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We have grouped our edged weapons into these categories:

US Bayonets
US Knives,Machetes & Daggers
Foreign Bayonets
Foreign Knives & Daggers
Swords Of All Sorts

Essential Reference Books for Bayonet Collectors

18190 JAPANESE BAYONETS- LARRY JOHNSON - 156 pages 8.5” x 11” hardbound. The classic, out of print standard reference on all Japanese Bayonets 1870-1988. Very well organized and illustrated and researched. Many collectors still prefer to use this due to its ease of use, even though Ra LaBar’s “Bayonets of Japan” is large and gets into greater depth (into excruciating levels of detail, for some readers). This is a used copy with dustjacket in near excellent condtion, showing some light scuffing on the dustjacket, a bit of very light finger soiling on some pages and the previous owner’s name stamped on the inside covers. Out of print, hard to find. $395.00 (View Picture)

18188 THE AMERICAN BAYONET 1776-1964- ALBERT HARDIN - 234 pages 8.5” x 11” hardbound. This was the first book on collecting American bayonets, published in 1964, and really enlightened collectors about what was out there. Some of the information has been superseded (e.g.- Reilly has added much more to our knowledge of socket bayonets, Hartman on the Krags, etc), but Hardin is still a classic reference. It remains the only reference to really address the bewildering field of brass handled sword bayonets, although there are some errors which have been discovered since this was published 45 years ago. This contains the physical and background descriptions and illustrations of over two hundred separate and distinct types of American bayonets from Colonial times to the present day. The text is profusely illustrated, and remains an excellent introduction or overview of the subject. The book covers Angular, Ramrod, Sword/Saber, Knife, Fencing, Intrenching, and Bolo Bayonets. Also included are the important variations of many standard types. The scabbards of many of the bayonets are discussed. There is also a Listing of Bayonet Patents and an extensive bibliography. Overall about excellent except dustjacket showing some scuffing and chipping and minor tears. A previous owner stamped his name on the inside covers. $165.00 (View Picture)

15519 Bayonets of Japan; A Contemporary Reference on Japanese Bayonets by Raymond C. LaBar - Just released and indisputably the definitive reference on every possible variation of Japanese made or used bayonets, including those used by other countries from the 1850s to the late 20th century. This includes all your familiar favorites, with details on makers, markings, and variations, with a convenient “LB-number” for shorthand use in referring to a specific type. It also covers virtually all the exotic, rare and prototype bayonets, such as those made for double barrel shotguns, etc. Frog variations are also covered in great detail. This book does cost a bit more than your usual reference book, but that is because nearly every photo in it (and there are LOTS of them, sharp and showing the details you want to see!) is in full color. This pretty well sets the new standard for edged weapon reference books in the quality of the organization and the effective and helpful use of color, and the quality of the scholarship. As a special incentive, each copy has been autographed by the author. These are in stock, ready for shipment. Even if you do not collect Japanese bayonets, this is a good reference to review so you can pick up hints on spotting the really rare stuff out of a pile of common ones. Highly recommended! Free shipping on orders received prior to May 20th. After that we will have to charge for shipping. $120.00 (View Picture)

15337 BAYONETS FROM JANZEN'S NOTEBOOK- 258 pp 8" x 10" hardbound. Absolutely the best single reference book for anyone interested in bayonets. It covers nearly all the standard models of all countries of all periods. Excellent line drawings with brief descriptions, organized by country and then by date. While it will not list the 10 maker/marking variations for a specific model, it is essential to identifying stuff, and to give an idea of what a complete collection might consist of. Jerry Janzen was President of the Society of American Bayonet Collectors, and had one of the best collections in the country. First published as a paperback, this is the second, hardback edition of 253 pages of the original plus 6 pages of additional errata, notes, and corrections. Brand new, not used. OUT OF PRINT- VERY LIMITED SUPPLY LEFT. $125.00 Postpaid in the U.S. (View Picture)

15079 The Knife Makers Who Went West- by Harvey Platts - 1978. First Edition Hardback folio, about 12.5 inches tall, in half black cloth on brown cloth covered boards. 201 pages 9” x 12.5” hardcover. Published in 1978. A well illustrated history of an important series of several generations of knife makers and their operations in Connecticut, New York, then on to Bradford, PA as the W.R. Case Company, then ending up as Western Cutlery in Boulder (later Longmont) Colorado. The author is the great grandson of H.N. Platts who moved west to establish the Western company. An excellent company history with indispensible information for collectors of the company's knives, with photos showing the various facilities, interiors with workmen making knives, family groupings and their homes, and lots of catalog and advertising copy to assist in identification. It is fascinating to see how small many of these operations really were, and glimpse into the family life of the entrepreneurs who were able to create new businesses using knowledge passed down from earlier generations. Overall used fine with good dustjacket. $95.00 (View Picture)


**NEW ADDITION** 22051 BAYONET SCABBARDS OF ALL KINDS -

 

22051A- U.S. MODEL 1917 WW2 PLASTIC SCABBARD for M1917 Bayonets for Trench Guns- Mint unissued. Seldom ever find these loose. Gary Cunningham’s great book on U.S. bayonets indicates the ink stamped inspector markings on this one are circa 1950s made as replacements for use with trench guns still in service, an not the later ones procured with bayonets during Vietnam. You just know you have to have one of every variation… $135.00 (View Picture)

22051B- LOT OF TWO U.S. M3 PLASTIC SCABBARDS for M1905 BAYONETS One is mint unissued M3 WW2 G.I. original. Other one is one of the recent reproductions that looks great and works great, but has a shiny green plastic body and the throat piece has a silver paint finish instead of being parkerized and had a green plastic insert. Good to know the difference if you see something at a show. BOTH for only $135.00 (View Picture)

22051C- LOT OF 2 U.S. SCABBARDS- ONE M7 & ONE M8A1 The M8A1 was issued with the M3 Trench knife and M4, M5, M6 and M7 bayonets, and it is in pretty good shape except the metal throat piece has surface rust. The M7 scabbard for the 10 inch M1 Bayonet for the Garand is one of those altered by shortening the earlier M3 scabbard for the 16 inch M1905 bayonets. It looks nice at first glance, but the tip area is worn and frayed and starting to separate. This could be fixed with a bit of epoxy and the plastic body repainted OD if you like. BOTH for only 55.00 (View Picture)

22051D- TWO U.S. MODEL 1885 SCABBARDS FOR .45-70 TRAPDOORS One is rough condition with the steel body crusty rusty but overall dark and untouched. The leather loop is partially torn as show in the photos. Slap some epoxy on there and it will look okay. Second is the steel body only. These were secured to the leather frog with a rivet, and part of the tab holding the rivet has been broken off. Epoxy will do an even better job. Has old black paint finish over patina, not bad, not great. BOTH for only $35.00 (View Picture)

22051E- BRITISH PATTERN 1853 SCABBARD FOR .577 ENFIELD BAYONET This is the first type made 1853-1860 (per Skennerton), with the frog stud being separate from the throat piece, and secured by lacquer and punch marks (staking). Overall minty excellent condition not dinked with or degraded. I really should keep this but will list it anyway. $135.00 (View Picture)

22051F- +BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET SCABBARD- EARLY WW1 This is the early type with the tear drop shaped frog stud and arched shape on the throat and tip pieces. The black leather body has a nice smooth surface and waxed finish, with one scar and assorted minor scuffs, but pretty nice. The throat has traces of blue finish mixed with mostly patina and surface rust while the tip is mostly rusty, but these could be cleaned up and touched up with black paint as was the British practice. A good serviceable piece. $50.00 (View Picture)

22051G- -BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET SCABBARD- EARLY WW1 This is the early type with the tear drop shaped frog stud and arched shape on the throat and tip pieces. The black leather body has a rough textured surface dyed black, and covered with yucky grease. The throat and tip pieces are mostly smooth with most of an old black paint finish but chipped and worn. A good serviceable piece. $45.00 (View Picture)

22051H- WW2 JAPANESE TYPE 30 BAYONET SCABBARD VG-fine condition with about 50% blue mixed with patina and worn bright areas. $49.00 (View Picture)

US Bayonets

What bayonet fits your 20th century US military rifle?   Click Here to find out.

**NEW ADDITION** 22056 TWOFER BARGAIN LOT OF TWO U.S. SOCKET BAYONETS - First is a M1855 type for .58 caliber muskets, but with blade only 15 3/8” long instead of the usual 18 inches. No U.S. marking visible and looks like there never was. Possibly Confederate? This has been in a fire and blade is bent and socket warped a little and cracked at the rear. Pretty much rusty and scaly condition. Second is a U.S. M1855 made in .58 caliber, in basically new condition which was in the process of being converted to M1873 configuration for issue with the .45-70 trapdoors. This was done by cutting a small strip from the socket and forging the socket down to the smaller diameter. The joint is just barely visible but final finishing has not been done. An interesting item to show the thrift of the Ordnance Department. This was probably sold as scrap about the time that the rod-bayonet trapdoors were adopted, making these unnecessary. The lot of two for $95.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22047 U.S. MODEL 1892 KRAG BAYONET & SCABBARD 1898 DATE - Overall very good condition, needing a bit of cleaning to be a well above average example of the Spanish American War Krag bayonet used with the 1892, 1896 and 1898 rifles regardless of date manufactured. This is the early type with the grip rivets ground flush. This has some staining and very light finger print rust and two very small areas of very light pitting on the left side of the crossguard. Scabbard has one small ding on the edge, but retains about 90%+ original blue finish, with a bit of light surface rust/patina and some thinning, but well above average. A good representative example with the desirable 1898 date for possible use in the Spanish American War or the Philippines. $225.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21941 U.S. M7 BAYONET FOR M16 RIFLE- ONTARIO - Excellent example with a bit of very light scabbard wear on the blade finish, and a rack number stenciled on the front of the M8A1 scabbard. Made by Ontario, marked on the crossguard. There are 2 or 3 small rust stains on the crossguard, otherwise excellent. $45.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21627 U.S. M1 BAYONET MADE BY PAL WITH SCABBARD - A very nice clean example with about 90%+ parkerize finish remaining, mostly just wear on the tip. Grips are replacements in lesser condition, and the scabbard is one made to U.S. specifications for sale/issue to Greece, so this bayonet probably spent some time there too. The only difference is the style of markings and the mold markings on the scabbard body which will never be noticed except by an advanced collector, so it wil be fine as a representative example to go with your M1 Garand, especially if you got one of the “greasy Greeks” when they were sold by CMP. The U.S. provided vast quantities of arms to Greece and other allies during the Cold War, and many of these have come back in through the CMP program. $89.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 21604 U.S. M1905 BAYONET FOR M1903 SPRINGFIELD WITH M1910 SCABBARD (SA 1907) - Bayonet was made at Springfield Armory in 1907 and originally had a bright blade, but late in WW1 and thereafter these were refinished in a dark parkerize type finish, and issued up through the end of WW2. The scabbard is the typical WW1 and WW2 M1910 style with the rawhide covered wood scabbard body with a removable woven web cover having a leather tip. Scabbard is overall fine, with the webbing somewhat shrunken as with most of them, and some staining. Bayonet is excellent with about 99% of the parkerized arsenal refinish remaining on the blade and about 95% on the hilt mainly due to poor storage scrapes and scratches on the crossguard. Old rack number 679 painted on the left wooden grip scale. Well above average example. $395.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20772 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET FOR M1903 SPRINGFIELDS RIA 1918- CHEAP! - This is an original bayonet made at Rock Island Arsenal in 1918, but it has been heavily cleaned, leaving no finish, and there is some dried grease or crud in various places. The grips have been sanded some and one area on the left grip filled with some sort of filler material that actually blends in pretty well. The scabbard body is in excellent condition, but the cover is a good quality reproduction. Touching up the finish on the hilt and the bottom 1/8” of the blade would restore it to typical 1918 and earlier appearance, or just dunk it in dark parkerize to make it look like late 1918 through WW2 appearance. Not pitted anywhere. Priced well below market price of a typical original M1905 bayonet and scabbard at $145.00 (View Picture)

19376 U.S. M1905 BAYONET SA 1909 WITH WW2 M3 SCABBARD- NICE! - Made in 1909 at Springfield Armory as a "bright blade" example with a 16 inch blade, but sometime after 1918 refinished to dark parkerize finish, probably for use during WW2. About 98% finish remains, with some bright/thinning spots on the crossguard. WW2 M3 plastic scabbard with USN MK 1 on the throat is in in matching excellent condition with thinning to the finish on the throat. Some of these arsenal updated bayonets were reissued with new plastic grips, but others like this one reused the walnut grips with the rough turning marks. These were issued with both the M1903 rifles and the Garands during WW2. The bayonet alone, or matched with an earlier M1910 scabbard would be appropriate for a late WW1 M1903 Springfield as well. A minty example! $365.00 (View Picture)

19375 U.S.M4 BAYONET FOR M1 CARBINE W/SCABBARD (BREN-DAN) - Overall about excellent bus showing some light use. Bren-Dan is a 1960s era production, made with the plastic grips. This is the type used in Vietnam, while the WW2 issue carbine bayonet had the leather handles, which did not hold up well in tropical conditions. Complete with M8A1 scabbard. $85.00 (View Picture)

14314 U.S. M1873 BAYONET FOR .45-70 "TRAPDOORS" WITH M1885 SCABBARD- SUPERB! - Probably the best example we have ever had. Bayonet is flat mint with 99% of the bright blue arsenal finish. The scabbard is the M1885 with the brass belt hook (to slip down into one of the loops of the Mills belts). Scabbard body retains about 98% of the bright blue, not age toned or turning plum like most, but still a glorious bright blue with only a couple of small scrapes. The leather loop is excellent and the best we have seen in along time. The best trapdoor bayonet and scabbard we have ever had, and impossible to find in this condition any more, although there are a lot of 95% examples out there, but not as nice as this. Fit for a trapdoor that just got removed from a sealed crate! $450.00 (View Picture)

23143 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET- BRIGHT BLADE SA 1906 WITH M1905/1910 SCABBARD - A very nice example of the early “bright blade” Model 1905 bayonet as made up to the start of WW1 when they began to darken the blades, and later most of the bright blade models were refinished, leaving the survivors scarce and desirable. This one was made at Springfield Armory in 1906, the first year of production, with serial number 141295. Walnut grip scales retain their rough turning texture and have only the GI oil finish. Hilt and crossguard retain about 40% of the original blued finish, along with the blue strip on the lower portion of the blade. The crossguard has some pitting and little finish, and the lower portion has a slight bend which should be easy to correct. Pommel and the top and bottom edges of the hilt retain most the their blue finish. Blade has been lightly cleaned and there is some very minor pitting near the tip, probably from dampness inside the scabbard. The scabbard is a VG Model 1905 leather covered scabbard which originally had a Krag style swivel hook. These were converted after adoption of the M1910 belt system by removal of the swivel hook and addition of a leather collar with a M1910 hook. There are two types of conversion and this is the “type 3” discussed in Gary Cunningham’s “American Military Bayonets of the 20th Century” on pages 29-30. Scabbard body has original Rock Island 1907 markings. Unlike most of the leather covered scabbards, the tip stitching has NOT split and the leather pulled back, although it is somewhat scuffed. A far above average example of the early M1905 bayonet and the altered 1905/1910 scabbard. Very hard to find these any more with any condition at all. $595.00 (View Picture)

19643 U.S. M1 BAYONET CONVERTED BY KOREANS TO KM-5 CONFIGURATION - The Koreans liked the smaller blades of the M5 bayonet made for the Garand and as a result they cut down and reshaped the blades of thousands of the 10 inch blade M1 Garand bayonets we had given to them. The designated these as the KM-5 model, and many were imported about 25 years ago with the Blue Sky import guns. Except for a few folks who collect oddball stuff, these are mainly valued for the internal parts and grips for use in repairing regular M1 Garand bayonets. What you see is what you get for only $12.00 (View Picture)

15278 U.S. MARINE CORPS BAYONET TRAINING AID RIFLE “MOKUJU” - This is part of the USMC “Martial Arts Kit” for training for close quarters combat skills, which the Marines take very seriously. The “Traininig Aid, Rifle, Mokuju” name comes from the original Japanese term used to describe these devices which are basically a wooden shape approximating a rifle and bayonet the same length as the M16, and having a rubber tip on the bayonet end to minimize injuries. Made from ash or similar strong hard wood about 45.5” long, 1” thick and 3.5” wide and weight about 2.5 pounds. These are similar in concept to the old “pugil sticks” used but are lighter, easier to move and the ends are not nearly as padded so the impact is more painful for the losers. But, to paraphrase the old saying “the more you bruise in peace the less you bleed in war.” The photos show this Mokuju and also a USMC photo showing it in use. The NSN for this is 8415-01-519-7783, and this is from the official supplier to the USMC. I got a couple of these for a display I did and am selling off the extra one now- new condition. $49.00 (View Picture)

16616 U.S. M1873 .45-70 TRAPDOOR BAYONET SCABBARD - (Reilly S85) The most used type of scabbard issued with the M1873-1884 Springfield Trapdoor rifles. These had the leather belt loop for use with the leather waist belts being issued when the McKeever cartridge boxes were in service, prior to the Mills type web belts. Fine to excellent example with steel body having about 95% of the original bright blue finish. Good, but cracked and slightly flaked leather frog with faint Rock Island Arsenal markings. This has the second (post 1874) “US” in the brass rosette, while a few of the very earliest has “U.S” with a period. Hard to find in decent shape as most were worn out and then scrapped as the M1885 scabbard was issued. $125.00 (View Picture)

12285 U.S. M1873 .45-70 TRAPDOOR BAYONET FOR M1873-1884 RIFLES - Excellent example with about 95-97% original blue finish, marred by assorted storage scrapes and dings and three or four small (less than 1/2" dia) patches of rust that may clean off (or maybe not). Not quite minty, but close and a nice item to go with a nice, but somewhat used, trapdoor rifle. $95.00 (View Picture)

22247 U.S. MODEL 1873 "TROWEL BAYONET" FOR .45-70 TRAPDOOR RIFLES - (Janzen 215-2) A very clever attempt to combine the features of a bayonet and the entrenching tool into a single item, thereby reducing the soldier's load and perhaps achieving some cost reduction as well. Like so many good ideas dreamed up by the bureaucrats at their desks, it was a dismal failure. Indian fighting tactics did not include the necessity for use of the bayonet, and as a result, bayonets were seldom carried in the field anyway. Although the instructions said that this item was to be used like a trowel for digging entrenchments, human nature dictated that it sure looked like a shovel when mounted on a rifle, so it should be used like a shovel. This resulted in bent barrels and other problems. About 10,000 were made, and they are a fascinating addition to any U.S. military collection sure to elicit comments or inquiries from visitors. An excellent representative example with most of the bright polished finish remaining on the blade, but some scattered light staining. No chips or cracks on the edges as is often the case. The handle portion which was originally blued has about 95% blue left and the tiny patent date marking is sharp and legible. These fit any of the M1873/1877/1879/1884 trapdoor rifles (except the rod bayonet models) and are a real attention getter when people see them. Original scabbards are very hard to find but you can get repros for S&S or other sources quite reasonably priced. This is a well above average example of this scarce and desirable bayonet. $495.00 (View Picture)

21661 U.S. M1873 BAYONET FOR .45-70 "TRAPDOORS" WITH M1885 SCABBARD - Excellent example with about 95+% original blue finish, with a few scattered surface rust freckles and traces of scabbard wear on the sharp edges. Scabbard is the M1885 type with the brass belt hook (to slip down into one of the loops of the Mills belts). About 98% of the original blue on the scabbard body, and leather loop is about excellent with storage dirt and a few minor scrapes. The brass hook is tarnished or covered with dried crud that should clean up okay. Far above average and one of the best we have seen recently. Great for just about any real nice M1873-1884 trapdoor rifle except maybe one that just got removed from a sealed crate. $325.00 (View Picture)

21715 CIVIL WAR SPRINGFIELD MUSKET BAYONET SCABBARD - (Reilly S54) U.S. Model 1861, standard type with the eight rivets which was the most commonly used CW scabbard for the U.S. .58 caliber bayonets. Condition is rough, but will display okay. The body is still with the stitching long gone on the back, and the leather surface cracked and flaking. The leather of the frog has lost all the surface, but is now a flexible, almost buff type appearance. Bayonet fits in nicely. Too fragile for use, but fine for static display, although in fairy rough condition, so it would look out of place if the rest of your collection is excellent to minty, but be fine to go with a collection that is more to the rusty and relic and of the spectrum. $65.00 (View Picture)

19954 U.S. WW2 MODEL 1905 BAYONET FOR M1 GARAND AND M1903 (Series) RIFLES MADE BY UFH IN 1942 WITH SCABBARD - Very nice example with the scarce brown (instead of black) Bakelite grips. This retains about 75-80% of the original gray parkerized finish, worn on the tip area with some sharpening and a few rust specks on the blade as shown in the photos. There is some light pitting on the muzzle ring as shown in the photos. These were made with great urgency, by workforces largely made of women who replaced the experienced workers in the small companies which filled bayonet contracts. This one was made by Union Fork and Hoe in 1942 and the markings are poorly struck, but legible. The M3 scabbard is one of those made for the U.S. Navy, but later integrated into the combined service supply system, and generally considered correct for any of the WW2 made M1905 bayonets as they were delivered separately from the bayonets and matched up later when issued. Overall, a very good representative example of the so-called “Model 1942 bayonet” although officially they were always Model 1905. This will go well with a rifle that has been issued and shows some wear, not a minty gun. $350.00 (View Picture)

14458 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET- SPRINGFIELD ARMORY 1916 WITH BRIGHT BLADE AND BLUED HILT - This one needs a good cleaning and will look a lot better. This has the original finish with the blued hilt extending up about 1/8” on the blade, and the rest of the blade finished bright. The hilt has some light surface rust freckles and is starting to turn plum. The blade has some light staining that should clean up with some emery cloth. Edge of blade shows evidence of period sharpening, the better to slice up the Huns. A nice representative example of the classic U.S. bayonet for the M1903 Springfield used in WW1. Remember, bayonets were NOT shipped with the rifles, so it is perfectly normal to find either a SA or RIA bayonet on a SA or RIA rifle. These bayonets continued to be used during WW2, but most were refinished starting in the midst of WW1 to darken the blade, and later they were given parkerize finish. Will go well with a rifle that has been used some, not a really minty example. $275.00 (View Picture)

22848 WW2 GERMAN DRESS BAYONET & SCABBARD- EICKHORN - WW2 German enlisted man’s dress bayonet with scabbard, made by Eickhorn. These were made in a variety of grades by various makers, and this one seems to be a bit better quality than most. These were strictly dress items, not combat weapons, so the blades were often made of soft metal, and many had dummy catches, or even omitted the slots for attaching to the rifle entirely. What you see is what you get. $95.00 (View Picture)

17162 U.S. MODEL 1892 BAYONET & SCABBARD FOR .30-40 KRAG RIFLES- 1900 DATE - Overall VG-fine and will clean up and look a lot nicer. 1900 date on the blade, with US on the other side. Blade has a few spots of staining and light roughness as shown in the photos, some of which will clean up with some careful work. The hilt has a lot of light surface rust that will clean off. Nice walnut grip scales. Nice scabbard, free from dents or rust, but not much of the blue finish remains. Good Krag bayonets are getting harder to find, and when cleaned up this will be above average and a good representative example to go with any of your Krag rifles Model 1892, 1896 or 1898 of any date. $250.00 (View Picture)

13677 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET- BRIGHT BLADE SA 1909 WITH M1905/1910 SCABBARD - A very nice example of the early “bright blade” Model 1905 bayonet as made up to the start of WW1 when they began to darken the blades, and later most of the bright blade models were refinished, leaving the survivors scarce and desirable. This one was made at Springfield Armory in 1909, with serial number 401253. Walnut grip scales retain their rough turning texture and have only the GI oil finish. Hilt and crossguard retain about 90% of the original blued finish, along with the blue strip on the lower portion of the blade. Blade has been lightly sharpened and cleaned. Some scattered light pitting in the fuller, mainly at the rear on the right side, visible in the photographs. The scabbard is a VG Model 1905 leather covered scabbard which originally had a Krag style swivel hook. These were converted after adoption of the M1910 belt system by removal of the swivel hook and addition of a leather collar with a M1910 hook. There are two types of conversion and this is the “type 1” discussed in Gary Cunningham’s American Military Bayonets of the 20th Century on pages 29-30. Scabbard body has original Rock Island 1911 markings, and was probably converted almost immediately after being accepted. As with nearly all of the leather covered scabbards, the tip stitching has split and the leather pulled back some as the leather shrunk over the years. A well above average example of the early M1905 bayonet. Very hard to find these any more. $650.00 (View Picture)

11910 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET (RIA 1918) WITH REPRO M1910 SCABBARD - Bayonet Made by Rock Island in 1918, serial number 352036. Walnut grip scales still have the rough turning marks. Metal parts parkerized, probably during or after WW1 when they did away with the bright blades previously used and went to darkened finishes. Very nice blade with about 90-95% finish, just a bit of scabbard wear. One tiny chip on the edge near the tip (less than 1/8"). Scabbard is excellent quality reproduction of the M1910 looking great and reducing the price significantly over one that was original. $375.00 (View Picture)

SMEW2476 VIETNAM ERA U.S. M1917 BAYONET & SCABBARD MADE FOR USE WITH TRENCH GUNS - After WW2 the Model 1917 Enfield rifles and bayonets were declared obsolete and sold off or given away as foreign aid. However, during Vietnam the need arose for trench guns, mainly for riot control purposes, but some saw combat use. Since all the M1917 bayonets were out of the supply system, contracts were made for a new supply of bayonets. Exact numbers made are not clear, but these are seen very rarely compared to the WW1 era bayonets. This one was made by General Cutlery in Fremont, OH, and marked on the face of the crossguard with US M1917/ GENCUT. Dark gray parkerized finish except for factory sharpened edge which was done after finishing. About 98% finish remains, showing just normal wear on sharp edges of the hilt and a bit of in and out wear on the blade. Black plastic grips. Overall workmanship is significantly below that of WW1 era M1917 bayonets, but these were procured from the lowest bidder to the minimum acceptable government specifications during the Vietnam era. Plastic scabbard body with parkerized metal throat marked U.S.- M1917/ VZM. About unissued condition, but 40 years of careless storage have resulted in scraping of hilts causing the finish wear. These will fit any of the trench guns made for M1917 bayonets, or the M1917 Enfield rifle, or even British Pattern 1913 rifles. $295.00 (View Picture)

22867 U.S. M1892 BAYONET FOR KRAG RIFLE- 1901 DATED - What you see is what you get. Viewed from the left side this is an excellent bayonet with good grips and sharp markings. Viewed from the right side, it is badly pitted on the blade, crossguard and pommel. Some of it might be cleaned up a bit with some patient file work, but it will never be great. Good for a display item as long as you place it so no one turns it over and gets surprised. $65.00 (View Picture)

22458 U.S. MODEL 1816 BAYONET FOR PERCUSSION CONVERSIONS OF M1816 MUSKETS - At the time that the M1816 flintlock muskets were being converted (circa 1856-1863) contracts were let for a supply of replacement bayonet for those which had been damaged or lost over the years. These had the M1816 style sockets, but instead of the old 16 inch blades, the current M1855 style 18 inch blades were used. These are most often associated with the Hewes & Phillips conversions, but could have been issued with any of the M1816 conversion. This is a nice example, not quite minty, showing a mix of a lot of original bright polished finish, mixed with some staining and rust spots. If desired this could be cleaned up to be a really nice example. The M1816s were not 100% interchangeable, and a bit of very minor hand fitting is sometimes necessary to mate a musket and bayonet. (Or you can return it if it does not fit!) $195.00 (View Picture)

20841 U.S. Model 1905 Bayonet made by Rock Island in 1911 with early M1905 scabbard with Krag type swivel - This is a very nice example of the long Model 1905 bayonet, made by Rock Island Arsenal in 1911, one of the harder dates to find with only about 22,500 made that year. Original walnut grip scales in nice shape and about 97% of the WW1 era arsenal parkerized refinish remains. Blade not sharpened and no dings in the edge. The scabbard is the scarce early Model 1905 type with the leather covered body and blued metal throat piece with the long swivel hook similar to those used with Krag scabbards. After adoption of the Model 1910 Infantry equipment most of these early scabbard were converted by removal of the long swivel and replacement with a leather collar and M1910 belt hook. This is a pretty nice example of the scabbard, with about 60% thinning blue on the throat, about 80-90% on the swivel. Leather is nice looking despite some loss of leather on the backside at the tip. Hard to find them any better than this, and most of the early scabbards seen today are pretty trashy. $495.00 (View Picture)

19658 U.S. MODEL 1816 BAYONET FOR PERCUSSION CONVERSIONS OF M1816 MUSKETS - At the time that the M1816 flintlock muskets were being converted (circa 1856-1863) contracts were let for a supply of replacement bayonet for those which had been damaged or lost over the years. These had the M1816 style sockets, but instead of the old 16 inch blades, the current M1855 style 18 inch blades were used. These are most often associated with the Hewes & Phillips conversions, but could have been issued with any of the M1816 conversion. This is a nice example, not quite minty, showing a mix of a lot of original bright polished finish, blemished by a few minor spots of staining and llight surface rust and dried grease. A little cleaning will make this an exceptionally nice example. Remember, the M1816 muskets and bayonets were not 100% interchangeable, and a bit of hand fitting was sometimes necessary to mate a musket and bayonet. We offer a full refund (less shipping on all items) if it does not fit, so you cannot go wrong. $225.00 (View Picture)

19657 Winchester Bayonet for M1876 and Hotchkiss Muskets - (and possibly other late Winchester musket models) (Reilly B131). Looks like a typical US M1855-1873 type except for the socket bore and the visible bulge or knob shape on the back of the shank where joins the blade. A scarce bayonet. Condition is minty with only a few specks of surface rust as seen in the photos. $295.00 (View Picture)

20345 U.S. M1873 BAYONET FOR .45-70 "TRAPDOORS" - Excellent example with about 95-97% original blue finish, with a few assorted storage scrapes and dings and a lot of tiny light surface rust freckles that should clean off easily. Not quite minty, but close and a nice item to go with a nice, but somewhat used, trapdoor rifle. No scabbard $165.00 (View Picture)

20110 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET WITH SCARCE M1905 SWIVEL SCABBARD (ATROCITY VICTIM!) - Bayonet is Springfield Armory 1908 production which still retains the blued hilt and bright blade. Lots of fine salt and pepper pitting on the blade, and some surface rust on the hilt, but overall a fair to good example that can be cleaned to look a bit better. This is the first style scabbard as made 1905-1910 with a permanently attached leather cover over the rawhide covered wooden core, and fitted with a swivel type belt hanger attachment like those used on Krag bayonets. In 1910 the new belt system was adopted and the scabbards were simplified so that a simple removable canvas cover with the curly M1910 belt hook was used over the rawhide covered wooden body. Most of the M1905 scabbards had the swivel hook removed and a leather collar placed around the top of the scabbard with the new style curly hooks, making surviving examples of the M1905 scabbard pretty rare. This scabbard was butchered by Bubba who felt compelled to cut through the leather covering just below the metal throat piece, and remove all of it below that point. While this essentially turned a several hundred dollar artifact into near junk, it does present the opportunity for someone to show how the early scabbards were constructed. At least that is the best excuse we can think of for wanting to own it. Or, someone good with leather could neatly fit a piece snugly against the bottom of the throat piece and stitched on the back or edge and restore it to pretty much correct appearance. In any case, the degraded condition makes this one a lot cheaper than normal at $295.00 (View Picture)

19936 U.S. M1905 BAYONET BRIGHT BLADE (SA 1908) AND M1910 SCABBARD - Prior to WW1 the bayonets for the M1903 Springfield were made with the hilts blued and the blades polished bright, but during and after WW1 most were refinished and the blades darkened usually by Parkerizing. This is one that escaped being refinished, but, alas, has suffered from poor storage and is sort of ugly now. About 50% of the blue finish on the hilt remains. The blade has numerous splotches of staining and rust on the blade. It may be possible to remove most but some will leave pitting behind. The walnut grip scales are worn but pretty good, and have K55 stamped on the left grip, filled with red. The scabbard is well used as well, with the leather tip clearly marked BRAUER BROS. 1918. The suspension look has a period sewn repair, but is sound. Not the nicest set we have seen, but not really bad, and could be cleaned up a lot. Will display nicely with a well used rifle with 50-60% finish and lots of dings. $425.00 (View Picture)

19660 SCARCE WW1 WOODEN FENCING MUSKET MADE AT ROCK ISLAND - Borphy’s book describes these in detail on pages 102-105, along with the other fencing equipment used to teach soldiers the techniques of bayonet fighting. Up until about 1916 the Army converted obsolete trapdoor muskets to “fencing muskets” by cutting them to the length of a M1903 Springfield, removing the sights and hammers, grinding off some other protruding parts, and filling the barrel with lead for proper weight. A bayonet was provided that attached to the barrel and had a leather covered spring steel blade with a blunt tip to avoid injury. By the outbreak of World War One, the Army had adopted a much cheaper and expendable wooden rifle for bayonet training. It was made of a thick, dense wood (similar to mahogany) roughly shaped to the outline of the M1903 rifle with fixed 16 inch bladed bayonet. Several heavy rivets reinforced the butt in two places and the crossguard area of the bayonet to prolong service life. The tip of the bayonet was covered with a padded leather ball, nearly always missing from these. Brophy shows an example marked RIA 1914 but all of the 5 or 6 I have ever seen have only had a tiny ordnance wheel inspector mark. Overall length about 60 inches. This example is about average condition with the padded leather tip missing, and assorted dings and scars. The wood has been drying out for 90 years and the buttstock has numerous age checks or cracks, but it is solid, thanks to the reinforcing rivets. Overall a mellow medium brown patina. Ordnance wheel inspector mark is present. This is a rare M1903 Springfield accessory, or a rare addition to a U.S. bayonet collection. As noted, we have only seen a handful of these, so survival rate is pretty low. $250.00 (View Picture)

19442 U.S. MODEL 1855 SOCKET BAYONET FOR THE .58 CALIBER MUSKETS AND .50-70 RIFLES (SLIGHTLY SHORTENED) - Probably shortened by Bannerman or one of the surplus merchants to sell with their “cadet” rifles or “Quaker rifles” popular with youth groups and military schools in the late 19th century. This is a standard M1855 bayonet and will fit all the .58 muskets and .50-70 rifles, but the blade has been shortened from 18” to 15 ¼ inches. Overall it has an old dark brown color which is a mix of patina, dried crud and possible some sort of browned finish applied by Bannerman. This could be easily polished bright if you like, or wanted to use it for living history or reenactor events, or will display nicely as a representative Civil War bayonet with a “brown gun” example of a musket. If unaltered, price would be about $50 higher, but it is a bargain at only $95.00 (View Picture)

19367 U.S. Model 1855 .58 caliber bayonet partially converted to M1873 .45-70 caliber - We have seen a number of these over the years, having the socket pressed down to the smaller diameter for use on the .45-70 rifles. However, in the process, some failed and there is a resulting crack along the lower edge of the socket. The bayonets are otherwise in excellent condition, still finished bright and needing final polishing. These should work okay on a .45-70 (maybe need a little final fitting) but are nice for display to show how the thrifty army tried to save money by altering obsolete material to meet current needs. It also explains how they got into the rod-bayonet business after the supply of Civil War surplus bayonets for conversion was exhausted. What you see is what you get. This one has a crack at the front of the socket. $89.00 (View Picture)

558 U.S. M4 bayonet with RUBBER GRIPS - Rare variant shown in Cole III, page 108, number 17. (Also Janzen 228-1) No marks on guard. Blade has about 99% of dark parkerize finish, probably done when cast rubber grips were installed. Overall would grade as near excellent. These are a recognized variation done under U.S. military authority. Rare item. Have only ever seen two others. With M8 scabbard with M1910 belt hook added to alter to M8A1. $165.00

18389 M1873 BAYONET FOR .45-70 TRAPDOOR - A near mint unissued example that suffered from poor storage and how has a lot of surface rust spots, especially on the socket. Most should clean off but some will not, but it will look a lot better with a good cleaning. $110.00 (View Picture)

17910 Scarce- Partially completed conversion of U.S. Model 1855 .58 caliber bayonet to fit .45-70 rifles - At the end of the Civil War the Army had hundreds of thousands of surplus bayonets for the obsolete .58 caliber rifle muskets. They continued to use some of these with the .50-70 rifles. However, when production of the Model 1873 rifles in .45-70 caliber began, the army was in a chronically underfunded struggle to cut costs. Therefore, they developed a method to compress the sockets of the surplus .58 caliber bayonets down a bit to fit on the smaller .45-70 rifles. Although some suggest that they just squeezed the sockets down, that does not allow for displacement of the metal no longer needed for the new diameter of the socket. Others have suggested, and the evidence is very strong, that the old bayonets had a narrow slit cut on he underside of the socket and then it was compressed or essentially cold forged to the diameter and when refinished would look like a new made bayonet. We have had a half dozen of these bayonets with failed seams in the socket which we believe are rejects from the alteration process due to failure of the seam to properly close up. Some are clearly previously issued bayonets, and others, like this one, seem to be nearly completed ones that were still on hand at Springfield as work in progress when production of the .58 caliber bayonets ended. Perhaps they were an unsuccessful first attempt at conversion, or rejects from the process finally adopted. In any case, here is an opportunity to add a partially completed conversion to your collection to go with your .45-70s. Overall excellent plus with original bright finish, and it looks like final work had not been completed on the mortise to fit over the front sight and the lock ring stop pin had not been installed. First one of these we have had in several years. $125.00 (View Picture)

17908 Remington made French Model 1886/93/16 Bayonet & Scabbard - (Janzen 72-1) Based on the 1886 design adopted for the revolutionary 8mm Lebel rifle, the first small caliber smokeless powder rifle adopted by any nation, this continues use of the long cruciform blade, and metal alloy handle with a silver color. However, unlike the earlier versions this has no hook on the crossguard. The Remington made bayonets are unique in that they are totally unmarked, while the French made examples are serialized on the guard and the scabbard with assorted other marks as well. Considerable uncertainty exists on exactly when these were made(during WW1, or circa 1924-32?) and in what quantity, and if the were ever accepted by the French or not. In any case this is an unissued example that has been poorly stored. The blued scabbard has turned plum mixed with patina, and the steel parts of the hilt need to be cleaned. Still a nice bayonet, but not minty as some. The scabbard has a slight bend that you have to look to see, but works fine. This is the correct bayonet for the French made Mle 1907/15 Mannlicher Berthier rifles. These turn up from time to time, but not very often. $115.00 (View Picture)

17890 U.S. MODEL 1905 BAYONET- SA 1918- NICKEL PLATED - Most nickel or chrome plated bayonets are the result of unauthorized modification at the unit level for ceremonial use (color guards, parades, etc). However, I recall reading somewhere that Springfield Armory did nickel plate some M1905 bayonets in 1918, but I cannot find that reference. This one looks like it was never polished or previously finished, but simply nickel plated when newly made. It has acquired some minor flaking or rust bubble underneath the nickel as shown on the photos, mainly on the left side of the blade. Grips are about perfect with the rough turning marks intact. I believe this to be one of the SA nickeled bayonets (if, indeed, they actually made some) but it may be a later refinish by the local VFW post. Overall near excellent, and if authentic, a very rare variation for the advanced collector. $325.00 (View Picture)

16761 M1905 BAYONET (SA 1907) & RARE M1905 SCABBARD for M1903 SPRINGFIELD - The bayonet is a very nice one with original bright polished blade and some of the original blue on the hilt and bottom 1/8” of the blade. Fine to excellent walnut grip scales. Blade has some very light staining that could be polished off if desired, and one tiny patch (1/8” x ¾”) where the staining is a bit darker. No nicks in the edge. Crisp markings SA [Springfield Armory] / ordnance bomb / 1907 on the ricasso, with serial number209281 on the other side. A very handsome bayonet showing the early bright blade finish, but not quite minty. The scabbard is the Model 1905 with the Krag style swivel hook. This is the second pattern, with the longer blue steel throat piece. These were made from sometime in 1906 until replaced by the canvas covered rawhide M1910 scabbards. At that point nearly all of the M1905 scabbards were modified by removal of the Krag hooks and installation of a leather collar with a M1910 style belt hook for use with the new style web gear. Thus unmodified examples of het M1905 scabbard are quite scarce, and we have only had maybe 2 or 3 others in the last 10+ years. The leather body on this one shows the usual wear at the tip, and apparently the side stitching had problems and a previous owner glued the seam shut so it is tight now. Unfortunately, someone put several strips of tape on the leather, it when removed, it lifted some of the surface finish. This can be made a lot less noticeable with some polishing and leather treatment. Scabbard is marked on the back RIA (Rock Island Arsenal—where all the scabbards were made then) and dated 1907. While not in the best condition, this is still a very nice representative example of the bright bladed bayonet and M1905 scabbard with matching date. $695.00 (View Picture)

15515 Lot of 3 socket scabbards circa 1840-1865 - These came in with a lot of bayonets and swords and will be sold as a single lot. A- Regulation U.S. “Type II” scabbard adopted circa 1858-59 with two rivets. This one is overall VG condition with good leather and minimal cracking or flaking, but the tip is missing. Looks like it was probably for the 16 inch blade of the M1816 bayonet, but could have worked with the 18 inch M1855 or 1842 bayonets although they might stop slightly short of seating fully. No markings. We are including a free CW era brass tip from a scabbard, but it will not fit any of these three. Reilly S51. B- Regulation U.S. Model 1861 scabbard with 8 rivets for the 18 inch M1855 or M1842 bayonets. Tip is broken off and missing. Leather is dark, stiff with cracking and flaking. Has faint traces of the double oval markings often seen on Gaylord made items. Reilly S54. C- Non-regulation pattern, crude construction, probably militia or Confederate. Belt loop is noticeably narrower than the regulation patterns. Leather is scuffed, stiff and flaking. Stitching is weak and loose. Tip is broken off and missing. This will fit the 18 inch M1855 or M1842 bayonets but the point will stick out the bottom, or with the tip of the bayonet safely inside, will fit the 16 inch M1816 blades so common in early years of the war, especially in the South. Very similar to Reilly S63. The lot of three for $175.00 (View Picture)

15428 U.S. MODEL 1892 KRAG BAYONET (NO SCABBARD) - 1901 dated- Overall not quite good condition, but not total trash either. Blade has been neatly sharpened during its period of use. Pommel has some light rust (but probably very little if any pitting underneath) and rest of the hilt is dull steel gray. Some very light fingerprint type rust on the blade that should come off with a good cleaning. Grips show some wear but are pretty nice. This is one that could be aggressively cleaned up for use by a reenactor, or it will display just fine with a less than stellar Krag. The very best feature is the price, only $145.00 (View Picture)

15291 U.S. MODEL 1855 BAYONET MADE BY COLLINS & CO. FOR M1855-1861 .58 MUSKETS - At first glance this is as nice a M1855 bayonet as I have seen in years, with the added advantages of being made by the famous Collins & Company, and having the 1861 and earlier short rotation on the locking ring. Bright steel finish has mellowed to a smooth silver-gray with only a very few small specks of staining. Perfect for a minty M1855 or early M1861 musket. The Collins marking “C & Co” marked on the socket However, close inspection reveals the letter “C” struck on the rear of the socket, the infamous “mark of condemnation” indicating that this bayonet was rejected by federal inspectors. The flaw is probably in the welding of the shank to the socket as the faired in portion at the rear of the shank seems to be separates slightly, although the blade is firmly and permanently attached, so it is more of a cosmetic defect than a major problem. Still, the inspector did his job, and the bayonet was probably then sold to fill a state order instead! For someone who wants the very best, but with an interesting twist to the story. I know I will regret not keeping this for myself! $395.00 (View Picture)

14289 WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SOCKET BAYONET FOR M1873 (NEAR MINT UNISSUED!) - (Janzen 204-2) These use the common M1855 style blade shape, but the smaller diameter socket and short shank and very long riccasso of the face of the blade are distinctive identifying features on these. Many of the M1873 muskets were sold overseas, but a fair number were sold to state militias and domestic users for guard use. This example retains about 98% of the original bright polished finish, with one strip of light surface rust that should clean off along the edge of blade at the rear. About as close to mint unissued as you will ever get. Nicest of the doze or so I have seen over the years. $325.00 (View Picture)

14283 WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SOCKET BAYONET FOR M1873 WINCHESTER - (Janzen 204-2) These use the common M1855 style blade shape, but the smaller diameter socket and short shank and very long riccasso of the face of the blade are distinctive identifying features on these. Many of the M1873 muskets were sold overseas, but a fair number were sold to state militias and domestic users for guard use. This example retains about 95% of the original bright polished finish, slightly dulling to steel gray, but has scattered speckles of staining and a tiny patch of very light pitting (about 3/8” diameter) halfway own the blade. Still overall excellent example. $275.00 (View Picture)

SMEW1026 - U.S. M4 bayonet manufactured by Conetta. Correct U. S. Korean war vintage bayonet for the M1 Carbine with black plastic grips. Bayonet is in VG-Excellent condition, with Dark blue/black finish and crisp, clear markings. $75.00 (View Picture)


U.S. Knives, Machetes, & Daggers

**NEW ADDITION** 16585 U.S.N. MARK 2 KNIFE ("KABAR") MADE BY CAMILLUS- VIETNAM ERA- MINT - (Cole III, page 87 number 13). This is definitely post-WW2 with the blade markings and US above the maker name. Scabbard is black leather, and quality of construction looks about right for Vietnam, but a little less than I would expect for the 1950s. Overall about mint unissued with just a couple of tiny rust spots on the crossguard from poor storage. Factory edge sharpened only. $59.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 15938 VIETNAM ERA GERBER MARK II COMBAT KNIFE LEATHER SCABBARD - What you see is what you get, exactly as found, alas with no knife or sharpening stone, just the scabbard. Here is a chance to replace a missing scabbard for your knife. $85.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 20676 WW2 USMC “KA-BAR” KNIFE & SCABBARD - See Cole, volume 3, page 91 top of the page). This was made by Camillus, NY and is marked across the front of the guard with the maker name and USMC. This is the typical type with the pinned pommel. Scabbard is typical leather type which was stamped USMC/BOYT/43 but someone unsuccessfully ground off most of that. Otherwise the scabbard is in excellent condition. The knife shows period use and sharpening, and retains maybe a third of the gray parkerized finish mixed with patina and surface rust/staining. The leather grip washers are sound, but dark and dirty. These were beloved and heavily used by Marines, and a lot more useful than any bayonet. Post WW2 “Ka-Bars” (which were actually made by at least four makers during WW2 and even more later) are fairly easy to find. This is a good representative WW2 knife and a great scabbard, which you may want to switch to a better knife. $85.00 (View Picture)

21634 U.S. MODEL 1904 HOSPITAL CORPS KNIFE (BOLO) WITH SCABBARD- DATED 1904 - (Cole III, pp. 14-15). The first limited issue Army bolos were for the Hospital Corps troops to clear brush and cut poles for litters, tents etc. After experience in the Spanish American War and the Philippine Insurrection, the Model 1904 Bolo was developed. This used a curved 12" blade with a rounded end, and a curved handle with wood grips attached by brass rivets with an "S" shaped crossguard to protect the hand. One of a variety of edged weapons or tools made at Springfield Armory. The heavy well balanced blade was effective for chopping or cutting brush to clear aid stations, or wood for splints, etc. However, this was not intended for use as a weapon, and the tip was rounded to emphasize its non-weapon status. Springfield Armory made 39,919 between 1904 and 1915. This first year of production example is dated 1904, with US and serial number 1167. While made at Springfield Armory the SA and flaming bomb markings above the date were not used until 1907. The walnut grips were modified during the period of use to remove the three bumps for finger grip. Period sharpened with some roughness and pitting, but overall good condition. The scabbard is the scarce type made 1904-1908 with a heavy leather belt loop, and the more common 1909 and later dated examples use a metal belt hook similar to those used on Krag bayonets. Most of the cotton thread stitching on the scabbard has deteriorated and pulled loose, but it would be easy (although tedious) to restitch by hand through the existing holes as the leather is all there and in fairly decent shape. A presentable example of first year production with the first type scabbard. U.S. military edged weapons other than bayonets are an interesting collecting niche, with the books by H.M. Cole being an excellent guide, along with several websites, especially http://www.springfieldedge.com/index.html The bolo category includes the Model 1887 Hospital Corps knife, the M1904 Hospital Corps bolo, the M1909 Machete and the M1910 Bolo, all made by Springfield Armory, and the two latter also by contractors during WW1, and the WW2 USMC Medical bolo. Other machetes include some by Collins, and a wide variety from the WW2 era. Another good site is http://www.knife-expert.com/bolo.txt $195.00 (View Picture)

18891 U.S. MODEL 1909 BOLO- SPRINGFIELD ARMORY 1909 - (Cole, III, pp. 16-17) First year production, serial number 1337, one of about 2,700 made that year. The M-1909 Bolo Knife was designed to deal with the jungle foliage that they had previously encountered in Cuba and the Philippines, where natives used similar sized machetes. (Earlier attempts at creating cutting tools with bolo bayonets designed for the Krag rifle were seen as failures.) The M-1909 Bolo Knife was designed to be carried as a belt knife. A total of 17,540 were produced at the Springfield Armory between 1909 and 1915. During WW1 Plumb and Collins produced variants of the M-1909, designated as M-1917 Bolo Knife. This example looks pretty nice on the left side with the flaming bomb, SA and 1909 markings visible, although there is some heavy pitting on the upper part of the crossguard. The right side, however, has two large areas of heavy pitting, so don’t hurt your eyes, by looking at that, just turn it over and admire the nice side. Sharpened somewhat during period of use. Good walnut grips. No scabbard. U.S. military edged weapons other than bayonets are an interesting collecting niche, with the books by H.M. Cole being an excellent guide, along with several websites, especially http://www.springfieldedge.com/index.html The bolo category includes the Model 1887 Hospital Corps knife, the M1904 Hospital Corps bolo, the M1909 Machete and the M1910 Bolo, all made by Springfield Armory, and the two latter also by contractors during WW1, and the WW2 USMC Medical bolo. Other machetes include some by Collins, and a wide variety from the WW2 era. Another good site is http://www.knife-expert.com/bolo.txt $149.00 (View Picture)

17089 U.S. MILITARY PARACHUTE “HOOK BLADE KNIFE” (SHROUD CUTTER) - This is a simple, but essential tool carried either in a cloth pouch on the parachute case, or on a special pocket of the flight suit so that it is instantly available if needed. The “hook blade” eliminates any sharp point which might stab the user, or damage equipment. The inside edge of the hook is sharpened, so that you can “hook onto” parachute shroud lines to quickly cut them away in an emergency, or for use as survival material. This is the first of these we have had, and has orange plastic(?) handles. The stainless steel blade has maker marking etched in place with a 1974 date. Used (or carried) VG-fine condition. $35.00 (View Picture)

SMEW2415 Bolo Knife U.S. Model 1917 Manufactured by Plumb of St. Louis. - Blade is in good condition withsome sharpening but very little pitting. Ricasso is marked ``U.S. / MOD. 1917`` reverse ricasso marked ``PLUMB / ST LOUIS``. Grip scales are good condition but have some dents and dings. Grips and pommel are stampped `L111'. $150.00 (View Picture)

19228 SPANISH AMERICAN-WW1 ERA COLLINS No. 1005 MACHETE & SCABBARD - This is the type believed to have been used in Spanish American War with heavy thick "bolo" blade, not light type found on WW2 machetes. Type 1 shown in Cole III, p. 36 with the green horn handle. “4 D” branded into the grip, but exact meaning unknown. Scabbard is type with brass throat and tip (as shown with type 1 blade) having the Collins “Legitimus” logo and two rows of scrolls. No US military marks (except maybe the 4 D??) but certainly identical type as purchased for military use. Blade has been heavily sharpened during period of use with some stray grind/file marks and has stain and some small areas of light pitting. Handles are a bit dry. Tooled leather scabbard in good shape, but the brass top plate on throat piece has come loose, which can be soldered (or more easily- fastened with epoxy) back in place. This general type was military issue circa 1898 until the late 1920s. $225.00 (View Picture)

19229 SCARCE COLLINS 1232 BOLO OR SPLINT KNIFE FOR THE CCC - (Cole IV p. 14; D.E. Henry- Collins Machetes & Bowies pp. 116-121) This was patterned after the U.S. Model 1904 Hospital Corps Knife, but made somewhat lighter (and less costly) 12 inch blade for use by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s. This one, like one mentioned by Henry is stamped CDF for the California Division of Forestry. The horn used for the grips is beginning to delaminate some, but is intact. Edge shows period sharpening and the edge has only a couple of tiny insignificant nicks. A scarce example of a military item adapted for civilian use and used by the famous CCC during the depression. $225.00 (View Picture)

19052 ASIAN (Philippine?) BOLO(?) KNIFE AND WOODEN SCABBARD - Nice quality handmade bolo(?) knife and scabbard, probably from the Philippines, or possibly somewhere else in Asia. Overall length about 14-15 inches. I believe this is a WW2 era souvenir, but possibly from Vietnam. The hand forged blade is about 11 inches long, flat on one side, and the edge is rounded over on the other side to form the sharp edge. The wooden hilt appears to be some sort of ugly animal type figure (or maybe it is a Democrat- hard to tell the difference sometimes). The wooden scabbard is well made with the outside a dark mahogany type wood and the back a lighter color wood, bound together by six braided bands of leather or sinew of some sort. Near the top of the scabbard there is a raised rib with two holes for some sort of thong type attachment to a belt. Overall this is fairly good native workmanship, not cheap-hurry up tourist trade junk, but certainly nothing that approaches fine art or skilled craftsmanship. I know there are people who collect this sort of thing and can probably narrow down where it came from, so if you have any questions, I don’t have any more answers on this one. $75.00 (View Picture)

556 Collins No. 1005 Machete - This is the type believed to have been used in Spanish American War with heavy thick "bolo" blade, not light type found on WW2 machetes. Type 2 shown in Cole III, p. 36 with coco-bolo wood grips. Scabbard is type with brass throat and tip (as shown with type 3 blade). Blade shows rough forged nature, but has been heavily sharpened (be careful, it is REALLY sharp!). Tooled leather scabbard in good shape, but leather loop is badly cracked and flaking. Brass top plate on throat piece has come loose, but can be soldered (or more easily- fastened with epoxy) back in place. This general type was military issue circa 1898 until the late 1920s. $175.00 (View Picture)



Foreign Bayonets

**NEW ADDITION** 15939 ENGLISH .577 ENFIELD SHORT RIFLE/MUSKETOON SWORD BAYONET WITH SCABBARD & FROG- NICE! - (Janzen 50-1, Skennerton Brit & Commonwealth Bayonets B151 or B153). There is some conflicting terminology on these which may have minor differences in muzzle ring diameter. Janzen calls them Pattern 1856, while Skennerton lists B151 as Pattern 1856/58, and B153 as Pattern 1860. All of these are for the “bar on barrel” stud, not the bar on the band, but exact muzzle ring dimensions listed vary from 20.6mm to 20.9mm. My bet is that this is the Pattern 1860, the most common of the possible matches, which should fit most of the two band Enfields with the bayonet lug on the barrel. This is by far the best condition example of the Enfield sword bayonet we have ever seen, one of the few found with a decent scabbard and the only one with the original frog. Like many of these, the blade (or perhaps the entire thing) was made in Solingen by Kirschbaum, with their knight’s head marking. Large numbers of two band Enfields were imported for use during the Civil War, by both north and south, and this could have been used by either, or perhaps remained safely in English storage. I doubt if you will find a nicer example to go with your two band Enfield. $595.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22053 SWEDISH MODEL 1896 MAUSER BAYONET FROG - There are several different frogs used with the M1896 bayonets and this one is the “Frog M39 for M39 Belt.” Unmarked, overall VG condition. Photo shows one of the long belt loops laid out and other one buckled. $10.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22052 ARGENTINE MODEL 1909 BAYONET WITH CREST INTACT AND MATCHING SCABBARD - (Janzen 2-3) These are very hard to find with the crest as the Argentine policy was to grind off the crest. Matching numbers C8304 on the blade and scabbard. Scabbard has a couple of very minor dings with nearly all the blue finish intact. The bayonet is about excellent with some minor light surface rust on the hilt which should clean off. Fine walnut grip scales. These bayonets were used with the Argentine M1909 rifles and short rifles. Above average example. $135.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22049 BRITISH No 4 MKIII SPIKE BAYONET (For No 4 Mark I rifles) - This is the scarce late war design utilizing crude welds, brazed spike and rough finish. Socket has traces of black paint. Spike has staining and light discoloration. These were only made by Joseph Lucas Ltd in 1944-45. This comes with a good MK 1 scabbard $20.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 22048 -BRITISH No 4 MKIII SPIKE BAYONET (For No 4 Mark I rifles) - This is the scarce late war design utilizing crude welds, brazed spike and rough finish. Socket has traces of black paint. Spike has staining and light discoloration. These were only made by Joseph Lucas Ltd in 1944-45. This comes with a good MK 1 scabbard $15.00 (View Picture)

**NEW ADDITION** 19861 SCARCE WW1 GERMAN MADE BAYONET FOR AUSTRIAN M1895 MANNLICHER - (Janzen 97-3) These were made in Germany by Ernst Busch Company in 1917 with the typical German Crown/W/17/Inspector mark on the top edge of the blade. It is believed that these were made for German troops on the Eastern and Italian fronts who were sometimes armed with Austrian Model 1895 Mannlicher rifles. Overall nicely cleaned with just a tiny bit of easily overlooked roughness on parts of the blade. The catch piece is a good quality replacement. Scarce item. The subject of foreign made arms pressed into service by the Germans in WW1 and/or WW2 would be an interesting collecting specialty with a wide variety of guns and edged weapons to pursue. $95.00 (View Picture)

21029 AUSTRALIAN USED WW1 BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 57-3) Made in November 1917 by Sanderson, one of the largest makers of the Pattern 1907 bayonets for the No. 1 Mark III SMLE rifles. This is a good representative example of the type, showing wear, but not abuse or overhaul. The blued portions of the hilt and lower inch or so of the blade have traces of blue, but are mostly plum or patina. The blade is lightly cleaned, mostly dull steel gray. Good markings, including large broad arrow within a D on the pommel, the Australian Defence Department ownership marking used circa 1911-1920s. The crossguard has the marking [D2D and broad arrow] for the Australian 2nd Military District (headquartered in Sydney and covering most of New South Wales). Overall about good condition bayonet and scabbard typical of those used by the Australians from WW1 though the end of WW2. $125.00 (View Picture)

20572 JAPANESE WW2 TYPE 30 BAYONET (HOOKED GUARD) WITH SCABBARD AND LEATHER FROG - (Janzen 133-1). Made by Nagoya Arsenal, probably early in WW2. Overall fine to excellent condition with about 80-90% original bright blue finish on the blade, and hilt and scabbard, thinning in some areas. A few random grind marks from sharpening in the field, but nothing too bad. Serial number on the butt. Scabbard is one of the nicest we have seen with lots of quality blue finish, and only on small shallow dent and a few small spots of rust near the tip. This comes complete with the original brown leather frog with three piece construction, double belt loops, small brass buckle and leather strap. Frog shows use but overall G-VG. The Type 30 bayonet was issued with both the 6.5mm Type 30 rifles and the 7.7mm Type 99 rifles, as well as some carbines. This is a very nice representative example of those which would have been in the field by the time of the landings on Guadalcanal, and will go with just about any WW2 Japanese rifle. Hard to find complete with the frog. $165.00 (View Picture)

20551 JAPANESE TYPE 30 BAYONET AND SCABBARD - (Janzen 134-2) Made by National Denkai under Kokura supervision, this is a good representative example of a midwar production bayonet, with about 60% original arsenal blue remaining. Finish is starting to turn dull plum color, and shows thinning and wear. Blade shows sharpening in the field. Scabbard is good despite one dent as shown in the photos. This shows the gradually declining quality of production with the crossguard being straight, the sides of the pommel left flat and use of rivets instead of screws to attach the grips. Many people believe this type was made at the same time as the Type 99 rifles while the earlier better made examples were for the Type 38 rifles. $125.00 (View Picture)

20090 SWISS SOCKET TRIANGULAR BAYONET FOR M1871 VETTERLI CADET RIFLE(?) - This came from a very advanced collection where it was identified as for Swiss M1871 Vetterli Cadet Rifle. However, it does not fit on a M1871 Cadet rifle we had available to compare, with the socket bore being a bit oversize and the slot for the sight too small. I believe that the Cadet rifles were made with considerable variation and the identification may be correct and it is just made for a cadet rifle from a different maker. However, we also checked it on a M1863/1867 Millbank-Amsler infantry rifle and it fit nicely on there, except for the front of the socket being just a bit short for a proper fit. The blade is short and lightweight with a distinctive thin appearance where it approaches the shank so it is almost certainly a cadet blade of some type. Overall about 90-95% blue finish remains, excellent on the blade but thinning and turning plum on the socket. Measurements: Socket bore .718”, socket length 2 5/8” Blade 16 3/8” x 11/16” $95.00 (View Picture)

19979 SWEDISH MODEL 1914 BAYONET & SCABBARD FOR M1894 6.5x55mm MAUSER CARBINE- MINT! - (Janzen 181-2) this is a really nice example, probably never issued, but not as well cared for in storage as we would like. The blade has nearly all the original bright polish, but also some stained spots that should polish out if they bother you, but are not rusted or pitted. The grips are great with some nice figure in one of them. No unit marks or numbers anywhere, just the EJ [anchor] AB maker marks on the blade. Hilt and rear portion of the blade retain most of the original blue. The scabbard shows no signs of wear and one side has the dark blue black finish, while the other has turned plum with some light surface rust. These bayonets are hard to find, and only fit the great little M1895 carbines- nearly all of which were altered with the SMLE style bar and stud. $149.00 (View Picture)

19977 Swedish Model 1896 Bayonet and Scabbard- MINTY! - (Janzen 180-1) A well designed and well made bayonet of the finest Swedish steel, in excellent plus condition. Once very common, these are harder to find and this is probably the nicest one we have ever had of this model with beautiful bright polished blade showing no wear or abuse at all, still covered with Swedish grease, and about 97% original dark phosphate finish on the scabbard and blue on the hilt, with finish wear mostly from lousy storage scuffing the high points and sharp edges. Scabbard number does not match the bayonet. $65.00 (View Picture)

19191 JAPANESE TYPE 30 BAYONET WITH LAST DITCH WOODEN SCABBARD - (Janzen 136-1) Blade is late type with no fullers and only sharpened on the front 2/3 of the blade. About 95-97% blue remains on the blade. The hilt finish has turned to plum and patina with a little surface rust on the catch button which should clean off easily. Straight pommel, not the bird's head. Crossguard is piece of flat stock with muzzle hole. Wooden scabbard has metal throat and tip pieces and two bands where wrapped with cord. Khaki paint has about 75% remaining. Very good grip scales, secured by rivets. Blade marking is that of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works under Nagoya supervision. A nice example of the very scarce last ditch bayonet, showing the increasingly desperate measures to continue the flow of war material while being bombed by the Allies. $195.00 (View Picture)

16557 GERMAN MODEL 1898/05 N/A “BUTCHER BLADE” BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 86-1) Unlike most which were made by the various blade makers at Solingen, this one was made by V.C. Schilling in Suhl. The crown/W /17 on the spine of the blade (not included in photos) indicate it as made for the Prussian military of Kaiser Wilhelm in 1917. This is an excellent condition bayonet with nice bright blade, unsharpened and no rust or pitting. Hilt shows some light staining. Good Walnut grips. The scabbard has a few small dents on the outer side near the tip, and the blue finish is long gone and the scabbard shows light roughness and pitting but is an overall dull steel gray color. These were the less common standard bayonet of the Germans in WW1, vilified by the Allies as “Butcher bayonets” for propaganda purposes, but hardly the least grisly or barbaric of the weapons used by both sides during that horrible conflict. By WW2 these had mostly been scrapped and the bayonets used then had a shorter, narrower conventional knife blade. A pretty good example for a very uncommon maker. $165.00 (View Picture)

7163 SWISS MILLBANK-AMSLER TRIANGULAR SOCKET BAYONET - This came from a very advanced collection where it was identified as for the Model 1853 Jaeger Gewehr. However, it is a perfect fit on a Model 1863/67 Millbank-Amsler we had available. While the socket bore diameter is about right, it will NOT fit on the Vetterli infantry rifles because their front sights are too long to work with the slot in this bayonet. (However, the Vetterli bayonets should fit on the earlier .41 caliber rifles back to about 1856.) Overall about 90-95% blue-brown finish remains, excellent on the blade but thinning and turning plum on the socket. Measurements: Socket bore .718”, socket length 2 11/16” Blade 20” x 13/16” Overall about 90-95% blue finish remains, excellent on the blade but thinning and turning plum on the socket. $165.00 (View Picture)

21428 AUSTRIAN-ROMANIAN-TURKISH MODEL 1893-1935 BAYONET & SCABBARD - This started as a bayonet for the Steyr made Model 1893 Mannlicher bolt action rifles adopted by Romania in 6.5x53mmR, not to be confused with the Austro-Hungarian Model 1895 straight pull 8mm rifles, also made by Steyr. These M1893 Romanian bayonets (Janzen 162-2) have the step down or saddle on the top of the grip. About 120,000 rifles were delivered circa 1893-1913. In 1916 Romania aligned itself with the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) against the Germans, Austrians and Turks. This bayonet was captured circa 1916-1917 by the Turks, and sometimes after 1929 it was modified for use on the Turkish Mauser rifles by welding on a new muzzle ring section, and the weld joint discoloration is visible. These are designated the Model 1935 (Janzen 195-3). The scabbard was made in Turkey. Markings include the Romanian “Phoenix” mark on the pommel with a later serial number 17340 on one side, and AS.FA for Askari Fabrika, the Turkish Arsenal on the other side. Blade has the OE/WG marking, although the upper portion is pretty well gone. An interesting example of the long and sometimes complicated history of military arms. $55.00 (View Picture)

19993 BRITISH PATTERN 1913 BAYONET AND SCABBARD MADE BY REMINGTON - FOR THE PATTERN 1914 RIFLE Blade is marked 1913 (the pattern), 11-16 (manufacture date) and the Remington mark in a circle. Other side has the crown/A3/A inspector mark, the latter A indicating it was an inspector working in America. This is an excellent plus condition example, although the blade has been lightly cleaned to brighten it from the issued dull gray appearance. Excellent unsanded walnut grips. The hilt, crossguard and pommel have about 98% of the original blue finish. Note that this is the early pattern made before the clean out hole was added to the pommel The leather scabbard is identical to those used on the SMLE Pattern 1907 bayonets, but the steel tip and throat pieces have the RE mark indicating manufacture by Remington. These retain most of the original blue finish, and the lather has the original dark brown fish, with a few minor scrapes, but not oil soaked and overall one of the nicest WW1 scabbards I have seen in many years. Although not quite minty due to the period cleaning of the blade, this is one of the nicest matching Remington made Pattern 1913 bayonet and scabbard sets we have seen in a very long time. $250.00 (View Picture)

19296 ARGENTINA MODEL 1898 ARTILLERY MACHETE (SHORT SWORD) - A great addition to a collection of Argentine or South American military arms. These were part of the ongoing rearmament of Argentina from German sources circa 1891-1914. Made by Wyersburg-Kirschbaum & Co. of Solingen, which also made the bayonets for the Argentine Mauser rifles. Makers mark is faintly visible on the ricasso and on the other side is “MACHETE DE ART. Mlo ARG 1898” and faint traces of the Argentine crest over the serial number 3225. These use a hilt with white metal (aluminum?) grips nearly identical in shape to swords of the period. The 15” blade has a slight bolo shape and is flat on one side with the other side having a fuller. Overall condition is fair, with lots of light pitting on the blade and dings on the grips. These are pretty hard to find compared to virtually all the other Argentine arms of that era. These were intended for use by the artillery to clear fields of fire or prepare emplacements which involved cutting and digging. No scabbard. $149.00 (View Picture)

18312 UNUSUAL AUSTRIAN LORENZ SOCKET BAYONET - I think this started off as a standard Austrian Model 1854 Lorenz musket bayonet, instantly recognizable by the diagonal slot on the socket and the quadrangular blade form. However, this one has been modified with the ridge on the face of the blade ground off, making it more of a conventional triangular form. Blade length is now about 13 inches long, and 1” wide at the back. Socket is just under 3 ¼” long with about .750” socket bore diameter. Overall condition is a shown in the photos, rough, lightly pitted and cleaned. My gut tells me this may be a Confederate alteration, but I have absolutely nothing to confirm that. Only thing I know for sure is that the price is $55.00 (View Picture)

21526 ARGENTINE MODEL 1891 --BRASS GRIP--BAYONET WITH SCABBARD AND FROG - (Janzen 2-2). Although Janzen speculates that the brass grips were for police or naval use, Colin Webster’s definitive study of the Argentine Mauser rifles confirms that the first 40,000 bayonet (serial numbers with A through D prefix) delivered in 1892-1893 has brass grips. The remaining 190,000 (E through W prefix) bayonet had aluminum grips, adopted as a weight reduction measure. (See Webster pages 91-97.) This is an excellent condition example with some storage stains and dirt a few small rust spots that should clean up easily. As with most of the M1891 bayonets, this has had the Argentine crest removed from the ricasso by grinding. Scabbard is from the T series and is in excellent condition with most of the original blue, but it does have one dent just below the frog. Frog is sort of rough and may or may not be correct. $149.00 (View Picture)

21073 DANISH/COLOMBIAN MADSEN M1947 BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 38-1) Mint unissued with 99% of the original black paint finish on the scabbard and hilt (basically just some storage wear on the high points of the crossguard). Bright polished blade has some light spots or staining which could be polished out if desired. These were well made bayonets to match the innovative and well thought out design of the Madsen Bolt action rifles. A small number were sold to Colombia, but trying to sell bolt action rifles after WW2 was akin to selling buggy whips after everyone wanted a Model T Ford. I have seen a dozen or more rifles, but only a handful of the bayonets, and this is as nice as any we have seen. Number 5012 neatly marked on the blade. $150.00 (View Picture)

19092 FRENCH MODEL 1842/59 SABER BAYONET WITH SCABBARD - (Janzen 68-4) In 1840 the French adopted the first of a series of saber bayonets which were fashion setters for many nations, with handsome brass handles and a curvy Yataghan style blade. Originally these were intended only for issue to NCOs, and served as an indicator of rank as well as a dual purpose sword or bayonet weapon. Of course, like all such dual purpose schemes, they were not very useful either as a bayonet or as a sword, but they still looked handsome at surrender ceremonies. The model 1840 had an all brass hilt and crossguard, while the Model 1842 used a steel crossguard instead. The Model 1842/59 was the same as the 1842 except for use of an internal coil spring for the catch instead of the earlier flat spring on the side of the grip. This is a good representative example in good condition but needing a thorough cleaning. The 22 inch blade is generally smooth with a mellow dull steel gray except for the last few inches at the point where there is some moderate pitting . The iron scabbard is free of dents with a darkish appearance and some light roughness. The maker markings are engraved on the top edge of the blade and often erroneously believed to be some sort of presentation markings. In this case, they are hard to read but roughly would translate into something like "Manufactured at Chattlerault in 1862-Model 1842.” Some of these were imported into the U.S. and are considered to be appropriate in a Civil War collection, but this one came out of Canada, so who knows where it traveled before that. Just collecting yataghan blade bayonets would be a neat niche, and there is a handy check list of all the countries which used them at www.old-smithy.info/bayonets/HTNL%20DOCUMNETS/yataghan%20models.htm This is the Model 1842/59, not the similar looking but slightly lighter and much more common Model 1866 Chassepot bayonet. $165.00 (View Picture)

18668 SCARCE NORWEGIAN KRAG BAYONET MODEL 1894/14 WITH SCABBARD - (Janzen 151-3) Janzen notes that this is the third variation of the long Norwegian bayonets for their Krags, with a shorter fuller and false edge not found on the earlier Model 1894/1912. The scabbard is unusual in that the frog (not included) has the usual leather belt loop, but the lower portion is a metal stamping that engages the raised lump on the scabbard body. Scandinavian bayonet expert Pers Holmbeck’s site http://www.holmback.se/bayonets/Notes-English/nor-Main.html uses “Model 1916” for this bayonet, instead of Janzen’s 1894/1914. Holmbeck notes that this design was approved April 17, 1916 for use with the 1894 rifles and 1912 carbines and a total of 43,160 were made. The blade is pristine with 99% of the original bright polished finish. The exposed portions of the hilt have light surface rust that should clean off, but the base of the pommel has some heavier rust as shown in the photos. The bayonet and scabbard have matching numbers 131563, and 9335 is stamped on the other side of the crossguard. Kongsberg arsenal mark is on the blade. The scabbard has what looks like a black coating over blue finish over a coarsely polished surface. These are much scarcer than the shorter Norwegian Krag bayonets, and the first one we have ever seen in person. $250.00 (View Picture)

11434 BRAZILIAN MODEL 1908 MAUSER BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 23-1) This is a nice example, with near excellent scabbard. Bayonet is unmarked except for the cryptic marking on the top edge of the blade, peculiar to the Brazilian contract bayonets, and serial number D2841 on the crossguard. These are usually pretty doggy, so it is nice to see one like this for a change. $79.00 (View Picture)

19643 U.S. M1 BAYONET CONVERTED BY KOREANS TO KM-5 CONFIGURATION - The Koreans liked the smaller blades of the M5 bayonet made for the Garand and as a result they cut down and reshaped the blades of thousands of the 10 inch blade M1 Garand bayonets we had given to them. The designated these as the KM-5 model, and many were imported about 25 years ago with the Blue Sky import guns. Except for a few folks who collect oddball stuff, these are mainly valued for the internal parts and grips for use in repairing regular M1 Garand bayonets. What you see is what you get for only $12.00 (View Picture)

20671 DANISH MODEL 1889 KRAG BAYONET WITH SCABBARD - (Janzen 37-2) with the durable wooden grips instead of the earlier black leather checkered grips. Made in Copenhagen according to the blade markings. Crown over 10 on the rudimentary guard probably indicates government acceptance in 1910. Serial number 67145 on the side of the pommel, and unit marks on other side of pommel. A very unusual design that is a single piece of steel with grips attached on the sides, a vertical catch at the rear, and no muzzle ring. Has been sharpened during its service life, and needs a good cleaning. Scabbard in good condition. Uncommon item. $125.00 (View Picture)

14315 RARE URUGUAY SOCKET BAYONET FOR MODEL 1871 MAUSER RIFLE - This is a conversion of the British Pattern 1853 Enfield socket bayonet especially for use by Uruguay on their recently purchased 11 mm. Model 1871 Mauser bolt action rifles. Designated by Uruguay, Bayoneta de Cubo para los rifles Mauser Mod. 1870 (Socket Bayonet for Mauser Model 1870 Rifles), little is known about this uncommon socket bayonet. It was used by both Uruguay and Japan with M1871 Mauser rifles procured from Steyr in the 1880s. The bayonet conversion work is believed to have been done by one of the Liege, Belgium arms producers. The British cancellation mark on the ricasso clearly shows that this example had prior service. Although the socket bayonet lacks the formidable appearance of the German M1871 sword bayonet, it would have been a much less costly alternative, and South American nations were chronically short of money (and corruption sometimes resulted in creative purchasing schemes.) The conversion entailed replacing or modifying the Enfield socket to a much shorter 2.125 inch length with a wide mortise and thin bridge. The locking ring is unique in that it is one solid piece, with no screw, simply pressed around the socket. This bayonet is historically significant as one of only two socket bayonet types ever used with a Mauser rifle. Both were conversions, there never being a socket bayonet actually designed for use with a Mauser. (The other Mauser socket bayonet is the Spanish conversion of the M1871 Remington rolling block socket bayonet for use on the 7 mm. Mauser M1893 rifle, called the M1871/93 bayonet.) The best information on this is found at: http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Uruguay/uruguay.html Overall condition is VG but with a light cleaning to remove the staining on the blade this will be a really handsome (and scarce) addition to a collection of South American Mauser rifles. $225.00 (View Picture)

22630 SPANISH MODEL 1893 MAUSER BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 175-1.d) This one was made at Fabrica De Artilleria, Toledo in 1899. It looks like it was nickel placed at one time, but has suffered poor storage and has rust and pitting and the grips are badly deteriorated, so overall call it CHEAP, I mean poor to fair condition. The scabbard is identical to the Spanish American War type, and is in about good condition. All the yellow gunk in the photo is nasty old grease of some sort. CHEAP history $29.00 (View Picture)

18388 PORTUGUESE M1885 KROPATSCHEK BAYONET AND SCABBARD - (Janzen 157-1) Yataghan style sword bayonet with the Steyr 1886 maker markings on the top edge of the blade (similar to the French style of marking.) The stud ehich engages in the slot of a frog is missing from the scabbard. Overall G- VG. A very impressive blade, especially when mounted on the rifle! $145.00 (View Picture)

9484 DUTCH BEAUMONT VITALLI M1871 BAYONET (FIRST TYPE) - (Janzen 145-1) with 20 inch cruciform blade. Locking ring on the socket is the first type, made as a two pieces with two screws. Overall about excellent with mostly bright finish and just a few areas of light staining or patina. The Beaumont-Vitalli rifles are fairly common, but the bayonets less so, and the first type are very seldom seen. Note that we are sticking with Jerry Janzen’s description as the “first model.” However, the curator of the Dutch Army Museum, disagrees and says the single screw was the first model and more difficult to make, so the two screw model was adopted as the second model. $149.00 (View Picture)

9483 DUTCH BEAUMONT VITALLI M1871 BAYONET (SECOND TYPE) - (Janzen 145-2) with 20 inch cruciform blade. Locking ring on the socket is the second type, made as a single piece as with most socket bayonet lock rings. Overall about excellent with mostly bright finish and just a few areas of light staining or patina. The Beaumont-Vitalli rifles are fairly common, but the bayonets less so, and the first type are very seldom seen. Note that we are sticking with Jerry Janzen’s description as the “first model.” However, the curator of the Dutch Army Museum, disagrees and says the single screw was the first model and more difficult to make, so the two screw model was adopted as the second model. $125.00 (View Picture)

**SOLD** SMEW2572 BRITISH PATTERN 1913 BAYONET MANUFACTURED BY REMINGTON. - This is the correct bayonet for either the British P-14 or the US M1917 rifle. Blade is marked ``1913/ 12 15/ REMINGTON`` on the reverse ricasso and with British inspectors marks on the ricasso. All markings are sharp, crisp and clear. The walnut grips are missing the grip screws. Leather scabbard is the US type with web belt hanger and has been painter OD green. This is a scarce bayonet, one of the few 1913 models that we have had in a long time. $100.00 (View Picture)

22749 GERMAN MODEL 1898 "NEUER ART" LONG BAYONET MADE IN 1903- UNIT MARKED - (Janzen 82-2) This is very long (25.5" overall,.20.5" blade) with the ribbed back and spear type tip. Those made from 1898 to 1902 (M1898 alte art.) had one piece wooden grips. Starting in 1902 the M1898 N/A used two piece grips. This example was made by Erfurt, and has the Prussian crown/W/ 1903 date on the top of the blade. Overall the metal is in VG condition, with most of the hilt and blade a mix of dull steel gray and patina and staining. However, there is a small area of pitting on the base of the pommel. Good walnut grip scales. No scabbard. Unit marked on the crossguard: 31.R.1.181 indicating use by Infantrie Regiment 31, Kompagnie 1, waffen nr. 181. These long bayonets were widely used in WW1, and this is a pretty nice example that will look really nice after a good cleaning. $195.00 (View Picture)

21682 BRITISH JUNGLE CARBINE BAYONE & SCABBARD (REPRODUCTION BUT CHEAP!) - Nice quality Indian made replica of the No.5 Mark II bayonet for the Jungle Carbine. Originals are hard to find, usually missing the scabbard and pretty pricey, so this is an excellent substitute. It is highly polished and blued, and looks much nicer than the originals. Only markings are RFI on the blade, the marks used by Rifle Factory Ishapore, but I suspect that this was made specifically for the collector market elsewhere. $69.00 (View Picture)

21559 ENGLISH PATTERN 1887 MARK III SWORD BAYONET FOR MARTINI-HENRY WITH SCABBARD - (Janzen 54-2) The big and impressive bayonet was approved June 22, 1888, differing from the earlier Mark II by omission of the fuller on the blade. The scabbard with steel tip and throat is a slightly later type approved in 1891 but interchangeable with all the Martini sword bayonets. This one is in near excellent condition with a slight bit of pitting on the pommel, a little staining on the blade and hilt, and excellent pressed leather grip scales, and excellent scabbard. The scabbard has Nepalese (Ghurka) style markings on the throat piece and some stamped number on the top of the throat. This needs a good cleaning and will be a very handsome addition to your Martini-Henry .577-450 caliber rifle. $225.00 (View Picture)

21105 Argentine Model 1891 bayonet and scabbard (brass grips) for 1891 Mauser Rifle - (Janzen 2-2). Although Janzen speculates that the brass grips were for police or naval use, Colin Webster’s definitive study of the Argentine Mauser rifles confirms that the first 40,000 bayonet (serial numbers with A through D prefix) delivered in 1892-1893 has brass grips. The remaining 190,000 (E through W prefix) bayonet had aluminum grips, adopted as a weight reduction measure. (See Webster pages 91-97.) This is a good representative excellent example but needs a good cleaning. As with nearly all of the M1891 bayonets and rifles, this has had the Argentine crest removed by grinding. Blade was sharpened during period of use and there is some rust on the cross guard and scabbard has several dents as shown in the photo. Catch is stuck half way extended, but cleaning should fix that. Scabbard is from the B series. Hard to find the brass handled examples. $125.00 (View Picture)

17707 CANADIAN ROSS RIFLE BAYONET MODEL 1910 (MARK II) WITH WW1 POINTED BLADE - (Janzen 25-3) with the blade sharpened and refinished to frosty blue-gray with the hilt blued. This is the type which was used by the Canadians, but NOT the US, which used the earlier Model 1905 bayonet which had the muzzle ring thicker than the crossguard. Canadian unit marks and clear Ross Rifle Company markings. Janzen give both explanations for the ugly pointed blade- some claim they were sharpened from butcher shape to pointed during WW1, while others claim they were made this way. In either case, it is a very unattractive blade shape. Overall VG condition, but no scabbard. $95.00 (View Picture)

22652 DANISH MODEL 1889 KRAG BAYONET WITH SCABBARD AND FROG - (Janzen 37-2) The standard M1889 bayonet for the Model 1889 8mm Danish Krag rifles. Early production had pressed leather grip scales, but most, like this have wooden scales secured by brass rivets. These are an extremely rugged design, basically a one piece forging with a rib on the top of the grip making it extremely rigid. Bayonet was made by RKV KOBHVN and has been sharpened during its service life. Unit marks on pommel 75032 and 38B.830. The black leather scabbard has steel throat and tip pieces and is overall fine to excellent condition, much nicer than these are usually found. There is a primitive aluminum frog or belt loop, but not sure that is a regulation design. There is a spring loaded catch that does not need to be touched, but will retain the bayonet in place until sufficient force is exerted to pull it loose. $135.00 (View Picture)

23385 French Model 1886/91/16/1935 Lebel Bayonet and Scabbard - (Janzen 71-4) This is the M1886 Lebel bayonet shortened from its original length of about 25 inches to a more manageable 18 inches. Overall fine plus to excellent with slight staining on the cruciform blade, and the brass handle having a mellow aged appearance. Complete with scabbard (mismatched numbers, as nearly all were by this point in their long history.). These were older bayonets shortened after 1935 for use with the older French arms used by colonial troops and various support units, and were the last of the epee style bayonets used by the French. $125.00 (View Picture)

20560 MAUSER BAYONET WITH 15” BLADE- BELGIAN 1924 LONG EXPORT MODEL- WITH SCABBARD - (Janzen 19-2). Typical Mauser 98 configuration to fit rifles with the bayonet “bar” under the barrel instead of on the bottom of the upper band as with the earlier Mauser rifles. This is well made, Belgian workmanship, but only markings found are a serial number on the back of the pommel, an illegible oval marking on the side of the pommel and an unidentified marking on the frog stud of the scabbard. The 1924 rifles were sold all over the world, for many years, so it could have been used by nearly any of the South American, African, or other nations which got arms from FN. Overall dirty and needing a good cleaning with lots of crud, dried grease and some light surface rust, but looks like about 90% of the original dark parkerized finish remains. $65.00 (View Picture)

21837 FRENCH M1874 GRAS BAYONET & SCABBARD- MADE BY ST. ETIENNE IN 1878 - (Janzen 70-1) Made by St. Etienne in July 1878 and so engraved on the spine of the blade. Mismatched numbers on crossguard and scabbard. Scabbard is free from dents and has lots of original blue left mixed with some surface rust and patina.. Blade about fine with bright polished finish and some staining. Good walnut grips. Some patina on the crossguard that should clean off okay. An G-VG example, from one of the main makers of the Gras bayonet used by the French at the height of their status as a worldwide colonial power. $125.00 (View Picture)

21095 SWEDISH MODEL 1896 MAUSER BAYONET FROG - Used fine, with clear "three crown" marking. $15.00 (View Picture)

20117 French Model 1892 (modified) bayonet w/ scabbard for 1892 Berthier - (Janzen 74-2) The Model 1892 second pattern bayonet is identical to the first pattern except that it has a longer muzzle ring, extending slightly behind the handle. These bayonets were produced for the M-1892 Mannlicher Berthier short rifle which was issued to Calvary, railroad troops, and telegraph units.. This has the extended muzzle ring of the second model. Hook has bee removed from the crossguard. Looks like old arsenal cleaning job to remove most of the evidence of long use before being sent off to yet another obscure colony. Grip scales seem to be some sort of Bakelite or something, held by rivets, not screws. Overall good. $135.00 (View Picture)

SMEW2550 GERMAN MODEL 1898 "NEUER ART" LONG BAYONET MADE IN 1907 - (Janzen 82-2) This is very long (25.5" overall,.20.5" blade) with the ribbed back and spear type tip. Those made from 1898 to 1902 (M1898 alte art.) used one piece wooden grips. Starting in 1902 the M1898 N/A used two piece grips. This example was made by W. Kirschbaum & Company in Solingen, and has the Prussian crown/W/date on the top of the blade. G-VG condition with most metal a mix of steel gray with some staining, and just a bit of rust on the pommel, and some light pitting around the very tip of the blade. Edge of blade shows sharpening. Grip scales are good to excellent with mellow patina. These were issued with a steel mounted leather scabbard, but most (like this one) are encountered without scabbards today. A good representative example of the very long bayonet that fit on the very long Gewehr 98 Mauser rifles used in WW1. We have noted an increase in interest in WW1 items and prices are starting to climb. $175.00 (View Picture)

23129 DUTCH BEAUMONT VITALLI M1871 BAYONET (FIRST TYPE) - (Janzen 145-1) with 20 inch cruciform blade.  Locking ring on the socket is the first type, made as a two pieces with two screws.  Overall G-VG with mostly bright finish, but some areas of light surface rust from poor storage, but it should clean up with little or no roughness underneath.  The Beaumont-Vitalli rifles are fairly common, but the bayonets less so, and the first type are very seldom seen.  Note that we are sticking with Jerry Janzen’s description as the “first model.”  However, the curator of the Dutch Army Museum, disagrees and says the single screw was the first model and more difficult to make, so the two screw model was adopted as the second model. (View Picture)

21097 EGYPTIAN HAKIM BAYONET - (Janzen 40-1) Clearly descended from the Swedish M1896 bayonet, except with traditional wooden grip scales instead of the tubular steel handle on the Swedish version. (Remember, the Egyptian made Hakim was a slightly modified version of the Swedish Ljungman rifle.) Although the blade looks to be double edged, it is only sharpened on the lower edge. Blade with about 97% blue finish with some scratching, Hilt with most of the blue, but worn on the guard and muzzle ring swith s couple of spots of light surface rust that should clean off. Although Hakim rifles were imported in large numbers, bayonets seem to be very scarce. First one we have had in many years. $125.00 (View Picture)

21803 FRENCH MODEL 1892 BAYONET (MODIFIED) - (Janzen 74-2) This will fit many of the Mle 1892 carbines and Mle 1907 Mannlicher-Berthier variations. Bayonet has the slightly longer barrel shroud that extends back a bit above the grip. Arsenal reblued with about 98% remaining on the bayonet. Walnut grip scales are cracked, but sound. Scabbard has lots of dents, but still works. $125.00 (View Picture)

19356 ARGENTINE MODEL 1909 BAYONET WITH CREST INTACT AND MATCHING SCABBARD - (Janzen 2-3) These are very hard to find with the crest as the Argentine policy was to grind off the crest. Mismatched numbers F6243 on the blade and H2740 on the scabbard. Scabbard has a large dent on the back side, but pretty nice on the front with most of the blue finish intact, but thinning. The bayonet is about fine but has been repolished, now covered with some dried grease. Fine walnut grip scales. These bayonets were used with the Argentine M1909 rifles and short rifles. $125.00 (View Picture)

19354 ARGENTINE MODEL 1909 BAYONET WITH CREST INTACT AND MATCHING SCABBARD - (Janzen 2-3) These are very hard to find with the crest as the Argentine policy was to grind off the crest. Matching numbers F9298 on the blade and scabbard. Scabbard has some surface rust where the frog attracted moisture which should clean up okay, but is about excellent elsewhere with most of the blue finish intact, but thinning. This needs a good cleaning to remove some spots of surface rust on the hilt. The blade is basically bright but somewhere along the way it picked up several spots (about thumbprint size) where there is moderate pitting, although later cleaned bright. Otherwise the blade is fine to excellent with the arsenal bright polished finish. These bayonets were used with the Argentine M1909 rifles and short rifles. $135.00 (View Picture)

22985 YUGOSLAVIAN MODEL 1924 SHORT BAYONET WITH SCABBARD & FROG FOR YUGO M48 SERIES RIFLES - (Janzen 243-1) Will fit any of the G98/K98 series rifles, but has a muzzle ring not used on the German made bayonets. Cyrillic Produze 44 markings in an arc on the blade, roughly translating to Factory 44, one of the Yugo arsenals. Mismatched numbers with scabbard. Overall used excellent with about 90-95% finish, and excellent leather frog. Correct for any of the Yugo M48 series rifles, but will fit nearly any of the Mausers with the bayonet bar under the barrel. $85.00 (View Picture)

22984 SWISS MODEL 1918 BAYONET FOR M1911 and M1931 SCHMIDT-RUBIN RIFLES - (Janzen 187-1) A later variation of the Model 1889 bayonet, but made with a double edged blade similar to the British Pattern 1888 bayonets. These are relatively scarce compared to the earlier types. Some minor dings on the wood grip scales. Metal parts very bright, and I think chrome or nickel plated, but old original. Scabbard with black finish is also excellent. These were also used with the SIG AK53 assault rifle and some SMGs. $125.00 (View Picture)

19889 French Model 1886/1893/1916/1935 Lebel Bayonet & Scabbard - (Janzen 71-4) Originally made for the Mle 1886 Lebels, these were used in various configurations right up to WW2. The earliest version has a silver colored alloy handle, and the later ones used a brass handle with a different construction. The early ones had a hooked crossguard, modified in 1916 to remove the hook. Although designed for the Lebels, these were standard for the Mannlicher-Berthier Mle 1907, 1915 and 1916 rifles. In 1935 they were modified by shortening to meet the regulations for use with the 7.5mm conversions (Mle 1907-15-M34 and the newly made Fusil Mle 1934). Overall condition fine to excellent. Only markings noted are an anchor, a circle J and circle M. Scannard in similar condition. The blade is still long enough for prominent display of surrender flags, or use as a spit for a snail BBQ. $125.00 (View Picture)

20135 RARE SOCKET BAYONET FOR GERMAN M1871 RIFLE- USED BY JAPAN AND URUGUAY - Among the many money making innovations of surplus dealers was the alteration of surplus British Pattern 1853 socket bayonets to fit on surplus German Model 1871 Mauser rifles. The alteration was done in Belgium, and the end result sold to both Japan and Uruguay to go on the rifles they had been sold. Listed in Janzen as 244-1 as unidentified, and associated with Japanese used Model 1871, the additions and corrections at the back of the second printing correct this to identify them as being for a Uruguay contract. Ray LaBar’s superb “Bayonets of Japan” lists this as LB-32 and provides the identification that the conversion was done in Belgium, and sold to both Japan and Uruguay. He notes that these are the most common Japanese socket bayonet, and that while the rifles are Kanji marked the bayonets were not. These bayonets are instantly recognizable from the very short socket (only 2 1/8” long) and the locking ring made without any screw. This one is sort of ugly in the photos with a lot of surface rust, but I think it will clean off pretty well, although there may be some staining and maybe some minor scattered very fine pitting. A nice addition to a Japanese or South American rifle collection, and very seldom seen. $275.00 (View Picture)

20107 BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET & SCABBARD FOR .303 SMLE NO 1. MARK III - WW1 example made in the UK by Wilkinson Sword Company, with typical markings, but mostly illegible. Metal parts are mostly dull steel gray after a cleaning, but with staining and some light pitting. Grips are dark and oil soaked. Overall a below average bayonet. But the scabbard is a nice, fine to excellent condition WW2 Australian made example with MANGROVITE marking on the back and most of the brown finish. A cheap bayonet and scabbard set. $65.00 (View Picture)

19934 ASIAN (PHILIPPINE?) BOLO(?) KNIFE AND WOODEN SCABBARD - Nice quality handmade bolo(?) knife and scabbard, probably from the Philippines, or possibly somewhere else in Asia. Overall length about 23 inches. I believe this is a WW2 era souvenir, but possibly from Vietnam. The hand forged blade is about 18 inches long and made from a file. It is flat on one side, and the edge is wedge shaped on the other side to form the very sharp edge and it has a very sharp point. The wooden scabbard is well made of two pieces of a medium brown mahogany or monkey pod type wood, bound together by eight braided bands of leather or sinew of some sort. Near the top of the scabbard there is a raised rib with a hole for some sort of thong type attachment to a belt. Overall this is fairly good native workmanship and clearly intended for actual use as a tool/weapon, not cheap-hurry up tourist trade junk, but certainly nothing that approaches fine art or skilled craftsmanship. I know there are people who collect this sort of thing and can probably narrow down where it came from, but if you have any questions, I don’t have any more answers on this one. $110.00 (View Picture)

19653 ARGENTINE MODEL 1909 BAYONET WITH CREST INTACT AND MATCHING SCABBARD AND FROG - (Janzen 2-3) These are very hard to find with the crest as the Argentine policy was to grind off the crest. Matching numbers L6850 on the blade and scabbard. Scabbard is free from dents, and has some blue finish, but is mostly covered with thin light surface rust that should clean off leaving some of the blue. The bayonet is about good but has been stored poorly so there is light surface rust on the exposed portions of the hilt. This should clean up with minimal pitting when done. The leather frog came with this, but I am not sure of the exact model. These bayonets were used with the Argentine M1909 rifles and short rifles. $149.00 (View Picture)

19652 FRENCH M1874 GRAS BAYONET & SCABBARD- MATCHING- NAVAL MARKED- MADE BY L. DENY IN 1881 - (Janzen 70-1) Made by L. Deny in 1881 and so engraved on the spine of the blade. Matching numbers on crossguard and scabbard. Scabbard is free from dents and has lots of original blue left mixed with some surface rust that should mostly clean off. Blade has lots of the original bright polished finish but also some stained/rust spots. Good walnut grips. Some light stain and patina on the crossguard that should clean off okay. Crossguard is marked with the anchor, indicating French Naval use. A fine to excellent example, from a scarce maker, of the Gras bayonet used by the French at the height of their status as a worldwide colonial power. $175.00 (View Picture)

19651 FRENCH M1874 GRAS BAYONET & SCABBARD- MATCHING- NAVAL MARKED- MADE BY L. DENY IN 1881 - (Janzen 70-1) Made by L. Deny in 1881 and so engraved on the spine of the blade. Matching numbers on crossguard and scabbard. Scabbard is free from dents and has lots of original blue left mixed with some surface rust that should mostly clean off. Blade has lots of the original bright polished finish but also some stained/rust spots. Good walnut grips. Some light stain and patina on the crossguard that should clean off okay. Crossguard is marked with the anchor, indicating French Naval use. A fine to excellent example, from a scarce maker, of the Gras bayonet used by the French at the height of their status as a worldwide colonial power. $175.00 (View Picture)

19369 BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET BY CHAPMAN- 1916 dated - Made by Chapman, one of the scarcer makers, with April 1916 date, with the early JAC markings instead of CHAPMAN. A good example with lots of blue on the hilt and blade, with the balance of the blade mostly frosty gray. Unfortunately, it has bee sharpened in the field during its period of use, leaving rather ugly grind marks on both sides. Still a good representative example of the Pattern 1907 WW1 bayonet used with the No. 1 Mark III .303 Lee Enfield Rifles right through the end of WW2. No scabbard. $89.00 (View Picture)

18959 Remington Rolling block socket bayonet- long blade - This is Remington’s long export model bayonet with a 21 3/8” blade and 2 5/8” socket and a bore of about .723 inch. These were sold with the rolling block rifles going to dozens of nations, but Spain and the South American countries were the most prolific users. Overall a mix of brown patina and traces of blue with some very fine roughness, which is about the same condition as most of the rolling block rifles you see today! $110.00 (View Picture)

18281 SPANISH MODEL 1941 BOLO BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 177-1) Featuring the uniquely Spanish bolo blade shape, this one has the coarsely checkered wood grips. These will fit the M1893, 1916 and 1943 Mausers, but not the "Standard Model" or the 1943 Air Force rifles which both used conventional K98 type bayonets. A fairly scarce and impressive looking bayonet to add to your collection. Overall about VG-fine condition except for some rust spots on the blade and a few on the scabbard. $85.00 (View Picture)

17908 Remington made French Model 1886/93/16 Bayonet & Scabbard - (Janzen 72-1) Based on the 1886 design adopted for the revolutionary 8mm Lebel rifle, the first small caliber smokeless powder rifle adopted by any nation, this continues use of the long cruciform blade, and metal alloy handle with a silver color. However, unlike the earlier versions this has no hook on the crossguard. The Remington made bayonets are unique in that they are totally unmarked, while the French made examples are serialized on the guard and the scabbard with assorted other marks as well. Considerable uncertainty exists on exactly when these were made(during WW1, or circa 1924-32?) and in what quantity, and if the were ever accepted by the French or not. In any case this is an unissued example that has been poorly stored. The blued scabbard has turned plum mixed with patina, and the steel parts of the hilt need to be cleaned. Still a nice bayonet, but not minty as some. The scabbard has a slight bend that you have to look to see, but works fine. This is the correct bayonet for the French made Mle 1907/15 Mannlicher Berthier rifles. These turn up from time to time, but not very often. $115.00 (View Picture)

17855 COMMIE BLOC "FENCING MUSKET" - Obviously patterned after the Mosin Nagant, but then altered with a block of wood resembling an AK style magazine added to the bottom, these were used for teaching bayonet fighting. The spring loaded tip can be depressed about 4 inches into the barrel, similar to a pogo stick. This is a fairly common approach, and I have seen fencing muskets with the same concept from Sweden and England as well. The U.S. used bayonets with passed spring steel blades, and later switched to "pugil sticks". Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. These may be East German as some are marked "MODELL 4.853" which sounds German to me. Overall excellent plus condition, the best of the half dozen or so we have had over the years with virtually all the blue finish on the "barrel" and the stock exceptionally clean and free from dings. Complete with original excellent sling. Still legal in Kalifornia, but may be next on their ban list. Non-firearm, no FFL needed. $125.00 (View Picture)

17854 SWISS "FENCING MUSKET" (SIG 57 TYPE) - These were used for teaching bayonet fighting, but avoided damaging "real" rifles and bayonets in the process by using specially made cheap substitute arms. Nearly all metal construction, made of tubing and flat stock shaped to imitate the SIG 57 assault rifle in size, weight and feel with the "bayonet" permanently welded in place. This has a rubbery type butt pad or sleeve. These were painted black, and this one retains about 98-99% of the black paint finish. Some of these are pretty well beat and this is the only really great condition one we have seen. Just collecting "fencing musket variations would be neat specialty with probably several dozen variations from all over the world to chase down. $150.00 (View Picture)

17891 EGYPTIAN HAKIM BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 40-1) Clearly descended from the Swedish M1896 bayonet, except with traditional wooden grip scales instead of the tubular steel handle on the Swedish version. (Remember, the Egyptian made Hakim was a slightly modified version of the Swedish Ljungman rifle.) Although the blade looks to be double edged, it is only sharpened on the lower edge. Blade with about 98% original blued polished finish with one little fingertip size spot where finish is missing. Scabbard with about 95% original blue with some scratching or thinning. Hilt with about 85-90% of the blue, worn on the guard and muzzle ring. Although Hakim rifles were imported in large numbers, bayonets seem to be very scarce. First one we have had in many years, and the nicest one so far. $175.00 (View Picture)

17888 SPANISH(??) MODEL 1893 SHORT BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 175-1a) This is one of the early German made bayonets as delivered with the M1893 Spanish Mauser rifles which were used in the Spanish American War. This has the “hump back” profile to the top of the grip which was later made straight instead. However the grips have the straight top and are therefore replacements, and have been painted black. Serial number on the crossguard is illegible. Maker name Simson & Co. Suhl on the blade and an illegible mark on the top flat of the blade. Nicely cleaned and sharpened so it looks pretty good despite a bit of pitting on the blade. Scabbard of black leather with steel mounts is near excellent. $75.00 (View Picture)

17885 Brazilian Model 1908 Mauser Bayonet & Scabbard - (Janzen 23-1) This is an extra nice example, with matching number 1358 on the bayonet and scabbard, and just overall near excellent in every way. These are usually pretty doggy, so it is nice to see one like this for a change. $125.00 (View Picture)

17826 Remington made French Model 1886/93/16 Bayonet & Scabbard - (Janzen 72-1) Based on the 1886 design adopted for the revolutionary 8mm Lebel rifle, the first small caliber smokeless powder rifle adopted by any nation, this continues use of the long cruciform blade, and metal alloy handle with a silver color. However, unlike the earlier versions this has no hook on the crossguard. The Remington made bayonets are unique in that they are totally unmarked, while the French made examples are serialized on the guard and the scabbard with assorted other marks as well. Considerable uncertainty exists on exactly when these were made(during WW1, or circa 1924-32?) and in what quantity, and if the were ever accepted by the French or not. In any case this is an unissued example that has some rust spots o the scabbard near the tip that should clean off nicely. This is the correct bayonet for the French made Mle 1907/15 Mannlicher Berthier rifles. These turn up from time to time, but not very often. $150.00 (View Picture)

17721 Turkish Model 1874 Peabody Sword Bayonet - (Janzen 190-2) This is a Yataghan style blade with pressed leather grips and steel crossguard. Unmarked except for a letter on the blade and another on the guard. It was based on the robust British sword bayonets of the 1860s, but made in the U.S. and delivered as part of the Turkish contract with the Providence Tool Company for 600,000 Peabody rifles. This bayonet is fairly scarce in the U.S. Overall condition is about good-very good. Leather grips are excellent. The blade shows some scaling or flaking and is dirty. It would look a lot better if cleaned up. $165.00 (View Picture)

17545 FRENCH M1874 GRAS BAYONET & SCABBARD- MADE BY STEYR IN 1881 - (Janzen 70-1) Made by Steyr in 1881 and so engraved on the spine of the blade. Mismatched numbers on crossguard and scabbard. Scabbard is free from dents and has about 90-95% original blue left. Blade about perfect with original bright polished finish. Good walnut grips. Some light stain and patina on the crossguard that should clean off okay. An excellent example, from a scarce maker, of the Gras bayonet used by the French at the height of their status as a worldwide colonial power. $149.00 (View Picture)

17258 TURKISH MAUSER BAYONET MADE FROM CAPTURED BRITISH PATTERN 1907 BAYONET - Probably one gleaned from the battlefields of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign in WW1, and then converted by the Turks to fit their various Mauser style rifles. There are dozens or hundreds of variations of Turked up bayonets cobbled together from all sorts of blades and scrap iron, but this is one of the most interesting and historic types. The British markings are clearly visible on the ricasso, and the hilt is pretty much as made Pattern 1907, but the cross guard was heavily modified to fit, and a later owner filed it a bit to fit a specific rifle. The scabbard is the usual junk quality Turkish scabbard and a Mauser style leather frog. Overall good condition. Interesting item for a WW1 collection, or an Enfield or Turkish collection. $165.00 (View Picture)

16271 INDIAN SAPPERS & MINERS SOCKET SWORD BAYONET CIRCA 1845-1860 - (Janzen 43-1 similar; Skennerton I-123 very close match) The British adopted a sword bladed socket bayonet for use on their sappers & miners carbines about 1842, and the Indian forces quickly followed. The British made versions are usually marked ENFIELD on the top edge of the blade, while Indian production was unmarked. This one has a socket 4 inches long with 25mm bore, and the reinforcing ring at the rear is not cut for a Lovell style latch. The blade is about 22.5 inches for overall length of 26.5 inches, slightly shorter than Skennerton’s I-123 or I-124. Metal is a smooth brown patina with a bit heavier rust on the socketI am 95% sure this is an authentic old example, and not a reproduction, but they have been faking all sorts of stuff in India for several decades now, so it is hard to be certain about anything. The front of the socket has very slight deformation from someone trying to force it on a barrel, but it should not prevent it fitting on a correct size barrel, and a few file strokes would fix it up. A very interesting variation of a socket bayonet design that is a real attention getter in a display. $165.00 (View Picture)

15503 British pattern 1842 bayonet w sight notch - (Skennerton B139, Janzen 44-2) Overall length 21 inches and socket is 3 inches long, so nominal blade length using Reilly system would be 18 inches, but by the British measurement from tip to the shoulder it is the official 17 inch length. Socket bore about 24mm. The large collar at the rear and the wedge shaped lump engage the “Lovell’s” pattern catch to retain it on the musket. These were made in two styles, one with a notch for better sight picture, and one without. This bayonet does not have the sight notch. This bayonet has a rusty brown patina over light pitting and may clean up a little to get rid of the surface rust, but will never be better than about fair. Illegible markings on the blade. $75.00 (View Picture)

14861 French Model 1886/1893/1916 Lebel Bayonet - (Janzen 71-3) Originally made for the Mle 1886 Lebels, these were used in various configurations right up to WW2. The earliest version has a silver colored alloy handle, and the later ones used a brass handle with a different construction. The early ones had a hooked crossguard, modified in 1916 to remove the hook. Although designed for the Lebels, these were standard for the Mannlicher-Berthier Mle 1907, 1915 and 1916 rifles. Overall condition is G-VG except the mismatched numbers on the scabbard and the scabbard having some bends and waves in it, although it fits fine. Extra long blade handy for prominent display of surrender flags, or spit for a snail BBQ. $95.00 (View Picture)

14911 RUSSIAN MODEL 1891/30 MOSIN NAGANT BAYONET - (Janzen 164-3) The standard WW2 and later era bayonet for the Mosin Nagant, with the spring loaded plunger for locking. This is an exceptionally excellent condition example of an exceptionally crudely made bayonet. Obviously made during the desperate days of WW2, by marginally capable workers with worn and badly adjusted machinery with absolutely no attention to any sort of final finishing. Good enough to stick a Kraut, I guess. Probably went directly to storage until released with the recent glut of surplus Mosin Nagants, showing just a few handling blemishes to the 99% dark blue-black finish. $35.00 (View Picture)

13731 Spanish Military Bolo and scabbard (circa 18901-1918?) - This features the distinctive bolo shape peculiar to Spanish edged weapons from the 1890s and lingering as late as 1969 in various bayonets, fighting knives and bolos. (That would be a neat little collecting niche all by itself- Spanish Bolo Blades!) This is in excellent plus condition with about 95% of the arsenal blue (original or refinish??) on the hilt and scabbard mounts. Blade is polished bright, but covered with a dried grease. One small fingerprint size rust spot on the right side of the blade near the tip. Blade is very hard to insert in scabbard, due to the dried greas and needs to be cleaned up and then should fit fine. Nifty thumb spring on the top of the hilt for a scabbard catch. An unusual piece. Come to think of it, Spanish military arms would be an interesting and collecting specialty, with a nice variety of rifles and edged weapons to chase, without taking out a second mortgage every time you want to buy something. I like this blade, and know you will too. $295.00 (View Picture)

11048 SWISS MODEL 1957 SIG BAYONET, SCABBARD & FROG - (Janzen 188-1) Exceptionally well designed weapon, made of stainless steel with a true double edged blade. Ribbed black plastic grips. Latch is unusual in that you grab both ends and slide it down, instead of pushing from one side. With black nylon type scabbard. Reportedly many were sold to Chile, and others were used by Swiss reservists. Overall VG-fine condition. $35.00 (View Picture)

11446 TURKISH BAYONET FOR G1(FAL) RIFLE (ERSATZ TYPE) - Double ring Ersatz bayonet with scabbards. Fullered blade, straight crossguard type in excellent condition (but somewhat crudely made) with 90%+ finish intact. Since these are all rehab bayonets cobbled together from old parts they show plenty of use to the steel but were refinished after conversion to the latest configuration. The Turks have produced an incredible variety of extremely crudely made "ersatz" bayonets using salvaged parts. Besides the ones made for the boatloads of shabby old Mausers of all sorts, they made them for M1 Garands and even the latest FAL type rifles. $35.00 (View Picture)

11312 SPANISH CETME BOLO BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 177-2) Featuring the uniquely Spanish bolo blade shape, this is a cousin of the M1941 bayonet with a similar blade. Checkered plastic grips. Overall excellent condition with about 98% original dark gray parkerized typo finish. These will also fit the Mauser FR-8 rifles converted to mimic the appearance of the SETME rifles. $35.00 (View Picture)

11311 SPANISH MODEL 1941 BOLO BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 177-1) Featuring the uniquely Spanish bolo blade shape, this one has the coarsely checkered wood grips. These will fit the M1893, 1916 and 1943 Mausers, but no the "Standard Model" or the 1943 Air Force rifles which both used conventional K98 type bayonets. A fairly scarce and impressive looking bayonet to add to your collection. Overal about VG-fine condition with some staining and a few light pits here and there. $85.00 (View Picture)

11048 SWISS MODEL 1957 SIG BAYONET, SCABBARD & FROG - (Janzen 188-1) Exceptionally well designed weapon, made of stainless steel with a true double edged blade. Ribbed black plastic grips. Latch is unusual in that you grab both ends and slide it down, instead of pushing from one side. With black nylon type scabbard. Reportedly many were sold to Chile, and others were used by Swiss reservists. Overall VG-fine condition. $35.00 (View Picture)

10261 Spanish Model 1969 Bayonet and scabbard for CETME rifle - (Janzen 177-2) A well made bayonet with the unique Spanish bolo pattern blade. Overall about mint unissued. Besides the CETME, I believe these also fit the FR8 rifle. $49.00 (View Picture)

10051 GERMAN MODEL 1898 "NEUER ART" LONG BAYONET MADE IN 1914 - (Janzen 82-2 with scabbard shown for 82-3) This is very long (25.5" overall,.20.5" blade) with the ribbed back and spear type tip. These made from 1898 to 1902 (M1898 alte art.) with one piece wooden grips. Starting in 1902 the M1898 N/A used two piece grips. This example was made by C.G. Haenel in Suhl, and has the Prussian crown/W/date on the top of the blade. About fine condition with most metal bright, some scattered minor staining, and one or two small spots where it has turned to light pitting. Good but somewhat dented grip scales. Most were issued with a steel mounted leather scabbard, which did not stand up well in trench warfare. A very small number of replacement all steel scabbards were made, and this has one of those. Scabbard is shaped to look like the leather scabbards, and finished with black enamel. About 90-95% of the enamel remains, with one area about 1" x 4" or rusting near the tip on one side. Nice example of a scarce bayonet, and a great example of the even scarcer scabbard. $395.00 (View Picture)

9704 CZECH VZ24 MAUSER BAYONET & SCABBARD - (Janzen 33-3) Short type with muzzle ring and blade edge on the upper side. Although made for the VZ24 they will fit any of the 98 Mauser types (German, Yugoslav, etc) with the bar under the end of the barrel. Overall near excellent with about 98% blue ont he scabbard and bright polished blade and hilt, and good walnut grip scales. There are some rust spots from poor storage on the upper tang between the grips and a streak of light rust on the left side of the pommel, and all but an area about 1/4" dia on the top should clean up easily. CZ log on the blade, A on the crossguard and number 1111 electric penciled on the frog stud. $45.00 (View Picture)

9634 GERMAN MODEL 1898 "NEUER ART" LONG BAYONET MADE IN 1907 - This is very long (25.5" overall,.20.5" blade) with the ribbed back and spear type tip. Those made from 1898 to 1902 (M1898 alte art.) used one piece wooden grips. Starting in 1902 the M1898 N/A used two piece grips. This example was made by V.C. Schilling in Suhl, and has the Prussian crown/W/date on the top of the blade. Vg-fine condition with most metal bright, some scattered minor staining, and just a bit of pitting around the very tip of the blade. Good but somewhat dented grip scales. These were issued with a steel mounted leather scabbard, but most (like this one) are encountered without scabbards today. $195.00 (View Picture)

9332 British Pattern 1858 or 1860 Yataghan Sword bayonet (Confederate??) - (Similar to Skennerton B153) There are a number of minor variations of these, and many were handfitted not fully interchangeable, but with a bit of filing they should work with the two band .577 Enfield muskets used during the Civil War or later Snider conversions. These were made for British military issue, and are found with assorted broad arrow and inspector markings, and others were made for Volunteer units, with less markings. Some were purchased for use by Confederate troops during the Civil War from the same makers, but seldom were any with the broad arrow markings sold for export, and the federal army also purchased lots of the Enfield style rifles and bayonets, so proving Confederate use is pretty tough. This example is unmarked, except for tiny T 44 on the base of the pommel. It has the 22.7" long Yataghan style blade, which has some staining and traces of bright finish, plus lots of very light surface rust that would easily clean off with 320 or 400 grit emery, or for a less polished look, some steel wool. The muzzle ring diameter is about 20.5mm and the hole is set almost flush with the tang, so this was made for rifles with the bayonet lug on the barrel, not the later "bar on band" types. The slot for the bayonet lug is "T" shaped, and there is no slot for a "lead" extending forward of the lug itself. The stud spring is retained by a screw, not the rivet used prior to 1858. The pressed leather grips are among the best we have ever seen, with only a small amount of flaking along the tang on the top of the left grip. Pommel also has light surface rust, but no pitting. With a gentle cleaning this will look great with very good examples of any of the .577 two band rifles or Sniders, or with a more detailed cleaning would be suitable for display with examples n exceptional condition. No scabbard. $295.00 (View Picture)

5169 Swiss Model 1957 SIG export Bayonet
(Janzen 188-1)  Stainless steel true double edged blade, with ribbed black plastic grips.  Latch Is unusual in that you grab both ends and slide it down, instead of pushing from one side.  With black nylon type scabbard.  Reportedly many were sold to Chile, and others were used by Swiss reservists.  Overall VG-fine condition.  $35.00  (View Picture)

3111 Brazilian Model 1908 Bayonet & Scabbard Bayonet G-VG but needs cleaning to remove scattered light surface rust. Good walnut scales. Black leather scabbard with brass tip and throat piece. Numbers do not match. (Janzen 23-1) $45.00

471x English No. 4 Mk II spike - Used excellent, various makers, no scabbard. $12.00


Foreign Knives & Daggers

**NEW ADDITION** 13258 WW2 GERMAN PARATROOP GRAVITY KNIFE - This is the second model with the small square tab which can be pushed to allow the cap with the arrow to slide off and then one handle can be pivoted away to open it for cleaning. Overall used good-very good condition with the small loop intact and the release trigger and locking mechanism working properly. Unmarked except for a serial number on the latch trigger, and the spike marked RB. NR. 0/0561/0019 with letter R on the reverse side. Very little finish left on the outside, and grips are worn, but still an average or better example. These were issued to paratroops (Fallschirmjaegers) and also to Luftwaffe personnel as they could be opened with one hand when needed to cut free from a parachute or other survival tasks. Scarce item rarely found any more. $525.00 (View Picture)


Swords Of All Sorts

19296 ARGENTINA MODEL 1898 ARTILLERY MACHETE (SHORT SWORD) - A great addition to a collection of Argentine or South American military arms. These were part of the ongoing rearmament of Argentina from German sources circa 1891-1914. Made by Wyersburg-Kirschbaum & Co. of Solingen, which also made the bayonets for the Argentine Mauser rifles. Makers mark is faintly visible on the ricasso and on the other side is “MACHETE DE ART. Mlo ARG 1898” and faint traces of the Argentine crest over the serial number 3225. These use a hilt with white metal (aluminum?) grips nearly identical in shape to swords of the period. The 15” blade has a slight bolo shape and is flat on one side with the other side having a fuller. Overall condition is fair, with lots of light pitting on the blade and dings on the grips. These are pretty hard to find compared to virtually all the other Argentine arms of that era. These were intended for use by the artillery to clear fields of fire or prepare emplacements which involved cutting and digging. No scabbard. $149.00 (View Picture)

22887 HANDSOME CIRCA 1800-1820 U.S. NAVAL(?) OFFICER’S EAGLE HILT SWORD - This was made for use as a weapon, in addition to decorative use. The heavy blade is 1 3/16” x 32 ¼”with a deep stopped fuller. The stopped fuller blade has no decorative etchings of any kind. A slight false edge at the symmetrical point, and the edge is free from nicks. The pommel is a handsome eagle with a stirrup type guard and a single loop knuckle guard. The small ring under the eagle’s beak is typically (but not exclusively) a feature of naval officers’ swords. The bone (?) grips are nicely fluted. There are traces of silver plating on the face of the crossguard and a few protected areas of the hilt and the back side of the scabbard mounts, which may suggest Infantry officer use instead of naval. Unmarked except for two “star” marks on the spine of the blade, which may be markings, or made by a vise. The blade is mostly bright, mixed with some staining for a nice aged looking appearance. This sword includes the original leather scabbard, although it is missing about 6 inches at the tip, and the throat piece can be slipped off. Some stitching failure between the mounts, and the leather is cracked and flaking. But, since most swords of this era have no surviving scabbards at all, so it is nice to have at least this mostly complete scabbard. The eagle was a very popular patriotic motif in the federal era following the formation of our country, including in military uniforms, and this is a very handsome example of an early U.S. military weapon. $595.00 (View Picture)

19162 Horstmann Model 1840 NCO Sword with turned down reverse guard - (Thillmann, Civil War Army Swords page 212). Identical to the example in Thillmann except that the blade bears an illegible Solingen style mark on the obverse of the ricasso, and HORTSMANN/PHLA on the reverse, nearly impossible to see due to the turned down counterguard. Although previously thought by some to be possible U.S. Marine Corps NCO swords, Thillmann clearly states that they are not, and that they were either for a U.S. contract or (more likely) state regiments. In any case, this is a good representative Civil War era NCO sword. The hilt is in good condition with a mellow aged tone to the brass. The blade is free from pitting, and has a nice old steel-gray tone, however, the edged has dozens of tiny and a handful of moderate nicks, probably the result of youthful sword fights, not heroic combat on the battlefield. No scabbard. $325.00 (View Picture)

18174 U.S. MODEL1906 AMES IRON GUARD M1860 LIGHT CAVALRY SABER WITH SCABBARD - One of 18,961 delivered in 1906 fulfilling a 1904 contract for these and also 1,039 experimental lightweight officer’s swords. The iron guard swords were ordered to meet the need for arms for cavalry troops at a time when the traditional cavalry roles and tactics were evolving. Swords were needed immediately as stocks of the old Civil War era swords were exhausted, but experimentation was underway to find a better weapon as a replacement, hence the uncommon practice of a single contract calling for a standard item and simultaneously an experimental weapon. Except for the use of iron instead of brass for the guard, these are the traditional M1860 light cavalry saber. Reportedly the blades were actually imported from Germany, although more recent research may have modified that claim. The hilt is a dull brownish patina wearing thin. Leather and twisted wire wrappings on the grip are in fine condition. The 34 ¾ inch blade is marked on the ricasso A.S. Co [Ames Sword Company]/ [flaming bomb]/ 1906 and on the other side with U.S. over inspector initials JC. Blade has extensive staining and light patina, and really should be given a careful cleaning with abrasive to restore it to the correct bright blade appearance. A couple of tiny negligible nicks on the blade, but never in the hands of youthful pirates to get badly dinged up. The iron guard and pommel have a thick patina, and some pitting on the pommel. I believe that the guards were originally blackened, not polished bright, so I would just leave it alone. This example has the correct scabbard with the suspension rings placed closer together to better match the new style saber hangers instead of old “Stuart” hanger. The scabbards were often finished in a brown or blue process rather than polished bright to try to overcome the problems with rust caused by sweaty horses. But, alas, the horse sweat won out and the scabbard is an even brown patina. Undoubtedly the correct original scabbard, but we could not find the expected JC inspector initials on the drag, so they were probably lightly struck and now hidden by patina, or masked by the barely visible unit marks that look like 1 CAV/ GA 25 on the drag. A good representative example of this often overlooked U.S. cavalry sidearm which was replaced in 1913 by the Patton Saber. $595.00 (View Picture)

19234 U.S. NAVY “SINGLESTICK” WOODEN TRAINING CUTLASS - Scarce, late 19th century Naval training sword known as a singlestick. Made of carved oak or hickory for the blade and grip, with a large stiff leather basket guard around the hilt. Overall, this imposing weapon measures 35 ½ inches long. The guard slides over the “blade” and should be secured at the front by a brass pin (missing but the hole is there for it) while the pommel is a simple brass washer with metal wood screw. Overall this practice sword is in excellent plus original condition, probably never issued. Colonel Robert H. Rankin’s “Small Arms of the Sea Services,” has a photo showing these in use, captioned as: “Singlestick practice aboard a U.S. warship in the 1890’s. Enlisted members of the crew, including Marines, were encouraged to attain proficiency in swordsmanship by fencing with singlesticks. After the need for proficiency in using the cutlass had waned, fencing was encouraged as a form of physical exercise.” While an interesting Navy or Marine Corps collector item, this would also fit into a collection of U.S. (or all military) “fencing equipment” used for training with edged weapons such as swords and bayonets. You could make something like this for the kids to play with using a dowel from the home center, and a guard made from leather or even plastic from a milk jug- so they won’t be tempted to play with this great condition collector item. $295.00 (View Picture)

14749 CIRCA 1821-1860 IRON GUARD SWORD WITH FOLDING GUARD (Similar to Model 1833 Dragoon sword) - Knights head on ricasso confirms it was made in Germany by Kirschbaum, and only other markings are 2 over 9 on the other side of the blade. Quill-back blade is 33 inches long sharpened most of the way, with 11 inch false edge. Iron hilt has three branch guard with rounded pommel and folding counter guard. This appears very similar to the British Pattern 1821 Infantry sword, but sword designs were a very fashion driven game, so this could be from a European country which was an earlier pattern for, or a later copy of, the British sword; or one imported for U.S. militia use. Mostly dull steel gray mixed with staining, but left side of blade has 3 inch section of the quill and a nearby part of the blade having numerous “blood pits”. Hilt is mostly smooth brown patina. Grip has about 90% of the black leather wrapping but none of the twisted wire. Overall G-VG. No scabbard. Possibly something imported for use in the Civil War by the Confederate, or maybe pre-war militia use, or maybe just an old sword from the commercial market. What we do know for sure is that the price is $325.00 (View Picture)

14746 Ames short sword for the Columbian Exposition of 1893(?) - A nice quality blade that was identified as such by the previous owner who was very meticulous in his research. However, we cannot confirm that ID. The hilt is a fairly well known type with a crossguard, fluted bone grip and a knights helmet pommel There are langets on both sides with a Union shield with 12 stars and 17 stripes. The 22 x 15/16 inch blade is single edged with a single deep fuller and a 4 ½ inch false edge. Similar hilts are shown as Peterson #11, identified as a 1850-1870 Militia NCO sword (with a different style blade. Flayderman’s book of the Medicus collection shows a very similar example as item 110B, although it has a 26 inch blade. John Hamilton’s “Ames Sword Company” includes a copy of their (circa) 1885 catalog where a similar sword is listed as item number 625, although with a longer blade. Blade is excellent, and hilt has pleasing mellow patina to the brass, and some minor looseness in the crossguard. No scabbard. An exotic treasure or just a good looking sword? All we know is that the price is $195.00 (View Picture)

14730 U.S. MODEL 1850 FOOT OFFICERS SWORD BY AMES MFG CO. (NO SCABBARD) - This is a scarce variation that has the blade inspected by John Hannis, but is not dated or accepted. Thillmann’s superbly researched “Civil War Army Swords” notes a similar example with JH inspection marks only and another with only the LD inspector marks. Apparently these were 30 ½ inch blades that passed inspection, but were made up for commercial sale to officers instead of filling government contracts. This has the standard ornate blade etching with scroll motives flanking a block U.S. on one side and a martial design on the other. Ames Mfg CO/Chicopee/Mass is included as part of the etching, a style later replaced by stamped markings on the ricasso. The block U.S. was used through 1862 when it was replaced by a script U.S., which along with the style of Ames marking helps date this to around 1862, so it probably saw use in the Civil War. Judging by the number of nicks on the edge of the blade, it must have seen tough campaigning, or kids later used it a lot. The cast guard has the typical hand finish work to heighten the details. The grip retains 100% of the sharkskin wrap, but only a small piece of the twisted wire remains, trapped under the pommel. The apparent crack on the left side of the grip is actually the joint where the ends of the skin were folded in place. The blade is a dull steel gray mixed with staining, and some very light roughness for the final 4 inches at the tip. The leather washer is missing, causing slight looseness to the guard on the blade. A good representative example of the classic Civil War infantry officer’s sword, which was an actual combat weapon in those days. Ames is the premier maker of U.S. military swords for the government, and for private purchase as well (and officers were still supposed to furnish their own arms). $585.00 (View Picture)

14692 Civil War Model 1840 Cavalry Sabre by Clemen & Jung (C&J) with scabbard - Thillmann’s “Civil War Cavalry and Artillery Sabers” discusses this maker on pages 162- 164. Founded in 1860 in Solingen, Germany, C&J provided a large number of sabers during the Civil War, of the regular Model 1840 pattern. Except for the blade marking “C&J” this is unmarked. The scabbard has inspectors marks H.W on the drag, although Thillmann states that they should be G.H. Since this has no foreign inspector or rack marks, this is presumed to be one purchased for use in the Civil War, and Thillmann notes that “It is possible, indeed likely, that their swords wend both North and South.” The C&J marking is a scarce variation. Overall good-very good condition with no pitting anywhere, just staining mixed with dull steel gray on the blasé. Brass hilt with mellow old dark patina. Two miniscule tiny nicks on the blade, not really worth mentioning. Leather washer is dry and worn, but intact Brass wire wrapping is correct extra tight twist and in good condition. Leather wrap has a number of spots that are worn (or chewed) through, but about 80%+ remains. The scabbard has a darker mix of patina and staining mixed with dull steel gray, and has been lightly cleaned long ago. Three or four very shallow small dents in the body. Overall a very nice and correct example of the Model 1840 cavalry saber used by both sides during the Civil War. Not “minty” but it looks “old” to go with a collection of items that are less than outstanding condition, the sort that most normal people who are not rich can afford. $535.00 (View Picture)

14691 VERY RARE- 1839 TRIALS EXAMPLE OF SCHNITZLER & KIRSCHBAUM MODEL 1840 CAVALRY SABRE - John Thillmann’s “Civil War Cavalry and Artillery Sabers” discusses this rare variation on page 370. This is identical to that example, with the tall pommel cap, blade marking of a diamond with “O” cartouche over 39 over S&K on the blade back, and matching diamond/O over 39 on the face of the guard. Scabbard drag marked crown/D and S&K. The 1839 trials were to select new swords for the cavalry, artillery and dragoons. Some 600 cavalry sabres were purchased from S&K, 500 from England and 500 more from France. Although the French Model 1822 design was selected for the Cavalry, S&K got the first contract to produce them in 1840. Of course, the thrifty Ordnance department would not throw away the trials pieces and they undoubtedly remained in service with the Regular Army or possibly passed on to militia forces. Unfortunately, this is from an estate and we have no provenance for this, but it is exactly as described in Thillmann. Condition is overall very good with the blade a nice bright polished finish, possibly cleaned, but nicely done with only a few minor spots of staining. Numerous small nicks on the edge of the blade and on the sharp corner of the top flat. There is a slight bend to the blade about halfway down. Brass hilt in excellent condition. Grips retain nearly all the leather wrapping, but it has shrunk some and pulled away from the pommel. Twisted wire is missing from the grip. Scabbard is mostly brown patina with some pitting and about three shallow dents. A very rare U.S. martial sword for the advanced collector. $1125.00 (View Picture)

15834 RARE U.S. EXPERIMENTAL OFFICERS SWORD- AMES 1906 - One of only 1,039 delivered in 1906 by Ames. This experimental form used a very slightly curved blade, clearly intended for thrusting rather than the traditional slashing bloc of the “Old Wristbreaker” M1840-1860 cavalry sabers. The lightweight stamped sheet steel guard is clearly the predecessor of the very similar (but much larger) design used by Lt. (later General) George S. Patton for what became the U.S. Model 1913 cavalry saber. These experimental swords were delivered under a contract that also called for 18,961 of the familiar Model 1860 cavalry sabers delivered by Ames with the iron guards and dated 1906. Relatively unknown to most collectors, these lightweight experimental swords are rarely encountered, and inexplicably, they are usually in rather poor condition. The best (but still very limited) reference on these is on page 207 of John Hamilton’s Ames Sword Company. The 29 ¾ inch polished steel blade is marked on the ricasso A.S. Co [Ames Sword Company]/ [flaming bomb]/ 1906 and on the other side with U.S. The blade has some light staining and a few nicks, but nothing serous. The hilt remains tightly wrapped with the fish skin covering and twisted wire, although some of the grain has worn off the skin, exposing the smooth skin underneath. The stamped guard still retains probably 80-90% of the blue finish, but it is mixed with patina and assumulated crud from long storage and really needs a careful cleaning if you want to see much of the finish. These used an iron scabbard, covered with russet leather. No scabbard for this one, but we feel fortunate to offer the sword even without the scabbard. A rare prize for the advanced collector of U.S. martial edged weapons, or Ames products. $1095.00 (View Picture)

SMEW1633 - Sword Hanger German WW2 (?). This hanger was included with a collection of captured German and Italian items that we purchase from a retired WW2 vetern. It is made of gold wire on a gold cloth background with a blue stripe running down the middle and back borders. Hanger is about 45 inches long and adjustable with silver (probably nickel plated) buckles and clips on both ends. Hanger is in excellent condition with no tears, holes or fraying of the fabric and no rust or damage to any of the metal hardware. $125.00 (View Picture)

**STOLEN BY PERSON IN PORTLAND, OR AREA, or possibly a long haul trucker. $200 reward for return of this item or information leading to arrest and conviction of the thief, who got several other antique arms from other dealers by credit card fraud... $100 reward if you are first to spot this on an auction site.** 6957 BRITISH SABER MODEL 1796[?] WITH SCABBARD - Heavy duty saber with 32" blade 1 3/8" wide having a single broad fuller. Nicely polished blade in excellent condition. Heavy iron guard with longets on both sides. Iron topstrap ending in a rounded pommel. These parts have smooth brown age patina. Wooden grip has heavy wear and minor damage to the cord wrapping and leather cover, with some filler material added. Iron ferrule at front of grip has a wide staple for sword knot on the right side. Heavy iron scabbard with rounded lower edge, and flat top edge. Scabbard has layer of old black paint over lightly pitted surface. (Horses tend to sweat a lot and scabbard rust was a constant problem.) Very handsome, very old looking. A nearly identical sword was adopted by the Prussians as the Model 1811. European military fashion was quite faddish, usually adopting the frills of the latest winners. While this example is totally unmarked (except for a squiggle on the top of the blade that may be a flaw or ding instead of a mark) and possibly not British, but some imitator, it certainly is of the style used during the Napoleanic Wars, or as called in the U.S., the War of 1812. Nice addition to a collection in either one of those fields. Unable to confirm exact model, but everything I can find points to this being correct, and this is the description used when the former owner got it in the UK many years ago from a militaria dealer. $450.00 (View Picture)


  

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