stationary target. Factory produced rifles were all dated 1941 or later, but Robert Ball’s “Sniper Variations of the German K98k Rifle” notes that some earlier rifles and even Gew 98s were converted for sniper use.

However, this one is NOT a genuine sniper rifle made with an original Zf 41 scope, as those are very rare, and therefore very expensive. Most of the Zf 41 snipers found on the market are at best replicas (if described honestly) or at worst fakes trying to steal your hard earned cash. This is a replica at an affordable price offered as a filler for a collector on a budget, or a reenactor. The rifle itself has virtually no finish, having had it all removed, except the trigger guard which has about 50-60%. Metal parts are smooth with no pitting except a bit on the bands where they contact the wood. The scope mount bar is a repro mounting bar attached to a standard rear sight base by solder, instead of being machined integral with the sight sleeve. The stock has been altered to clear the scope mount. The scope and scope mount are very high quality reproductions, with correct period markings and excellent optics, probably better than the originals. The mount and base have 99% of their finish (except a couple of rust spots on the mount), so they look out of place on the mostly no finish rifle. This is an excellent candidate for someone to either take the time to do the simple (but time consuming) rust blue process on, or just hit it all with one of Brownell’s excellent cold blue products to turn it all a nice deep blue black color. If this were a genuine correct Zf 41 rifle and scope, the price would be many times higher, but being what it is, you can decide if it will fit your collecting needs, and save a bundle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $1150.00 (View Picture)

SMOF5000 - 16605 - ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 MAUSER 7.65MM RIFLE MADE BY DWM IN 1899 - Serial Number S3238 matching throughout, including the cleaning rod. These are 7.65x53mm Mauser caliber (sometimes called 7.65mm Argentine Mauser). The Model 1891 is an important milestone as the first of many Mauser models adopted by various South American countries. Marked on the left side of the receiver "MAUSER MODELO ARGENTINO 1891/ DEUTSCHES WAFFEN-UND MUNITIONS FABRIKEN/ BERLIN" Argentine crest has been ground off the receiver ring per Argentine law after some Argentine rifles showed up in a neighboring country's guerilla forces.

Loewe was the original maker of the M1891 Argentine rifles, but after merging in 1899 with the Mauser brothers to form Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) filled the rest of the contracts under the DWM name. Overall excellent plus condition. The stock has just a few minor storage dings, the worst being shown in the photos. Bolt retains most of its original bright polished finish, including on the handle and knob which usually are darker, but nice and bright on this one. Other parts with about 95% original brilliant blue finish, except where the removed receiver crest was touched up to blend in; some wear on the magazine floorplate and adjacent sharp corners and some wear on the buttplate. Stock is a very pleasing light brown colored straight grain walnut with matching handguard. The stock has had the argentine crest removed by grinding.

This is one of 53,000 Argentine rifles made in 1899 under the DWM name. From an old pre- 1968 collection and not defaced by any import markings. This is among the very best of the M1891 Argentine rifles we have had in years. The bore is dirty (old grease?) although we expect it will clean to the same superb condition as the exterior. These are usually found in nice condition, but often with mismatched parts. South American military rifles are an attractive collecting specialty, with a wide number of examples, either limited to Mausers alone, or including all types. Most are still pretty reasonably priced, although it may take a while to find some variations, especially in decent condition. (We highly recommend Robert Ball's Mauser Military Rifles of the World to learn more, or Colin Webster’s definitive Argentine Mauser Rifles for the 1891-1909 models and their variants and accessories.) Argentine Mausers made before the “O” prefix block were made in 1898 or earlier, but this one was made in 1899 and thus does not qualify as an “antique” so we need to ship to a FFL (C&R is okay). Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $675.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4982 - 16371 - EGYPTIAN HAKIM 8 X 57MM SEMI-AUTO RIFLE (SUPERB!) - Serial number 49268, absolutely the best condition Hakim we have ever seen. Made at "Factory 54" which later became Maadi Military and Civil Industries Corporation. Once plentiful on the surplus market these are now hard to find with any sort of condition. These represent a very interesting era of small arms development. The FN-49 rifles made for Egypt had not performed well for them. So, the Egyptians bought the surplus Swedish AG42 Ljungman machinery and after modifying it slightly to use 8mm Mauser ammunition, adopted it as the Hakim. They later found out that the fine tolerances that worked well in Sweden did not like the sand and grit in the desert. Following French and British attacks on Suez in 1956, and periodic butt-kickings by the Israelis, the Egyptians sought small arms help from other countries, ending up under the influence of the Soviet Union, which resulted in the later adoption of the 7.62x39mm Rashid rifles, a much modified cousin of the Hakim The number above the serial number on the receiver of this Hakim translates to 1967, but we are not sure if that is the date of manufacture or something else, and there does not seem to be any reliable source of that actual dates of manufacture for the Hakim or the Rashid rifles. The Hakim is in 8mm Mauser caliber, using a detachable 10 round box magazine. It uses a “direct impingement” gas system, and is well made although not a very sexy looking rifle

This one is in excellent condition (unlike many which are pretty beat up) with about 98% original blue-black finish having just a few minor storage and handling scrapes but almost no wear. Bore looks like it will clean to excellent once the dried grease and crud are removed. Stock is likewise excellent with just a very few minor handling dings. There is a wire staple on the right side of the bolt carrier, intended for a rubber pad, almost always missing, but the remnants are here, held with electrical tape. Comes with an old web Russian style sling which may or may not be correct, but is a free bonus anyway. A surprising number of former Egyptian arms are available on the collector market- Remington Rolling blocks, SMLEs, the FN-49s, Rashids, Helwan pistols, etc for a well defined collecting niche with interesting historical connections to the various eras represented. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $895.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4980 - 16368 - ARGENTINA MODEL 1909 MAUSER CARBINE 7.65MM MADE BY FMAP IN 1948 - Serial number 003037 matching. This is one of only 5,000 Model 1909/1926 first model Cavalry Carbines made in Argentina by DGFM-FMAP. (Dirrecion General de Fabricaciones Militares- Fabrica Militar de Armas Portatiles) This was the Argentine arsenal set up to make Mauser rifles on machinery purchased from Germany under license from Mauser. The equipment was purchased in 1926-27, but chronic financial problems delayed actual construction of the factory and production until 1947. The Model 1909 cavalry carbine was originally made without any provisions for a bayonet, but in 1926 the design was altered to add a bayonet lug under the stock, and a large muzzle cap for the muzzle ring, being a retrofit on the early carbines made by DWM in Germany. However, the bayonet provisions were added during manufacture on the DGFM-FMAP made guns. They first model carbines like this one were made 1947-1949 and are marked with the national crest on the receiver ring, and EJERCITO ARGENTIONO MAUSER MOD 1909 on the left side of the ring, with the DGFM-(FMAP) markings on the left rail. The more common second model carbines (11,905 made 1949-1959) used a simplified crest with EJERCITO ARGENTINO on the top of the ring

Colin Webster’s superb “Argentine Mauser Rifles 1871-1959” is the definitive study on the Argentine arms, and is highly recommended for anyone interested in South American military arms as it has info on several models provided to other countries

This example is in average condition for this model, well used and then arsenal refinished prior to export. Stock has large repair to the toe, as with most I have seen. Assorted dings and bruises and overall a very dark brown, almost black color. Metal with about 98-99% of the arsenal blue-black refinish and bright polished receiver for a handsome appearance. Bore is good, but shows use. There appears to be a small crack in the wood alongside the receiver tang inletting, but it does not appear to be anything serious. Chipped section at right front of the handguard. Tiny import marks on right rear side of receiver. A good example of this fairly scarce Argentine military arm. I have always recommended South American military arms as a collecting niche with a large variety of items available at mostly reasonable prices. And, most are types that should be immune to crazy gun ban schemes. First one of these we have had for sale in several years. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $525.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4838 - 15538 - YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 24/47 8MM MAUSER SHORT RIFLE MADE BY KRAGUJEVAC ARSENAL Serial number A3499 matching on the receiver, bolt, and stock. Prior to WW2 Yugoslavia had purchased a number of Model 1924 short rifles and a full set of machinery to make them from FN in Belgium. Then they made more rifles in their own Kragujevac Arsenal, later known as Factory 44 (PREDUZECE 44). The Model 1924 rifles had an “intermediate length” action about Ľ inch shorter than the standard Model 98 Mauser actions used in the Gew 98 and K98 series rifles, but were otherwise very similar to the K98k. During the post- WW2 rearming of Yugoslavian forces under Marshall Tito and the Communists virtually all old rifles on hand were refurbished, and remarked with the communist crest (two sheaves of wheat bordering a torch, with the commie star above) and given a new model designation. This rifle is one of the Model 1924 short rifles, upgraded to Model 24/47 configuration with the new markings, and totally refinished at that time. About 98-99% of the finish remains, although quality is sort of sloppy (as typical of unenthusiastic workers in most Communist regimes!). Bore is excellent- bright and sharp. Tiny SAMCO import marks on barrel near the muzzle. An interesting variant of the classic 98 Mauser family. Collecting Yugoslavian Mauser variations would be a fun and inexpensive specialty. See Robert Ball’s superb Mauser Military Rifles of the World for more on any type of Mauser rifle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $375.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4837 - 15535 - JAP TYPE 99 7.7MM RIFLE (“LAST DITCH” SERIES 37) - Serial number 49194 made at Tokyo Juki Kogyo in Tokyo. Except for retaining the adjustable rear sight, this has most of the crude features which have earned the name “last ditch” rifles including: lack of protective ears on the front sight, single screw butt swivel, wood buttplate, no provisions for the monopod, two screw upper band, and very crude metal finish and woodworking. Although not as well made as the rifles used by the allies, these “last ditch” rifles were completely serviceable and were used in many of the Pacific battlefields. Bolt assembly numbers do not match, but are correct for this maker and serial number range. Metal parts with about 95-96% original blue finish showing just normal wear patterns. No dust cover or cleaning rod, as usual. The stock has not been sanded, but the finish appears to be just a simple brown stain, not the usual reddish-brown shellac, however we think it is probably original, not Bubba’s strip and stain work. There is some brown yuck on the upper and lower tangs that is some sort of tape residue or something and will flake right off to reveal the blue underneath. Excellent bore. A very nice representative “last ditch” rifle. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4627 - 14294 BRITISH ''DRILL PURPOSE'' PATTERN 1914 .303 CALIBER RIFLE BY REMINGTON Serial number 359704 with matching number on bolt. Other parts appear to be typical mix of makers including the ''fat boy” Eddystone stock. Drill purpose rifles were made from obsolete patterns to provide non-lethal arms to be used by recruits or cadets learning the manual of arms, close order drill, punishment marching, etc where a current service rifle was not needed, but something with the approximate weight and feel was desired. This would be an interesting collecting niche, with the goal of including the many different ''Drill Purpose” arms from the British, the US Navy Mark I Training rifle made by Parris Dunn and the Mark V dummy drill rifle, , the M16 ''Rubber Duck” and the CMP M1903 and M1 drill rifles. The Pattern 1914 DP rifles were converted by drilling a hole laterally through the chamber (and adjacent stock and handguard) and welding a steel rod in place, painting a red and white stripe around the action area, and stamping DP on just about every part. These rifles had seen hard use prior to conversion and usually show numerous stock repairs, as well as dings and bruises acquired throughout their career aggravated by clumsy handling by awkward recruits intimidated by screaming sergeants. A number of these came into the US in the 1980s or 90s, and sold for ridiculously low prices at the time, with most of them snatched up and stripped down for their actions to make sporters. This has left surviving examples rather scarce. A great addition for a British collection, or for the P1914/M1917 addict, or someone interested in ''drill rifles”. Overall condition is VG. The wood continues to weep a bit of the heavy grease they were packed in for storage, although we cleaned all we could. Small split on let side above trigger that could be repaired or tripped to avoid splinters. Even though incapable of firing with the drilled and plugged chamber, this still is considered a ''firearm” and must go to a FFL or C&R FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $350.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4629 - 14293 BRITISH ''DRILL PURPOSE'' PATTERN 1914 .303 CALIBER RIFLE BY WINCHESTER Serial number 51684 with matching number on bolt. Other parts appear to be typical mix of makers including the ''fat boy'' Eddystone stock. Drill purpose rifles were made from obsolete patterns to provide non-lethal arms to be used by recruits or cadets learning the manual of arms, close order drill, punishment marching, etc where a current service rifle was not needed, but something with the approximate weight and feel was desired. This would be an interesting collecting niche, with the goal of including the many different ''Drill Purpose” arms from the British, the US Navy Mark I Training rifle made by Parris Dunn and the Mark V dummy drill rifle, , the M16 ''Rubber Duck” and the CMP M1903 and M1 drill rifles. The Pattern 1914 DP rifles were converted by drilling a hole laterally through the chamber (and adjacent stock and handguard) and welding a steel rod in place, painting a red and white stripe around the action area, and stamping DP on just about every part. These rifles had seen hard use prior to conversion and usually show numerous stock repairs, as well as dings and bruises acquired throughout their career aggravated by clumsy handling by awkward recruits intimidated by screaming sergeants. A number of these came into the US in the 1980s or 90s, and sold for ridiculously low prices at the time, with most of them snatched up and stripped down for their actions to make sporters. This has left surviving examples rather scarce. A great addition for a British collection, or for the P1914/M1917 addict, or someone interested in ''drill rifles”. Overall condition is VG. The wood continues to weep a bit of the heavy grease they were packed in for storage, although we cleaned all we could. Even though incapable of firing with the drilled and plugged chamber, this still is considered a ''firearm” and must go to a FFL or C&R FFL. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3899 - JAPANESE RIFLE TYPE 99 7.7MM (SERIES 10- "LAST DITCH") SERIAL NUMBER 59423 Made at Toriimatsu factory of Nagoya Arsenal. "Last Ditch" type made late in the war, with wood buttplate, fixed rear sight, no ears on the front sight. loose forend piece restrained by the bands. "Mum" is mostly visible, but defaced by chisel marks. Overall about 90+% of the very rough finish blue remains. Wooden buttplate shows wear on the top and bottom, and there is a chip out of the pistol grip on the right side, the latter probably done at time of manufacture. Missing the crude butt swivel which was held by a single screw. $249.00 (View Picture)

SMOF3919 - 10809- JAPANESE TYPE 38 6. 5MM CARBINE MADE AT MUKDEN (MANCHURIA)- SERIAL NUMBER 41326 (SERIES 6). Probably the nicest Type 38 carbine we have ever had, and perhaps the nicest we have ever seen. The 6.5mm Type 38 rifle was the standards Japanese Infantry rifle from 1906 until 1939 when the 7.7mm Type 99 was adopted. During that time the short Type 38 Carbine was standard for the Japanese cavalry, and made in very small numbers compared to the rifles. In 1931 the Japanese took over the Mukden Arsenal in Manchuria (in China) and a few years later began rifle and carbine production there, although in much smaller numbers than at Japanese homeland facilities. Apparently about 110,000 Type 38 rifles were made at Mukden, and 51,000 Type 38 Carbines. Of the type 38 carbines, collectors recognize three serial number blocks- two without any series designation and only the final 15,000 or so having the "series 6" series indicator. This carbine has about 97-98% original blue finish mixed with a little light fingerprint surface rusting here and there and two tiny patches of pitting (less than 1/4" diameter) on the trigger guard- one hidden by the floorplate. Interestingly, the outside of the flooplate is nicely finished and blued, but the inside is really rough and crude and bare metal, so they must have used the rust blue method instead of a dip process. Bolt handle, safety and floorplate all have number 32 with an illegible mark, and I am not sure if that indicates that they are matching to the gun (which ends in 326) or if mismatched. The underside of the bolt handle and the firing pin are marked 135. I will let someone who knows more about Japanese arms decide if this is matched or mismatched, but it sure is nice anyway. Trigger, bolt catch spring, floorplate catch and sight spring are all straw colored, mixed with darker staining. Bolt body is bright but handle and exposed part of the body are stained dark to almost blue appearance. Bright finished cleaning rod, but exposed portion is stained dark. Superb bright and sharp bore. Unsanded stock has nearly all of the original shellac finish and a pleasing reddish brown color. Only a few mostly very minor storage and handling dings in the wood. Even the buttplate retains most of the blue finish, although thinning and worn bright on the heel. Mum has been lightly ground with a few chisel marks, but faintly visible, and the Type 38 markings are mostly intact. Not import marked. If you want a great example of a Type 38 carbine from the scarcest maker, this is for you. Sorry we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $795.00 (View Picture)

SMOF4377 - 9389 - JAPANESE 6. 5MM TYPE 38 CARBINE MADE BY KOISHIKAWA. Serial number 136182. About 90% original blue finish showing just normal wear. Trigger, bolt stop spring and rear sight spring all retain some or most of straw color. Stock assembly has old thick layer of varnish that has picked up some dirt and crud and could stand a gentle cleaning. Excellent bore. Numbers on bolt and upper band are mismatched to either the serial number of the assembly number on the bottom of the receiver. Mum has been ground, but patina now blends in with the finish. Cleaning rod missing. Very handsome example of these somewhat scarce Japanese arms. This one was reportedly a WW2 vet bring-back, but no further information was available. Sorry, we can not accept credit card payment for this item. $395.00 (View Picture)


Restoration Projects

SMOF5189 - WINCHESTER RECEIVER AND TRIGGER GUARD FOR A BRITISH PATTERN 14 RIFLE MADE BY WINCHESTER SERIAL W157760 The British Army, charged with maintaining order in a world wide empire, adopted a bolt action rifle firing a rimmed cartridge in 1892. After their experience of being wounded and killed by the 7 mm Mauser rifles during the Boer War, the British Army decided to adopt a new rifle in 7 mm using the Mauser bolt system. This rifle was called the Pattern 1913, and enough were made for trials by selected infantry units in 1913-14. The outbreak of World War I in August 1914 stopped the plan to adopt a new rifle, and the British Army fought World War I with their Lee Enfields.

The British Army contracted with three U.S. arms makers to produce the Pattern 1913. This rifle was called the Pattern 1914 rifle. Contracts were issued to Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone, a division of Remington, and several hundred thousand rifles were made. In one of the great ironies of history when the U.S. entered the War in April 1917, the U.S. could not made enough Model 1903 “Springfield” rifles, and turned to these firearms makers with existing equipment, changed the caliber to 30-06, and the Pattern 14 became the U.S. Model 1917, equipping the majority of U.S. troops who fought in France.

This receiver was in a rifle made by Winchester. The floorplate, and magazine are also included. The action has the letters DP inscribed on the trigger guard and bolt, but it intact. The Pattern 14 receivers are valued as the basis for magnum caliber sporting rifles because of their size and strength. $225.00 (View Picture)


Classic & Collectible Commercial Longarms
(post-1898)

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